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By: Tim Kovacs #33, Ben Messer #40, Kyle Rinda #46, Lisa Washakowski #57

Brief Description: The Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner is a superefficient airplane with new passengerpleasing features. It will bring the economics of large jet transports to the middle of the market, using 20 percent less fuel than any other airplane of its size.

Boeing 787-9:

The Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner is a slightly bigger version of the 787-8. Both are super-efficient airplanes with new passenger-pleasing features that bring the economics of large jet transports to the middle of the market, using 20 percent less fuel than any other airplanes of their size.

Seating: 210 to 250 passengers Range: 7,650 to 8,200 nautical miles (14,200 to 15,200 kilometers) Configuration: Twin aisle Cross Section: 226 inches (574 centimeters) Wing Span: 197 feet (60 meters) Length: 186 feet (57 meters) Height: 56 feet (17 meters) Cruise Speed: Mach 0.85 Total Cargo Volume: 4,400 cubic feet Maximum Takeoff Weight: 502,500 pounds (227,930 kilograms)

Seating: 250 to 290 passengers Range: 8,000 to 8,500 nautical miles (14,800 to 15,750 kilometers) Configuration: Twin aisle Cross Section: 226 inches (574 centimeters) Wing Span: 197 feet (60 meters) Length: 206 feet (63 meters) Height: 56 feet (17 meters) Cruise Speed: Mach 0.85 Maximum Takeoff Weight: 553,000 lbs (250,836 kg) Total Cargo Volume: 5,400 feet3 (153 m3)

Uses 20% less fuel than comparable size airplanes Travel at similar speeds as fastest twin engine airplanes (Mach 0.85) 20-45% more cargo capacity 50% composite materials More fuel efficient GE and Rolls Royce engines Eliminated 1,500 aluminum sheets and 40,000-50,000 fasteners On-board health monitoring system

Boeing 787 Dreamliner project announced with a 2010 delivery date

Used for 7 fuselage barrels and wings Increase fatigue life and decrease maintenance Lightweight Allows for increase in window size

Used for elevators, rudder, spoilers, raked winglets, and inboard movable leading edge Strong and lightweight Core material between two carbon fiber face sheets

Can withstand loads better than Aluminum Minimal fatigue Highly resistant to corrosion

Aluminum still used where composites cannot be used taking on loads


Stabilizers and engine

Steel used mainly for landing gear

787 Dreamliner 50 percent composites 20 percent aluminum 777 12 percent composites 50 percent aluminum - On first fuselage barrel section, composites save 1,500 aluminum sheets and 40,000 to 50,000 fasteners - The Boeing 747 fuselage requires around 1 million hole drilled during assembly, while the 787 Dreamliner requires less than 10,000

Carbon fiber tape is applied to a predetermined shape (rolls on like duct-tape) Baked in a giant oven which hardens the material
Harder than aluminum Require some of the biggest autoclaves in the world
In Wichita, it is 30 ft. in diam., 70 ft. long

First time ever, the wings are produced overseas Same process as fuselage
Carbon fiber tape autoclave

Announced that assembly of each 787 would employ subassemblies from contractors worldwide

Final assembly takes place in the United States Different components are joined together Once assembled, the 787 is taken to another hangar and painted

Boeing 787 Production Line

Wing box problems with the plastic composite stringers

Boeing 787 Dreamliner makes first flight from Everett, Washington to Kings County, Washington

July 2010
Delivery of Boeing 787 Dreamliners postponed until early 2011 due to problems with test instrumentation

Test flight forced to land in Texas due to smoke in rear cabin.

First Dreamliners delivered to Japans All Nippon Airlines and first commercial flight

Contained debris from GE engine sparks a fire during a pre-flight test

September 15, 2012


Dreamliners with GE engines are grounded by FAA

First US Dreamliner flight by United Airlines from Houston to Chicago

United Airlines Dreamliner carrying 174 passengers is forced to land due to mechanical and electrical failures

December 13, 2012


Qatar Airlines grounds several Dreamliners due to mechanical and electrical failures similar to United Airlines

Battery of auxiliary unit causes fire to ignite

Japan Airlines and Japans All Nippon Airlines experience fuel leaks, landing gear brake problems, a cockpit window crack, and more oil and fuel leaks

ALL Dreamliners are grounded by FAA until further inspections conducted of recent problems and all are resolved

NO! Current battery problems have not been resolved and cleared by FAA Various problems continue to occur
Multiple different failure parts

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/flightblogger/20 09/02/boeing-787-final-assembly-line.html http://kirill-guevara.livejournal.com/116729.html http://www.aviationnews.eu/2011/08/26/anaboeing-set-date-for-first-787-dreamliner-delivery/ http://blog.seattlepi.com/aerospace/files/library/a35 0firstbarrelbig.jpg http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f07HpUAuWgk http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GDqxnahwbk www.boeingblogs.com http://www.aviationexplorer.com/787_facts.htm

http://www.boeing.com/boeing/commercial/ 787family/background.page http://www.cbc.ca/news/interactives/boeing 787-timeline/ http://www.boeing.com/boeing/commercia l/787family/specs.page?