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Split fava beans

Moroccan bessara
This classic Moroccan dish can be served as a dip or soup, is based on a recipe from Moroccan chef Alias website, cookingwithalia.com Serves 8

Ingredients
400g split dried fava beans 3 large garlic cloves 1 tsp salt 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp paprika 1 tbsp olive oil Juice of 2 lemons To serve Cumin Paprika Olive oil

Method
Place the fava beans and garlic in a large pan, and cover with 1.5 litres cold water. Cover the pan and cook on a medium high heat until they are soft enough to easily puree (about 40 minutes). Skim occasionally. Puree the beans and garlic, either by hand or in a food processor, according to your preferred texture. Stir in the olive oil, spices and lemon juice. The consistency can be adjusted: for a thinner soup, mix in more hot water; for a thicker dip, boil the beans with less water. Serve the bessara hot, drizzled with olive oil and seasoned with cumin and paprika.

Kabuki peas

Japanese pea and wasabi dip


A refreshing and spicy dip that can be made with Japanese wasabi or British horseradish. Serves 4

Ingredients
100g dried kabuki peas 150ml sour cream 1 tsp wasabi paste (adjust to taste) or use horseradish sauce or grated 1 tsp lemon juice

Method
Soak and cook the peas following the instructions on the pack. Blend the peas with the cream, lemon juice, and wasabi or horseradish to taste. Season with salt and pepper. Refrigerate and serve chilled as a dip.

Split fava beans

Egyptian falafels
Surprisingly easy to cook from scratch, this traditional Arab food is delicious as a snack or meze. Authentic Egyptian falafels are made with fava beans instead of chickpeas. Unlike many others, our recipe is both gluten free and vegan it contains no eggs, flour or breadcrumbs. Makes about 16 falafels

Ingredients
500g pre-soaked split fava beans 1 red onion Big bunch fresh coriander 1 red chilli pepper Zest of 2 lemons 10 mint leaves 3 pinches coarse salt 3 pinches fresh ground black pepper 1 tsp cayenne 1 tsp ground cumin tsp cinnamon Vegetable oil for deep frying For the yoghurt sauce 8 mint leaves 350g yoghurt Juice of lemon Coarse salt Fresh ground black pepper

Method
For this recipe you need to pre-soak the beans, but dont boil them as all the cooking happens in the oil. Coarsely chop the herbs, chilli and onion. Mix with the beans, spices and lemon zest, and pulse in a food processor until fairly smooth though not to a paste. Roll ping pong ball size patties from the mixture and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare the yoghurt sauce. Finely chop the mint and stir with the yoghurt, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Refrigerate. Heat enough vegetable oil to cover a single layer of patties in a deep pan. When the oil is very hot, carefully place the patties in the oil and deep fry until dark golden brown this will take a few minutes. Drain briefly on kitchen paper and sprinkle lightly with salt. Serve the falafel with the yoghurt sauce, a lightly dressed salad and some pitta bread.

Split fava beans

Indian vaal dal


This dal is popular in the Gujarat region of western India. It can also be made with sprouted whole beans (which should always be thoroughly cooked). Serves 6

Ingredients
For the dal 400g split dried fava beans 4 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed 4cm piece of root ginger, peeled and cut into half a dozen chunks 1 tsp turmeric 4 or 5 small green chillies, 2 finely chopped, 2 or 3 left whole For the tarka 2 tbsp oil - ideally groundnut or ghee, but sunflower is fine 2 shallots, finely sliced (or a small red onion) 1 tbsp cumin seeds 1 tsp mustard seeds 1 tsp chilli flakes Bunch of fresh coriander, chopped to serve

Method
The dal: Put the beans in a large heavybottomed pan with a lid and cover with cold water. Bring to the boil for 10 minutes then drain, rinse and return to the pan. This time cover with about 2 litres of cold water, bring back to the boil and add the garlic, ginger, turmeric and chopped chillies with a pinch of salt. Turn down the heat and put the lid on leaving space for steam to escape. Simmer the dal very gently, stirring occasionally and checking that it isnt sticking add a little more water if required. After 30 to 40 minutes the beans will have broken down and become creamy. Now either add a little boiling water or reduce the dal further to achieve your preferred consistency. Season to taste be quite bold with the salt and perhaps try a little sugar. Stir in the two whole chillies and simmer for a further 15 minutes. The tarka: Heat the oil in a frying pan and add the shallots. Stir until golden and beginning to crisp, but dont allow to burn. Add the dried spices and cook for a couple of minutes until the mustard seeds are popping. To serve: Stir the spices and shallots (the tarka) and half the chopped coriander into the dal. Garnish with the remaining chopped coriander.

Split fava beans

Italian mashed beans, potato, greens


This comforting recipe is adapted from Paula Wolferts recipe for mashed fava beans with potatoes and chicory (fava pure e cicorielle) in her classic book Mediterranean Cooking. Its a dish from Puglia in Italy, where fava beans are much appreciated: Of all fresh and dried vegetables, the fava bean is queen, sovereign of all, soaked in the evening, cooked in the morning. popular Apulian saying Serves 4

Ingredients
100g split dried fava beans 250g potatoes, peeled and sliced 200g bitter green leaves (eg dandelion or curly endive) Salt Pepper 50ml extra virgin olive oil

Method
Place the rinsed fava beans in a large saucepan, cover with water, boil for 10 minutes. Drain the beans and return to the pan with 1 tbsp olive oil, cover with salted water and simmer for 10 minutes. Add the sliced potatoes, top up with water if necessary to cover, and simmer for about 20 minutes, until the potatoes and beans are soft. Rinse and roughly cut the green leaves and sweat in a pan for 10 minutes with just the water left on the leaves from rinsing. Drain off the liquid exuded by the leaves, pressing the leaves with a spoon if necessary. Add just a little water (2 tbsp) to the leaves and boil uncovered for about 5 minutes until no water is left. Drain any excess liquid from the potatoes and beans, and mash, adding back a little of the liquid if needed to keep it smooth. Stir in the greens with the remaining olive oil, season to taste and serve.

Whole fava beans

Egyptian ful medames


The national dish of Egypt though also served across North Africa and the Middle East, ful medames is a delicious spicy stew traditionally eaten for breakfast (and to break fast). This is the recipe we took to the Aldeburgh Food Festival where it proved very popular! Serves 8-12 (ideal for home freezing)

Ingredients
1kg whole dried fava beans 45g fresh coriander 20g fresh parsley tsp cayenne tsp cinnamon 3 heaped tsp cumin 3 heaped tsp sugar (or more to taste) Large jar (500700ml) tomato passata 2 heaped dsp tomato paste Juice of 2 or 3 large lemons 1 clove garlic 1 red onion 1 small (but hot) chilli 100ml sunflower oil (plus oil for frying) 1 large pinch salt Pepper to taste

Method
Soak the beans overnight. Drain, place in a pan, cover with plenty of water and cook until tender about 20 minutes in a pressure cooker, 60 minutes if boiling. Chop the onion and garlic until very fine (or puree in a food processor), fry gently in a little oil. Meanwhile chop and mix (or blend) the herbs, oil, lemon juice, chilli and spices. Add the spice and herb mix to the onions and garlic and cook for a few minutes. Add the passata and tomato paste plus 100ml of water (use it to wash the remains of the passata out of the jar or packet it came in). Cook for a few more minutes and then add the beans, continue to simmer and taste add sugar, salt and pepper to adjust seasoning. The beans are ready as soon as the seasoning is balanced, though you can leave them to reduce for a thicker sauce. Eat straight away and/or cool and freeze in portions. Delicious eaten with pitta bread, tomato salad and a fried egg!

Whole fava beans

Bungay baked beans


Fava beans make an interesting change from the imported navy beans in canned baked beans, with a very different texture. Serves 6-8

Ingredients
500g whole dried fava beans 3 onions 3 large garlic cloves 1-2 tbsp olive oil 3 tsp paprika tsp ground cloves 3 tins chopped toms 5 tbsp tom ketchup 400ml hot water with 1 tsp bouillon powder 2 tbsp soft brown sugar Kabuki peas

Method
Soak the beans overnight. Drain, place in a pan, cover with plenty of water and cook until tender 20 mins in a pressure cooker, 60 mins if boiling. Blend the onions and garlic in a food processor. Heat the oil and sweat the mixture until soft. Stir in the paprika and cloves, and cook for 1 min before adding the rest of the ingredients apart from the beans. Simmer for 15 mins before whizzing again until smooth in the food processor. Season to taste. Pour back into an ovenproof saucepan, mix in the cooked beans & cover with foil or a lid. Bake in the oven for 1 hours. Add some boiling water if they get dry.

British pea, mint and ham soup


This favourite soup is a good way to use up leftover ham. Serves 4

Ingredients
200g dried kabuki peas 1-2 tbsp olive oil 1 lg onion, chopped 2 cloves garlic 4 rashers bacon, chopped 1.2 litres stock 125-200g cooked ham, diced

Method
Soak and cook the peas following the instructions on the pack. Heat the oil in a large saucepan. Gently fry the onions, garlic and bacon over a low heat for about 10 mins until the onions are soft and the bacon is browned. Add the stock, bring to the boil, turn down heat and simmer for about 10 mins. Add the peas and ham to the pan, then blend until smooth. Season with salt, pepper and a little sugar if needed.