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Abstract We analyze the adsorption-desorption

processes of particle adsorption on solid surfaces to check if


these processes are Poissonian in order to adopt or disregard
the vast mathematical heritage previously developed for
Poissonian processes in all practical situations where these
processes are essential: plasmonic and other adsorption-
desorption sensors and sensing networks, microresonators
and other MEMS RF devices, integrated optics, to name just
a few. We use the stochastic analysis approach with the
probability generating functions.

Keywords adsorption-desorption process, poissonian
process, probability generating functions, stochastic analysis.
I. INTRODUCTION
HE awareness on the importance of Poisson processes
is not new. Since the first application of Poisson
distribution in 1898 [1], it has been used for modeling the
stochastic behavior of large number of random indepen-
dent events occuring at fixed intervals of time with a
known average rate in a plethora of applications [2]:
Requests for telephone calls at a switchboard
Customer/job arrivals at queues (queueing
theory)
Goals scored in video and internet games
Requests for a service on a web server, etc.
In reliability engineering Poisson distribution is often
used to model various fundamental noise sources in elec-

Olga M. Jaki, Center of Microelectronic Technologies and Single
Crystals, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, University
of Belgrade, Njegoeva 12, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia.
e-mail: olga@nanosys.ihtm.bg.ac.rs
Zoran S. Jaki, Center of Microelectronic Technologies and Single
Crystals, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, University
of Belgrade, Njegoeva 12, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia.
e-mail: jaksa@nanosys.ihtm.bg.ac.rs
Danijela V. Randjelovi, Center of Microelectronic Technologies and
Single Crystals, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy,
University of Belgrade, Njegoeva 12, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia.
e-mail: danijela@nanosys.ihtm.bg.ac.rs
eljko D. upi, Center of Catalysis and Chemical Engineering,
Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, University of
Belgrade, Njegoeva 12, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia.
e-mail: zcupic@nanosys.ihtm.bg.ac.rs
Ljilljana Z. Kolar-Ani, Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of
Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia,
e-mail: lkolar@ffh.bg.ac.rs
This work was funded by Serbian Ministry of Education and Science
through the projects TR 32008, III 45001, and ON 172015.
tronic components [3]. Since huge mathematical heritage
concerning the Poisson processes has been established,
rigorous derivations of the moments of stochastic variables
in papers dealing with new contemporary applications are
often omitted in case the analogy with the proven Poisson
processes is out of question.
Adsorption-desorption processes at active/effective
surfaces of novel MEMS, NEMS and adsorption based
devices (such as plasmonic sensors) represent examples
for this. With scaling enabled by advances in micro and
nano-technologies, electronic devices gained speed and
capacities but also became vulnerable to the influences of
the surrounding medium; for instance, mass fluctuations
due to adsorption-desorption processes affect the resonant
frequency and deteriorate the stability of MEMS and
NEMS resonators [4]. On the other hand, adsorption-
desorption processes may be favorable in novel structures
like plasmonic sensors and generally adsorption-based
micro sensors [5].
Much work has been done in the field of characterizing
these components [6-9] assuming the Poissonian nature of
particle arrivals on the surface. In [7, 10] noise spectra in
equilibrium are determined using that assumption and an
analogy between the adsorption-desorption and the
generation-recombination processes.
The aim of this work is to verify or discredit the
assumption of the Poissonian nature of adsorption-
desorption processes and in case the assumption is
conditional, to set the limits that bound its validity. The
fundamental techniques of the probability theory are
utilized to that purpose.
II. ADSORPTION-DESORPTION PROCESSES
Adsorption-desorption processes have been studied in in
various applications in the field of chemistry and physical
chemistry for decades (for instance adsorption of dyes
from solutions, separation of chemical by using the
adsorption membranes) etc. The common representation of
this process is through the balancing stoichiometric
equation for the second order chemical reaction [11]:

''
a
d
k
g f a
k
A A A

+

(1)
Eq. (1) denotes the situation where a free adsorption site
A
f
and a free gas particle A
g
stochastically and reversibly
change into an adsorbate particle A
a
with an adsorption
The Poissonian Nature of
Adsorption-Desorption Processes

Olga M. Jaki, Zoran S. Jaki, Senior Member, IEEE and Danijela V. Randjelovi, Member,
IEEE, eljko D. upi, Ljiljana Z. Kolar-Ani
T
20th Telecommunications forum TELFOR 2012 Serbia, Belgrade, November 20-22, 2012.
978-1-4673-2984-2/12/$31.00 2012 IEEE 206

rate constant k
a
'', while the desorption rate constant is k
d
.
The corresponding kinetic equation is

( ) ( )
0
''
''
a
a g f d a
a a a d a
dN
k N N k N
dt
k N N M N k N
=
=
(2)
N denotes numbers, indices denote reactants, N
0
is the
overall number of particles in the system and M is the
number of adsorption centers on the surface. In case N
0

greatly exceeds M (valid for pressures and surfaces in the
majority of engineering situations [12]), even if the whole
surface is populated, N
0
does not decrease significantly
and this expression transforms into a linear first order
differential equation

( )
( )
0
0
''
, ''
a
a a d a
a a d a a a
dN
k N M N k N
dt
k M N k N k k N

= =
(3)
All further analysis is valid for the latter model.
III. THE STOCHASTIC NATURE OF AN ADSORPTION-
DESORPTION PROCESS
A. The probability generating function
Generating functions connect the discrete and the
continous mathematical approaches to the problems. They
transform functional problems into problems about
sequences. Here we give the definition of the probability
generating function (PGF) and its properties used through-
out our stochastic analysis to determine the probability
distribution of the number of adsorbed particles.
If we denote the number of adsorbed particles on the
solid surface with x and the probability that in time instant
t will be x adsorbed particles on that surface with P
x
(t), the
monovariate PGF is
( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( )
1
1
0 0
1
1 0
0
,
1
x x
x x
x x
x
x
x
F s t P t s P t s
s
P t s P t

= =

+
+
=
= =

= +
_ _
_
(4)
The first derivative of this PGF is
( )
( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( )
1 2
1
0 0
1 0
0
,
1
1 0 , 1
x x
x x
x x
x
x
x
F s t
xP t s x P t s
s
x P t s P t s

= =

+
=

= =

= + +
_ _
_
(5)
The second derivative is
( )
( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( )
2
2
2
0
3
1
0
1
1 0
0
,
1
1 2 1
1 0
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
F s t
x x P t s
s
x x P t s s
x xP t s P t

+
=

=
= + +
_
_
_
(6)
The derivatives of the PGF with respect to s satisfy

( )
( ) ( )
1
,
E 1 1
i
i
s
F s t
x x x i
s
=

( = +

(7)
Based on this expression, all moments can be
straightforwardly found [13].
B. The stochastic analysis
For the adsorption-desorption system under
consideration we assumed the following: the surface is
nonporous, homogeneous (all binding sites are equal);
initially all binding sites are free. Gas is ideal, all particles
alike, non-interacting with each other, forming only
monolayers on the surface.
The state space for the system comprises M + 1 possible
states (the number of adsorbed molecules is N
a
, we will
denote it here with x for the sake of compactness of long
expressions; N
a
= x may be 0, 1, 2, , M). The time span
for our system observations t is small enough, so that
only transitions between the neighboring states may occur.
The system can reach the state with x adsorbed molecules
in three ways:
the system was in a state with x 1 adsorbed
molecules and then one more is adsorbed;
the system was in a state with x + 1 adsorbed
molecules and then one is desorbed;
the system was in a state with x adsorbed molecules
and no transitions occurred.
The transition probabilities between these states are

( ) ( )
( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
1
1
1
a a
d d
a a d d
P x x k x t o t
P x k x t o t
P x x k x k x t o t
= +
+ = +
= + +
(8)
where o(t) is the Landau order symbol meaning that it
vanishes with a higher order than its argument t. The first
transition is a consequence of adsorption and x
a
is the
number of free adsorption centers at that particular
moment, i.e. x
a
= M (x1). The second transition is a
consequence of desorption and x
d
is the number of
adsorbed molecules for that case, x
d
= (x + 1). The only
possible situation left is when no transitions occur, and
then x
a
= Mx and x
d
= x. The probability that the system
will be in a state with x = N
a
adsorbed molecules, t time
units after t is
( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
1
1
1
1
x x
x x
P t t P t P x x
P t P x x P t P x x

+
+ =
+ + +
(9)
Hence, with all that in mind, eq. (8) and (9) give
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
( )
1
1
1
1
1
x x a
x d
x a d
P t t P t k M x t o t
P t k x t o t
P t k M x k x t o t

+
(
+ = +

( + + +

(
+ + +

(10)
After regrouping and taking the limit when t 0 we
get the Kolmogorov differential equation for probability
function
( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( )
1 1
d
1 1
d
x
x a x d
x a d
P t
P t k M x P t k x
t
P t k M x k x
+
= + +
+
(11)
We now multiply the expression (11) by an infinite
power series of s, and sum over x. We group the members
so that one can recognize the probability generating
function of the P
x
(t) and its derivatives.
207

( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( )
1
1
0 0
2 2
1 1
0 0
1
0 0
1 1
x x
x a x
x x
x x
a x d x
x x
x x
a x a d x
x x
d
s P t k Ms P t s
dt
k s x P t s k x P t s
k M P t s k k s xP t s

= =

+
= =

= =
| |
=
|
\ .
+ +
+
_ _
_ _
_ _
(12)
Since all probabilities beyond physical limits (involving
x out of the range 0, M) are zero, by the use of
definitions (4), (5) and (6), eq. (12) becomes
( )
( )
( ) ( )
( ) ( )
( )
2
, , ,
,
,
,
a a d
a a d
F s t F s t F s t
k MsF s t k s k
t s s
F s t
k MF s t k k s
s

= +

(13)
Using this method, eq. (11), difference differential
equation over probability, is transformed at the end into
the partial differential equation over PGF generating
function

( )
( )
( )
( )
( ) ( )
2
, ,
1 ,
d a d a
a
F s t F s t
k k k s k s
t s
k M s F s t

= +

+
(14)
The initial condition corresponding to N
a
(0)=0 is
F(s,0)=1 and the solution to this linear partial differential
equation is
( )
( )
( )
( )
0
,
1
a d
M
k k t a x a d
x
a d a d x
F s t
k s k s k
P t s e
k k k k

+
=
=
( +
= +
(
+ +
(

_
(15)
In order to extract the probability distribution function
we regroup the binome members and get
( )
( )
( )
( )
1
,
a d
a d
M
k k t
k k t
a
a d
a d a d
k e
k e k
F s t s
k k k k
+
+
(

+
(
= +
(
+ +
(

(16)
Written in a form of series, this expression is
( )
( )
( )
( )
0
,
1
a d
a d
x
k k t M x
k k t
M
a
a d
a d a d x
F s t
sk e
M k e k
x k k k k
+
+
=
=
| |

| |
+ | | |
|
|
|
| + +
\ .
| \ .
\ .
_
(17)
The exact probability distribution function is then
( )
( )
( )
( )
1
a d
a d
x
x
k k t M x
k k t
a
a d
a d a d
P t
k e
M k e k
x k k k k
+
+
=
| |

| |
+ | | |
|
|
|
| + +
\ .
| \ .
\ .
(18)
The sum of all probabilities over all possible numbers of
adsorbed molecules must be 1, which is satisfied.
IV. THE PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION OF A POISSONIAN
PROCESS
The Poisson distribution stems from Bernoullie's (also
called binomial) distribution. In a total of N outcomes of a
stochastic variable that can have either one outcome with a
probability p or the opposite outcome with a probability
q = 1 p, the probability that that stochastic event occurs
exactly n times is
( ) ( ) 1
n
N
N
p n p p N n
n
| |
=
|
\ .
(19)
Fig. 1 shows this distribution for various pairs of (N, p).



Fig. 1. Binomial distribution for different pairs of (N, p)

In case there are some constraints that force the
probability to proportionally decrease with an increase of
N, and that is the case with all examples from the
introduction (the number of servers, service centers or
places in a queue is finite), all distributions converge to the
same one like that shown in Fig. 2. That distribution is
Poissonian and the mathematical expression stems from
( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( )
1 2 1 1
!
1 2 1
1 1 1 1 1
!
N n
n
N
n N n
N N N N n p p
p n
n
n
pN p
N N N
n

+
=
| || | | |

| | |
\ .\ . \ .
=
(20)
For a constant product of N and p, equal to , we get

( )
1
1
1
1
!
1
N
n n
N
n
i
i N
p n
N n
N

=
| |

|
| | \ .
=
|
\ .
| |

|
\ .

(21)
For a very large N it holds that

( ) lim
!
n
N
N
p n e
n

= (22)
V. DISCUSSION
If we adopt the notation from the previous section and
put

( )
( )
1
a d
k k t
a
a d
k e
p
k k
+

=
+
(23)
and check

( )
( )
( ) 1
1
a d
a d
k k t
k k t
a
a d
a d a d
k e
k e k
k k k k
+
+
+
=
+ +
(24)
we see that the true probability distribution of an
208

adsorption-desorption process, eq. (18), is actually
binomial. For a large M the process can be treated as
Poissonian with the parameter

( )
( )
1
a d
k k t
a
a d
k M e
Mp
k k

= =
+
(25)


Fig. 2. Binomial distribution for different pairs of (N, p)
in case their product is constant, =50.

So, if M is large, this means that the number of
adsorption centers on the surface is large. Thus according
to the first assumption we made, this whole model (eq. 3)
is valid if that number is greatly exceeded by the overall
number of particles in the system. Practically, that means
that the surface is large and surrounding gas is under high
pressure. But high pressures lead to a situation where
multilayers of adsorbed particles/molecules may occur on
the surface and even the first two equations cease to be
valid (the model is for monolayer adsorption).
From a practical point of view, the pressure is not the
designers' dilemma. The question is not "What is the
minimal pressure that provides that eq. (3) is still valid and
what is the maximum pressure beyond which eqs. (1) and
(2) do not hold any more". Pressure is the subject of
unpredictable situation and the question is "With the given
set of determined physical parameters, how to design a
sensor area (that affects the adsorption rate constant k
a
and
the number of adsorption sites M) that meets the
predictions and the performances derived with the
treatment of an adsorption-desorption process as a first
order chemical reaction with a Poissonian probability
distribution function, or (in the case M is set), should I do
the research analysis and optimizations all over again
presuming second order chemical reaction or the binomial
probability distribution?".
From Fig. 2, it is enough for N to be 20 times greater
than in order to be reasonable to treat the process as
Poissonian, but the augmentation of M does not
necessarily mean that p will be proportionally decreased
and preserved. The physical parameters of a target gas
species for which we design the sensor affect adsorption
kinetics through the sorption rate constants [12] and do not
alter with scaling. The physical parameters of a material
for sensor surface are also fixed.
VI. CONCLUSION
It is proven in this work that the exact probability
distribution function of an adsorption-desorption process is
binomial. The conditions for the assumption of a
Poissonian distribution function may be met in a praxis,
but should be checked for each particular situation.
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
To Diana Stojanovi-Wongkaren for discussions.
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THE POISSONIAN NATURE OF
ADSORPTION-DESORPTION PROCESSES
Olga M. Jaki, Zoran S. Jaki, Senior Member,
IEEE and Danijela V. Randjelovi, Member, IEEE,
eljko D. upi, Ljiljana Z. Kolar-Ani

209

Steering Committee / Upravni odbor

Prof. Dr ore Paunovi, Chair/Predsednik, TS/DT, ETF,
Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Branko Kovaevi, Dean/Dekan, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Aleksandar Nekovi, Chair/Predsednik, TPC, ETF,
Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Ljiljana Mili, Chair/Predsednik, Org. Committee, IMP,
ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Irini Reljin, Vice Chair/Potpredsednik, TPC, ETF,
Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Nataa Nekovi, Chair IEEE S&M Section, ETF,
Belgrade, Serbia

Technical Program Committee (TPC) / Programski odbor

Prof. Dr Aleksandar Nekovi, Chair/Predsednik, ETF, Belgrade,
Serbia
Prof. Dr Irini Reljin, Vice Chair/Potpredsednik, ETF, Belgrade,
Serbia
Prof. Dr Nataa Gospi, SF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Vlado Deli, FTN, Novi Sad, Serbia
Prof. Dr Duan Draji, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Miroslav Duki, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Academician Prof. Dr Antonije orevi, SANU, ETF, Belgrade,
Serbia
Prof. Dr Jovan orevi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Mr Nenad Krajnovi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Miroslav Lutovac, Singidunum University, Belgrade,
Serbia
Prof. Dr Miomir Miji, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Ljiljana Mili, IMP, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Nataa Nekovi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Zorica Nikoli, EF, Ni, Serbia
Prof. Dr ore Paunovi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Predrag Pejovi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Vladimir Petrovi, ETF Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Grozdan Petrovi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Miodrag Popovi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Jelica Proti, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Branimir Reljin, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Abdalla Abdulgader, Univ., Libya
Prof. Dr ura Budimir, Univ. Westminster, London, UK
As. Prof. Dr Zoran Veljovi, ETF, Podgorica, Montenegro
Prof. Dr Branka Vueti, Univ.Sidnej, Australia
Prof. Dr Octavian Fratu, Univ. Politehnica, Bucharest, Romania
Prof. Dr Liljana Gavrilovska, UKIM, Skopje, Makedonia
Dr Alexander Gelman, NETovarions group, IEEE ComSoc,USA
Dr Apostolos Georgiadis, CTTC, Barcelona, Spain
Prof. Dr Simona Halunga, Univ. Politehnica, Bucharest, Romania
Prof. Dr Toni Janevski, UKIM, Skopje, Makedonia
Prof. Dr Venceslav Kafediski, UKIM, Skopje, Makedonia
Prof. Dr Ivo Kosti, ETF, Podgorica, Montenegro
Dr George Koutitas, Internat. Hellenic Univeristy, Thessaloniki,
Greece
Prof. Dr Rolf Kraemer, IHP Microelectronics, Frankfurt, Germany
Dr Milo Krsti, IHP Microelectronics, Frankfurt, Germany
Prof. Dr Milica Pejanovi-urii, ETF, Podgorica, Montenegro
Prof. Dr Igor Radusinovi, ETF, Podgorica, Montenegro
Prof. Dr Zbynek Raida, Dept. Radio El., Brno, Czech Republic
Prof. Dr Kurt Richter, Tech. Univ., Graz, Austria
Prof. Dr Sherif Welsen Shaker, Kuang-Chi Institute of
Adv.Technology, Shenzhen, China
Prof. Dr Hannes Topfer, Tech. Univ., Ilmenau, Germany
Prof. Dr. Ion Tutanescu, Fac. ECC, Univ. of Pitesti, Romania
As. Prof. Dr Matej Zajc, Univ. Ljubljana, Slovenia

Scientific Committee / Nauni odbor

Prof. Dr Ljiljana Mili, IMP, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Duan Draji, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Filip Bankovi, Telekom Serbia
As. Prof. Dr Milan Bjelica, ETF Belgrade, Serbia
Dr Dragan Bogojevi, TS, Belgrade, Serbia
As. Prof. Dr Dragan Boji, ETF Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Zoran Bojkovi, SF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Branka Vueti, Univ.Sidnej, Australija
Prof. Dr ura Budimir, Univ. Westminster, London, UK
As. Prof. Dr Zoran Veljovi, ETF, Podgorica, Montenegro
Dr Alexander Gelman,IEEE ComSoc,USA
Prof. Dr Nataa Gospi, SF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Vlado Deli, FTN, Novi Sad, Serbia
Dr Dejan Draji, Iritel, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Miroslav Duki, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Jovan orevi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Academician Prof. Dr Antonije orevi, ETF, SANU, Belgrade,
Serbia
Ljiljana orevi, Telekom Serbia
Prof. Dr Goran orevi, EF Ni, Serbia
Milivoje uni, TS, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Octavian Fratu, Univ. Politehnica, Bucharest, Romania
Prof. Dr Liljana Gavrilovska, UKIM, Skopje, Makedonia
Dr Apostolos Georgiadis, CTTC, Barcelona, Spain
Prof. Dr Simona Halunga, Univ. Politehnica, Bucharest, Romania
As. Prof. Dr Predrag Ivani, ETF Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Toni Janevski, UKIM, Skopje, Makedonia
As. Prof. Dr Milan Jankovi, RATEL, Serbia
Mr Mihailo Jovanovi, PTT Serbia
Prof. Dr Venceslav Kafediski, UKIM, Skopje, Makedonia
Prof. Dr Vladimir Kati, IEEE, FTN, Novi Sad, Serbia
Dragan M. Kovaevi, IRITEL, Belgrade, Serbia
Dr Milan . Kovaevi, SAGA, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Ivo Kosti, ETF, Podgorica, Montenegro
Dr George Koutitas, Internat. Hellenic Univeristy, Thessaloniki,
Greece
Prof. Dr Rolf Kraemer, IHP Microelectronics, Frankfurt, Germany
Dr Milo Krsti, IHP Microelectronics, Frankfurt, Germany
Prof. Dr Husnija Kurtovi, ETF Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Borivoj Lazi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
As. Prof. Dr. Josip Lorincz, FESB, Univ. of Split, Croatia
Prof. Dr Miroslav Lutovac, SINGIDUNUM University, Belgrade,
Serbia
Prof.dr Veljko Milutinovi, ETF Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Miomir Miji, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Bratislav Milovanovi, EF, Ni, Serbia
Prof. Dr Vladimir Miloevi, FTN, Novi Sad, Serbia
Ivan Nador, Telekommunications Society, Belgrade
Zorica Nestorovi, Telekom Serbia
Prof. Dr Aleksandar Nekovi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Nataa Nekovi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Boko Nikoli, ETF Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Zorica Nikoli, EF, Ni, Serbia
Prof. Dr ore Paunovi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Milica Pejanovi-urii, ETF, Podgorica, Montenegro
Prof. Dr Vladimir Petrovi, ETF Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Grozdan Petrovi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Dr Predrag Petrovi, IRITEL, Belgrade, Serbia
Academician Prof. Dr Dejan Popovi, ETF, SANU, Belgrade,
Serbia
Prof. Dr Mirjana Popovi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Miodrag Popovi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
As. Prof. Dr Milka Potrebi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Jelica Proti, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Jovan Radunovi, RATEL, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Igor Radusinovi, ETF, Podgorica, Montenegro
Prof. Dr Zbynek Raida, Dept. Radio El., Brno, Czech Republic
Prof. Dr Branimir Reljin, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Irini Reljin, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Kurt Richter, Tech. Univ., Graz, Austria
As. Prof. Dr Mirjana Simi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Momilo Simi, Telecommunications Society, Belgrade
As. Prof. Dr Lazar Saranovac, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Sherif Welsen Shaker, Kuang-Chi Institute of
Adv.Technology, Shenzhen, China
Milan Simi, Telekom Serbia
Prof. Dr Nenad Simi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Aleksandra Smiljani, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
As. Prof. Dr Mirjana Stojanovi, SF, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr Zlatan Stojkovi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Mr Ivan Teleki, TS, Novi Sad, Serbia
Prof. Dr Miodrag Temerinac, FTN, Novi Sad, Serbia
Prof. Dr Hannes Topfer, Tech. Univ., Ilmenau, Germany
Prof. Dr Dejan Toi, ETF, Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Dr eljen Trpovski, FTN Novi Sad, Serbia
As. Prof. Dr Matej Zajc, Univ. Ljubljana, Slovenia