Science Topic/Content Area: Properties of Matter

1. What concepts/big ideas do you intend students to learn?

Learning Cycle Lesson Planning Form Grade Level: Science Standards to be Addressed: 5 SC.5.P.8.3 Demonstrate end explain that mixtures of solids can be separated based on observable properties of their parts such as particle size, shape, color and magnetic attraction. Science concept(s): How can I separate different kinds of mixtures? We can separate some mixtures using their physical properties. Idea(s)about the nature of science: There is no single step by step method by which all science is done. This aspect of the nature of science fits into my cycle because we will not be using the step by step method that my students are expected to use during STEM Fair. They will just be following procedures and making observations and talking about them. In my lesson I will relate what we have done as far as a method is concerned to what they are expected to do in their STEM Fair projects. Students should be able to identify the physical properties that mixtures can be separated by- color, shape, size, and magnetic attraction. They should also be able to describe what a mixture is and that mixtures can be separated. Students should be able to identify different kinds of mixtures (solid/liquid, liquid/liquid, solid/solid). Students should learn that scientists use these ideas in their work place. When a new element is found scientists try to figure out if it is a mixture and can be separated. There are an uncountable amount of mixtures in the world including things that students come into contact each day. “A mixture is made when two or more substances are physically combined or mixed together to make what appears to be a single substance while remaining chemically separate and distinct. Air is a mixture of gases, mainly nitrogen and oxygen…Mixtures are made by physical changes and can, at least in theory, be separated by physical changes, though this may be very difficult” (Understanding Primary Science page 139). There are six combinations of solid, liquid and gas mixtures. Some students don’t think they can take mixtures that dissolve apart. Students don’t think that it is a mixture if something has dissolved. Particles misrepresented and undifferentiated in concepts involving elements, compounds, mixtures, solutions and substances. A "thick" liquid has a higher density than water. Engage: Make a salad. Have a couple of students come up and add ingredients to my salad (mixture). A student will come up and mix it all up. Then I say “oh but I don’t like tomatoes.” Students take all the tomatoes out of my salad. We talk about how easy it w as to just take the tomatoes out of my salad. Then I introduce the word mixture. I say that my salad is an example of a mixture and that there are different kinds of mixtures. We are going to explore different kinds of mixtures and the different ways we can separate them. Exploration: Students will be placed in four groups. There will be four stations in which students will have to figure out how they will separate the mixture placed in front of them. They will draw a chart in their science notebooks to help them organize their observations. Station 1: Nuts and bolts- students will use magnets to separate the mixture of nuts and bolts and record in their notebooks. Station 2: Cereal-students will use forceps to separate the mixture of lucky charms and record in their notebooks. Station 3: Oil and vinegar- students stir the mixture for 30 seconds and observe what happens. Station 4: Sugar and water- students stir sugar into the water and record in their notebooks. Explanation: Whole group discussion. Talk about the nature of science. Relate the process students went through in this investigation to the process they are going through in their STEM Fair investigations. Talk about how there are different ways of using the scientific method and that there is not only one order or way to do it. Then talk about how scientists use mixtures in their work. When they find a Adapted from the Content Representation Tool (Loughran, Mulhall, & Berry, 2004)

2. What do you expect students to understand about this concept and be able to do as a result? 3. Why is it important for students to learn this concept? (Rationale) 4. Provide an overview/ explain what teachers should know about this topic. What misconceptions do students typically have about this concept? (Lesson Background Info) 7. What specific activities might be useful for helping students develop an understanding of the concept in each phase of the Learning Cycle?

new element the first thing they do is see if they could separate it into different parts to see if it is a mixture. They use what they have learned about mixtures to learn about mixtures they use in their work. Then have students share how they separated their mixtures. They will also share the different kinds of mixtures they came across (liquid/liquid, liquid/solid, solid/solid). Students will glue a foldable into their journal and answer the essential question “How can I separate different kinds of mixtures?” in which they will write about the physical properties they used to separate mixtures and what mixtures they came across. Extension: Students will create a mixture of their own at home and explain what kind of mixture it is and how they separated it. Formative Assessment:  Engage: Ask students about the physical properties they used to separate the salad mixture.  Explore: working with students at each station and asking them how they think the best way to separate their mixture is.  Explain: “Let’s look at our data. What kinds of mixtures did we come across?” “What were some ways we separated them?” “Did we use any science tools to help us?” “What have we learned about mixtures after investigating them?”  Extend: Students will be able to identify the kind of mixture they created and explain how they separated it. Summative Evaluation: I was helping my parents clean out the garage and they gave me this big bucket full of all sorts of “stuff”. My parents asked me to sort it all out so we could organize everything. In the bucket are some screws, nails, little toy cars, small pieces of paper, and pens. What kind of mixture is this? How can I separate it? Are there any science tools I could use to help me? Engage:  Cucumbers  Tomatoes  Green peppers  Bowl  Spoon Explore:  Container of nuts and bolts  Container of different kinds of cereal that have different physical properties  Oil and vinegar  Two clear plastic cups  Water  Sugar  Plastic spoon  Straws  Science journals (or data sheet for ESE students) Explain:  Data Extension:  Science journal  Foldable  glue Understanding Primary Science Third Edition Page 139 Adapted from the Content Representation Tool (Loughran, Mulhall, & Berry, 2004)

8. In what ways would you assess students’ understanding or confusion about this concept?

9. What materials/ equipment are needed to teach the lesson?

10. References (Please list

all resources consulted in developing this form)

http://amasci.com/miscon/opphys.html National Geographic Science (fifth grade student textbook) Hillsborough County School Science Curriculum Map

Adapted from the Content Representation Tool (Loughran, Mulhall, & Berry, 2004)

(summative)

Name:

Date:

Directions: Please read the following problem and write a paragraph answering the questions below. Be sure to include everything you know about mixtures in your response including physical properties and tools. I was helping my parents clean out the garage and they gave me this big bucket full of all sorts of “stuff”. My parents asked me to sort it all out so we could organize everything. In the bucket are some screws, nails, little toy cars, small pieces of paper, and pens. What kind of mixture is this? How can I separate it? Are there any science tools I could use to help me?

Adapted from the Content Representation Tool (Loughran, Mulhall, & Berry, 2004)

Materials

Solid, Liquid or Gas?

How did I separate it?

Adapted from the Content Representation Tool (Loughran, Mulhall, & Berry, 2004)