12-16-2013 Mon Edition | Cetacea | Marine Mammals

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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 • Vol XIII, Edition 103
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
SONAR TESTING
STATE PAGE 6
NINERS BEAT
TAMPA BAY
SPORTS PAGE 12
KERRY ON CLIMATE
CHANGE IN VIETNAM
WORLD PAGE 8
NAVY OPTS TO CONTINUE ACTIVITY
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
AMillbrae startup focusing on
helping businesses lower ener-
gy costs by balancing the power
grid with batteries charged dur-
ing cheaper non-peak hours just
received $15 million in funding
that will assist it to expand its
operations.
Stem, an
energy storage
company on
Rollins Road,
announced an
i n v e s t m e n t
from General
Electric and
t he Spani sh
renewable energy company
Iberdrola in early December. It
also named John Carrington its
new chief executive officer late
last week.
It is a developer of an inte-
grated cloud energy optimiza-
tion, which leverages real-time
data, cloud-based predictive ana-
lytics and energy storage to
help businesses optimize ener-
gy use. The business was found-
ed by a group of people who
realized there were inefficien-
cies in the utilities space,
Carrington said.
“Stem is at the forefront of
bri ngi ng i nt el l i gence t o t he
edge of the grid through its soft-
ware-driven approach to energy
storage,” he said. “With strong
demand among commercial and
utility customers, I’m excited to
join Stem to build on this
momentum and accelerate our
market expansion.”
Buildings are put on energy
systems, which use the utilities’
Funding to spark energy company’s growth
Millbrae startup gets $15M investment from General Electric, Spanish energy group; new CEO named
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The search to find a new
home for an alternative high
school in the San Mateo
Union High School District
is still on, but the district
has passed its deadline on
finding property to make
sure a good fit is found.
Superintendent Scott
Laurence gave himself until
October to find a more cen-
tral location before submit-
ting his recommendations
to the Board of Trustees. The
school is currently housed at
aging facilities on the cam-
pus of the former Crestmoor
High School in San Bruno.
Laurence and Elizabeth
McManus, deputy superin-
tendent of business servic-
es, previously talked about
the difficulties they were
encountering in finding the
right space for the high
school. At the same time,
they are also looking for a
new location for the outdat-
ed district office.
The district discussed one
piece of land at 45 Edwards
Court in Burlingame
New school
site search
slow going
John Carrington
San Mateo Union officials pass deadline for
finding new alternative high school location
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Sacred Heart Prep running back Ben Burr-Kirven rushed for a game-high 161 yards and
four touchdowns on just 15 carries to lead the Gators to a 42-7 win over El Cerrito in
the Northern California Division III regional championship game Saturday night.
SEE SPORTS PAGE 11.
NOR CAL CHAMPIONS!
New animal
shelter now
in the works
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo County has a new pet
project.
The county intends to spend up to
$20 million on a new, modern ani-
mal shelter to replace the aging and
outdated facility
at Coyote Point
— a building the
head of the
P e n i n s u l a
Humane Society
said was behind
the times from
the day it
opened.
The design of
the building,
which dates from the 1960s, was
primitive even then. The wear and
tear of workers, volunteers and
about 8,000 live animals through
its doors annually takes a toll, said
Ken White, executive director of the
Peninsula Humane Society/Society
for the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals.
“The facility is being held up with
maintenance, duct tape and a
prayer,” White said.
San Mateo County contracts with
PHS for its animal control and shel-
tering services and has done so for
more than 50 years. Animals are
processed at the 12 Airport Blvd.
location and if or when deemed
ready for adoption moved to the
Tom Lantos Center for
Compassion, the donor-funded
facility that opened in 2011 on
Burlingame’s Rollins Road.
The current contract expires in
Cities would lease
building with cost
estimated at $20M
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Silicon Valley is known as the
mecca of innovation, startups
and entrepreneurs. But there’s
one demographic that isn’t as apt
to jump in on the high-tech buzz
— working moms.
Downtown San Mateo’s Draper
University started a scholarship
program to encourage and prepare
women to become business own-
ers.
“The general
consensus here
is that women
have just as
much to give as
men do and are
just as ambi-
tious and are
great leaders
and make great
CEOs. There’s
absolutely no reason why women
shouldn’t be involved in entre-
preneurship,” said Emily Lopez,
spokeswoman for Draper
University.
Draper University is a seven-
week boarding school that typi-
cally caters to 18- to 29-year-
olds who have the ability to pick
up and move onto its campus
while learning the ins and outs of
entrepreneurship.
The Draper University curricu-
lum covers all of the business
fundamentals, marketing, sales,
finance, networking and how to
pitch ideas. Students learn what
investors are looking for and are
exposed to lawyers to learn how
to incorporate their own busi-
nesses, Lopez said. The online
students interact with boarding
students, working closely on
joint projects and are able to
meet like-minded people, Lopez
said.
The momtrepreneur scholar-
ship covers half of the online
program’s $850 cost, Lopez said.
“Draper’s goal is to really
Draper offers ‘momtrepreneur’ help
Downtown San Mateo university offers online classes for working mothers to start business ventures
Ken White
Megan Jones
See SCHOOL, Page 22
See ENERGY, Page 30
See MOMS, Page 30 See SHELTER, Page 22
Zebra escapes from
Tenn. farm, roams for weeks
CLEVELAND, Tenn. — The black-
and-white-striped animal that’s
been spotted at different places
around a Tennessee town isn’t a
funny-looking horse.
Nope, there’s a zebra loose in
East Tennessee.
Bradley County dispatchers say
they’ve had several people call to
report sightings of the animal -
near homes, businesses and even a
highway.
Although some people have tried
to catch him, the animal named
Zeek has remained elusive.
Zeek’s owner, Ronald Price, told
WRCB-TV that the animal escaped
from his farm in Cleveland about
three weeks ago by jumping a high
fence.
Price says he’s keeping a watch
out and hopes that someone is able
to help Zeek return home safely.
Mystery man gives
‘ Tips For Jesus’ up to $10,000
NEWYORK — Restaurant workers
around the country are being pho-
tographed with huge smiles on
their faces - holding up receipts
with tips of up to $10,000.
Each tab is stamped with the han-
dle (at)tipsforjesus and bears an
illegible signature.
The anonymous tipster has left
hi s t rai l of generosi t y coast t o
coast and even in Mexico. A waiter
in Phoenix beams looking at his
$2, 500 t i p. And a $111.05 New
York restaurant check includes a
$1,000 tip and the words “god
bless!” scrawled across it.
Photos of the outlandish tips are
posted on the Instagram account
“Tips for Jesus” that has more than
50,000 followers. The feed comes
with the tagline, “Doing the Lord’s
work, one tip at a time.”
The tipster has yet to come for-
ward. Meanwhile, he’s keepi ng
everyone guessing.
Police: Driver hid
pot as Christmas presents
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. —
Pennsylvania State Police say they
found 20 pounds of marijuana in
boxes wrapped as Christmas pres-
ents inside a minivan after a traffic
st op.
The Centre Daily Times reports
that 38-year-old Randy Jesus
Valdivia, of Surfside, Fla., faces
felony drug charges after the stop
on Interstate 80 near State College.
Police say they became suspi-
cious after Valdivia was stopped
Thursday afternoon, and got him to
agree to a search.
They say they found 20 pounds of
weed vacuum-sealed inside large
boxes wrapped as Christmas gifts.
Online court records say he was
taken to the local jail. A defense
lawyer wasn’t listed.
Hundreds of suited-up
Santas hit NYC streets, bars
NEW YORK — Several hundred
red-suited Santas have braved the
blustery snow for New York City' s
annual SantaCon pub crawl.
The New York Post reports police
officers were out in full force
Saturday to monitor the hordes of
drunken revelers dressed as Santa
Claus. New Yorkers have com-
plained about public drunkenness
and unruly behavior during the
event in previous years.
Police officers handed out fliers
at subway stations and parks warn-
ing the Santas to remove their fake
beards before entering bars.
Police told the newspaper that
one Santa was treated for injuries at
Bellevue Hospital and later
released. They say at least 10 sum-
monses were issued.
On its website, SantaCon
describes itself as a "nonsensical
Santa Claus convention" that
donates cash to the Food Bank for
NYC and other local charities.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Billy Gibbons (ZZ
Top) is 64.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1773
The Boston Tea Party took place as
American colonists boarded a British
ship and dumped more than 300
chests of tea into Boston Harbor to
protest tea taxes.
“That life is worth living is the most necessary
of assumptions and, were it not assumed, the
most impossible of conclusions.”
— George Santayana (1863-1952)
Actress Liv
Ullmann is 75.
Actor Benjamin
Bratt is 50.
Birthdays
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
“Santa”Robert Hunter gets some helping hands from members of the Golden Gate Chapter Harley Owners Group when they
delivered gifts to the San Mateo Medical Center on Saturday, Dec.14.The annual Holiday Toy Run brought a truck full of toys
and a check for $1,000.
Monday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
Northeast winds 10 to 20 mph.
Monday night: Mostly clear. Lows in
the mid 40s. East winds 10 to 15
mph...Becoming southeast around 5 mph
after midnight.
Tuesday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 60s.
Light winds.
Tuesday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 50s.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy. Aslight chance of rain.
Lows in the lower 40s.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy. Aslight chance of showers. Highs
in the mid 50s.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy. Lows around 40.
Friday through Saturday: Mostly clear. Highs in the upper
50s. Lows in the lower 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1653, Oliver Cromwell became lord protector of
England, Scotland and Ireland.
I n 1809, the French Senate granted a divorce decree to
Emperor Napoleon I and Empress Josephine (the dissolu-
tion was made final the following month).
In 1811, the first of the powerful New Madrid earthquakes
struck the central Mississippi Valley with an estimated mag-
nitude of 7.7.
I n 1863, philosopher and author George Santayana was
born in Madrid, Spain.
I n 1907, 16 U.S. Navy battleships, which came to be
known as the “Great White Fleet,” set sail on a 14-month
round-the-world voyage to demonstrate American sea power.
I n 1944, the World War II Battle of the Bulge began as
German forces launched a surprise attack against Allied
forces in Belgium (the Allies were eventually able to beat
the Germans back).
I n 1951, a Miami Airlines Curtiss C-46 Commando
crashed just after takeoff from Newark Airport in New Jersey,
killing all 56 people on board.
I n 1960, 134 people were killed when a United Air Lines
DC-8 and a TWASuper Constellation collided over New York
City.
I n 1962, Nepal’s Panchayat Constitution was proclaimed.
I n 1976, the government halted its swine flu vaccination
program following reports of paralysis apparently linked to
the vaccine.
I n 1982, Environmental Protection Agency head Anne M.
Gorsuch became the first Cabinet-level officer to be cited for
contempt of Congress for refusing to submit documents
requested by a congressional committee.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
THANK GAUGE SICKEN WINNER
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: This section of the gym was a — “WEIGHT-
ING” AREA
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NIXTO
YECDA
CCRUHH
COBNEK
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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A:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Big Ben, No. 4,
in first place; Eureka, No. 7, in second place; and
Hot Shot, No. 3, in third place.The race time was
clocked at 1:48.53.
9 2 4
19 24 26 27 70 12
Mega number
Dec. 13 Mega Millions
14 25 32 33 41 34
Powerball
Dec. 14 Powerball
10 17 18 21 25
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
0 6 5 7
Daily Four
2 8 0
Daily three evening
10 12 18 22 31 2
Mega number
Dec. 14 Super Lotto Plus
Civil rights attorney Morris Dees is 77. Actress Joyce
Bulifant is 76. CBS news correspondent Lesley Stahl is 72.
TV producer Steven Bochco is 70. Former Nevada Gov. Jim
Gibbons is 69. Pop musician Tony Hicks (The Hollies) is 68.
Pop singer Benny Andersson (ABBA) is 67. Actor Ben Cross
is 66. Rock musician Bill Bateman (The Blasters) is 62. Actor
Xander Berkeley is 58. Actress Alison LaPlaca is 54. Actor
Sam Robards is 52. Actor Jon Tenney is 52. Country singer-
songwriter Jeff Carson is 50. Actor-comedian JB Smoove is
48. Actor Daniel Cosgrove is 43. Rhythm-and-blues singer
Michael McCary is 42. Actor Jonathan Scarfe is 38.
3
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
º work well with others
º Excellent communication, pre-
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required
º A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
REDWOOD CITY
Grand theft. Two men stole more than
$400 of liquor from a store on Broadway
before 7:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 9.
Grand theft. A tool bag was taken from
the back of a truck on Woodside Road
before 2:04 p.m. Monday, Dec. 9.
Pet t y t hef t. A laptop was stolen on
Middlefield Road before 1:08 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 9.
Pet t y t hef t. Tools were stolen from a
truck on Silver Hill Road before 12:25
p.m. Monday, Dec. 9.
Vandal i sm. Two tires were slashed on
Redwood Avenue before 7:30 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 9.
HALF MOON BAY
Sus pi ci ous ci rcumst ance. A woman
reported that someone went into her
house because she realized that her cat was
not in the same room where she left it on
the 100 block of Beach Way in Moss
Beach before 11:50 p.m. on Wednesday,
Dec. 11 .
Vandal i sm. A vehicle had all four tires
punctured on the 600 block of Magnolia
before 6:30 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 10.
Dri vi ng wi t h suspended l i cense. A
driver was cited for not having a valid dri-
ver’s license on Third Avenue and Filbert
Street before 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 6.
Police reports
Stinking vandals
Part of the city sewer system was van-
dalized on the 100 block of Keefe Court
in San Bruno before 9:07 a.m. Friday,
Dec. 6.
T
he United States in the 1930s experi-
enced the worst depression it had
ever had.
The beginning of the 1940s offered new
hope as we were edging our way out of the
stagnant economic situation of the ’30s.
However, on Dec. 7, 1941, the entire out-
look of the United States changed. Grief,
anxiety, fear and indignation swept the
country after the Japanese bombed Pearl
Harbor. Our military was faced immediately
with problems that could not be solved
because it had not been prepared for this con-
frontation. Young men began signing up to
fight in the war. The government quickly
froze prices and began restricting regulating
distribution of all farm goods. Strategic and
important material such as rubber, copper,
steel, tin, aluminum and lumber were put on
restricted lists. The production of automo-
biles and rubber tires for civilian use ceased.
The county of San Mateo had around
140,000 residents and they geared up imme-
diately to stop the possible invasion from
the west. In San Mateo, Paul Fagan showed
his patriotism by financing a tower to the
west of San Mateo that was used as an obser-
vation post to detect airplanes that might
bomb the Bay. “Fagan’s Tower” was manned
throughout the war by volunteers. Crystal
Springs dam was immediately declared a
vital point on the Peninsula and it was
closed and guarded by armed personnel. By
the end of 1942, 14,660 volunteer hours had
been given since Pearl Harbor by Millbrae
volunteers in the Ground Observer Corps.
These hours were spent scanning the sky,
searching for hostile aircraft. The personal
inconveniences and sacrifice of these people
were enormous. The ship-building estab-
lishment in South San Francisco began
revving up for production of war-time ships
and in the southern part of South San
Francisco cement ships (barges) were con-
structed that were used to tow war cargo.
Coyote Point would open up a merchant
marine school that would supply personnel
to run the much-needed ships across the
Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans. Electronic
tubes and material for the new radar screens
were much in demand. EiMac in San Bruno
became an extremely important tube-manu-
facturing industry, and it broke the
male/female barrier by hiring women to do
the work.
This was a great change in attitude for
working people in the United States. To sup-
ply labor for all of these rapidly-built indus-
tries, a huge heretofore untapped labor force
from the Midwest and the South migrated to
California in vast numbers to help in the war
effort. It was a time of great influx of minor-
ity individuals, and this put a strain on the
society even in war time.
There was much that had to be done by cit-
izens on the local level as well. Because of
the influx of thousands and thousands of new
workers, all apartments and vacant rooms
had to be registered with the government.
Rent control went into effect. In Millbrae,
George Davis was named as the head of the
Home Food Production Committee by the
San Mateo County Agricultural Department
in Redwood City. The aim of the committee
was announced to be “A Victory Garden in
Every Home.” The desired goal was a hearty
cooperation with the home production of
vegetables in every vacant space that people
could find — “Victory Gardens.” Amateur
gardening was encouraged and the Home
The Home Front — World War II on the Peninsula
Posters touting the benefits of ‘Victory
Gardens’ were prevalent in the days of World
War II.
See HISTORY, Page 30
4
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
5
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The California Public Utilities
Commission this week plans to
allow PG&E to increase the pres-
sure of a questioned San Carlos nat-
ural gas pipeline back to the maxi-
mum allowed based on what it said
is sufficient testing and safety certi-
fication.
But San Carlos Mayor Mark
Olbert said he and other city offi-
cials are urging the CPUC to delay
the vote until January and remove
the recommendation from its con-
sent calendar where it is currently
slated for approval without any
public discussion.
“We don’t believe that due process
was really done and now it’s being
dealt with by consent which sends the
message that
they find our
concerns irrele-
vant,” Olbert
said.
Olbert spent
Friday trying to
reach members
of the CPUC but
as of mid-after-
noon was
unsuccessful.
CPUC officials did not respond to
a Daily Journal inquiry.
City Manager Jeff Maltbie asked
the CPUC staff earlier in the week to
remove the item recommending lift-
ing the pressure restriction but was
told it would be in the hands of com-
missioners to do so, Olbert said.
According to the agenda, staff
found that Pacific Gas and Electric
provided sufficient information on
its pressure test results and safety
certification of Line 147 and recom-
mends allowing it to operate at the
maximum operating pressure of
330 pounds per square inch gauge.
Olbert said city brass thinks the
CPUC needs more review of those
findings and should consider what
the city-hired experts say.
“We think there are still some
serious unknowns here,” Olbert
said. “Our outside experts say the
industry norm is that when you
don’t know what’s in the ground
you don’t go higher than 220 psi.”
The city declared a state of emer-
gency in October after the city
learned of November 2012 emails
by a PG&E engineer questioning
the safety of 84-year-old gas trans-
mission Line 147 which runs paral-
lel to Brittan Avenue. The former
engineer suggested the city could
be “another San Bruno situation” in
reference to the Sept. 9, 2010 gas
line explosion and fire that killed
eight, injured dozens and destroyed
38 homes. The engineer also ques-
tioned if hydrotesting in 2011
exacerbated cracking.
Following the state of emer-
gency, a county judge imposed an
emergency injunction putting the
line out of service but it was later
lifted and PG&E lowered the pres-
sure to 125 psi.
In hearings about gas line safety,
the engineer tempered his concern.
The city of San Carlos also allocat-
ed $250,000 for its own consult-
ants. Meanwhile, PG&E represen-
tatives insisted the line was safe
and emphasized a desire to get the
line back in service because of the
cold winter months.
On Dec. 6, Administrative Law
Judge Maribeth Bushey recom-
mended the CPUC at its Dec. 19
meeting allow PG&E to restore the
pressure.
Olbert said the city thinks the
CPUC should take PG&E’s asser-
tions with a grain of salt.
“Looking at the history, you
have to remember that PG&E had
that conversation in November
2012 but didn’t even notify the
CPUC until March 2013 about the
concerns,” he said.
City officials will likely attend
the Thursday hearing, Olbert said.
The CPUC commission meets
9:30 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 19 at 505
Van Ness Ave., San Francisco.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
CPUC plans to increase San Carlos gas line pressure
City officials urging month-long delay to review testing procedures
Mark Olbert
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Newly sworn-in councilmen Eric
Reed and Charles Stone say they
plan on staying true to the issues
they focused on in their successful
campaigns for Belmont City
Council.
Both began their tenure Tuesday
during the council’s reorganization
that also saw Councilman Warren
Lieberman become mayor and
Councilman David Braunstein
become vice mayor. Reed and Stone
said they are looking forward to
working with others on the council
as a collaborative body to address
Belmont’s economic development,
downtown and aging infrastructure.
Reed and Stone took the seats of
longtime councilmembers Coralin
Feierbach, who retired, and Dave
Warden, just
elected to the
Mid-Peninsula
Water District
Board.
Everyone on
the council
wants to derive a
solid economic
d e v e l o p me n t
plan and see
something done with downtown,
Stone said.
“I’m open to listening to the
community and I think that’s impor-
tant. I’d like to see high-quality aes-
thetics, something that’s very
appealing and fits in with the village
feel of Belmont,” Stone said.
For years, the city has been try-
ing to balance retail development
while keeping with a quaint home-
town feel. Reed wants to pick up
where others left
off and push for-
ward with the
development of
d o wn t o wn ’ s
F i r e h o u s e
Square.
“I would like
to see us begin
work, actually
begin work and
put shovel to dirt in the Firehouse
Square project in 2014. I know
that’s extremely ambitious, but I
think that should be our target,”
Reed said.
City concerns and challenges
haven’t changed much, but there is
one momentous difference since
Reed and Stone ran for office. The
Crystal Springs Uplands School
purchased the 6.5-acre Davis Drive
property in a bold move few knew
about until it announced its finaliza-
tion of escrow Nov. 26. It was a
risky move to purchase the multi-
million dollar property with no guar-
antees of entitlement, Reed said.
“But I’m very excited to be able to
see that project in front of the City
Council and discuss it and see if it
aligns with Belmont’s priorities for
the future,” Reed said.
Belmont’s apparent loss of the
Crystal Spring Upland Schools’
offer to construct a private middle
school in the city in October 2012
became a contentious debate about
the council’s actions that may have
given Reed and Stone an advantage
in the election.
“I really think that the process
that was followed last time needs to
be improved upon. … I’m opti-
mistic that city staff and Crystal
Springs [Upland School] can work
together and find a way to alleviate
citizens’ concerns and make this a
win-win for Belmont,” Stone said.
Although he wasn’t privy to pre-
vious council’s closed meetings,
this time around they have to estab-
lish a level of trust and mutual respect
as soon as possible, Reed said. He
looks forward to sitting with other
councilmembers in study sessions to
talk about their priorities and how to
work together, Reed said.
“There’s a lot that we need to do in
Belmont, but I think the most
pressing concern right now is
developing a working style of a
council that is collaborative,” Reed
said. “I really like Mayor
Lieberman’s working together
theme and that is on the top of my
agenda list right now.”
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Councilmen sworn in, ready to work
Eric Reed, Charles Stone recently join new-look Belmont City Council
Eric Reed Charles Stone
6
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/LOCAL
By Julie Watson
and Alicia Change
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — The U.S. Navy plans to
increase sonar testing over the next five
years, even as research it funded reveals
worrying signs that the loud underwater
noise could disturb whales and dolphins.
Reported mass strandings of certain
whale species have increased worldwide
since the military started using sonar half
a century ago. Scientists think the sounds
scare animals into shallow waters where
they can become disoriented and wash
ashore, but technology capable of close
monitoring has emerged only in about the
last decade.
Aside from strandings, biologists are
concerned marine mammals could suffer
prolonged stress from changes in diving,
feeding and communication.
Two recent studies off the Southern
California coast found certain endangered
blue whales and beaked whales stopped
feeding and fled from recordings of sounds
similar to military sonar.
Beaked whales are highly sensitive to
sound and account for the majority of
beachings near military exercises.
Scientists, however, were surprised by the
reaction of blue whales — the world’s
largest animal — long thought to be
immune to the high-pitched sounds. It’s
unclear how the change in behavior would
affect the overall population, estimated at
between 5,000 and 12,000 animals.
The studies involved only a small group
of tagged whales and noise levels were less
intense than what’s used by the Navy. Shy
species, such as the Cuvier’s beaked whale
that can dive 3,000 feet below the surface,
have taken years to find and monitor.
“This is a warning flag and deserves
more research,” said Stanford University
biologist Jeremy Goldbogen, who led the
blue whale study published this summer in
the journal Proceedings of the Royal
Society B.
Both studies were done by a team of inde-
pendent scientists as part of a Navy-funded,
five-year project launched in 2010 to under-
stand how sonar affects marine mammals.
Navy officials say it’s vital to national
security that sailors receive sonar training
in real-life conditions.
Environmentalists have long claimed
that sonar harms marine mammals, which
use acoustics to mate and forage. They want
more protections and accuse the Navy of
rushing to obtain five-year permits under
the Marine Mammal Protection Act from
the National Marine Fisheries Service to
increase its sonar testing in U.S. waters
without considering the latest science.
“If you deafen a marine mammal for even
a short period time, you are affecting its
ability to survive,” said Michael Jasny of
the Natural Resources Defense Council,
whose group has sued to force the Navy to
add more protections.
Afederal judge in September ruled marine
fisheries officials did not consider the best
available data when it approved permits
last year for operations stretching from
Northern California to the Canadian bor-
der. The agency has until August to
reassess how it will protect ocean life.
The California Coastal Commission also
rejected the Navy’s five-year plan for exer-
cises that would start in January off
Southern California. However, the state
agency does not have the power to block
the drills and the Navy has ignored the
agency’s requested protections in the past.
The Navy estimates that its activities
could inadvertently kill 186 whales and
dolphins off the East Coast and 155 off
Hawaii and Southern California, mostly
from explosives.
It calculates more than 11,000 serious
injuries off the East Coast and 2,000 off
Hawaii and Southern California, along
with nearly 2 million minor injuries, such
as temporary hearing loss, off each coast.
It also predicts marine mammals might
change their behavior — such as swim-
ming in a different direction — in 27 mil-
lion instances.
Navy expands sonar testing despite troubling signs
A gray whale and her calf.
Katherine A. McMillan
Katherine A. McMillan died peacefully
surrounded by her children Tuesday, Dec.
10, 2013.
She was 89.
Katherine attended
Saint Vincent School of
Nursing and finished her
training as a registered
nurse as an ensign in the
U.S. Navy.
Moving to Redwood
City in 1956, Katherine
began a 30-year career at
Sequoia Community Hospital. After retire-
ment, she established the day care center at
St. Pius Church where, over 10 years, she
cared for hundreds of children who learned
to use words like “bubbler” and ‘pocket-
book.” She made many life-long friends at
St. Pius.
She was appointed to the Health Plan of
San Mateo County. Her son and grandsons
attended Junipero Serra High School. She
was the first woman to receive the Serra In
Via award and delighted in being crowned
the first and only homecoming queen at
Serra.
She was a rabid sports fan who loved the
Red Sox, Patriots, 49ers and the S.F.
Giants. She was a strong woman, proud of
her Irish heritage and possessed of a sly wit
and a deep faith.
She is survived by her daughters
Katherine (Kate Marie), Mary, her son
Bobby (Julie), and her grandsons Sean and
Kenny.
Amass will be at St. Pius Church 11 a.m
Tuesday, Dec. 17, with a reception to fol-
low in the Fitzsimmons Center at the
church. In lieu of flowers, the family
requests that donations be made in
Katherine’s memory to the Junipero Serra
High School Annual Fund or to the St. Pius
Children’s Center.
Obituary
NATION 7
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By Kevin Begos
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH — The U.S. Coast Guard
wants to allow barges filled with fracking
wastewater to ply the nation’s rivers on
their way toward disposal. Many environ-
mentalists are horrified, but industry
groups say barge transport has its advan-
tages.
Now, the wastewater is usually disposed
of by truck or rail, which poses more risk
for accidents than shipping by barge,
according to a government report. And one
barge can carry about the same amount of
waste as 100 exhaust-spewing trucks.
The disagreements go to the core of the
fight over shale gas drilling.
Environmentalists say the chemicals in
fracking waste are a tragedy in the making,
but the industry says far greater amounts of
toxic chemicals are already being moved
by barge, including waste from oil drilling.
In 2010, U.S. barges carried 2,000 tons
of radioactive waste, almost 1.6 million
tons of sulfuric acid and 315 million tons
of petroleum products, according to the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
“We expect that shale gas wastewater can
be transported just as safely,” said Jennifer
Carpenter, of American Waterways
Operators, a trade group based in
Washington, D.C.
Environment America, a federation of 29
state-based groups, strongly disagrees. The
group said in a statement that it gathered
29,000 comments opposed to the proposal
from people around the country.
Courtney Abrams, the clean water pro-
gram director for the group, urged the
Coast Guard to “reject this outrageous
proposal . ”
Extracting natural gas trapped in shale
formations requires pumping hundreds of
thousands of gallons of water, sand and
chemicals into the ground to break apart
rock and free the gas. Some of that water,
along with large quantities of existing
underground water, returns to the surface,
and it can contain high levels of salt,
drilling chemicals, heavy metals and natu-
rally occurring low-level radiation.
The Marcellus Shale formation, underly-
ing large parts of Pennsylvania, West
Virginia, Ohio and some neighboring
states, is the nation’s most productive nat-
ural gas field. Thousands of new wells have
been drilled there since 2008, and hundreds
of millions of gallons of wastewater needs
to be disposed of each year.
Some states, such as Texas and Ohio,
have many underground waste disposal
wells. But Pennsylvania has only a few,
meaning the leftovers have to be shipped
elsewhere.
The Coast Guard proposal says barge
companies want to move waste from the
Marcellus region “via inland waterways to
storage or reprocessing centers and final
disposal sites in Ohio, Texas, and
Louisiana.” That means large quantities of
waste could be shipped on major rivers such
as the Ohio; one of its main tributaries, the
Monongahela; and the Mississippi.
Critics say that if there were an accident,
it could threaten the drinking water supply
of millions of people. They also cite the
uncertainty around what’s in that toxic
mix. The Coast Guard is proposing to
address that by requiring chemical testing
of each barge load before shipment; test
results would also be kept on file for two
years.
Coast Guard wants barges to ship fracking water
By Amanda Lee Myers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OHIO — A neighbor was arrested Sunday
in the killing of a 9-year-old Ohio girl
whose body was found in a trash bin near her
home after authorities and residents con-
ducted a frantic search for the missing child.
Jerrod Metsker, 24, was arrested at his
home on a murder charge about 12 hours
after deputies found the body of Reann
Murphy near her home at a mobile park in
Smithville, about 30 miles southwest of
Akron, Wayne County Sheriff Travis
Hutchinson said at a news conference.
It was not immediately clear whether
Metsker had an attorney. His first court
appearance is scheduled Monday morning.
Metsker was arrested at his home after he
ignored knocks on his front door and
deputies obtained a key from a family mem-
ber, Hutchinson said.
Reann was last seen Saturday night play-
ing outdoors at the park. Officers, firefight-
ers and neighbors joined in the search for
Reann, going door-to-door and combing
area properties. Hutchinson wouldn’t say
how Reann was killed or offer a motive. He
described Metsker as a family friend and
neighbor.
“All she did was love people,” Reann’s
father, Richard Murphy, told The Daily
Record in Wooster. He said that he wanted
the “worst for the guy” who killed his
daughter and declined to comment further.
Neighbor of girl found
dead in trash arrested
By Dan Elliott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CENTENNIAL, Colo. — Colorado’s gov-
ernor asked the nation Sunday for prayers for
the 17-year-old girl who was critically
wounded by a classmate at her suburban
Denver high school.
Gov. John Hickenlooper also credited
security procedures adopted after the 1999
massacre at nearby Columbine High School
for helping put a quick end to the Arapahoe
High School shooting by Karl Pierson, an
18-year-old student who shot Claire Davis at
point-blank range before killing himself.
“We all have to keep Claire in our thoughts
and prayers,” he told CBS’ “Face the
Nation.” Davis is hospitalized at Littleton
Adventist Hospital.
Hickenlooper told The Associated Press
that Davis’ parents “are remarkable people. I
feel so directly their suffering. ... They
raised this beautiful young woman who had
her whole life ahead of her. ”
About 500 classmates held a candlelight
vigil Saturday for Davis, who was sitting
with a friend near the school library when
she was shot in the head. Arapahoe County
Sheriff Grayson Robinson has said investi-
gators think she was shot at random by
Pierson, who had gone into the school look-
ing for a teacher with whom he had a dispute.
Pierson may have been nursing a grudge
against the teacher — a librarian and head of
the school debate team — since September.
Pierson was on the team and had been disci-
plined by the librarian for reasons yet to be
disclosed, the sheriff said. He said Pierson
threatened that teacher in September and
came to the school Friday intending to harm
him and inflict numerous other casualties.
Pierson excelled at speech and debate and
was passionate about the team, friends said.
They described him as a smart student who
apparently didn’t shirk from confrontations
in class.
Colorado governor visits
school shooting victim
WORLD 8
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Mathew Lee
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KIEN VANG, Vietnam — From an
American gunboat decades ago,
John Kerry patrolled for commu-
nist insurgents along the winding
muddy waters of the Mekong Delta.
From those familiar waterways that
eventually turned the young lieu-
tenant against the war, the top U.S.
diplomat confronted a modern
enemy Sunday — climate change.
In this remote part of southern
Vietnam, rising sea waters, erosion
and the impact of upstream dam
development on the Mekong River
are proving a more serious threat
than the Viet Cong guerrillas whom
Kerry battled in 1968 and 1969.
“Decades ago on these very
waters, I was one of many who wit-
nessed the difficult period in our
shared history,” Kerry told a group
of young professionals gathered
near a dock at the riverfront village
of Kien Vang.
“Today on these waters I am bear-
ing witness to how far our two
nations have come together and we
are talking about the future and
that’s the way it ought to be,” he
said.
That future, especially for the
water-dependent economy of the
millions who live in the Mekong
Delta, is in jeopardy, he said.
Kerry pledged $17 million to a
program that will help the region’s
rice producers, shrimp and crab
farmers and fisherman adapt to
potential changes caused by higher
sea levels that bring salt water into
the delicate ecosystem.
Kerry said he would make it a per-
sonal priority to ensure that none
of the six countries that share the
Mekong — China, Myanmar,
Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and
Vietnam — and depend on it for the
livelihoods of an estimated 60 mil-
lion people exploits the river at
the expense of the others.
In a pointed reference to China,
which plans several Mekong Dam
projects that could affect down-
stream populations, Kerry said:
“No one country has a right to
deprive another country of a liveli-
hood, an ecosystem and its capaci-
ty for life itself that comes from
that river. That river is a global
asset, a treasure that belongs to the
region.”
The Mekong’s resources must
“benefit people not just in one
country, not just in the country
where the waters come first, but in
every country that touches this
great river.”
It was his first visit since 1969 to
the delta’s rivers, which had made a
vivid impression on him as a
young officer. Kerry had made 13
previous postwar trips to Vietnam.
As Kerry’s boat eased off a jetty
onto the Cai Nuoc River, he told
his guide: “I’ve been on this river
many times.” Asked how he felt
about returning to the scene of his
wartime military service for the
first time, Kerry replied: “Weird,
and it’s going to get weirder.”
Standing next to the captain and
surveying the brown water and
muddy banks, Kerry recalled the
smell of burning firewood as his
boat passed through small fishing
villages where the aroma hasn’t
changed in 50 years.
At one point, a family in a sam-
pan traveling in the opposite direc-
tion smiled and waved. Kerry waved
back, and noticed the family had a
dog on board:
“I had a dog, too. Its name was
VC,” he said. VC was the abbrevia-
tion for the Viet Cong, forces fight-
ing the South Vietnamese and their
U.S. allies.
Before his remarks in Kien Vang,
Kerry visited a general store and
bought candy for a group of chil-
dren. He delighted them with a few
words in Vietnamese.
Back on the boat, Kerry looked
out at the jungle canopy that rises
just off the riverbank. “It hasn’t
changed all that much. Alot of it is
same old, same old,” he said.
“This was what we called a ‘free-
fire zone’,” he said. “The Viet Cong
were pretty much everywhere.”
Kerry first set foot in Vietnam 44
years ago after volunteering for
service because, as he has said, “It
was the right thing to do.”
He was decorated with three
Purple Hearts, a Silver Star and a
Bronze Star for fighting in a con-
flict that he came to despise and
call a “colossal mistake,” one that
profoundly influenced his political
career and strategic view.
“When I came home after two
tours of duty, I decided that the
same sense of service demanded
something more of me,” he wrote
in his 2003 book, “A Call to
Service,” as he was unsuccessfully
campaigning for the presidency in
the 2004 election.
“The lesson I learned from
Vietnam is that you quickly get
into trouble if you let foreign poli-
cy or national security policy get
too far adrift from our values as a
country and as a people.”
On his first trip to Vietnam as
secretary of state, he was deter-
mined to bolster the remarkable
rapprochement that he had encour-
aged and helped engineer as a sena-
tor in the 1990s.
In the city he first knew as
Saigon, the capital of the former
South Vietnam, Kerry on Saturday
met with members of the business
community and entrepreneurs to
talk up a trade agreement the U.S.
is negotiating with Vietnam and
nine other Asian countries.
To take full advantage of the
deal’s economic opportunities,
Kerry said Vietnam, which has
been widely criticized for its human
rights record, must embrace
changes that include a commitment
to a more open society, the free
exchange of ideas and education.
Climate change is new enemy for Kerry in Vietnam
REUTERS
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry rides a boat through the Mekong River
Delta,Vietnam.
OPINION 9
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Health insurance better in 2014
Editor,
I wish to thank Ethan Jones for his
letter, “From bad to worse” (in the Dec.
11 edition of the Daily Journal) and for
his recommendation of cancer treatment
centers Cedars-Sinai and Sloan
Kettering. More than 360 California
hospitals and 80 percent of California
physicians are in-network for private
insurance plans available on
coveredca.com, the marketplace made
possible by the Affordable Care Act
(AKA“Obamacare”). That includes
Stanford and UCSF. Aquick check
revealed Cedars Sinai is in-network for
HealthNet, one of four major private
plans available to me on coveredca.com.
Should I get cancer and choose treatment
at either facility, two other PPO plans
would pay part of the bill, although
those facilities are “out-of-network.” To
anyone who has had insurance in the
past quarter century, there is nothing
unusual about a choice of private insur-
ance plans offering contracted rates with
in-network providers and lesser cover-
age of out-of-network providers. Should
Mr. Jones wish one of these private
plans negotiates a lower contracted rate
with Sloan Kettering, in the spirit of
free markets he should direct his ire
toward Sloan Kettering and the private
plans, not Congresswoman Speier.
As for insurance plans being can-
celled, a study by FamiliesUSAconclud-
ed less than 0.6 percent of people under
age 65 will end up paying higher premi-
ums. I’m part of that 0.6 percent, and
after taking a careful look, I can say that
my 2014 insurance will definitely be better.
Bob Sawyer
Woodside
Climate science denial
Editor,
At the risk of sounding alarmist, our
social and political response (or lack of)
to the mountains of scientific data com-
piled on climate change ignores reality.
Deliberately denying indisputable scien-
tific facts is convenient, as it relieves us
of any responsibility to act. We can all
hide our collective heads in the sand, but
our children and grandchildren will be
paying the price for our inaction.
NASA, NOAA(National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration), the
National Science Foundation, the
International Energy Agency and dozens
of other research foundations around the
world involve thousands of climate sci-
entists and have done hundreds of studies
using satellites and ice core samples.
They also monitor stations atop the
highest mountains in the world, measur-
ing not only the carbon content of the
air, but ocean temperatures and acidity,
sea ice and glaciers. According to the
independent PEWPoll, 97 percent of cli-
mate scientists around the world agree
climate change is happening and is
mostly caused by man.
So in this season of reflection, please
do yourself (and every other living
thing) a favor and research independent,
unbiased data, check the source (follow
the money) and find out the facts about
the most important issue of our time.
Gordy Burton
San Carlos
Syria — new revelations
Editor,
According to Pulitzer Prize-winning
investigative journalist, Seymour
Hersh, the Obama administration
appears to have “cherry-picked” intelli-
gence to justify its original planned
attack on Syria.
It failed to disclose that it was well
aware that radical Islamic groups —
Syrian forces al-Nusra Front, AQI and al-
Qaida of Iraq — had significant quanti-
ties of sarin and the know-how to pro-
duce other lethal chemical agents. Hersh
asserts that the administration clearly
had this knowledge and deliberately mis-
led the public by asserting through their
official spokesman, press secretary
James Carney, that only the Assad
regime had stockpiles of chemical
weapons and that an attack was, there-
fore, justified.
Fortunately, the attack did not hap-
pen, but it does create an uncomfortable
feeling that President Obama, like his
predecessor, President Bush, can distort
facts and mislead the public in pursuit of
a policy agenda — much like the false
claims of weapons of mass destruction,
which resulted in the Iraq war debacle.
Jagjit Singh
Los Altos
Letters to the editor
The Japan Times
A
fghan President Hamid Karzai
is playing a dangerous game.
His term in office expires next
April, and to preserve his leverage
over political developments, he has
withheld assent to a security agree-
ment with the United States that sets
the terms for the future U.S. troop
presence.
Washington has threatened to pull
most of its troops out if he does not
move quickly. Karzai remains unbend-
ing, putting his personal interest
above that of his country.
The U.S., along with other foreign
countries, seeks to withdraw the bulk
of its troops at the end of 2014, when
the NATO mandate for operations in
Afghanistan expires. It has for about a
year negotiated the terms of an agree-
ment with Karzai’s government that
would allow roughly 8,000 U.S.
troops to stay on in Afghanistan after
that scheduled departure date.
The agreement they have tentatively
reached would allow about 15,000 for-
eign troops to remain in Afghanistan
to train and assist the fledging Afghan
military.
Since the outline was agreed, Karzai
has piled on additional conditions. He
has demanded assurances from the U.S.
that it will not interfere with Afghan
elections scheduled for next April.
The U.S., along with other Western
governments, condemned the last bal-
lot that kept Karzai in office, conclud-
ing that the ballot was not free.
Ultimately, however, the critics backed
down and Karzai stayed in office.
The Afghan president is known for
11th-hour negotiating and heavy doses
of brinkmanship. This latest gambit is
in keeping with that reputation. His
demands make plain Karzai’s desire to
present himself as the protector of
Afghan sovereignty. Any such deal has
provisions that are difficult to swal-
low. (Japanese know well that bitter
truth whenever there are questions
about the U.S. Status of Forces
Agreement.)
More important, however, is his
desire to protect the interests of his
family and friends in a post-Karzai
regime. The president has served two
terms and is constitutionally barred
from serving a third. He wants to
maintain as much influence as possible
over the next government.
Ensuring that his preferred successor
wins the April ballot is one way of
doing that. Equally helpful would be
brokering a deal with the Taliban,
which would confirm and consolidate
his status as a deal maker.
The stakes are high. The U.S. has
insisted that any deal must be signed
soon or it will pull virtually all its
troops out of Afghanistan. Those will-
ing to call Washington’s bluff need
only look at Iraq to see that the Obama
administration can hold firm and will
not put its troops at risk without an
agreement.
Karzai needs to start acting like a
president. His actions appear to be
driven by pique and the substitution of
his own interest for that of the coun-
try. He needs to put Afghanistan’s
national interest first and sign the
Bilateral Security Agreement.
Karzai balks on a deal
Philosophical
city evolution
By Herb Perez
A
ccording to the dictionary, a city is simply defined as
a center of population, commerce and culture. While
the origin of cities dates back
thousands of years, Foster City dates back
less than 50 years and yet the complexity
of our system has experienced unprece-
dented smart growth since its inception.
For more than 40 years, whether we have
realized it or not, Foster City has been
engaged in a process of “urbanization.”
Progress and grow. That’s what cities are
challenged to do on a perpetual basis. And
much like a business, it needs to continu-
ously improve on its processes, find ways to more effectively
achieve its objectives, communicate the quality of its service
offerings, protect, maintain and grow its customer base and
exceed the expectations of the market. The most profitable
businesses are those businesses that continuously provide
services or goods that people need or value and moreover,
want. Foster City is in the business of customer service and
our clients are the residents, businesses and visitors.
We as a city need to consider what we can do to improve or
build upon our reputation for customer service. If we do noth-
ing, our service level will atrophy over time and our “brand”
equity, the cache associated with living, working and playing
here, will diminish. We need to perpetually reinvent and rein-
vest in ourselves to bolster the experience economy. We must
provide high levels of service and create a culture that fosters
loyalty in all stakeholders, not just our residents.
In business, there is great effort to create and maintain such
a culture. Many books have been written about the subject,
however it can be distilled down to a simple philosophy.
Successful businesses create a culture of innovation; the
application of better solutions that meet new requirements,
unarticulated needs or existing market needs through more
effective products, programs, processes, services, technolo-
gies or ideas that are readily available to markets, govern-
ments and society.
They do so to be able to offer the greatest experience to
their customers as they know that that experience directly
translates to the health and vitality of their organization. A
good experience creates loyalty. Agreat experience creates
referrals that drive new business opportunities. Average or
negative experiences have an unequal and exponentially
opposite effect. Cities are not immune.
Residents choose to live in a city for various reasons which
manifest themselves in their experience — that perceived
quality of life. Foster City provides excellent customer serv-
ice in its departments of Police, Fire, Public Works, City
Administration, Park and Recreation and City Hall staff.
However, a city is not defined solely by what it does well but
rather by what areas it needs to improve. In recent times, clear
areas are emerging which require greater focus to provide the
level of service we know we are capable of delivering.
The philosophy of a city needs to be sharply honed so that
its governing documents reflect the policies, principles and
priorities necessary for successful operation. As we look
ahead to the next 10 years, the needs of our “customers” and
the demands placed on our own business (the city) and its
practices — the complexities associated with delivering the
services associated with managing our infrastructure and
enhancing our operating methodologies — will be taxed to a
point of diminishing returns. Arenewed commitment and
revitalized focus on “customer” satisfaction, client service
and relationship management needs to flow through all
aspects of our community development services.
I believe there currently exists a need for us to review and
better understand the policies that have guided us to date. Over
the past years, we have enjoyed great successes, however we
have experienced great challenges of late in particular areas of
our city’s operations due to outdated policy and processes,
many of which have truly outlived their useful life and which
now are having a negative impact on the customer experi-
ence.
It would be easy to blame it all on outdated ordinance struc-
tures, but that would be disingenuous. We as a city must
accept responsibility and take action to proactively; whether
it is simple modifications to ordinances and codes or creating
processes to allow for exceptions.
Perhaps this is an oversimplification of what lies ahead, but
nonetheless relevant. Much like purchasing a car or a cup of
coffee, at the end of the day, we take our business to who we
believe has our best interests at heart. Our city staff is capable
and talented. Together, we can raise the bar and achieve even
greater successes through our commitment to excellence and
service.
Herb Perez is a member of the Foster City Council. He can
be reached at 468-3143 and hperez@fostercity.org.
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By Jennifer Agiesta and
Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Americans
who already have health insurance
are blaming President Barack
Obama’s health care overhaul for
their rising premiums and
deductibles, and overall 3 in 4 say
the rollout of coverage for the
uninsured has gone poorly.
An Associated Press-GfK poll
finds that health care remains
politically charged going into
next year’s congressional elec-
tions. Keeping the refurbished
HealthCare.gov website running
smoothly is just one of Obama’s
challenges, maybe not the
biggest.
The poll found a striking level of
unease about the law among people
who have health insurance and
aren’t looking for any more gov-
ernment help. Those are the 85
percent of Americans who the
White House says don’t have to be
worried about the president’s his-
toric push to expand coverage for
the uninsured.
In the survey, nearly half of
those with job-based or other pri-
vate coverage say their policies
will be changing next year —
mostly for the worse. Nearly 4 in 5
(77 percent) blame the changes on
the Affordable Care Act, even
though the trend toward leaner cov-
erage predates the law’s passage.
Sixty-nine percent say their pre-
miums will be going up, while 59
percent say annual deductibles or
copayments are increasing.
Only 21 percent of those with
private coverage said their plan is
expanding to cover more types of
medical care, though coverage of
preventive care at no charge to the
patient has been required by the
law for the past couple of years.
Fourteen percent said coverage
for spouses is being restricted or
eliminated, and 11 percent said
their plan is being discontinued.
“Rightly or wrongly, people
with private insurance looking at
next year are really worried about
what is going to happen,” said
Robert Blendon, a professor at the
Harvard School of Public Health,
who tracks public opinion on
health care issues. “The website is
not the whole story. ”
Employers trying to control
their health insurance bills have
been shifting costs to workers for
years, but now those changes are
blamed increasingly on
“Obamacare” instead of the econo-
my or insurance companies.
Political leanings seemed to
affect perceptions of eroding cov-
erage, with larger majorities of
Republicans and independents say-
ing their coverage will be affected.
The White House had hoped that
the Oct. 1 launch of open enroll-
ment season for the uninsured
would become a teaching moment,
a showcase of the president’s phi-
losophy that government can help
smooth out the rough edges of life
in the modern economy for work-
ing people.
Instead, the dysfunctional web-
site became a parable for
Republicans and others skeptical
of government.
At the same time, a cresting
wave of cancellation notices hit
millions who buy their policy
directly from an insurer. That
undercut one of Obama’s central
promises — that you can keep
the coverage you have if you like
it. The White House never clearly
communicated the many caveats
to that promise.
Health law seen as eroding coverage
REUTERS
A man looks over the Affordable Care Act signup page on the
HealthCare.gov website.
By Charles Babington
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — People hop-
ing for a government that works
better can’t decide whether to
cheer or lament a bipartisan budg-
et bill that legislative leaders call
a breakthrough even as they
acknowledge it does little.
In an era of low expectations,
House passage of the bill marks a
rare cease-fire that should avoid a
repeat of this fall’s government
shutdown and flirtation with
default.
Yet it comes nowhere near the
more ambitious efforts to address
long-term spending and debt.
Such comprehensive plans
repeatedly collapsed in recent
years despite secret White House
talks, blue-ribbon panels, a con-
gressional “supercommittee” and
other devices and tactics.
Several Washington insiders
warn against assuming the new
budget deal will lead to progress
on immigration and other stale-
mated issues.
“The president calls it a good
first step, but to what?” said Bob
Bixby of the bipartisan Concord
Coalition, which advocates far-
reaching budget reforms. “My
fear is that it may be the end of
the search for the larger grand
bargain rather than the begin-
ning. It has that feel.”
“Grand bargain” refers to a
bipartisan accord that would start
to slow the long-term cost pro-
jections of Social Security and
Medicare while raising tax rev-
enues to lower the deficit, among
other things.
The bill that passed the House
on Thursday, and awaits Senate
action, is a tiny step forward,
Bixby said. “But you can’t get
that excited if your kid brings
home a D because it wasn’t an F, ”
he said.
Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., a
chief architect of the budget deal,
said the agreement helps “bring
some respect to the word ‘com-
promise.”’
Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin,
who represented Republicans in
negotiating the deal, expressed
hope that “the country is not
going to see these shutdowns and
Congress is going to get back to
the business of paying the bills
and prioritizing spending.”
Both Murray and Ryan were
interviewed on NBC’s “Meet the
Press.”
Some lawmakers see the glass
half full. They hope the budget
deal will cool partisan passions
in 2014 and beyond.
“Maybe it’s something we can
build on,” said Rep. Tom Cole, R-
Okla. “Success begets success,
and trust builds trust.”
One possible area of renewed
effort is a proposed immigration
overhaul. The Democratic-run
Senate passed a version this year,
but the Republican-controlled
House has stalled it.
Advocates talk of a possible
piecemeal House approach. But
Democrats and Republicans are
divided on whether millions of
immigrants living in the U.S.
illegally should be given a path
to citizenship. Some influential
lawmakers say the budget deal
doesn’t necessarily brighten
prospects elsewhere.
“I don’t see that this is a clear
channel for us to move to immi-
gration,” said Rep. Pete Sessions,
R-Texas, chairman of the House
Rules Committee. “I don’t think
that’s what this was about.”
Sessions said he hopes the
House-passed measure will stave
off future budget fights “with a
little more certainty, where we
can aim at Obamacare, and its
impact on the economy and
jobs.”
Sentiments like that suggest
Washington may return quickly
to divisive issues, most promi-
nently President Barack Obama’s
health law, which Republicans
bitterly oppose.
The budget deal eases a harsh
set of spending cuts scheduled for
2014 and 2015. But it leaves
intact most of the roughly $1 tril-
lion in automatic cuts set to hit
the military, domestic agencies
and Medicare providers through
2021.
Replacing the cuts would be
new money from, among other
things, higher airline security
fees, reductions in pension bene-
fits for working-age military
retirees, and higher pension
costs for employers and new fed-
eral workers hired after the end of
this year.
The deal does little to dent the
nation’s $17 trillion debt. It is
meant instead to halt a pattern of
lunging from one financial crisis
to the next because of Congress’
growing inclination to resist
compromise, a trend quickened by
the tea party’s rise in 2009.
Budget deal may signal era of tiny achievements
REUTERS
Senate Budget Committee chairman Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA) and House
Budget Committee chairman U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI)
depart after a news conference to introduce The Bipartisan Budget Act of
2013 at the U.S. Capitol in Washington.
C o l d w e l l
B a n k e r
R e s i d e n t i a l
B r o k e r a g e
announced that
Jul i e Fl outy,
a Realtor in the
company’s San
Mateo office,
has earned the
C o l d w e l l
Banker Previews Property
Specialist Designation.
The Coldwell Banker
Residential Brokerage Previews
marketing program is designed
specifically to market luxury resi-
dential properties to affluent buy-
ers worldwide.
Flouty has lived in Foster City
for more than 45 years.
On the move
Julie Flouty
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
RICHMOND — The Sacred Heart Prep
football team knew the names: Derik
Calhoun, Adarius Pickett, Keilan and Keith
Benjamin, all the standout, college-bound
players featured by the El Cerrito squad.
But when the final horn sounded at De
Anza High in Richmond in the Northern
California Division III championship
game Saturday, one name stood taller than
the others:
Sacred Heart Prep.
The Gators dominated from the opening
whistle and put a 42-7 beat down on El
Cerrito, shocking not only the Gauchos
(12-3) but Northern California. No one
gave the Gators much of a chance against
El Cerrito, which was one of the top-
ranked teams in Northern California.
“I knew their names,” said SHP’s Ben
Burr-Kirven, who wrecked shop on both
sides of the ball. “I hope they know mine
now. ”
Burr-Kirven essentially did it all for the
Gators in the stunning upset. He rushed for
a game-high 161 yards on 15 carries and
scored four touchdowns as the offense
churned out 364 yards of offense – 309 on
the ground.
Burr-Kirven was also the central figure
on a SHP defense that held the Gauchos to
just 228 yards of offense and season-low
for points scored. The Gators recorded
three sacks, forced a pair of fumbles and
knocked out both the Gauchos starting
quarterback as well as his backup.
See SHP, Page 17
SPORTS 12
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Fred Goodall
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TAMPA, Fla. — Colin
Kaepernick wasn’t interested in
rating his performance.
The surging San Francisco 49ers
are hitting their stride at the right
time, and that’s what really mat-
ters to the young quarterback.
Kaepernick threw touchdown
passes to Vernon Davis and
Michael Crabtree, then led a long,
clock-exhausting, fourth-quarter
drive that produced a field goal to
help the defending NFC champi-
ons pull away from the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers 33-14 on Sunday.
The third-year pro’s inconsis-
tency has been an issue this sea-
son, however he protected the
football and hurt the Bucs (4-10)
with his feet as well as his arm in
helping the 49ers extend their
winning streak to four games.
But was it his best performance?
“I don’t know,” Kaepernick said.
“It’s another win for us though.”
Davis caught a TD pass for the
fifth straight game and Michael
Crabtree scored his first TD since
returning from injury for San
Francisco (10-4). Frank Gore
rushed for 86 yards to go over
1,000 in a season for the seventh
time.
“Frank’s an amazing running
back. I feel like he’s the most
underrated running back in the
NFL. He does everything for our
offense,” Kaepernick said. “He
runs the ball. If we ask him to
block, he does it. If we ask him to
catch a pass, he does it. What he
means to this team and what he
contributes really can’t be quanti-
fied.”
Gore carried 22 times, hiking
his season rushing total to 1,017
yards.
“It’s a blessing. Ninth year in
the league. Every year I hear the
doubters, you know, ‘Can you still
do it?”’ Gore said. “I take it one
year at a time. My coaches still
believe in me. This organization
still believes in me.”
The 10-minute drive Kaepernick
led to one of Phil Dawson’s four
field goals and steadied the 49ers
after Tampa Bay pulled within 20-
14. Kendall Hunter put it well out
of reach, scooping up a fumble on
the ensuing kickoff and diving 2
yards into the end zone for a touch-
down.
Meanwhile, the 49ers moved
closer to a playoff berth. They
began the day needing a win, plus
an Arizona loss combined with a
loss or tie by Dallas or
Philadelphia to clinch a spot with
two weeks left in the regular sea-
son.
“This is when, as a team, you
want to get good, this time of
year. We’re showing people that
we’re taking steps,” Gore said.
“We still haven’t played our best
game yet, and that’s the scary
part.”
Tampa Bay closed within six
points on Mike Glennon’s TD
pass to Tim Wright on the first
play of the fourth quarter. The Bucs
(4-10) didn’t get the ball back
until Kaepernick used 17 plays to
move the 49ers 77 yards into
position for Dawson to kick a 21-
yard field goal that made it 23-14.
Kaepernick completed 19 of 29
passes for 203 yards, two touch-
downs and no interceptions. In
addition to hurting Tampa Bay
with his feet by running seven
times for 39 yards, he threw TD
passes of 4 yards to Crabtree and
52 yards to Davis, who finished
with five receptions for 79 yards.
Glennon was 18 of 34 for 179
yards, two touchdowns and one
interception. But the Bucs only
managed 39 yards rushing and
were limited to a season-low 183
total net yards.
“It’s a tough loss. Ahard-fought
game. Unfortunate the way it
ended,” Bucs coach Greg Schiano
said.
Vincent Jackson scored on an
11-yard reception to trim a 17-0
deficit to 10 points just before
halftime. Glennon’s 24-yard pass
to Wright finished a 10-play, 92-
yard drive that gave Tampa Bay
hopes of pulling an upset.
But the Niners would have none
of it.
Kaepernick kept San
Francisco’s long fourth-quarter
march going with a 12-yard pass
to Crabtree on third-and-12, then
scrambled for 10 yards on third-
and-6 for a first down at the Bucs
19. The drive eventually stalled at
the 3, where the 49ers settled for
Dawson’s kick.
Eric Page fielded the ensuing
kickoff, started up one side before
heading across the field where he
attempted to hand the ball to
Russell Shepard on a reverse.
Shepard lost the ball as he slipped
to the ground, and Hunter made a
nice to play to scoop it up on the
run and score for a 30-14 lead.
Crabtree’s return from a torn
right Achilles tendon that side-
lined him the first 11 games of the
season has given San Francisco’s
offense, last in the league passing
yardage, a lift. The speedy receiver
averaged 18 yards per reception in
his first two games back and had
five catches for 45 yards, includ-
ing his first quarter TD on Sunday.
Kaepernick set up the first score
of the game with a couple of nifty
third-down conversions, scram-
bling for 17 yards on third-and-8
on one and throwing 5 yards to
Bruce Miller on third-and-3 on the
other.
Kaepernick, 49ers rip Bucs, win 4th in a row
USA TODAY SPORTS
With a gleeful head coach behind him, Colin Kaepernick reacts to a big first down conversion in Sunday’s 33-14
win over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
SPORTS 13
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Barry Wilner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Everyone
knows how cozy the Seahawks are in
Seattle. They found another place that feels
like home, and it’s a pretty good choice
considering what the Meadowlands will
host in February.
Seattle manhandled the New York Giants
23-0 Sunday for its sixth road win, holding
the hosts to 181 yards. This is the best
Seahawks road team in their history at 6-2;
they are 6-0 at home.
Should they return to New Jersey this sea-
son, it would be for the Super Bowl.
“I do think that’s advantageous to us,”
star cornerback Richard Sherman said after
grabbing two of a career-worst five intercep-
tions thrown by Eli Manning. “Anytime
you are comfortable with a stadium and seen
a locker room and the time zone change and
the weather, it helps. You get in a routine,
get a rapport with the place you’re at.”
The Seahawks have quite a chance to be at
MetLife Stadium again if they continue to
perform the way they did against the over-
matched Giants (5-9).
“Just being human, you know about it,”
coach Pete Carroll said of the first outdoor
Super Bowl in a cold weather city. “It’s not
important now. When the time comes, if we
put ourselves in position to do that ...”
Marshawn Lynch scored on a twisting,
triple-effort 2-yard run, Steven Hauschka
kicked three field goals and Russell Wilson
toyed with New York’s defense. The second-
year quarterback ran for 50 yards, threw for
206 and a touchdown before sitting out the
last few minutes.
Wilson has 23 wins, the most for a quar-
terback in his first two seasons in the Super
Bowl era.
“It does matter,” Wilson said of the 23
victories. “Winning a lot of games is really
important. It’s what we come to do every
day, to have a championship day, have a
championship year. ”
The Seahawks (12-2) are already in the
playoffs and are closing in on the NFC West
title and their best overall record; they went
13-3 in 2005 before losing to Pittsburgh in
the Super Bowl.
New York (5-9) will be deep into its off-
By Jonathan Dalton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — Taking on the NBA’s most
prolific backcourt, Eric Bledsoe and Goran
Dragic more than held their own.
Bledsoe scored seven of his 24 points in
the fourth quarter and Dragic added 21 points
to help the Phoenix Suns hold off Stephen
Curry and the Golden State Warriors 106-102
Sunday night for their fifth straight win.
“For this game, facing one of the best 1-2
punches in the game right now, it was a chal-
lenge,” Bledsoe said. “We definitely feel
good about ourselves.”
Bledsoe added eight rebounds and eight
assists and Channing Frye added 20 for the
Suns, who snapped a six-game losing streak
against Golden State.
Curry scored 30 points, including 20 in
the second half, and Klay Thompson added
19 for the Warriors, who have lost three of
four. David Lee added 18 points and 13
rebounds for his fifth straight double-double.
“I am finding that the guys in the suit and
tie want it more than the guys in uniform,”
Warriors coach Mark Jackson said. “It’s dis-
appointing right now. We are going to be
fine, but it’s disappointing to once again
lose in the same fashion.
“We see it. Everybody sees it. But I don’t
see anybody in uniform with that same pas-
sion. Enough is enough at some point. We
are watching the same movie every single
night.”
The Warriors lost even though Curry and
Thompson bettered their 44 points-per-
game average and went a combined 6 for 11
on 3-pointers.
Seahawks lock up NFC West
Suns win 5th straight, top Warriors 106-102
SPORTS 14
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Ralph D. Russo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Famous Jameis has
replaced Johnny Football as the face of col-
lege football.
Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston
won the Heisman Trophy on Saturday night.
Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel,
last year’s winner, finished fifth in the vot-
ing and seemed to enjoy a relaxing trip to
Manhattan, playing the role of supporting
actor to Winston’s leading man.
Manziel was the first freshman to win the
Heisman, and it helped turn him into one of
the biggest celebrities in sports. Not all the
attention he got after winning the award was
good.
Winston is now the second freshman to
win the Heisman. He has a chance to lead the
top-ranked Seminoles to a national champi-
onship next month against No. 2 Auburn,
though the entire story of his season has
included an unsettling chapter.
In many ways, Manziel has been where
Winston is headed.
“Life’s going to change,” Manziel said.
“This is an extremely big deal.”
Manziel basked in the spotlight after win-
ning the Heisman and decided to live loud
and large. His road trips made headlines. His
tweets were analyzed. He got tossed from a
frat party and overslept a meeting at the
Manning Passing Academy. Real potential
trouble came when the NCAA looked into
whether he signed autographs for money.
He got off with a half-game suspension.
“There’s a lot of scrutiny if you don’t walk
a fine line,” he said. “I was a little bit
uncharacteristic, a little bit out of the box,
and I caught some flak for it. Figured it out a
little bit as the year went on and continued
to live my life and learn as I went along. It
was tough, but I had to do it.”
Manziel’s missteps seem quaint consider-
ing the allegations that Winston was fac-
i ng.
Last month, a year-old sexual assault
complaint against him became public, and
the Tallahassee Police gave the dormant
case to the state attorney’s office for a full
investigation.
A female Florida State student claimed
Winston raped her. Winston’s lawyer said
the sex was consensual. The state attorney
determined there was not enough evidence
to charge Winston, announcing that deci-
sion four days before Heisman votes were
due.
Winston says he felt vindicated, but also
acknowledged needing to grow up some.
“One thing that coach (Jimbo) Fisher has
always told me, especially through this
process: ‘For you to be a man, the kid in you
must die,”’ Winston said before winning the
Heisman on Saturday. “I believe that kid in
me has died. I’m always going to have my
personality. I’m always going to have my
character. But I have to become a man.”
Manziel said he was impressed with the
way Winston handled his business on the
field while dealing with problems away from
i t .
“I had to go through controversy and I had
to go through some things,” Manziel said.
“To see him at such a young age, to put his
head down and to focus on his teammates
and where they are and where they’re headed
... I do give him a lot of credit for that with
all the scrutiny he’s under. I feel like he’s
done a tremendous job of focusing on his
team and on his family and what matters
most.”
Johnny Football passes torch to Famous Jameis
USA TODAY SPORTS
Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston
strikes the legendary Heisman pose.
SPORTS 15
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
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EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Boston 11 14 .440 —
Toronto 9 13 .409 1/2
Brooklyn 8 15 .348 2
New York 7 16 .304 3
Philadelphia 7 18 .280 4
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 17 6 .739 —
Atlanta 12 12 .500 51/2
Charlotte 10 14 .417 7 1/2
Washington 9 13 .409 7 1/2
Orlando 7 17 .292 10 1/2
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 20 3 .870 —
Detroit 11 14 .440 10
Chicago 9 13 .409 10 1/2
Cleveland 9 14 .391 11
Milwaukee 5 19 .208 15 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 19 4 .826 —
Houston 16 9 .640 4
Dallas 14 10 .583 5 1/2
New Orleans 11 11 .500 7 1/2
Memphis 10 13 .435 9
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Portland 21 4 .840 —
Oklahoma City 19 4 .826 1
Denver 14 9 .609 6
Minnesota 12 12 .500 8 1/2
Utah 6 20 .231 15 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 16 9 .640 —
Phoenix 14 9 .609 1
Golden State 13 12 .520 3
L.A. Lakers 11 12 .478 4
Sacramento 7 15 .318 7 1/2
Sunday’sGames
ISacramento 106, Houston 91
Minnesota 101, Memphis 93
Portland 111, Detroit 109, OT
Oklahoma City 101, Orlando 98
Phoenix 106, Golden State 102
Denver 102, New Orleans 93
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 33 22 9 2 46 92 70
Montreal 35 20 12 3 43 88 75
Tampa Bay 33 19 11 3 41 90 80
Detroit 35 15 11 9 39 89 94
Toronto 34 17 14 3 37 97 99
Ottawa 34 13 15 6 32 96 111
Florida 34 12 17 5 29 78 109
Buffalo 33 7 23 3 17 55 96
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 34 23 10 1 47 105 74
Washington 33 18 12 3 39 105 97
Carolina 34 14 13 7 35 79 94
N.Y. Rangers 34 16 17 1 33 76 91
Columbus 33 14 15 4 32 85 92
Philadelphia 33 14 15 4 32 76 91
New Jersey 34 13 15 6 32 78 85
N.Y. Islanders 34 9 19 6 24 83 118
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 36 24 7 5 53 135 101
St. Louis 31 22 6 3 47 110 73
Colorado 31 21 9 1 43 88 73
Minnesota 35 19 11 5 43 81 81
Dallas 31 15 11 5 35 90 93
Nashville 33 16 14 3 35 77 92
Winnipeg 34 14 15 5 33 90 100
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 35 23 7 5 51 111 89
Los Angeles 34 22 8 4 48 94 68
San Jose 33 20 7 6 46 108 82
Vancouver 35 20 10 5 45 98 83
Phoenix 32 18 9 5 41 104 100
Calgary 33 13 15 5 31 86 106
Edmonton 35 11 21 3 25 93 120
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Sunday’sGames
Washington 5, Philadelphia 4, SO
N.Y. Rangers 4, Calgary 3, SO
Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 0
Florida 2, Montreal 1
Chicago 3, Los Angeles 1
Anaheim 3, Edmonton 2
NHL GLANCE
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 8 6 0 .571 364 349
Dallas 7 7 0 .500 393 385
N.Y. Giants 5 9 0 .357 251 357
Washington 3 11 0 .214 305 434
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 10 4 0 .714 359 270
Carolina 10 4 0 .714 328 208
Tampa Bay 4 10 0 .286 258 324
Atlanta 4 10 0 .286 309 388
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 8 6 0 .571 406 391
Detroit 7 6 0 .538 346 321
Green Bay 7 6 1 .536 353 362
Minnesota 4 9 1 .321 363 425
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Seattle 12 2 0 .857 380 205
San Francisco 10 4 0 .714 349 228
Arizona 9 5 0 .643 342 291
St. Louis 6 8 0 .429 316 324
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 10 4 0 .714 369 311
Miami 8 6 0 .571 310 296
N.Y. Jets 6 8 0 .429 246 367
Buffalo 5 9 0 .357 300 354
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Indianapolis 9 5 0 .643 338 319
Tennessee 5 9 0 .357 326 355
Jacksonville 4 10 0 .286 221 399
Houston 2 12 0 .143 253 375
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 9 4 0 .692 334 244
Baltimore 7 6 0 .538 278 261
Pittsburgh 5 8 0 .385 291 312
Cleveland 4 10 0 .286 288 362
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Denver 11 3 0 .786 535 372
x-Kansas City 11 3 0 .786 399 255
San Diego 7 7 0 .500 343 311
Oakland 4 10 0 .286 295 393
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Monday’sGame
Baltimore at Detroit, 8:40 p.m.
SCORING
G FG FT PTSAVG
Durant, OKC 22 195 201 62828.5
Anthony, NYK 23 212 145 59926.0
James, MIA 23 207 133 57625.0
Love, MIN 22 177 137 54424.7
Harden, HOU 20 150 153 49324.7
George, IND 23 190 112 55424.1
Curry, GOL 21 174 84 50123.9
Aldridge, POR 24 231 99 56123.4
Cousins, SAC 20 165 112 44222.1
Martin, MIN 22 147 128 47321.5
DeRozan,TOR 22 168 108 47121.4
Afflalo, ORL 23 171 100 49221.4
Nowitzki, DAL 23 175 100 48621.1
Westbrook, OKC 19 141 89 40021.1
Irving, CLE 23 177 90 48120.9
Ellis, DAL 24 182 117 50020.8
Thompson, GOL 24 178 52 48720.3
Griffin, LAC 25 195 109 50220.1
Lillard, POR 24 147 117 47920.0
Paul, LAC 24 157 128 47319.7
REBOUNDS
G OFF DEFTOT AVG
Love, MIN 22 87 217 30413.8
Howard, HOU 24 90 230 32013.3
Jordan, LAC 25 102 218 32012.8
Drummond, DET 24 120 184 30412.7
Aldridge, POR 24 57 203 26010.8
Cousins, SAC 20 57 158 21510.8
Griffin, LAC 25 55 205 26010.4
Thompson, CLE 23 82 148 23010.0
Ibaka, OKC 22 60 155 2159.8
Bogut, GOL 23 58 1662249.7
NFL GLANCE
@Tampa
10a.m.
FOX
12/15
vs.Atlanta
5:40p.m.
ESPN
12/23
@Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/29
Playoffs
vs. Chiefs
1:05p.m.
CBS
12/15
@Chargers
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/22
vs.Denver
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/29
@L.A.
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/19
vs.Minn.
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/12
@Nashville
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/14
@St.Louis
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/17
vs. Colo.
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/23
vs. Dallas
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/21
vs.NOLA
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/17
vs.Dallas
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/11
vs.Houston
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/13
@Phoenix
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/15
vs.Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/21
vs. Spurs
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/19
@Phoenix
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/27
@Denver
6p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/23
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA — Suspended Portland C Meyers Leonard
and Philadelphia C Daniel Orton one game after
Leonard initiated an altercation by body-slamming
Orton to the floor and Orton retaliated by elbow-
ing Leonard in the mouth during Saturday’s game.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
NHL — Suspended Winnipeg F Anthony Peluso
three games for boarding Dallas D Alex Goligoski
during Saturday’s game.
DETROITREDWINGS—RecalledRWTomasJurco
from Grand Rapids (AHL).
WASHINGTONCAPITALS — Reassigned D Nate
Schmidt to Hershey (AHL).Recalled C Michael Latta
from Hershey.
AmericanHockeyLeague
HAMILTONBULLDOGS — Assigned F Ben Duffy
to Wheeling (ECHL). Released F Scott Zurevinski
from a professional tryout contract.
Central HockeyLeague
TULSAOILERS — Signed F Matthew Kirzinger.
COLLEGE
NORTHDAKOTASTATE— Named Chris Klieman
football coach, effective at the end of the season.
TRANSACTIONS NBA LEADERS
MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. — Tom
Brady’s latest comeback bid came
up short, and the Miami Dolphins
helped their playoff chances with
a 24-20 breakthrough victory
Sunday over the AFC East-leading
New England Patriots.
Afourth-down pass from Brady
was intercepted by reserve safety
Michael Thomas, in his first
NFL game, in the end zone with
2 seconds left, and Miami held
on to win.
The Patriots had mounted sec-
ond-half rallies to win their past
three games, and Brady moved
them from their own 20 with 1:15
remaining to the Miami 14. But he
threw three consecutive incomple-
tions before Thomas sealed the
third consecutive victory for the
Dolphins (8-6), who improved to
5-2 since tackle Jonathan Martin
left the team in a bullying scandal.
VIKINGS 48, EAGLES 30
MINNEAPOLIS — Matt Cassel
passed for 382 yards and two
touchdowns and ran for another
score to lead the injury-depleted
Vikings over Philadelphia, snap-
ping the Eagles’ five-game win-
ning streak.
With Adrian Peterson and Toby
Gerhart out, Matt Asiata rushed for
the first three touchdowns of his
career and Greg Jennings caught a
career-high 11 passes for 163
yards for the Vikings (4-9-1).
Asiata ran for 51 yards on 30 car-
ries.
Nick Foles threw for 428 yards
with three touchdowns and one
interception and DeSean Jackson
had 10 catches for 195 yards and a
score for the Eagles (8-6). They
started the day with a one-game
lead over Dallas in the NFC East.
FALCONS 27, REDSKINS 26
ATLANTA — Desmond Trufant
deflected Kirk Cousins’ pass on a
potential winning 2-point con-
version with 18 seconds remain-
ing, and the Atlanta Falcons edged
the Washington Redskins.
The Falcons (4-10) scored 20
points off seven Washington
turnovers. The Redskins (3-11)
tied a team record with five lost
fumbles.
Cousins passed for 381 yards
and three touchdowns, but had
three turnovers in his first start of
the season after coach Mike
Shanahan decided to bench Robert
Griffin III. Griffin watched from
the sideline.
NFL Capsules
16
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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A. Smith returns to Bay, torches the Raiders
Former 49ers QB tosses five touchdown passes as Chiefs clinch a spot in the playoffs
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Jamaal Charles
carried the Kansas City Chiefs
straight into the playoffs with a
record performance.
Charles tied a franchise record
with five touchdowns in a game
and gained 215 yards from scrim-
mage as the Chiefs beat the
Raiders 56-31 on Sunday to clinch
at least a wild-card spot.
Alex Smith threw five TD pass-
es, going 17 for 20 for 287 yards
to make the Chiefs the fourth team
ever to make the playoffs a year
after losing at least 14 games.
Kansas City (11-3) is tied for first
place in the AFC West with Denver
but needs help to win the division
because the Broncos swept the
season series.
Matt McGloin threw four inter-
ceptions and lost a fumble while
sharing time with Terrelle Pryor as
Oakland (4-10) allowed the most
points in franchise history and
lost its fourth straight game. The
Raiders had seven turnovers over-
all.
The performance drew constant
boos from a crowd frustrated over
11 straight seasons without a win-
ning record and raise questions
about whether the Raiders are
showing enough progress in year
two under coach Dennis Allen to
convince owner Mark Davis to
keep him around for a third sea-
son.
There is not questioning the
progress the Chiefs have made in
their first year under coach Andy
Reid. He took over a 2-14 team and
authored an impressive turn-
around.
The addition of Smith to a tal-
ented roster that featured six Pro
Bowl players also helped. Charles
was one of those Pro Bowlers a
year ago but he never had a game
quite like this even though he
only rushed for 20 yards in eight
carries.
He did most of his work in the
passing game, beating blitzes
with screen passes and also hav-
ing success running patterns
downfield. He caught eight passes
for 195 yards and four touchdowns
in the third-most productive
receiving day by a running back
since the 1970 merger.
Charles also joined Shaun
Alexander, Jerry Rice and Clinton
Portis as the only players since
the merger to score five touch-
downs and gain at least 200 yards
from scrimmage in a single game.
The Chiefs built a 35-10 lead
before the Raiders scored three
straight touchdowns to make it a
game late in the third quarter. It
quickly became a blowout again.
On a third-and-1, Smith found
Charles on a wheel route down the
sideline for a completion. Charles
then cut toward the middle and
raced in for the 71-yard score that
tied Abner Haynes’ team record set
in 1961 against the Raiders with
five TDs in a game.
The Chiefs put the game away
after Taiwan Jones fumbled the
ensuing kickoff, setting up a 6-
yard TD pass to Sean McGrath that
made it 49-21.
Knile Davis’ 17-yard run mid-
way through the fourth quarter
gave the Chiefs the highest-scor-
ing game in the NFL this season
and the most points ever scored
against the Raiders, breaking the
mark of 55 last reached by
Baltimore in 2012.
The Raiders were officially elim-
inated from the playoff chase for
the 11th straight season shortly
before kickoff and played like a
team going nowhere.
The tone was set right from the
start when Quintin Demps
returned the opening kick 50
yards and Charles then took a
short pass from Smith and raced
49 yards for the score. Charles
scored on a 39-yard screen pass on
third-and-19 on the next posses-
sion.
The game quickly got out of
hand from there as Eric Berry
returned an interception 47 yards
to make it 21-3. McGloin then
fumbled a shotgun snap from
Stefen Wisniewski, setting up a 1-
yard TD run by Charles and threw
another interception to Berry that
was followed by a 16-yard screen
to Charles on the next play to
make it 35-10.
USA TODAY SPORTS
Behind Alex Smith, Kansas City put up the most points against an
Oakland Raiders football team.The old record was 55.
SPORTS 17
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The entire Gators squad was firing on
all cylinders.
“I don’t think they were prepared for
us,” Burr-Kirven said. “Everyone
played great.
“We dominated them. That’s all I can
say. ”
The win sends the Gators to the
Division III state championship game
at the Stubhub Center in Carson at
noon Saturday, where they will face
Southern California Division III
champ Corona Del Mar-Newport
Beach.
The Gators used a familiar formula to
rout the Gauchos and they showed
their hand early. SHP’s stifling
defense forced an El Cerrito three-and-
out on the first series of the game and
then the Gators’ numbingly efficient
offense drove 63 yards on seven plays
for a 7-0 lead.
“I think it was massive to get a stop
on defense and a score on offense (to
start the game),” Burr-Kirven said,
who scored from nine yards out.
The defense then forced an El Cerrito
fumble on its next drive and the Gators
offense promptly took advantage,
driving 44 yards on seven plays with
Andrew Segre, who finished with 95
yards, scoring from a yard out to put
the Gators up 14-0. Chris Lee set up
the score with a 21-yard run.
El Cerrito responded with its best
drive of the half. Starting from their
own 33, the Gauchos drove to SHP 14
before the Gators stiffened and forced
El Cerrito to turn the ball over downs.
The Gators accomplished the feat
again when they stopped the Gauchos
short of a first down on a fake punt on
their next drive. SHP took over and all
but put the game out of reach. On sec-
ond down, Burr-Kirven took a handoff
off tackle and like a locomotive,
chugged 45 yards for his second score
of the game to put the Gators up 21-0
with 2:25 to play in the first half.
“They couldn’t stop us,” said SHP
coach Pete Lavorato. “I knew they
couldn’t stop us.”
The Gators kept momentum firmly
on their side when they took the sec-
ond-half kickoff and drove 61 yards on
eight plays. Burr-Kirven ripped off a
36-yard run during the march and he
capped it with his third score of the
game from a yard out to put the Gators
up 28-0.
El Cerrito finally put it all together
on its first drive of the second half,
marching 65 yards on eight play with
Pickett scoring on a 12-yard scamper.
That score appeared to energize the
Gauchos as they forced a three-and-out
on SHP’s next possession, but the
Gator got the ball right back when
they forced El Cerrito’s second fumble
of the game at its own 44.
The Gators took advantage right
away. After picking up an initial first
down, it was Segre’s turn to make the
highlight reel. He took a handoff,
broke into space and using a quick
sidestep, left a pair of El Cerrito
defenders grasping air. By the time
Segre was taken down, the Gators had
first down at the 7 and Burr-Kirven did
the rest, scoring his fourth touchdown
of the night for a 35-7 SHP lead head-
ing into the fourth quarter.
The Gators forced a Gauchos punt on
their next possession and the offense
put the final nail in the Gauchos’ cof-
fin. Facing fourth-and-long at the El
Cerrito 47, quarterback Mason
Randall dropped back and fired a pass
deep downfield to Mitch Martella. The
El Cerrito defender tipped the ball, but
it fell right into the waiting hands of
Martella, who went the rest of the way
for a 47-yard score and 42-7 SHP lead
with 7:12 left to play.
It was a running clock from there.
“I don’t think anyone thought it
would be us running the clock,” Burr-
Kirven said.
“This is crazy. 42-7 and it wasn’t a
fluke,” Lavarato said. “I’m sure we got
a little respect. This whole area (the
North Coast Section) probably has a
little (more) respect for us.
“We’re a darn good team.”
Continued from page 11
SHP
GUY KAWASAKI/SHP SPORTS
Members of the SHP football team
celebrate with the CIF Nor Cal
championship trophy.
Local Sports Briefs
The Notre Dame-Belmont girls’ soccer team had been on
a bit of a roll — winning five straights games to start the
season.
But WCAL play is here and the Tigers are finding it hard-
er to score goals. Presentation scored twice, both in the
second half, Sunday afternoon to hand Notre Dame its first
loss of the season.
MENLO 2, BURLINGAME 0
Menlo school girls soccer team defeated Burlingame 2-0.
The first half ended in a scoreless tie. Fifteen minutes into
the second half, Amanda McFarland scored off a corner kick
from Chandler Wickers. Wickers then scored unassisted in
the 34th minute on a 25 yard shot that found the upper cor-
ner of the goal.
Schuyler Tilney-Volk had 9 saves in goal for Menlo,
earning her 2nd consecutive shutout.
The loss drops Burlingame to 1-2-1 on the season.
BOYS’ SOCCER
Menlo School is still looking for its first win of the sea-
son following a 3-1 loss to Milpitas in the final group
game of the Oak Grove Gold Cup.
The Knights’ lone goal was scored by Will Chisholm,
who turned a missed penalty kick into a score to equalize.
But the Trojans scored twice to come away with the win.
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
SERRA 65, ARAGON 51
At the Merv Harris Classic, Serra out-scored Aragon 36 to
27 in the second half to come away with a 65-51 win.
Sean Watkins scored 16 and Danny Mahoney went for
18. Toby Liebergesell led all scorers with 20.
TERRA NOVA 53, HILLSDALE 44
Tied at 12 after one quarter, the Terra Nova inched forward
in the second period and held off the Khights 53-44.
Jaylend Jones led Terra Nova scorers with 15 points.
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
Carlmont ran its record to 5-1 with a 62-22 drubbing of
Yerba Buena. Seven different Scots scored led by Anisah
Smith and her 29 points.
NOTRE DAME 38, BEREAN CHRISTIAN 27
Emma Pastorino and Kaylin O’Leary earned all-tourna-
ment team nods after the Tigers took third place at the
Valley Christian Dublin tournament.
SACRED HEART PREP 59, LINCOLN 35
Meghan Holland went off for 28 points and Riley Hemm
added 18 in a Gator victory. They were both named to the
all-tournament team.
18
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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discs, I went through a series of
lumbar epidural injections without
success. The only thing that made
the pain and spasms go away was
Spinal Decompression treatments at
Crossroads Health Center. Four years
later and I am still pain-free!
Lisa K. San Jose, 2013
I came in to Dr. Ferrigno for
lower back pain. It’s a problem
that I have had for about 10 to
15 years. I tried everything from
physiatrists, medical doctors,
doctor of osteopathy, chiropractic,
acupuncture, pain medications,
epidural injections and everything
was a temporary fx. I decided to try
the DRX therapy and I’ve gone from
an average pain level between 5/7
out of 10 all the way down to a pain
level of 1 to 2 pretty consistently.
The DRX was defnitely the only
thing that has made me feel better.
Brian G. Los Gatos CA. 2013
How Will I Know If I Qualify
for Treatment?
When you come in for a
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ask a series of questions and perform
a comprehensive examination to
determine exactly where the pain is
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If we don’t feel like we can help we
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Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
Campbell San Mateo
855-240-3472 650-231-4754
www.BayAreaBackPain.com
DATEBOOK 19
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
L
ongtime family friends recently
contacted me, weeks after losing
their beloved dog of 14 years.
Though devastated, they were ready to open
their home to another dog. And, in my
opinion, they went about it the right way.
First, they were not expecting the new dog
to be a replacement. Anew pet can definite-
ly replace the feelings we have when we
share our lives with a pet, but it’s not fair to
expect one to replace another. Next, they
decided to conduct their search together.
Though it might take more time to find the
ideal companion when two people are look-
ing — my wife and I have trouble picking a
Christmas tree — this very important,
long-term decision is more successful when
both members of a couple are involved. My
friends also had an open schedule with no
plans between now and Christmas, which
meant they had nothing but time to bond
with their new companion. They saw a
photo of an adoptable shelter dog, and
although it felt like an instant love connec-
tion, they reserved final judgment for after
an in-person meeting. When that went well,
Misha, a 1-year-old, long-haired, blond
Chihuahua mix, went to her new forever
home. Our staff explained how to introduce
a new name in case they didn’t want to keep
the name Misha. Basically, her owners say
the new name and when their little girl
makes eye contact, they give her a treat.
With more reps, she begins to associate the
new name with something positive: treats.
Next, leash training. The leash was foreign
to Misha so, as is the case with any unfamil-
iar object, introductions work best with baby
steps. Put the leash on, but don’t go for a
walk the first time. Then, put it on, but walk
around the house. Later, once this is easy,
take a short walk outside. In terms of her
diet, they stuck with the dry food Misha was
used to eating. Four-start adoption!
Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Adoption,
Behavior and Training, Education, Outreach,
Field Services, Cruelty Investigation,
Volunteer and Media/PR program areas and
staff from the new Tom and Annette Lantos
Center for Compassion.
By Jessica Herndon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Undaunted hobbits
trumped princess power at the multiplex.
Per studio estimates Sunday, Warner
Bros. “Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug”
was No. 1 at the weekend box office with
$73.7 million, besting last weekend’s
No. 1 film, Disney’s animated fable
“Frozen.”
Melting down to the No. 2 position,
“Frozen” earned $22.2 in its third week-
end, bringing its impressive overall
domestic ticket total to nearly $164.4
million.
Despite its first place position,
“Hobbit” fell short of topping its pre-
quel’s debut. “The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey,” which opened this same week-
end last year, gained $84.6 million.
“’Hobbit’ rules this date and Warner
Bros. has linked this brand to this time of
year very effectively,” said box-office
analyst Paul Dergarabedian of Rentrak.
“We had an excellent weekend,” said
Dan Fellman, president of domestic dis-
tribution at Warner Bros. “Of course, it
could have been a little better, but the
weather back East was really tough last
night and probably took a couple million
dollars out of my pocket. But our box
office will survive. We are right on target
to do very similar numbers to the last
‘Hobbit,’ which grossed a $1 billion
worldwide (overall).”
Lionsgate’s holiday-themed “Tyler
Perry’s a Madea Christmas” came in third
place with $16.2 million.
“All of the Tyler Perry movies have
done in that $20 million plus range, but
the weather was a factor in some of the
performances of these films,” said
Dergarabedian.
Another Lionsgate film, “The Hunger
Games: Catching Fire,” earned $13.2 mil-
lion for the fourth place slot. To date
“Catching Fire” has grossed $739.9 mil-
lion, surpassing the worldwide box office
total for “The Hunger Games,” which
brought in $691 million.
Disney’s super hero sequel, “Thor: The
Dark World,” continues to thrive as it
remained in the top five with $2.7 mil-
lion, bringing its domestic total to
$198.1 million.
In its second weekend, Relativity
Media’s redemption drama “Out of the
Furnace,” starring Christian Bale and
Casey Affleck, dropped to the sixth place
position with $2.3 million after opening
in the third place slot.
Disney’s comedy “Delivery Man,” with
Vince Vaughn as the lead, dropped in at
No. 7 in its fourth weekend at the box
office with $1.9 million, bringing its
domestic total to $28 million.
The Weinstein Co. ’s “Philomena, ”
starring Judi Dench, who received a best-
actress Golden Globe Awards nomination
for her performance as a nun in search of
her son, landed in the No. 8 spot at the
weekend box office with $1.8 million.
In its sixth weekend at the box office,
Fox’s Nazi Germany-set “The Book
Thief,” starring Emily Watson, Geoffrey
Rush and Sophie Nelisse, held the ninth
position with $1.7 million.
Coming in at No. 10 was the Jason
Statham and James Franco-starring Open
Road crime thriller “Homefront,” which
gained $1.6 million in its third weekend.
Its total domestic gross is now $18.4 mil-
l i on.
Opening in limited release in just six
locations, David O. Russell’s con artist
tale, “American Hustle,” scored $690,000
over the weekend. This aces the success of
his Oscar-winning film “Silver Linings
Playbook,” which saw $27,687 during its
opening weekend in
December of 2012.
“American Hustle,” featur-
ing stellar performances
by Christian Bale, Bradley
Cooper, Amy Adams and
Jennifer Lawrence, has
been nominated for seven
Golden Globe Awards and two Screen
Actors Guild nominations.
With just a few weeks left in the year for
moviegoers to populate the multiplex,
the wide selection of impressive films
fares well for eclipsing 2012’s $10.8 bil-
lion box office record, said
Dergarabedian.
The top 10 movies at U.S. and Canadian
theaters Friday through Monday, followed
by distribution studio, gross, number of
theater locations, average receipts per
location, total gross and number of weeks
in release, as compiled Monday by
Rentrak, are:
1.“Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug,”
$73.7 million.
2.“Frozen,” $22.2 million.
3.“Tyler Perry’s a Madea Christmas,”
$16 million.
4.“Hunger Games: Catching Fire,”
$13.2 million.
5.“Thor: The Dark World,” $2.7 mil-
l i on.
6.“Out of the Furnace,” $2.3 million.
7.“Delivery Man,” $1.9 million.
8.“Philomena,” “$1.8 million.
9.“The Book Thief,” $1.7 million.
10.“Homefront,” $1.6 million.
‘Hobbit’ box office elite with $73.7M
REUTERS
Cast and crew members pose for photographers at the premiere of the film ‘The Hobbit:
The Desolation of Smaug’ in Los Angeles.
20
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Introductory 1-hour custom massage
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and operated. Franchise opportunities available. ©2013 Massage Heights, LLC.
Massage Heights San Mateo
650.488.6881
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San Mateo, CA 94403
LINDA YELNICK/SCHOOLOFROCK.COM
School of Rock Music Director Aldo Noboa gives a
curtain call after last weekend's shows at the San Mateo
B Street location. The shows featured a Radiohead
versus Foo Fighters performance.
Holiday train
Marco and Asusena Aguilar, of San Carlos, gave birth
to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Nov. 28, 2013.
Cameron Conti and
Andrea Santa, of Redwood
City, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
Dec. 1, 2013.
Thomas and Rebecca Marinos, of San Bruno, gave birth
to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Dec. 2,
2013.
David and Christina Hsu, of Foster City, gave birth to a
baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Dec. 3, 2013.
Herbert Pfennig and Mariela Pfennig-Mahmud, of
Redwood City, gave birth to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Dec. 3, 2013.
Caleb and Sylvia Peters, of Redwood City, gave birth to
a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Dec. 4, 2013.
Michael and Angela Nakanishi, of Redwood City, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City on
Dec. 4, 2013.
Carl Landers and Carol Dirig, of Redwood City, gave birth
to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Dec. 4, 2013.
Mason and Amy Gildro y, of Pacifica, gave birth to a
baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City Dec. 4, 2013.
Xiang Li and Lidan Huang, of Foster City, gave birth
to a baby girl Dec. 4, 2013.
Assaf Caitlin Henig, of Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby girl Dec. 4, 2013.
TOM JUNG
On Saturday, Dec. 14, Warrior Canine Connection held its "Winter
Wooferland" at the Veterans Administration Menlo Park Welcome
Center. The event included training demonstrations, craft projects, a
service dog "meet and greet", and entertainment by Heroes' Voices, an
organization providing veteran outreach through music. Here Huff, a
Warrior Canine Connection service dog,relaxes in the snow-covered play
area created for the event. Created in 2011, Warrior Canine Connection
uses its dog-training program to provide a safe, effective,
non-pharmaceutical intervention to help treat the symptoms of
post-traumatic stress (PTS) and traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Caltrain Community Relations Officer Tasha
Bartholomew takes a picture with Santa and Mrs.Claus
during the Caltrain HolidayTrain ride Dec. 7. Decorated
with 60,000 lights, the Holiday Train provided
entertainment at nine Caltrain stations on Dec. 7 and
8.The MarinesToys for Tots program and the Salvation
Army collected thousands of toy donations for local
children during the event.The Holiday Train,sponsored
by the Silicon Valley Community Foundation,has been
a local tradition since 2001.
Winter wooferland
School of rock
STATE 21
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXAMINATIONS
and
TREATMENT
of
Di seases & Di sorders
of t he Eye
EYEGLASSES
and
CONTACT LENSES
DR. ANDREW C. SOSS
OD, FAAO
GLAUCOMA
STATE BOARD CERT
1159 BROADWAY
BURLINGAME
650- 579- 7774
Provi der for VSP and most maj or medi cal
i nsurances i ncl udi ng Medi care and HPSM
www. Dr- AndrewSoss. net
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA ROSA — The first time
marijuana growers in Mendocino
and Humboldt counties gathered to
compare crops a decade ago, it was
an underground, end-of-harvest
celebration open only to a small
number of cannabis cognoscenti.
In a sure sign of the sizable role
marijuana has come to play in
California’s agricultural economy,
this year’s Emerald Cup — a com-
petition for organic pot farmers
who grow outdoors instead of
under powerful lights — was held
at the Sonoma County
Fairgrounds.
Hundreds of people gathered
there over the weekend to shop for
high-end seeds and hand-blown
pipes and to sample some of the
316 entries at the smoking area
open to those with a doctor’s rec-
ommendation for medical marijua-
na, The Press Democrat of Santa
Rosa reported.
Only weed that was grown
organically in the sun and hashish
cured without chemicals were eligi-
ble for the contest. A panel of
judges, including buyers for med-
ical marijuana dispensaries and
veteran growers, was expected to
announce the winners Sunday.
“The fact that Sonoma County
Fairgrounds is opening and wel-
coming to the medical cannabis
community and helping patients
come into the mainstream is a tes-
tament to the acceptance of
cannabis as medicine,” said
Sebastopal Mayor Robert Jacob,
the executive director of two med-
ical marijuana dispensaries and as
of earlier this month, the first
mayor in the nation to come from
the industry.
The Emerald Cup is named for
California’s “Emerald Triangle” —
a nickname attached to Humboldt,
Mendocino and Trinity counties
two generations ago because of
their reputations for producing
top-notch marijuana. As competi-
tion has surfaced from indoor
growers who can outwit the weath-
er with artificial lights, automatic
watering systems and growth-
maximizing chemicals, the Cup
founder has promoted the event as
a way to keep the spotlight on out-
doors cultivation.
“We never thought of it as a
branded name, something com-
mercial,” Tim Blake told the Press-
Democrat. “But now we’re proud of
it. We stand for integrity, we stand
for organic, sustainably grown
medicine.”
Ben Stone, director of the
Sonoma County Economic
Development Board, said marijua-
na has joined wine grapes as an
important cash crop and source of
economic activity in the county.
“I can’t say if it’s good or bad,
but it shows there’s a business
there,” Stone said.
Although California in 1996
became the first state to legalize
medical marijuana, its reputation
as the nation’s pot paradise was
eclipsed last year when voters in
Colorado and Washington passed
initiatives legalizing sales for
adult recreational use. At least
three initiatives that would try to
do the same in California have
been submitted to the Secretary of
State for the November 2014 bal-
lot, although some activists think
it might make more sense to wait
until 2016.
A Field Poll released last week
found that 55 percent of voters sur-
veyed favor legalizing marijuana
use for adults.
“Considering people were going
to jail for serious terms for an
eighth-ounce of weed in the past
decade, this marks a huge turning
point in society,” Emerald Cup
spokesman Josh Gates said of the
event. “The reality of the situation
is people smoke pot, grow pot.
It’s not going away. ”
Sonoma fairgrounds plays host to pot contest
Coastal swell brings
large waves, rip tides
Anyone heading to Bay Area
beaches on Sunday and Monday
should keep an eye on the ocean, as
a coastal swell is expected to bring
big waves and rip currents to the
regional coastline.
The National Weather Service
issued a beach hazards statement for
Northern California beaches from
Sonoma County to Monterey, say-
ing coastal spots could see waves
between six to eight feet high and
breaking around 17 seconds apart,
according to the weather service.
The westerly swell could produce
sneaker waves and strong tides,
posing a potential risk to beachgo-
ers and people fishing from shore-
line rocks or jetties the weather
service said.
The beach hazards statement will
be in effect through Monday after-
noon.
Four arrested for
alleged drunken driving
Four people were arrested Friday
for allegedly driving under the influ-
ence of alcohol or drugs during San
Mateo County’s Avoid the 23
Winter Holiday Anti-DUI crack-
down.
That number is down from 13 DUI
arrests that occurred during the same
time in 2012, according to Avoid
the 13 officials.
There were no deaths attributed to
drunken drivers either year on that
date.
Fallen horseback
rider rescued near stables
Firefighters rescued a horseback
rider and horse in Daly City
Saturday afternoon, according to
officials.
Crews were called to 2152
Olympic Way, near the Mar Vista
Stable, shortly after 4:30 p.m. on a
report of a cliff rescue, officials
said.
They found a horse back rider who
had been thrown from a horse, with
the horse then falling on to the
rider, fire officials said.
The rider was treated at the scene
by paramedics and brought up to an
ambulance using a rescue basket,
for transport to a local hospital.
Local briefs
By Gregory Katz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — Known on the one
hand for his starring role in
“Lawrence of Arabia,” leading
tribesmen in daring attacks across
the desert wastes, and on the other
for his headlong charges into
drunken debauchery, Peter O’Toole
was one of the most magnetic,
charismatic and fun figures in
British acting.
O’Toole, who died Saturday at
age 81 at the private Wellington
Hospital in London after a long
bout of illness, was nominated a
record eight times for an Academy
Award without taking home a sin-
gle statue.
He was fearsomely handsome,
with burning blue eyes and a pen-
chant for hard living which long
outlived his decision to give up
alcohol. Broadcaster Michael
Parkinson told Sky News televi-
sion it was hard to be too sad about
his passing.
“Peter didn’t leave much of life
unlived, did he?” he said.
Areformed — but unrepentant —
hell-raiser, O’Toole long suffered
from ill health. Always thin, he
had grown wraithlike in later
years, his famously handsome face
eroded by years of outrageous
drinking.
But nothing diminished his
flamboyant manner and candor.
“If you can’t do something will-
ingly and joyfully, then don’t do
it,” he once said. “If you give up
drinking, don’t go moaning about
it; go back on the bottle. Do. As.
Thou. Wilt.”
O’Toole began his acting career
as one of the most exciting young
talents on the British stage. His
1955 “Hamlet,” at the Bristol Old
Vic, was critically acclaimed.
International stardom came in
David Lean’s “Lawrence of
Arabia.” With only a few minor
movie roles behind him, O’Toole
was unknown to most moviegoers
when they first saw him as T.E.
Lawrence, the mythic British
World War I soldier and scholar
who led an Arab rebellion against
the Turks.
His sensitive portrayal of
Lawrence’s complex character gar-
nered O’Toole his first Oscar nom-
ination, and the spectacularly
photographed desert epic remains
his best known role. O’Toole was
tall, fair and strikingly handsome,
and the image of his bright blue
eyes peering out of an Arab head-
dress in Lean’s film was unforget-
table.
Playwright Noel Coward once
said that if O’Toole had been any
prettier, they would have had to
call the movie “Florence of
‘Lawrence of Arabia’ star
Peter O’Toole dead at 81
DATEBOOK
22
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
MONDAY, DEC. 16
Coping with the Holidays: How to
Deal with Stress and Joy. Noon.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. Discussion will
be led by the Rev. Tom Harshman,
director of Spiritual Care and
Mission Integration and Sequoia
Hospital. A healthy snack will be pro-
vided. For more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Maker Monday: Make Food. 3:30
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Class provid-
ed by Nicole Gimmillaro of
Moveable Feast by Nicole. Ages 12 to
19. Supplies included. For more
information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Pet photos with Santa. 6 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. Serramonte Center, 3
Serramonte Center, Daly City.
Dance Connection with Nob Hill
Sounds. Free dance lessons 6:30
p.m.-7 p.m. and open dance 7 p.m.-
9:30 p.m.Burlingame Woman’s Club,
241 Park Road, Burlingame. Annual
Christmas Ball, a fun evening of
dance and camaraderie. Bring a ‘new
first-time man’ and earn free entry
for yourself. Only one free entry per
new dance. Male dance hosts get
free admission. Admission $8 mem-
bers, $10 guests. Light refreshments.
For more information call 342-2221.
TUESDAY, DEC. 17
San Mateo County Newcomers
Club Luncheon. Noon. Wedgewood
Banquet Room, Crystal Springs Golf
Course, 6650 Golf Course Drive,
Burlingame. Bring unwrapped toys.
RSVP deadline was Wed., Dec. 11. For
more information call 477-2562.
Teen Study Hall. 3:30 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Ages 12 to 19. For more
information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 18
Shop Whole Foods Market San
Mateo 5 percent Day to benefit
Samaritan House. 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Whole Foods Market, 1010 Park
Place, San Mateo. Free. For more
information email marcy@samari-
tanhousesanmateo.org.
Twitter and YouTube information
session. 10:30 a.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Previous computer and
internet skills recommended. For
more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
4th Ave., San Mateo. Admission is
free, but lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation call 430-6500 or go to san-
mateoprofessionalalliance.com.
Christmas Tours. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Plymire-Schwarz House Museum,
519 Grand Ave., S. San Francisco. For
more information call 875-6988.
Teen Movie: ‘Fast & Furious 6.’ 3:30
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Popcorn will
be served. Rated PG-13. Ages 12 to
19. For more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Las Posadas. 6 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library Oak Room, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. Come to a library
program that celebrates a Latin
American cultural tradition for the
whole family with a candlelight pro-
cession, music, refreshments, stories
and crafts. Free. For more informa-
tion call 522-7838.
The Delta Wires (Club Fox Blues
Jam). 7 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $5 per per-
son. For more information call 877-
435-9849 or go to www.clubfoxr-
wc.com.
The Nutcracker. 7 p.m. Carrington
Hall, Sequoia High School, 1201
Brewster Ave., Redwood City. $25 for
adults and $15 for children. For more
information go to peninsuladancea-
cademy.com.
Holiday Songs and Stories. 7 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. Free. For more
information email conrad@smcl.org.
David Hockney: A Bigger
Exhibition Art Docent Lecture. 7
p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Part of the Millbrae Library
de Young Museum Docent Program.
Free. For more information call 697-
7607.
THURSDAY, DEC. 19
San Mateo AARP Chapter 139
Christmas Luncheon. Noon. San
Mateo Elks Club, 229 W. 20th Ave.,
San Mateo. John Siracusa will per-
form Christmas songs. Free. For more
information call Barbara at 345-
5001.
Movies for School Age Children:
Polar Express. 3:30 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
call 522-7838.
Holiday Jazz Cabaret featuring
Jackie Gage, Kay Kostopoulos and
Frances Fon. 7:30 p.m. Club Fox,
2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $15
per person. For more information
call 877-435-9849 or go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
FRIDAY, DEC. 20
Keeping your emotional bearings
during the holidays. 7:30 a.m. to
8:30 a.m. Crystal Springs Golf Course
- Wedgewood Room, 6650 Golf
Course Drive, Burlingame. Dr. Mark
Howard will be speaking on how to
cope with one’s emotions during the
holiday season. This event is spon-
sored by the Rotary Club of San
Mateo. $15 includes breakfast. For
more information call 515-5891.
Christmas Party with Dancing
with the “Swing Shift” Band. 10:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road.
There will be a ham lunch. $5. For
more information call 616-7150.
Annual LEGO Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. The Museum
of American Heritage (MOAH), The
Bay Area LEGO User Group (BayLUG)
and Bay Area LEGOTrain Club
(BayLTC) are co-hosting the 2013/14
LEGO Holiday display at MOAH.
Enjoy a variety of LEGO creations
made by members of the club, fea-
turing train layouts, Bay Area land-
marks, castles, miniature cities, sculp-
tures and more. Admission is $2.
Exhibit runs through Jan. 19 on
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.
Salsa Spot with Grupo Mazacote.
8 p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $15 per person. For
more information call 877-435-9849
or go to www.clubfoxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, DEC. 21
Hardly Strictly Blue Oaks. 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Bill and Jean Lane
Education Center at Edgewood Park,
6 Old Stage Coach Road, Redwood
City. Free. For more information
email scostabatis@redwoodcity.org.
Annual LEGO Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. The Museum
of American Heritage (MOAH), The
Bay Area LEGO User Group (BayLUG)
and Bay Area LEGOTrain Club
(BayLTC) are co-hosting the 2013/14
LEGO Holiday display at MOAH.
Enjoy a variety of LEGO creations
made by members of the club, fea-
turing train layouts, Bay Area land-
marks, castles, miniature cities, sculp-
tures and more. Admission is $2.
Exhibit runs through Jan. 19 on
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.
Christmas Tours. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Plymire-Schwarz House Museum,
519 Grand Ave., S. San Francisco. For
more information call 875-6988.
Bay Pointe Ballet’s ‘Nutcracker.’ 4
p.m. San Mateo Performing Arts
Center. 600 N. Delaware St., San
Mateo. Enjoy the best ‘Nutcracker’ on
the Peninsula! $30 to $60. For more
i n f o r m a t i o n
www.baypointeballet.org.
‘Portraits of Christmas.’ 7 p.m.
Crystal Springs Theatre, 2145 Bunker
Hill Drive, San Mateo. Presented by
the Crystal Springs Players. A series
of vignettes to explore Christmas
and its meaning; dessert potluck fol-
lows. Free.
Free Christmas Play. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Crystal Springs United Methodist
Church, 2145 Bunker Hill Drive, San
Mateo. Free. For more information
call 345-2381.
Elvin Bishop (Two Full Sets). 8 p.m.
Club Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood
City. $25 per person. For more infor-
mation call 877-435-9849 or go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
SUNDAY, DEC. 22
A Christmas Music Celebration.
10:30 a.m. Calvary Lutheran Church,
401 Santa Lucia Ave., Millbrae. Free.
For more information call 588-2840.
Annual LEGO Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. The Museum
of American Heritage (MOAH), The
Bay Area LEGO User Group (BayLUG)
and Bay Area LEGOTrain Club
(BayLTC) are co-hosting the 2013/14
LEGO Holiday display at MOAH.
Enjoy a variety of LEGO creations
made by members of the club, fea-
turing train layouts, Bay Area land-
marks, castles, miniature cities, sculp-
tures and more. Admission is $2.
Exhibit runs through Jan. 19 on
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.
Bay Pointe Ballet’s ‘Nutcracker.’ 2
p.m. San Mateo Performing Arts
Center. 600 N. Delaware St., San
Mateo. Enjoy the best ‘Nutcracker’ on
the Peninsula! $30 to $60. For more
i n f o r m a t i o n
www.baypointeballet.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Thursday night, according to a closed
session agenda item. McManus con-
firmed the Burlingame address is being
considered for a new district office.
Other interested parties are also look-
ing at the space though, she said.
“It’s centrally located and provides
flexibility,” she said.
Because of certain restrictions
under the state’s Field Act, the dis-
trict has taken a 1240 Bayshore
Highway ECC International corpo-
ration’s offices off the table for the
Peninsula High School relocation
because of its proximity to Highway
101 and San Francisco International
Airport. The district has also been
involved in talks about parcels not
on the market for the high school.
The district is still in the develop-
mental stage of the process,
McManus said.
“In the next couple months, the
board is going to make a decision,”
McManus said. “We’re trying to fig-
ure out what economically makes
most sense and what is best for the
students. There continues to be a lot
of open discussion because the
board wants to make the right deci-
sion. It’s such a big decision.”
Some school board members wish
the process was moving along
quicker.
“I would have liked to meet the
October deadline,” said Trustee Marc
Friedman. “Hopefully, we can wrap
it up in the next month or so.
There’s no reason to go on much
longer. ”
Board President Linda Lees Dwyer
agreed with Friedman, preferring
more progress faster and noting the
district only has so much money to
spend on purchasing land and build-
ing a new school.
“We need to push more quickly, ”
she said. “Peninsula is fine now, it’s
worked for years, along with the
buses. We have to take a hard look
to rebuild up at Peninsula and make
sure all options are explored as part
of the process.”
Lees Dwyer even suggested look-
ing at bringing the adult school,
currently housed next to San Mateo
High School in San Mateo, up to
Peninsula’s current San Bruno loca-
tion and creating joint programs
with Skyline College. She ques-
tioned whether the district is serv-
ing the San Bruno community as
well as it could.
“There’s t ransport at i on, t he
buses, at no cost,” she said. “The
parents need to make sure they (stu-
dents) take it.”
Meanwhile, Trustee Peter Hanley
agreed with McManus that the
process is moving along and the
district is trying to do a diligent
search.
“There’s just not a lot of available
property along the Peninsula we
could find for a school,” he said.
“We thought we would be able to
come back around October with a
decision, but we didn’t feel we could
at the time.”
Peninsula High School students
seek out the alternative school for a
variety of reasons, one of which
may be the need for a new environ-
ment. One option, locating the
school on the San Mateo High
School campus, drew criticism by
some in the community and concern
by some law enforcement officials.
Renovating the current location is
an option, but district officials have
said it is far away from many stu-
dents’ homes.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
SCHOOL
June 2015 and White said if the rela-
tionship continues — as all involved
seem to anticipate it will — the sepa-
rated duties of the two buildings would
actually keep down the cost of a new
shelter because it wouldn’t need to
replicate some areas such as adoption
or long-term animal housing.
Where the Lantos facility is very
focused on aesthetics to encourage
adoption, White said a new county
shelter would be more utilitarian and
practical in nature. Take, for
instance, what White is most excited
about potentially including in a new
shelter — a system to deliver disin-
fecting and cleaning chemicals
through a tube to where the techni-
cians are so they don’t need to drag
them out and mix by hand.
PHS has no official say in the
shelter as it is a county project but is
serving voluntarily as a consultant.
White, who has three facility builds
under his belt including the
Burlingame center, said shelter
designs are complicated and must
consider a broad range of factors.
Good air flow to prevent disease.
Volunteer access versus security.
Duration of animal stays. The range
of species. Exercise needs.
Only a half-dozen architects have
even designed shelters and the
amount of pipes and electrical work
alone can be daunting which why it
is so expensive per square foot,
White said.
Although a shovel is far from in
the ground, the plan currently calls
for San Mateo County to pick up the
construction price tag and own the
33,500-square-foot building. The
county’s 20 cities which contract
SPCA/PHS for animal control serv-
ices would then lease the building
from the county. The lease would
cover a portion of the construction
costs and ongoing maintenance,
said Environmental Health Director
Dean Peterson.
Discussions with the cities about
financing are still in the initial
stage, said Deputy County Manager
Petty Jensen.
Each city’s share would be prorated
based on a formula which includes
its level of use, she said.
Although hopes for a new shelter
have been mulled for years, Peterson
said the county committed its inter-
est about a year ago when Public
Works inspected the existing build-
ing and decided an entire overhaul
was more appropriate than a renova-
tion. The county issued a request for
proposals about six months ago and
Peterson said the possible firms
have been whittled down to three.
The price tag is estimated at most
$20 million but could be as low as
$13 million, Peterson said.
Construction would be phased so
that the existing shelter can continue
operating as the new facility is being
built at the same location.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
SHELTER
COMICS/GAMES
12-16-13
WEEKEND’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 14 and up, for short
4 Lose color
8 RCA products
11 Rank above maj.
12 Protection
13 Hive worker
14 Hurdles
16 Santa — winds
17 Debating
18 Showery time
20 Bride’s title
21 Iris locale
22 Catty remark
25 Sheens
29 Morays and congers
30 Tolstoy title word
31 Sinbad’s transport
32 Opposite of post-
33 Chapel vow (2 wds.)
34 Port near Kilauea
35 Swear under oath
38 Gem surface
39 Melancholy
40 Fleur-de- —
41 Fear
44 More spiteful
48 Want ad letters
49 Early locomotive (2 wds.)
51 Pale
52 Like twilight
53 LIkely
54 Almost-grads
55 Gaelic singer
56 PBS “Science Guy”
DOWN
1 NCAA Bruins
2 Gardener, often
3 Banner
4 Plants with fronds
5 Excited
6 Burrow
7 Literary works
8 Ski lift (hyph.)
9 —, vidi, vici
10 Performing mammal
12 Burning
15 Some shoes
19 Pup, often
21 Franc’s replacer
22 Equinox mo.
23 Wolf lead-in
24 Cousteau’s islands
25 “The — of the Lake”
26 Mr. Clapton
27 Movie part
28 Highlander
30 Spouse
34 Must (2 wds.)
36 PanAm rival, once
37 Cloud-seeding compound
38 Suspicious
40 Sri —
41 Grass droplets
42 Caboose’s place
43 Time periods
44 Snoopy
45 Where Tehran is
46 Glimpse from afar
47 Nerve network
50 Hurry
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2013
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — You may get an
opportunity to meet people who can help you reach
your career goals. You’ll need to mount a massive
charm offensive if you want to bolster your reputation.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Your moodiness
and changing attitudes may alienate you from friends
and family. Be careful what you say. Try to avoid
being controversial, and make amends quickly before
a situation spins out of control.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Avoid getting caught
up in details. Maintaining a general overview of a
situation should do for now. Your time is better spent
reading or meeting up with friends and colleagues
who provide mental stimulation.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Traveling or group
activities will foster new partnerships. Avoid investing
in moneymaking schemes. Be sure to consult with a
financial adviser before you open your wallet.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Seek a promotion
or a more lucrative position at work. Be wary of
competition — peers may try to make you look bad.
If you take special care to avoid being criticized,
affairs will work out well.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Now is not the time
to worry about your personal life. Focus on your
professional goals, and you’ll be amazed by what
you can accomplish.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — If you get out and meet
like-minded people, you could expand your network
of friends. It is also a very good time to consider
expanding your family or circle of loved ones.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Opportunities for
partnerships abound among the right people. Now is
the time to make a difference through involvement
in humanitarian ventures. Take a measured, rational
approach when dealing with children.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Your work rather than home
life is where you will shine most right now, so focus
your energy there. But don’t neglect your domestic
responsibilities entirely — try to maintain a balance.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Plan to travel, whether
for business or pleasure. Self-improvement efforts will
make you feel good and boost your aesthetic appeal.
Make decisions while free from outside influence.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Pay attention to nutrition,
as unwanted weight gain is likely at this time. Maintain
a healthy and active routine. You can take control if
you pay attention and are willing to work at it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Close friends and
relatives may steer you in the wrong direction
regarding a sensitive situation. Keep in mind that
it is you who must endure the consequences of
your actions.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 23
THE DAILY JOURNAL
24
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
º work well with others
º Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
º A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CLUB SPORTS
COORDINATOR
$3000-$4400 monthly
BA/BS Recreation,
Sports Management
2 years related experience in recrea-
tion, intramural,
college club sports program
Supervisory experience required
Apply to:
http://www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp/
CUSTOMER CONTACT -
OUTSIDE POSITION
FULL TIME/PART TIME
$15.62 per hour start
to $35 per hour
with bonuses
Full training and expenses
Mr. Connors (650)372-2810
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
INSPECTOR / HOME -
DO YOU HAVE
A LADDER?
DRAW A DIAGRAM?
USE A TAPE MEASURE?
CAMERA?
Full training, to do inspections
for our 28 year old company.
Good pay. And expenses.
Mr. Inez, (650)372-2813
HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED -
\San Mateo. Cleaning, washing, prepare
for meal (no cooking), take care of whole
house. $20 per hour, 2-3 hours per day,
5pm-7pm. Send resume by mail: Attn:
Connie, 3130-3132 Diablo Ave, Hayward
CA 94545.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
OPERATIONS
ASSISTANT I
$2700 - $4000 monthly
Excellent Benefits
High School Diploma or GED
General custodial services,
event and conference
assistance
Apply to:
www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp/
OPERATIONS
ASSISTANT II
$2700 - $4000 monthly
Excellent Benefits
High School Diploma or GED
General custodial services,
event and conference
assistance
Supervisory experience required
Apply to:
www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp/
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Howard W. Harrington
Case Number: 123997
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Howard W. Harrington.
A Petition for Probate has been filed by
Ellen B. Harrington in the Superior Court
of California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Ellen
B. Harrington be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
25 Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: January 15, 2014 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
R. Hollis Elliott 33805
841 Menlo Ave.
MENLO PARK, CA 94025
(650)321-8460
Dated: December 13, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on December 16, 23, 30, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
210 Lost & Found
295 Art
ART: 5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”,
signed Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all.
650-345-3277
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! (650)430-6556
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
(650)430-6556
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL REFRIGERATOR great for of-
fice or studio apartment . Good condition
$40.00 (650)504-6058
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 (650)591-3313
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, (650)787-8600
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 RARE Volumes of Lewis & Clark Expe-
dition publish 1903 Excellent condition,
$60 Both, OBO, SOLD
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., SOLD
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
MAHJONG SET 166 tiles in case good
condition $35.00 call 650-570-602
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TONKA EXCAVATOR, two arms move,
articulated,only $22 (650)595-3933
300 Toys
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BOX FULL TOYS Original Pkg., 40’s -
50’s, $90 for all (650)365-3987
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 SOLD
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER, mint condition, Photo
Smart, print, view photos, documents,
great for cards, $25.00 SOLD
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
NIKON FG SLR body w 3 Vivitar zoom
lenses 28-70mm. 28-219 & 85-205, Ex-
cell Xond $ 99 (650)654-9252
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SAMSUNG, FLAT screenTV, 32” like
new! With Memorex DVD player, $185
(650)274-4337
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
303 Electronics
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(SOLD
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO (650)515-2605
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINNING ROOM table with chairs excel-
lent condition like new. $99.00 (650)504-
6058
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50 SOLD
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
END TABLES 2 Cabinet drum style ex-
cellent condition $90 OBO (650)345-
5644
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $200 OBO
(650)368-6674
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
304 Furniture
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $85
RETAIL $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, SOLD
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable
coast $600.00 sacrifice $80.00
(650)504-6058
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 SOLD
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72” tall x 13”
wide, $20 (650)591-3313
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
TWINE BED including frame good con-
dition $45.00 (650)504-6058
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. (650)322-2814
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GAS STOVE - Roper, Oven w 4 Burners,
good condition $95 (650)515-2605
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO SOLD!01976533
26
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
306 Housewares
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
MONOPOLY GAME - rules, plastic real
estate, metal counters, all cards and pa-
per money $10 (650)574-3229
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 (650)368-0748
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW 18VOLT Drill/Driver w/ light,
warranty, only $29.99 (650)595-3933
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
16 BOOKS on Histoy if WWII Excllent
condition $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
310 Misc. For Sale
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BALANCING SANTA, Mint condition,
Santa rocks back/forth, 20 in high, sturdy
metal, snowman, chimney, $12.00
(650)578-9208
BLACK LEATHER Organizer, Unop-
ened, Any Year, Cell Holder, Wallet, Cal-
ender., In Box $12 (650)578-9208
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRIC IMPACT wrench sockets
case warranty $39.95 (650)595-3933
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FRONT LOADER, bucket & arm move,
articulated $12.50 (650)595-3933
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
310 Misc. For Sale
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX BATH TOWELS(3) 26"x49",
watermelon color $15 (650)574-3229
MARTEX HAND TOWEL(5) 15"x28", wa-
termelon color $10 (650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
310 Misc. For Sale
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$40. (650)873-8167
VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN
black/gold/white floral on aqua $10
(650)574-3229
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR no brand $65
(650)348-6428
FENDER BASSMAN 25 watt Bass am-
plifier. $50. 650-367-8146
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
K MANDOLIN - A Style, 1940’2 with
Case, $50 firm SOLD!
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
SOLD!
NEAPOLITAN MANDOLIN With case
sounds good $75 (650)348-6428
OLD USED Tube Amplifer, working con-
dition $25 SOLD!
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 SOLD!
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $10
(650)375-8044
316 Clothes
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. SOLD
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all SOLD
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
318 Sports Equipment
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB LOUNGE exercise machine cost
$100. sell for $25. Call 650-570-6023
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
LOOKING TO PURCHASE A TOTAL
GYM Price Negotible. SOLD
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
SMALL TRAMPOLINE $5.00 call 650-
570-6023
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
SOLD!
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. SOLD
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $45., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
27 Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Capital of Qatar
5 Invertebrate’s
lack
10 Former Cubs
slugger Sammy
14 Stale smell
15 Controversial
topic
16 Greek boy with a
bow
17 Allot, with “out”
18 *Naval cereal
icon sporting a
Napoleon-style
hat
20 Nuclear __:
social unit
22 City in Honshu’s
Kansai region
23 Academic URL
ending
25 Stately tree
26 Like most pies
28 *Nearly none, in
slang
31 Summer, in Paris
32 Nosed (out)
33 Eggs on
35 Christmas carol
36 Forest clearing
38 Feet pampering,
briefly
42 Bridal party rides
44 Anglo-__
45 Giant slugger Mel
48 *Venue for self-
publishing
51 Shingles or slate,
e.g.
53 “Isn’t __ bit like
you and me?”:
“Nowhere Man”
lyric
54 39-Down unit
55 Brown Betty fruit
56 Beantown
basketball player
58 *Arc-shaped,
finger-staining
snack food
61 5,280 feet
64 Erie or Huron
65 Myanmar, once
66 Yard sale sign
phrase
67 Expected
landing times,
briefly
68 Ply with drink
69 Formally turn
over
DOWN
1 __ Pérignon
2 Poem of
celebration
3 Sundae topping
4 Region
5 Mount Etna’s island
6 Biblical songs
7 ’60s espionage
show
8 Religious sister
9 Continental trade
org.
10 Grinch creator
11 Elaborately
decorated
12 Light bulb’s place
13 Slightly
19 Google Maps
offering
21 Pinochle
declaration
23 Genesis garden
24 Prank
26 Bean __: tofu
27 Fierce anger
29 “The Farmer in
the __”
30 Resembling
34 Practice in the
ring
36 Fed. agent
37 Like the “o” in
“no”
39 Beneficial activity
that ends the
answers to
starred clues
40 Two teaspoons,
say
41 Gadget’s rank:
Abbr.
43 Wall-climbing
vines
44 Lovers’ clash
45 Ancient
soothsayer
46 Astaire headwear
47 Capital of Kansas
49 Heat: Pref.
50 Chew out
52 Makes tracks
56 Mangy mutts
57 1998 Apple
debut
59 Go out, like the
tide
60 Pool shark’s stick
62 Jar topper
63 Opposite of WNW
By Gareth Bain
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
12/16/13
12/16/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
335 Garden Equipment
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
2 WALKABOUT ROLLATORS 4
Wheeled Rollators, hand brakes, seats
back rest, folds for storage, transport.
$50 each SOLD!
ELECTRIC HOSPITAL Bed, variable
pressure mattress $900, (650)348-0718
PATIENT LIFT with heavy duty sling,
$450 (650)348-0718
345 Medical Equipment
INVERSION TABLE relieves pressure
on back. Cost $100.00 sell for $25.
(650)570-6023
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
studios and 1 bedrooms, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)592-1271
REDWOOD CITY 1 bedroom apartment
$1350. month, $1000 deposit, close to
Downtown RWC, Absolutely no animals.
Call (650)361-1200
SAN MATEO Complete remodeled 2
bdrm 1 bath. Includes parking spot.. Wa-
ter and garbage paid. . $2500/month +
dep. 6503025523
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
620 Automobiles
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,900 OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2,400 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
GMV ‘03 .ENVOY, SLT , 4x4, excellent
condition. Leather everything. 106K
miles. White. $7,800 (650)342-6342
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
670 Auto Parts
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
28
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services • General
Errands • Event Help
$65 Holiday Special,
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Concrete
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTERS AND ROOF
REPAIR
• New Installation seamless,
• Cleaning and Screening,
• Commercial and Residential
Power Washing
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
Gutters
GUTTER
CLEANING
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
29 Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
Furniture
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
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WORLD 30 Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Food Production Committee immediately
obtained information about the resources
that the state and county agriculture depart-
ments had available to grow and improve the
fruits and vegetables. Local nurserymen
advised that vegetable plants suitable for
this locale included kale, celery, lettuce,
broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Swiss chard,
red chard, onion sets, artichokes, rhubarb
and brown or white multiplier onions.
Rubber scrap piles began appearing at gas
stations, and metal scrap piles in the middle
of cities started to grow rapidly. Contests
were held in which individuals or organiza-
tions vied to collect the most amount of
scrap paper, metal or rubber. The Boy Scouts
became very active in collecting rubber and
metal throughout the Peninsula. Wastepaper
was collected. The supply of pulp and other
products that are usually wasted or destroyed
was destined to become the raw material for
boxes and holders to send materials to the
front. Cooking grease from thousands of
housewives was collected and utilized in the
munitions industry.
Sugar was rationed and coupons had to
be applied for to buy it, as well as canned
goods and meat. In the grocery store, a
point value was given for the canned
goods. Each can of rationed foods was
stamped with both the point value and
price. You could not go over the allotted
points or coupons of store goods in your
purchases each month. Local grocery
stores began imploring people to use
their ration coupons at their stores
because the amount of food they got the
next month from the Ration Board
depended on that month’s purchases with
ration cards. All types of novels were col-
lected and sent to servicemen. Stiff penal-
ties for gasoline hoarding were imposed
and you could not store gasoline at your
home. Coupons were issued for the pur-
chase of gasoline and every motoring trip
had to be essential. If it was not an essen-
tial trip, you walked. The Sunday after-
noon “drive” in the country was stopped.
The many hardships that the American
people went through in World War II were
essential for the success of the war and
were endured to support the troops who
were putting their very lives on the line.
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold
Fredricks appears in the Monday edition of
the Daily Journal.
Continued from page 3
HISTORY
teach via experiences and to push people
beyond their comfort zones,” Lopez said.
“Because the more you’re pushed, the bet-
ter equipped you are to handle your own
business.”
The school’s current student body is
similar to the industry’s male to female
ratio and only about 25 percent are
women, Lopez said. So it introduced the
momt repreneur schol arshi p t o hel p
equalize that ratio, Lopez said.
To meet that goal and broaden its gen-
eral outreach, the school developed an
online program that allows people from
all over the world to participate in its
courses, Lopez said.
“Not everyone is as capable of pick-
ing up and moving to Silicon Valley for
seven weeks at a time. So this allows
people who can’t do that still get access
to the curriculum. The speakers are the
same and they get access to exactly the
same networks, which is one of the
most valuable parts of the Draper
University program,” Lopez said.
Online classes are more feasible for
working moms who are juggling or
starting careers while raising families,
Lopez said. The media tends to target
women, they know what’s new and are
out there buying for their families.
Women have the largest impact on the
country’s financial market and make
about 85 percent of all consumer pur-
chases, she pointed out.
“Based on that kind of statistic, clear-
ly women should be the ones running
businesses because they’re the ones who
make purchases. ... Momtrepreneurs
have such interesting backgrounds and
such a depth of knowledge that a lot of
people don’t have,” Lopez said.
Megan Li sa Jones, 47, i s a
momtrepreneur who recently finished
Draper University’s online course. As a
single working mother of two, Jones
said the program was flexible enough
for her to balance her busy life while
remaining challenging and supportive.
Jones had a career in technology and
Internet banking that she had to step
away from when she had her first child.
“Sometimes the demand of certain
types of jobs just makes it really hard
for a working parent, male or female, to
do it perfect. And it has nothing to do
with our abilities or pride, it’s just [due
to] our schedules,” Jones said.
At one point, she was even told that
once women have children, they can’t
hold a job, Jones said. After her son
turned 2, she went back to work in the
banking industry before realizing she
wanted to do something more meaning-
ful, Jones said. She began to focus on
educating children for an advancing
economy and has since written a book
and started her own company.
“[The program] provided flexibility to
push myself and grow and challenge
myself, ” Jones said. “You’re getting
valued for your work and the effective-
ness of your work. ... I’ve never had
such a supportive environment where
they do encourage you to dream big.”
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
MOMS
grid and a lithium ion battery. Stem inte-
grates data from various sources to pro-
vide energy usage forecasts. Energ y
flows to batteries when power is cheap
and stores it there. It then releases the
energy for use during higher, and pricier,
usage hours. Carrington said the technol-
ogy can help customers lower their ener-
gy costs. The business has been around
since 2009.
“It (the product) learns buildings and
observes weather to take you off the grid,
so you don’t get peak demand time
charges,” he said. “From the utilities’
standpoint, it helps them with their con-
gestion issues.”
Carrington got onboard with the com-
pany after deciding to hunt for a compa-
ny with a nexus of technology and ener-
gy interests. Prior to joining Stem, he
was chief executive officer at MiaSole, a
solar company with more than $550 mil-
lion of investment. He executed the sale
of MiaSole to Hanergy in December
2012. Previously, Carrington was execu-
tive vice president of marketing and
business development at San Francisco-
based First Solar.
A lot of the new funding is going
toward growth, Carrington said.
“We expect to hire 20 percent more
employees and to expand into other mar-
kets such as Southern California, Hawaii,
New Jersey and New York,” he said. “[The
funding is] a big statement and a vote of
confidence in our technology. ”
Carrington said there’s a tremendous
opportunity for Stem since it has such
compelling technology. It also is good
because it doesn’t impede upon utility
company’s core goals.
“We look forward to a lot of growth in
2014,” he said.
Stem’s current CEO, Salim Khan, will
remain with the company until Dec. 31 to
assist in transitioning his responsibili-
ties to Carrington.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
ENERGY
WORLD 31
Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Hyung-Jin Kim
THE ASSOCIATE PRESS
SEOUL, South Korea — The aunt of
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has
been named to an ad-hoc state committee,
the country’s official media reported, an
indication that the execution of her hus-
band and the country’s No. 2 has not
immediately diminished her influence.
The fate of Kim Kyong Hui — a younger
sister of late leader Kim Jong Il, Kim
Jong Un’s father — was questioned after
North Korea announced Friday that her
husband, Jang Song Thaek, was executed
for trying to overthrow the government.
But her name appeared in a state media
dispatch late Saturday alongside top offi-
cials on a funeral committee for fellow
senior Workers’ Party official Kim Kuk
Thae, who died Friday. Her name appeared
sixth in the dispatch, which listed more
than 50 funeral committee members.
Considered extremely close to her
brother Kim Jong Il, Kim Kyong Hui has
risen through the ranks in recent years,
helping to groom Kim Jong Un as the
country’s next leader and eventually take
over power after his father’s death in late
2011 .
The 67-year-old holds a slew of top
posts, including ruling Workers’ Party
secretary and four-star army general.
Some analysts said she may be spared her
husband’s fate because she is directly
related to the country’s founder, Kim Il
Sung, grandfather of Kim Jong Un.
Analysts said the dispatch suggested
that Kim Kyong Hui’s political standing
hasn’t been immediately affected by her
husband’s execution and that she may
have even given her nephew the green
light to fire Jang — but not to have him
executed.
“Jang’s purging may have taken place
after Kim Kyong Hui consented to it,”
said analyst Hong Hyun-ik from the pri-
vate Sejong Institute in South Korea.
“She may have opposed Jang’s death sen-
tence, but she could have agreed on Jang
being dismissed.”
Kim and Jang, who married in 1972,
had a dysfunctional marriage in recent
years, and their only daughter committed
suicide in 2006 while studying in Paris,
according to South Korean media reports.
If her health condition allows it, Kim
Kyong Hui is expected to join other top
officials Tuesday and attend ceremonies
marking the second anniversary of Kim
Jong Il’s death, Hong said.
Looking pale and gaunt lately in offi-
cial appearances, Kim Kyong Hui’s pub-
lic activities have been sharply reduced
in recent months amid media reports that
she suffers liver, heart and other ail-
ments.
Kim Jin Moo, a North Korea expert at
the state-run Korea Institute for Defense
Analyses in Seoul, said that Jang’s exe-
cution may have been possible because
Kim Kyong Hui had not been actively
engaged in politics due to her reported
health problems.
Jang’s execution was shocking because
it was carried out only a few days after his
dismissal from all posts. It’s unusual for
the country to publicize any purging and
execution of senior officials to the out-
side world. Many North Korea observers
said that the moves were aimed at
strengthening Kim’s power, but that they
also indicate Kim still lacks the same
absolute power held by his father.
Kim, the North Korea expert, said that
Jang’s execution and frequent personnel
reshuffles that Kim Jong Un has under-
taken over the past two years show that
the young leader doesn’t appear to have
confidence in who to trust as he reshapes
a government dotted with people from
his father’s era.
“Dictators always feel uneasy,” he said.
Kim’s aunt appears safe after husband’s execution
REUTERS
Jang Song Thaek, with his hands tied with a rope, is dragged into the court by uniformed
personnel in this picture published in Rodong Sinmun and released by Yonhap. North Korea
said on Friday that Jang, the uncle of leader Kim Jong Un, previously considered the second
most powerful man in the secretive state, has been executed for treason, the biggest
upheaval since the death of Kim's father two years ago.
32 Monday • Dec. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL

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