THE NEIGHBOR ISLANDS

MASTER PLAN
BORDERS WITHIN CENTRAL MAUI ARE FADING THANKS TO A SLOW-MOVING DEVELOPMENT BOOM
By Christie Wilson and Nanea Kalani | Photography by Krystle Marcellus

UP CLOSE

MAUI

POPUL ATION
20,729 26,328 20,219
11 7 6
MAUI

154,924
2010 total estimate

10 miles 1

2

90

MOLOKAI

2,752

3
LANAI

4,503

10 miles 8

15 4 , 8 3 4*

101,70 9

12 8 , 8 9 9

117, 8 95

139 ,131

8 5 ,10 0

P O PU L ATI O N G R OW T H
In five-year increments

6,907
5

22,156
*Excludes *Excludes K alawao Kalawao C ounty County

461 8 23,677
15

9

10 12

4

3,135

10,088

’ ’85 85

’ ’90 90

’ ’95 95

’ ’00 00

’ ’05 05

’ ’10 10

AG E O F P O PU L ATI O N
60-plus 60-plus 19 and under 1 9a nd u nder

E T H N I C B R E A K D OW N
Other 2 . 4 % Filipino Japanese

13

29,680
50-59 5 0-59

39,137
20-29 2 0-29

21. 8 % 2 3 .7 % 19 . 4 % 24 . 4 %

Hawaiian/ partHawaiian

2,291
14

24 , 0 37
40-49 4 0-4

18 ,5 05
30-39 -39

8.3 %

11,580
10 miles

2 2 , 9 31
1
A GE AGE W EST WEST M OLOKAI MOLOKAI

20,63 4
2 3 4 5

Mixed (not Hawaiian)

Caucasian

=1 1,000 ,000

6
W AIHEEWAIHEEW AIKAPU WAIKAPU

7
W AILUKU WAILUKU

8
K AHULUI KAHULUI

9

10

11

12
H AIKUHAIKUP AUWELA PAUWELA

13
H ANA HANA

14
K ULA KULA

15
K IHEI KIHEI

K ALAWAO E KALAWAO AST EAST C OUNTY COUNTY M ANAI MOLOKAI LANAI OLOKAI L

L AHAINA LAHAINA

M AKAWAOMAKAWAOPRECKELSVILLE P SPRECKELSVILLE P UUNENE S AIA PUUNENE PAIA

19 A N D UNDER 2 0 -2 9

9 31 336

0 7

1,191 4 67

856 346

5,268 2 , 913

2,096 74 8

5,520 2,3 42

7, 2 5 8 3 , 4 37

1 3

115 29

5 ,16 3 2,450

2 , 4 21 1, 0 8 9

6 14 256

2 ,297 9 51

5,4 06 3 ,131

3 0 -3 9 40-49

253 3 47

12 16

434 499

417 400

3,236 3,386

932 1,111

2 , 6 75 3 ,18 3

3 , 5 47 3,658

0 0

58 80

2,6 4 8 3,039

1, 4 52 1,6 0 6

272 26 4

1, 2 32 1,6 78

3, 466 3,66 4

50-59 60 A ND OL DE R ME DI A N AGE

358 527 33.9

26 29 55.3

7 01 1, 211 4 3.5

4 57 659 3 8 .7

3,390 3,963 39

1, 019 1, 0 01 36 .6

3 , 210 3 ,7 9 9 39. 4

3 , 0 21 5, 4 07 37. 2

0 4 45.5

80 99 4 3. 4

3 ,278 3 , 6 41 39.5

1, 8 67 1,6 5 3 40.4

374 511 4 0 .1

2 ,365 3 , 0 57 4 8 .1

3 , 8 91 4 ,119 39.5

Source: Source: U U.S. .S. Census Census B Bureau ureau

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HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER >> SUNDAY 9/8/13

OUR TEAM MAUI ABOUT THIS PROJECT

Christie Wilson is the Today/Features editor for the Star-Advertiser and has lived on Maui for nearly 30 years. Nanea Kalani has worked as a journalist in Hawaii since 2006. She grew up in Hana, Maui, and holds a journalism degree from Hawaii Pacific University. Krystle Marcellus is a 2006 graduate of Temple University with a degree in photojournalism. She has worked for the Philadelphia Daily News and Philadelphia Bulletin.

Central Maui eases into expansion
Hawaii is seeing population growth on the neighbor islands at a far faster pace than on Oahu, so this year the Star-Advertiser is examining the emergence of our neighbor islands in three special reports. In April, we published “Growing Pains,” examining challenges facing Hawaii island and the population explosion turning it into the fastestgrowing county in the state. From 1990 to 2011, the population of Hawaii and Maui counties grew by 54 percent; Kauai County by 31 percent. Oahu’s growth by comparison was a mere 15 percent, according to figures from the state Department of Business, Economic Development MASTER PLAN and Tourism. BORDERS WITHIN CENTRAL MAUI ARE FADING THANKS TO A SLOW-MOVING DEVELOPMENT BOOM This second report examines development in Central Maui, which has been at the forefront of recent commercial and residential growth on the Valley Isle. Flying into Maui offers glimpses of rolling green cane fields, but first-time visitors and those who haven’t been there in a while might be taken aback by the reach of development sprawling out from the old towns of Wailuku and Kahului. The two communities seem to have merged as remnants of ancient dune systems, pastureland and sugar cane fields have given way to business parks and master-planned communities. In the midst of it all stands Hawaii’s last surviving raw sugar producer and the largest farm in the state (see story on Page A1). There’s also the University of Hawaii Maui College, a major player pumping millions of dollars into the local economy and developing a workforce for the island’s future.
THE NEIGHBOR ISLANDS

By Christie Wilson and Nanea Kalani | Photography by Krystle Marcellus

Christie Wilson

Nanea Kalani

Marsha McFadden
CITY EDITOR
UH MAUI COLLEGE

Krystle Marcellus
CREDITS
PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER VICE PRESIDENT / EDITOR CITY EDITOR PHOTO EDITOR GRAPHIC ARTIST DESIGNER COPY EDITOR

Dennis Francis

Frank Bridgewater

Marsha McFadden

George F. Lee

Martha Hernandez

Michael Rovner

Celia Downes

ON THE COVER

Development in Kahului, Wailuku and Waikapu is booming.

Thousands of new homes are welcome in Central Maui Residential development in Central Maui that some might consider sprawl is viewed by many as an opportunity for young families to remain on the island or come home from the mainland. Slow-growing masterplanned communities are expanding the boundaries of the region with surprisingly little opposition.

Paia’s funky persona thrives without big-box influence Paia is a step back in time. Its charm has evolved over the years and while plantation-era storefronts remain intact, merchandise is now more suited to a funky clientele of windsurfers, New Agers and natureloving transplants. But Paia also must contend with growing pains. The question now is how to keep the chain stores at bay.

Access to water divides community in Central Valley A legal battle has persisted for nearly a decade over access to water from the Waikapu, Waiehu, Waihee and Wailuku streams. At the heart of the dispute is the diversion of water for the benefit of the Central Valley versus how much should be restored in order for the four streams to once again flow to the ocean.

Maui College works hard to attract, prepare students Enrollment at the University of Hawaii Maui College has jumped by about 50 percent in just five years — the highest enrollment of all UH neighbor island colleges. The college has boldly positioned itself to compete with four-year universities, catering to the local workforce and capitalizing on research and programs like culinary arts.

PAG E

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PAG E

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PAG E

18

PAG E

24

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HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER >> SUNDAY 9/8/13

MAUI

MANAGING

THE

SPRAWL

WAILUKU

BUILDING BOOM
Central Maui is swelling with thousands of homes, which have helped keep local families on the island
By Christie Wilson
cwilson@staradvertiser.com

KAHULUI

ream City. That’s what Alexander & Baldwin Inc. called Hawaii’s first modern, planned community, built on former cane fields in Kahului. John Arisumi was a 27-year-old mechanic at A&B’s Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co. in 1951 when he moved his family from the plantation’s Spanish Camp into one of the 3,200 fee-simple homes that were sold to sugar workers and other blue-collar families for a starting price of $6,600. “We were one of the lucky ones,” said Arisumi, 89, who worked for HC&S for 25 years before becoming a business agent for the International Longshore and Warehouse Union. New generations of working-class families are finding their own dreams of homeownership fulfilled as two major housing developments — Maui Lani and Kehalani — radically

D

expand the boundaries of Central Maui by creating master-planned communities on a scale not seen before on the neighbor islands. The vibrant green sugar fields that blanket much of the broad isthmus between Haleakala and the West Maui Mountains are giving way to a sprawling crazy quilt of residential and commercial projects. The border between the once-distinct towns of Kahului and Wailuku — home to more than a third of the island’s population — is being erased. “There used to be a clean separation because Sandhills was the edge of Wailuku and there was a big gap of kiawe trees between Kahului and Wailuku,” said Maui County Mayor Alan Arakawa. “But now most of those trees have been replaced with housing, and … very shortly the two cities will essentially merge.” Maui Lani, which extends from the southern edge of Dream City, is the larger of the two developments, with zoning for 3,000 homes on 1,012 acres. So far about 1,200 units have been

built. Kehalani, on either side of Honoapiilani Highway in Wailuku, is to have 2,400 units on 550 acres, with 1,300 homes completed. Future residential development will add more than 4,400 homes in the adjoining communities of Waikapu and Waiale, increasing the potential for urban sprawl. LONGTIME WAILUKU RESIDENT Jill Engledow explained that immediately after World War II, planners of the “New Kahului” indicated they did not intend to blur the division between the two towns. “Obviously that didn’t work out,” she said. “The area between Kahului and Wailuku was supposed to remain open space, but with the exception of some steep dunes, park areas and playing fields, it’s pretty much developed now. The little mall (across from Baldwin High School on the lower edge of Wailuku) where the new Safeway is going up was the last undeveloped open space dividing the towns.” The advancing development is obliterating

The town is all built. It’s unbelievable. To me, it’s progress. It’s good for everybody.”
John Arisumi His family in 1951 was among the first to move in to Alexander & Baldwin’s “Dream City” in Kahului

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HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER >> SUNDAY 9/8/13

the last remnants of Central Maui’s ancient landscape, according to Engledow, author of several award-winning travel and history books about the Valley Isle. The extensive dune system has been almost entirely covered by development. “Back in the late 1700s, these dunes in the Sandhills area provided cover for the army of Maui Chief Kahekili, allowing them to defeat the Hawaii island Chief Kalaniopuu in the battle of Kakanelua,” Engledow said. “Every time I drive through those dunes I imagine all those Maui warriors springing out to fight the invaders. I doubt the dunes will be with us for long. The Central Maui plateau has been leveled over the past couple of centuries by farming, sand mining and development, and these will be gone too.” Engledow conceded that the surrounding new housing developments are restoring essential commercial activity to Wailuku, such as grocery and variety stores, that abandoned the Continued on next page

At left, development is sweeping across Central Maui, with projects in Kahului and Wailuku and plans for more homes in Waikapu and Waiale. Work on Traditions, Maui Lani’s newest subdivision with 143 units, is under way in Kahului.

SUNDAY 9/8/13 >> HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER

5

MAUI

MANAGING

THE

SPRAWL

Dede Paet of Kahului shops at Ah Fook’s Supermarket, founded in 1917. The store, which relocated to a smaller location after a fire in 2005, is both a grocer and a gathering place. It still participates in Maui’s stamp redemption program, inset.

young families moving out from their parents’ homes and from rentals, as well as empty nesters and retirees looking to downsize. Maui County Planning Director William Spence attributed Maui’s steady population growth in recent years to “natural” growth in the local population, not to newly arrived malihini from outside the state. “Everybody goes to high school graduations, and those kids are going off and getting married and having families of their own. That’s the majority of how Maui is growing,” he said. “We pretty much have to provide for them.” Lezle and June Molina moved out of a Kihei rental when they bought a townhouse at Kehalani Gardens five years ago and are eagerly watching as new stores and other businesses open up on commercial lots in Kehalani and Maui Lani Village Center. Tenants so far include Longs Drugs, Marmac Ace Hardware, Wailuku Federal Credit Union and professional and medical offices. Walgreens and Foodland are expected to join the mix. “I love Wailuku and I just want to see it grow,” said Lezle Molina, 37, a receptionist for Clinical Laboratories in Kahului. “It’s amazing. It gives us more options for shopping. I don’t think it’s too much. Honestly, I think we need it.” The Molinas accompanied son Kaleb, 6, to the first day of second grade at the newly built Pu‘u Kukui Elementary town when the island’s School, which business epicenter shifted opened last month to Kahului. in the portion of Ke“Now some of those basic halani above Honoapibusinesses are coming back, ilani Highway. not to the core but to the edges The school was built for of Wailuku town. At least we 550 students but had an enwon’t have to brave the Kahului trafrollment of 560 on opening day. fic lights for every little necessity,” she “When they were designing the school in said. 2006 or 2007 and they looked up here, I don’t think they realized that it was going to grow WHILE SOME OLD-TIMERS lament the loss of identity and open space, others view the this much,” said Principal Chad Okamoto, 45, growth as an opportunity for young families to who moved his family to Kehalani in 2001. Maui Lani has its own public elementary remain on the island or come home from the school, Pomaika‘i, which opened in 2007. mainland. Arisumi, the retired union official who now lives in Kula, welcomes most of what ACROSS THE STREET from that campus has come with the recent evolution of Kahului. “The fish market, the railroad — those are all is Maui Lani’s fifth and newest subdivision, gone. The town is all built. It’s unbelievable,” he D.R. Horton-Schuler Division’s 143-unit Traditions, a small-lot development with a colorful said. “To me, it’s progress. It’s good for everyplayground featuring water jets. body.” Holley Turpen and her family are waiting for So just who are all these new homebuyers? the loan to close at the end of this month on County officials and developers say they are

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HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER >> SUNDAY 9/8/13

LIVING IN CENTRAL MAUI P O P U L AT I O N C O U N T 0 to 99 100 to 249 250 to 649 650 to 1,109 1,110 to 1,740
ui L a ni C om mu nity Ma au Lan Co mm un ster pl an ma aste lan Kehalani C om mu nity Kehalan Co mm un ster pl an ma aste lan Waiehu ehu Be each ach R Road oad

K ahului Kahulu Be ach each Road R oad

Median household income

$58,214 $72,011 $64,583
KAHULUI WAILUKU MAUI COUNTY

Kahului K ahului Harbor H arbor

WAILUKU
umanu Avenue K aa h

UH UH Maui Maui Ma College College Co

Kanaha K anaha Pond P ond
Puu e nen nu Ave

ni ola Ke

ce Pla

Year housing units built

K AHULUI

12.0%

Maui Maui Business Business s Park Park

21.4%

ay

15.4%

16.0%

Iao Valle I ao V Vall a l ey

Waiale Road

ighw

KAHULUI

18.0%

Kahului Kahului Ka Shopping Shop Sh opping Center Cente Ce ter

Kahului K ahului Airport A irport

Ha n

aH

8.8% 2000-2004 8.2%

hw

Honoap iilani Highw

he la n

ighw

Ku i

MAUI

ay

Area A rea o of f detail d eta ail il

11.8%

11.2%

11.6%

N

Moku

1940-1949

4.7%

5 miles

7.6%

1950-1959

1960-1969

1970-1979

10.4%

lele H

1980-1989

1939 or earlier

1990-1999

21.3%

The Traditions subdivision is family-friendly, complete with a playground that includes water jets. the three-bedroom home they purchased there for less than $400,000. Turpen, 28, was born and raised on Maui but lived in Colorado for 10 years. Turpen and husband Matthew, a National Guardsman and Maui Police Department recruit, moved to Maui in November after the birth of their son, Micah, now 17 months old. “When we had a baby we decided we wanted our child to be raised on Maui with my entire family around,” said Turpen, a substance abuse counselor for Maui Youth & Family Services. The young family live with Turpen’s parents in Waiehu Terrace and figured buying a home was not in their immediate future. But with mortgage rates at historic lows and a surge of new development in Central Maui,

looked at as far as new development versus existing homes, the prices are not close at all.” Turpen said she likes the family-oriented feel of Traditions — the playground, walking trails and its proximity to the elementary school. THE VERY THINGS that attract families to the massive master-planned developments — close-knit communities, miniparks, neighborhood stores, walking and bike paths — are in many ways a throwback to the plantationera lifestyle, according to Spence, the county’s planning director. “I don’t think anybody ever talks about Continued on next page

KAHULUI

WAILUKU

1.9% 2.4%
No telephone service
KAHULUI WAILUKU

3.5%

2.1%

Lack complete kitchen facilities
KAHULUI WAILUKU

“we decided to take a look and fell in love with it,” she said. “We ran the numbers and we decided to go for it. “We assumed it would be at least five years before we would be able to find anything in our price range. From what we

24.6% 23.4%
Three or more vehicles available
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

SUNDAY 9/8/13 >> HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER

2005-later
7

13.1%

WAILUKU

1.2%

1.5%

K u i ka

h i D r i ve

ay

iH

ig

HC&S HC& C&S Mill Mill

ay

5.6%

e

MAUI

MANAGING

THE

SPRAWL

The older section of Wailuku is experiencing a revival with events such as the monthly First Friday celebration on Market Street that draws thousands to the town’s restaurants, small businesses and shops. Breakdancers outside Request Music engaged in a twoon-two “Uptown Get Down” competition during August’s First Friday. About 30 percent of Kahului’s population is Filipino. Mary Jane Baculanta and her daughter, Ryka Jane, joined the party Aug. 4 when Joseph Bularon celebrated his graduation from Maui High School at the Binhi At Ani Filipino Community Center.

Maui is planning its community so it does not sprawl the way Oahu did.”
Alan Arakawa Maui County mayor on the gradual expansion focused in Central Maui

how they liked the plantation camps for the conditions. They remember the camaraderie and they remember being able to walk to the store and how close they were to their neighbors and how everybody watched out for everybody’s kids,” he said. “The trend across the nation is that residents are looking for more identifiable areas — a sense of place, not just convenience — and the effort in urban design is to create a sense of place. It’s the rebirth of an old idea.” Despite their massive sizes, Maui Lani and Kehalani largely escaped substantial opposition over the 20 to 30 years the projects have been in their planning and buildout phases. One reason might be that the buildout of the projects has been gradual because of the island’s smaller housing market, said Kehalani developer and Maui boy Stanford Carr. This has given the public time to get used to the master-planned developments and allowed developers and the county to cope with added infrastructure, environmental and pub-

8

HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER >> SUNDAY 9/8/13

Chad Okamoto, above, heads Pu‘u Kukui Elementary School, which opened Aug. 5. “When they were designing the school in 2006 or 2007 and they looked up here, I don’t think they realized that it was going to grow this much,” the principal says of the campus, which was built for 550 students but had 560 on opening day.

Second-grade teacher Lei Vickers, a resident of Kehalani, welcomed students on the first day of school at the subdivision’s Pu‘u Kukui in Wailuku.

lic service needs. Arakawa said it makes sense that largescale residential development has been focused in Central Maui where there is ample land, adequate water, easy access to the island’s transportation, government and commercial centers, and a location that is convenient to other population centers. “Kahului was designed for expansion,” he said, with development growing in a curvilinear “wagon wheel” pattern out from A&B’s Kahului Shopping Center near the harbor front. Arakawa said Maui is budding at “a comfortable and consistent rate” with “a lot of room to grow.” “Maui is planning its community so it does not sprawl the way Oahu did,” he said. WARNING OF THE DANGER of sprawl in the Kahului-Wailuku region, the Maui Island Plan approved by the County Council in December designates “urban growth boundaries” to accommodate future development. The plan recommends use of regional parks, greenways and protected areas to maintain separation between the projects, and the county already is moving ahead to purchase large tracts of land for open space and recreContinued on next page

7,498
Combined owner-occupied units in Kahului and Wailuku, of which 3,807 are in Kahului and 3,691 are in Wailuku

5,287
Combined housing units with a mortgage in Kahului and Wailuku towns, of which 2,499 are in Kahului and 2,788 are in Wailuku

2,211
Combined housing units without a mortgage in Kahului and Wailuku towns, of which 1,308 are in Kahului and 903 are in Wailuku June Molina said goodbye to his 6-year-old son, Kaleb, who entered the second grade at Pu‘u Kukui. June and his wife, Lezle, moved to Kehalani five years ago and have enjoyed seeing the area grow. “I don’t think it’s too much,” Lezle Molina says of the increase in activity. “Honestly, I think we need it.”
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

SUNDAY 9/8/13 >> HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER

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The face of Kahului has changed a lot. … But there’s still a feel of its own. There’s still that local character, that local flavor.”
Raymond Hew Owner, Ah Fook’s Supermarket

ational uses. The original Dream City remains a diverse working-class town with a large Filipino community — about 30 percent of the population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau — and newer immigrants from Samoa, Tonga, Micronesia, Mexico and Latin America. (Foreignborn residents make up 27 percent of the population in Kahului.) Many of the large house lots have been built out to their property lines and the cinder-block homes are topped with second-floor additions to accommodate multigenerational living. But Kahului remains without an identifiable downtown core. A&B has yet to pull the trigger on its Kahului Town Center, first announced in 2005 but put on hold when the market tanked. The project would redevelop the old Kahului Shopping Center into a mixeduse project with 440 condominium units. The same goes for its adjacent 103-unit ‘Aina O Kane. (A&B officials said in an email they are “re-evaluating the commercial component given the number of new/announced retail entrants in the area.”) In the meantime, the company has been

Further development is planned for Maui Lani Parkway, which opened a new link between Kahului and Wailuku. On the hills above are Kehalani and Wailuku Heights. busy developing its 255-acre business park on former agricultural land at the eastern edge of Kahului that has changed how Maui shops. A retailing juggernaut stretching from Kahului Airport to Puunene Avenue comprises Costco, Kmart, Lowe’s, OfficeMax, Old Navy, Sports Authority, Walmart, Home Depot and others. Target will join the lineup on a 24-acre parcel that is being sold to Safeway. IF THERE’S A SYMBOL of the old Kahului, it’s Ah Fook’s Supermarket. The store, started in 1917 by Chinese immigrant Tam Ah Fook, was one of the first tenants in the Kahului Shopping Center when the retail complex opened in 1951 as the hub of Dream City. For almost 60 years, Ah Fook’s was a gathering place for locals seeking groceries, pro-

duce, bentos, fresh fish, bakery products, cut flowers and Asian specialities. The outdoor mall had become something of a relic by 2005, when a fire gutted the market. At the urging of loyal customers, store owner Raymond Hew reopened Ah Fook’s in a smaller space fronting busy Kaahumanu Avenue that is a quarter of its former size. Even in the smaller space, Ah Fook’s continues to draw a steady trade. “The face of Kahului has changed a lot with the chain stores and development of new shopping centers,” said Hew, 65, who was busy cutting fish when a reporter called. “But there’s still a feel of its own. There’s still that local character, that local flavor.” Yet like so many others, Hew has found appeal in the new Kahului. In 2002, he left the Sandhills neighborhood in Wailuku to buy a home in Maui Lani’s The Island — the region’s first gated community. “I like the idea of a planned community, with rules and regulations that people have to follow, and that they abide by quiet times,” he said. “I come home and it’s real peaceful. “Although I miss the mango trees.”

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HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER >> SUNDAY 9/8/13

UP CLOSE

MAUI

HOUSING
51,893 479
Total households in 2012 Less than $100,000 unit value

STANDARD OF LIVING

$594,406
Median home value in 2011

15,381 678

$64,583
Median household income, 2007-2011

$500,000 to $999,999 unit value

9.2%

Foreclosure filings in 2012

People below poverty level

$29,654

Per-capita money income in the past 12 months (2011 dollars)

161,054 108

Vehicle registrations Electric vehicles registered

2.9

Persons per household

32

Public schools

20

1.14 MILLION
Total power sold in kilowatt-hours in 2012

Private schools

12,371
Civilian jobs in 2012

Water consumption in millions of gallons

EMPLOYMENT

72,600
UNIT OCCUPANCY IN 2010
EACH HOUSE IS 1,500 Owneroccupied

30,809 21,084 18,617
Vacant

$1,287 766

Median rent Units lacking complete plumbing

70,510

Renter-occupied Housing units in 2010

6.3%

1,460

Units lacking complete kitchen

Unemployment rate in 2012

2,820

Waiters and waitresses in 2011, the most common occupation

$35,729
Average annual wage in 2011

Sources: Hawaii State Data Book 2012; Maui County Data Book 2011 and 2012

SUNDAY 9/8/13 >> HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER

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MANAGING

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PAIA

Paia is packed with dozens of locally owned businesses ranging from bikini shops to offices and real estate agencies.

ECLECTIC ENERGY
Once a rough-and-tumble town on the North Shore, Paia now sports a casual, hip and ocean-loving vibe
People aren’t scared to come to Paia anymore. It’s been cool to see the changes.”
Greg Jay Co-owner of a trio of shops across Maui who moved to the island 20 years ago
By Christie Wilson
cwilson@staradvertiser.com

P

AIA >> It’s 10 a.m. on an already warm Sunday morning and cafes throughout this seaside hamlet buzz with friendly conversation. The surf shops, chic boutiques and art galleries are just opening up and the daily tide of tourists has yet to wash over the dusty sidewalks lightly stained with red dirt from the surrounding cane fields. At Paia Bay Coffee, the atmosphere and attire are loose and casual at the dozen or so outdoor tables set up under trees behind the

Puka Puka gallery on Hana Highway, a quick five-minute drive from Kahului Airport. Among those dropping by for a morning cup is Martin Brass, on his way back from a 50-mile roundtrip bicycle ride to remote Kahakuloa on Maui’s northwestern tip. Brass is president of the Paia Town Association and a partner in one of the town’s most popular restaurants, Flatbread Co., which opened in 2006. Like many residents, Brass was first drawn to Maui by world-class windsurfing sites such as Hookipa and Kanaha, located on either side of Paia. “People come here from all over the world.

It’s not just for shopping, it’s a lifestyle. That’s the charm,” he said. VISITORS WON’T FIND major national chain stores or fast-food restaurants in the one-stoplight town center, which runs for two blocks along Hana Highway and up Baldwin Avenue. About the closest thing to such establishments are two service stations and the Minit Stop convenience store known for its tasty fried chicken and potato wedges. In the past two to three decades, as the last general stores were boarded up or torn down, an eclectic mix of about 65 locally owned busi-

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HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER >> SUNDAY 9/8/13

nesses has come to occupy the plantation-era storefronts. The shops include Mandala Ethnic Arts, which sells Buddha carvings, flowy silk garments and sustainable Balinese hardwood homebuilding kits; and Maui Girl & Co., where a banner celebrates the 2013 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition cover that features supermodel Kate Upton in one of the store’s skimpy bikinis. (Rose Potter, executive director of the Paia Town Association, likes to joke there are more bikini stores per capita in Paia than anywhere else.) The area also offers hair salons, two tattoo parlors, offices for accountants, dentists, chi-

ropractors and lawyers, and real estate agencies peddling high-end properties. Moonbow Tropics co-owner Greg Jay and his entire extended family of grandparents, parents and siblings moved to Maui from Palm Desert, Calif., 20 years ago and opened the store, which sells Reyn Spooner shirts and similar apparel, in 1995. The family runs a second shop, Moonbow Cabana, in Paia and a third on Front Street in Lahaina. Jay, 42, who enjoys hiking and bodysurfing, prefers working in Paia. “It’s more laid-back. It’s who I am,” he said. He remembers when the town’s reputation

Jerry and Sarah Bizzell work at Island Ink Tattoo Co., one of two tattoo parlors in Paia’s town center.

wasn’t so welcoming. In the late 1980s and ’90s, when Paia was sputtering through the last days of Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co.’s Paia Mill, drugs and crime were chief concerns. “People aren’t scared to come to Paia anymore. It’s been cool to see the changes,” said Jay. At Mana Foods on Baldwin Avenue, a surfing etiquette poster is displayed inside the entrance and fliers pinned to a bulletin board advertise workshops on “Ancient Alchemy” healing and hot yoga. Continued on next page

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1939 or earlier

1940-1949

1950-1959

1.9%

Continued on next page

1960-1969

1970-1979

1980-1989

1990-1999

2000-2004

3.5%

483
Owner-occupied housing units

No telephone service

3.3%
Lack complete kitchen facilities

371
Housing units with a mortgage

112
Housing units without a mortgage
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

25.6%
Three or more vehicle available
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

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2005-later
15

2.3%

King’s Chapel Paia, top, is one of several churches in the seaside town. Above, John Woodruff has painted outside Nellie’s Bistro for five years. Alice in Hulaland, below, offers a wide variety of trinkets, apparel and souvenirs.

Laurie Landa Taylor works at Turnbull Studios, top, whose owners specialize in sculpture but also feature works by other artists. Above, traffic in Paia has increased but has not diminished the town’s unique character, residents say.

6.9%

4.3%

4.7%

The health-food market, in business for 30 years, is one of Paia’s anchors. “When we opened I used to sit on the bench outside the store and a car might drive by every five minutes. There was nothing going on in Paia,” said Theresa Thielk, 51, who runs the market with several family members. By the late 1930s, Paia boasted 6,500 residents, making it one of the island’s major population centers. As Maui’s economy became less dependent on sugar, residents dispersed to new jobs and homes in Central Maui and resort areas in Lahaina and Kihei. The 2010 Census counted 2,700 people living in Paia. The town took on a funkier vibe as the flower children of the ’60s arrived. Then in the late 1970s, Hookipa was dubbed “the windsurfing capital of the world.” “A bunch of windsurfers came to the North Shore and they were into healthy lifestyles and healthy eating, but they partied like animals,” laughed Thielk. The surf crowd and aging hippies soon were joined by an influx of Europeans, New Agers and what Brass likes to call “trustafarians,” wealthy newcomers seeking a simpler lifestyle. Paia’s rebirth was helped along by a proliferation of major windsurfing contests, vacation rentals and small housing developments in Paia and Haiku.

LIVING IN PAIA Median income

$67,788
PAIA

$64,583
MAUI COUNTY

Year housing units built

23.0%

10.7%

24.2%

22.1%

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There’s definitely way more traffic, way more people — just way more. But I think it’s maintained its character.”
Theresa Thielk Store manager, Mana Foods

but the bigger concern is if the process is mitigated to allow that to take place, how do you protect yourself from the next one? “People come to Paia because it is what it is today. To lose that quality by adding stores Maui Tomorrow Foundation and Wailuku attorney Isaac Hall — best known as prominent that you can find elsewhere, what’s the point? We just become average.” Hawaii Superferry foes — to contest the perPotter, of the Paia Town Association, noted mits. MOST OF THE SHOPS still close at there are nine separate projects in various Brass, whose own restaurant is part of the 6 p.m., but locals and visitors flock to Paia’s diverse eateries into the evening. The landmark Massachusetts-based Flatbread Co. chain that stages of development planned for Paia, including one that would double the amount of Charley’s Restaurant and Saloon, around since has about a dozen outlets in Martha’s Vine1969, hosts part-time Maui resident Willie Nel- yard and other small towns, said the conflict is lease space in town. Thielk, of Mana Foods, is optimistic Paia will not about tamping down competition. He’s son for occasional gigs. Next door, construction has started on a 3,585-square-foot Rock & seen what has happened in other beach towns endure as a unique “step back in time.” “There’s definitely way more traffic, way across the country where property values esBrews restaurant and bar, part of a national more people — just way more. But I think it’s calated, squeezing out local businesses that chain with Gene Simmons of the rock band could no longer afford rising rents and leaving maintained its character. All the original buildKiss as a frontman. ings are here and the quaint shops with things Local investors worked with county officials landlords no option but to lease to corporate you can’t find anywhere else,” she said. to ensure the establishment will fit in with the chains with deep pockets. As for Rock & Brews, Thielk said she hopes “I don’t think the Paia community realizes town’s plantation-era architecture, but the the new bar will enliven Paia’s nightlife. Paia Town Association is disputing the permit- how much is coming down the pike,” Brass “It might be a great thing where people can said. “It’s one thing to look at this and think ting process, saying it did not allow for adego to dance,” she said. quate public input. The group has joined with what’s the big deal, it’s just one restaurant, By the time the sugar mill was mothballed in 2000, the town — once just an optional stop on the way to Hana — had almost completed its evolution into a hip yet unpretentious dining, shopping and ocean-sport hot spot with international allure. Joshua Doggett works on a sign at Island Ink Tattoo Co.

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UP CLOSE

MAUI

TO U R I S M

AGRICULTURE
Total farm value l in n 2008 2

2.35 $144 MILLION $182. 2 3 MIL ILL LIIO ON N MILLION
MOLOKAI S U GAR
1

Visitor arrivals in 2012

Kaun kakai kai Kaunakakai

2 012 S TATI S TI C S
Occupancy Average daily room rate Revenue per available room Average daily visitor count Expenditures Average length of stay Spending per day per person 72.6% $257.95 $187.27 52,401 $3.5 billion 8.15 days $185.50
N
10 miles

Hawaiian waiian iia a Commercial Commerc mme mm merc & Sugar Suga uga gar ar Co. C revenue revenu evenu from cane in 2012 from

LANAI
3 Lahaina Lah in na

MAUI
Wailuku Wai iluku uku ku Kah K Ka ah hu hului ului Kahului 4 Kihei Kihe
5 6 7

Lanai City Lana
2

Hana

ACCO M M O DATI O N S

AGRICULTURAL AREAS

39.8%
OC E AN ACTIVIT Y

Stayed in hotels in 2011 In condos 32.4% In time shares 16.2%

WHAT ’ S G ROWN AN D AN N UAL R AI N FALL
A AREA REA C CROP ROP A AVERAGE VERAGE A ANNUAL NNUAL R RAINFALL AINFALL

1 Molokai 1 2 Lanai 3 West Maui 3

Aquaculture, bananas, cattle, coffee, flowers, herbs, hogs, nursery products, papayas, seed crops, taro, tropical specialty fruits, vegetables Bananas, cattle, herbs, papayas Bananas, cattle, coffee, nursery products, papayas, seed crops, vegetables

25.7 inches 33.7 inches 44.1 inches 28.0 inches 15.0 inches 22.3 inches 80.0 inches

41.2%

Visitors from the mainland East Coast who took a whale-watching, boat or submarine tour in 2011

4 Central Maui Bananas, cattle, flowers, herbs, hogs, nursery products, pineapples, 4 seed crops, sheep, sugar cane, taro, vegetables 5 South Maui 5 6 Upcountry 6 U t

Cattle, nursery products, seed crops Avocados, bananas, cattle, flowers, herbs, hogs, papayas, pineapples, tropical specialty fruits, vegetables Bananas, cattle, flowers, herbs, hogs, nursery products, taro, tropical specialty fruits, vegetables EACH PERSON IS 100

PARK

Attendance was highest of county co cultural attractions visited in 2012

94,668

7 North and 7 East Maui

Sources: S ources: H Hawaii awaii S State tate D Data ata B Book ook 2 2012; 012; M Maui aui C County ounty D Data ata B Book ook 2 2012; 012; H Hawai‘i awai‘i T Tourism ourism A Authority; uthorit ty y; H Hawaiian awaiian C Commericial ommericial & S Sugar ugar C Co. o.

1,600

Agriculture jobs in 2010

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NA WAI ‘EHA “The Four Waters”

39.9M
Average water produced in Maui streams and aquifers in gallons per day during July 2011

168.8M
Monthly water consumption in gallons for agricultural use in the Wailuku district

7.2B
Monthly water consumption in gallons for nonagricultural use in the Wailuku district
Sources: Maui County Department of Water Supply, Maui County Data Book 2011

Hokuao Pellegrino uses the Waikapu Stream’s natural flow to feed taro patches on his family’s land. He says he can cultivate only two of the 12 loi due to a water supply limited by diversion. “All we want to do is grow food,” Pellegrino says.

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HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER >> SUNDAY 9/8/13

FIGHT OVER WATER’S FLOW
A community group wants to restore four streams that have been diverted to feed sugar cane fields
SUNDAY 9/8/13 >> HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER 19

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By Nanea Kalani

It’s so frustrating that the public has to fight for this when the law is there.”
John Duey President, Hui o Na Wai ‘Eha

nkalani@staradvertiser.com

AO VALLEY >> John Duey gazes out over the parched Wailuku River streambed, a look of despair welling in his eyes. He’s standing atop a narrow metal bridge that crosses the stream above Kepaniwai Park. The stream quietly trickles past large river rocks bleached gray by sunlight in stark contrast to the dark, mossy rocks farther upstream. On most days, the water comes to a near

I

halt about 1,000 feet upstream. Enough water to fill about 90 Olympic-sized swimming pools, about 60 million gallons, is intercepted each day by an intake system built more than a century ago to deliver water to thirsty sugar cane fields in the arid Central Valley. Duey heads a community group that since 2004 has been engaged in a legal battle over access to water from the Waikapu, Waiehu, Waihee and Wailuku rivers, collectively known as Na Wai ‘Eha, meaning “The Four Waters.” Duey is president of Hui o Na Wai ‘Eha, representing about 300 community members. “I’m not an environmentalist. I’m a one-issue

guy. And it’s about the water,” said the 74year-old Duey, who’s lived in Iao Valley for 44 years. “It’s a fight worth fighting for.” The four streams historically flowed from — mauka to makai, sustaining communities when its waters teemed with native freshwa- W ter animals — opae (shrimp), oopu (fish), hihiwai (freshwater opihi) — and supplying water for wetland taro, a staple of the Native Hawaiian diet. W “Before, people could gather and be sustained, live off the land and ocean and the streams. Now you can’t do that,” said Skippy Hau, an aquatic biologist on Maui for 28 years

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HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER >> SUNDAY 9/8/13

Na Wai ‘Eha
Water is diverted from each of the Na Wai ‘Eha streams by three to five diversion intakes. WAIHEE >> Annual average: 34 million gallons per day from 1984 to 2007 >> Daily average: From 14 million to 750 million gallons per day WAILUKU (IAO) >> Annual average: 25 million gallons per day >> Daily average: From 6.1 million to 1,100 million gallons per day WAIKAPU >> Annual average: 4.3 million gallons per day >> Daily average: Not available WAIEHU >> Annual average: 6.4 million gallons per day. >> Daily average: Not available
Source: U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of the Interior

WAIHEE RIVER

Kahekili Highway WAIEHU STREAM

Wailuku Kahului

for the state Department of Land and Natural Resources. The intake system in the Wailuku River — a metal grate across the width of the stream — was built by the now-defunct Wailuku Sugar Co. plantation that shut down in the 1980s. It’s now run by a descendent, the Wailuku Water Co., which also inherited the 13,200-acre watershed in the West Maui Mountains that feeds Na Wai ‘Eha.

John Duey heads a group seeking to restore four streams whose waters were diverted to feed sugar cane fields. A stroll over Wailuku River revealed a small flow, nearly dry conditions and the area where water is intercepted.

the water, but “delivers surface water for agricultural uses” for a “delivery fee.” Maui County buys between 3 percent to 5 percent of the diverted water and sells it to businesses and residences, while Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co., the state’s last surviving sugar plantation, cultivates about 6,000 acres of cane with Na Wai ‘Eha water. Chumbley said he has “no position one way or another” on the restoration of the streams. Duey takes issue with the diversions. He Continued on next page

WAILUKU (IAO) RIVER Honoapiilani Highway

WAIKAPU STREAM

Kuihelani Highway

Maalaea
Area of detail

WAILUKU WATER President Avery Chumbley insists the company doesn’t sell

N

2 miles

MAUI

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To put water back in the stream just to put water back in the stream … we didn’t see the benefit to that.”
Rick Volner Jr. General manager, Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co.

said the law is clear: Water in Hawaii is a public trust resource. “The water code — the ‘Water Bible’ — doesn’t say water is for commercial sale. When you read the law, how in the devil can what’s happening happen? It’s so frustrating that the public has to fight for this when the law is there,” Duey said. Native Hawaiian rights protected in the code include access to water for subsistence, cultural and religious uses. The restricted water also affects organisms in the streams, Hau said. Their amphidromous life cycle — born in fresh water, they drift into the ocean as larvae before migrating back into fresh water to grow into adults — requires continuous mauka-to-makai flow. HUI O NA WAI ‘EHA in 2004 took its arguments to the state Commission on Water Resource Management, seeking enough water restoration to get the four streams to flow to the ocean. The fight is still ongoing.

The “Kehua Gang” — Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co. employee Mario de Guzman and his fellow workers — adds drip irrigation lines to water the company’s Haliimaile Field. HC&S General Manager Rick Volner Jr. says the company, which cultivates about 6,000 acres of sugar cane fields with water from Na Wai ‘Eha, would suffer financially if the water flow in Iao Valley’s four streams is restored. Earthjustice joined the case as the Hui’s attorney. The Office of Hawaiian Affairs and environmental group Maui Tomorrow Foundation also joined the fight. The water commission issued a decision in 2010: Release 10 million gallons per day to Waihee and another 2.5 million gallons per day to Waiehu, and nothing to Wailuku or Waikapu.

That decision strayed from the recommendation of former water commissioner Lawrence Miike, the hearing officer for the case, who presided over months of testimony and arguments. Miike had recommended returning a total of 34.5 million gallons a day into the four streams, which he said would have established mauka-to-makai flow for all of them. Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar had argued that Miike’s recommendation — about three times as much as the commission’s final decision — “tipped the balance too sharply in favor of stream restoration.” On appeal, the Hawaii Supreme Court late last year threw out the decision, ruling that “the commission violated the public trust in its treatment of (stream) diversions.” The high court sent the case back to the water commission. Miike has again been selected as the hearings officer for the do-over, which should get under way this fall. “All we want to do is grow food,” said Hokuao Pellegrino, whose ancestors farmed kalo on lands alongside the Waikapu Stream before it was diverted. With limited water, he said, he’s able to cultivate kalo in only two of the 12 loi (taro patches) on the 2.5-acre farm on kuleana land that dates from the 1848 Mahele, or division of land. Pellegrino, who is involved in the Na Wai ‘Eha case, added, “It’s an injustice: not allowing those who want to go into agriculture by restricting access to water. These are traditional, customary rights that we are entitled to from our ancestors.” HC&S GENERAL MANAGER Rick Volner Jr. said the majority of its 36,000 acres is irrigated with water from the East Maui watershed with the balance coming from Na Wai ‘Eha. He said 16 brackish water wells supplement the stream water when needed. In the summer months, Volner said, “every single drop of water that comes in the surface-water ditch system plus the wells running is still not enough.” He declined to say how much water the plantation consumes. Separate from Na Wai ‘Eha, he said the plantation restored water to 19 streams in East Maui in 2008 and 2010. Volner said restoring stream flow has a “negative impact financially” because less water for its crops means lower sugar yields. “Throughout the East and West Maui proceedings, we were very consistent in saying if there are people along the streams that require water, we see that as a valid use of wa-

W

W

22

HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER >> SUNDAY 9/8/13

ter,” he said, “but to put water back in the stream just to put water back in the stream and potentially affect 36,000 acres in the Central Valley and 800 jobs, we didn’t see the benefit to that.” Duey said, “We don’t want to see HC&S go out of business. That’s not our aim at all. The only goal is to get water flowing to the ocean. We’re not trying to take all the water.”

MEANWHILE, STREAM LIFE in the Waihee River, where 10 million gallons per day has been restored, is starting to make a comeback, said Scott Fisher, director of conservation for the Hawaiian Islands Land Trust. The trust, which owns the 277-acre Wai-

he’s gearing up for a second round in the case. “What the case made vividly clear was that there is plenty of water to be returned back to the rivers and streams now that Wailuku Sugar is gone,” he said. “These plantation companies turn into water companies and want to control the future. But water is hee Coastal Dunes and Wetland Refuge, not a private entity.” joined the Na Wai ‘Eha case as a petitioner. At the same time, he said he recognizes “We’re seeing a lot more standing water in the wetland … and in the stream, we’ve seen the economic benefits of HC&S’s operations. “The focus is on preserving the rivers and more species of oopu in larger numbers, opae and hihiwai. It takes time. We’re hoping streams for future generations and restoring them as a natural and cultural treasure like that over time with more water in the river, we’ll see a more vibrant and diverse ecosys- they were for hundreds of years before HC&S, and hopefully for hundreds of years tem,” Fisher said. Earthjustice attorney Isaac Moriwake said after HC&S,” Moriwake said. Hokuao Pellegrino with his 6-month-old daughter, Kawaihua, at home in Waikapu. Water diversion limits Pellegrino’s ability to cultivate kalo.

1.29B
Monthly water consumption countywide for agricultural use in 2010

10.9B
Monthly water consumption countywide for nonagricultural use in 2010
Sources: Maui County Department of Water Supply, Maui County Data Book 2011

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Enrollment at the University of Hawaii Maui College is the highest among all UH neighbor island campuses.

560
Earned degrees at the University of Hawaii Maui College on June 30:

TOP OF ITS CLASS
University of Hawaii Maui College prepares students for careers with four-year degrees and new facilities
By Nanea Kalani
nkalani@staradvertiser.com

161
Liberal arts

101
Business education

68
Culinary arts

125
Nursing

42
Public services

63
Technology
Source: Banner Operational Data Store

AHULUI >> Maui Community College’s name change to University of Hawaii Maui College was one sign of its far-reaching ambitions. No longer simply MCC, the school shed its junior college status in an effort to better compete with four-year universities as a school where students can earn a baccalaureate degree. With about 4,400 students, enrollment at the Maui campus exceeds the populations at UH’s

K

neighbor island colleges, including UH-Hilo. And UH Maui College is the only UH community college that offers its own four-year degrees alongside the more typical associate’s degrees and vocational certificates. The name change — approved in 2010 by UH and the Western Association of Schools and Colleges — speaks to the college’s commitment to adapt to the needs of Maui County residents, said longtime Chancellor Clyde Sakamoto, who helped push for the change. “It wasn’t that simple,” Sakamoto, 70, said. “But it really had to do with offering students and residents opportunities to access higher-

compensating jobs in the community. Having a bachelor’s degree makes them eligible to compete.” “What we were seeing for some time, especially in the area of tech, was that higher-paying jobs were going to candidates outside Maui County and Hawaii,” he said. “We knew we had to create the kinds of programs that would help our residents be responsive to those opportunities.” THE COLLEGE DESIGNED three baccalaureate degree programs that it says were developed in direct response to Maui’s work-

24

HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER >> SUNDAY 9/8/13

UH MAUI COLLEGE

force needs. The initial four-year degree program, a bachelor of applied science in applied business and information technology, graduated its first class of three students in 2007. The program has an entrepreneurial focus. Bachelor’s degrees in engineering technology and sustainable science management have since been added, and 44 students are currently pursuing one of the three degrees. Throughout the change, the college has kept the general community college standards of low tuition and open admissions while filling an academic niche. For example, tuition is

significantly cheaper on Maui than at UH’s traditional four-year campuses. Resident tuition at UH Maui College this semester is $106 per credit and $258 per credit for upper-division courses in the baccalaureate programs. That compares with resident tuition at UH’s flagship Manoa campus of $381 per credit for undergraduate programs. BEYOND TUITION REVENUE, the school also attracts valuable research grants and other spending that helps generate economic benefits for Maui and the state. The campus pumps more than $85 million

UH Maui College offers several four-year baccalaureate degrees to help its students be more competitive in the workforce, says Chancellor Clyde Sakamoto. The college, inset above, also is expanding its facilities and this year dedicated a $26 million science building with modern work areas to accommodate STEM education.

annually into the local economy, according to a study this year by the University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization. It said UH Maui College is also responsible for more than 700 direct and indirect jobs. “We’re not a huge campus, but we’re wanting to be fairly aggressive in seeking out additional resources,” said Sakamoto, who has led the school since 1990. “I’m proud that we’ve developed a strong infrastructure for higher education so that UH Maui College is positioned to make these kinds of contributions to Continued on next page

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UH Maui College’s culinary program, top, has earned national acclaim. The school also offers fashion courses, center, and houses the well regarded Institute of Hawaiian Music.

the county and state’s future.” UH Maui College has seen its enrollment increase by nearly 50 percent over the past five years, and boasts the highest enrollment of all UH neighbor island colleges. THE SCHOOL’S CULINARY ARTS program in particular has helped attract students, with 180 students currently majoring in the program. “We were bursting out of our seams before moving into our new facility in 2003,” said Chris Speere, external program coordinator for the Maui Culinary Academy. The academy went from 3,600 square feet of learning space to a 38,000-square-foot facility that also handles the dining needs of the entire campus. “We see such a diverse group of students, from kids just out of high school, retirees, some students with advanced degrees,” Speere said. “It’s a good time because the dining public is very aware and demanding.” The program got a big confidence boost last year when OpenTable, an online restaurant reservations service, ranked its restaurant — The Leis Family Class Act Restaurant — No. 1 on its list of best overall restaurants in Hawaii. (Popular Paia eatery Mama’s Fish House came in second place.) The fine-dining Leis Family Class Act Restaurant is run by culinary students in their final year of the program. Growth in other programs also has prompted expansion of the college’s physical presence. The campus this year dedicated a $26 million science facility called ‘Ike Le‘a, outfitted with modern laboratory and classroom spaces to house the school’s STEM Department (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). UH Maui College also plans to renovate a former student housing site and build the Hospitality Academy of Maui, an “educational and training hotel” that the school says will integrate courses with hands-on job experience for students. The goal is to better educate and train students for management-level positions. UH Maui College is also looking to expand its Food Innovation Center. The program acts

The college always seeks to make a contribution to the overall health and well-being of Maui County.”
Clyde Sakamoto University of Hawaii Maui College chancellor, on what sets the school apart
UH MAUI COLLEGE

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HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER >> SUNDAY 9/8/13

4,382
EACH PERSON IS 100
FALL ENROLLMENT

University of Hawaii Maui College enrollment for fall 2012

DEGREES EARNED

560
2011-2012

MAUI HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES
PUBLIC SCHOOLS

379
PERCENT CHANGE

174 7
Bachelor’s degrees Associate’s degrees Certificates of achievement

Entering University of Hawaii system in fall 2011 Maui campus Manoa campus Hilo campus Other campuses

527
PRIVATE SCHOOLS

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

2,989 2,985 2,996 2,903 2,841 2,981 3,287 4,114 4,367 4,527 4,382

10.7% -0.1% 0.4% -3.1% -2.1% 4.9% 10.3% 25.2% 100 6.1% 3.7% -3.2% 50 200

397
74 16 40

FACULTY
School years 2001 to 2011

154
150

70
Maui campus Hilo campus

Entering University of Hawaii system in fall 2011

39
21 9 1

Manoa campus

93.5
’01 ’02 ’03 ’04 ’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10 ’11

Other campuses

Sources: University of Hawaii Institutional Research Office, Maui County Data Book 2012

as a food business incubator, providing space and equipment to local farmers and ranchers for research, development and small-scale production of value-added food products. THE INNOVATION CENTER has already received $1.2 million in state funds to

design and build a new facility on campus. UH Maui College’s dental program also will expand under plans that call for renovating an existing building to house the college’s oral health center, to be named the Daniel K. Inouye Allied Health Center. “I think what makes us unique is that we have an extra community connection,”

Sakamoto said. “The mayors and county councils throughout the years, Maui legislators and at the federal level, Sen. Inouye, have always supported our initiatives. And I think it’s because the college always seeks to make a contribution to the overall health and well-being of Maui County.”

SUNDAY 9/8/13 >> HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER

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UP CLOSE

MAUI

CRIME
TOTAL CRIME INDEX 6,499 6,570 6,160 6,005 6,425

6,570
Total crime index in 2012
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

VIOLENT CRIME INDEX Murder Rape Robbery Assault 2 36 64 190 3 47 71 215 1 26 64 182 2 67 87 228 5 50 116 249 1,090 4,451 535 74

VIOLENT CRIME INDEX 336 292 273 384
2008 2009 2010 2011

420
2012

HEALTH

PROPERTY CRIME INDEX 6,207 6,150 5,824 5,732 6,041

PROPERTY CRIME INDEX Burglary 1,122 1,031 Larceny-theft Motor-vehicle theft Arson 4,474 4,185 544 67 552 56

1,034 1,067 4,046 4,221 618 34 673 80

86.5%
Adults in good or better health, 2001-2010

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

393

$11.1 MILLION 28.2% 415

Value of stolen property in 2012 Stolen property recovered Domestic violence arrests

Number of drug-related arrests by the Maui Police Department’s vice division in fiscal year 2012

208.6 154.9 33
5.8%
Adults without health insurance

Major cardiovascular disease death rate per 100,000 people Cancer death rate per 100,000 people Diabetes death rate per 100,000 people

Children age 17 and younger without health insurance (highest in the state)

538
Sources: Maui Police Department 2012 annual report; State Department of Health 28

Total offenses committed by juveniles in 2012, down from 723 in 2011

9.0%
Adults who are obese

22%
Adults who smoke

14.8%

HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER >> SUNDAY 9/8/13