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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 • Vol XIII, Edition 104
Exterior Cleaning Services
650.216.9922
c a r e f u l - c l e a n . c o m
UNCONSTITUTIONAL
NATION PAGE 7
ANTI-BACTERIAL SOAP
MAY NOT KILL BACTERIA
HEALTH PAGE 19
JUDGE SAYS NSA’S COLLECTION OF AMERICANS’PHONE RECORDS
LIKELY A VIOLATION
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
For some of the most challenged stu-
dents in East Palo Alto, the best part of
their day is closing their eyes and turn-
ing in to themselves.
Quiet Time, created by the Center for
Wellness and Achievement in
Education, is a semester-long pilot
program at Sequoia Community Day
School Green Street Academy that
focuses on meditation for stress reduc-
tion. Funded with $35,000 as part of
the Sequoia Healthcare District’s
Healthy Schools Initiative grant and
matching funds from the district. Of
that amount, $22,000 went to medita-
tion training and the presence of a
trainer from the wellness group while
$12,500 was for the three psychother-
apists to be there twice a week for ther-
apy sessions. Twice a day for 18 min-
utes, the students, who are have been
incarcerated and, or, expelled from
schools in the Sequoia Union High
School District, are led in a non-reli-
gious transcendental meditation by
trained teachers. Students sit, close
their eyes and allow themselves to
have their attention travel naturally to
a less active, quieter style of mental
functioning.
“There’s no way they would close
their eyes before [Quiet Time],” said
Karen Li, wellness coordinator for the
school district. “In their world, you
School says meditation helps struggling students
Pilot program lowers stress levels in East Palo Alto day school
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Billionaire environ-
mentalist Tom Steyer said Monday that he
will launch a campaign next year urging
California lawmakers to approve taxes on
companies that extract oil in the state.
Steyer, a major Democratic donor who
also bankrolled last year’s Proposition 39
campaign, said he thinks is it ridiculous that
California is the only oil-producing state
Billionaire to push state
lawmakers for oil tax
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
ASan Bruno child care facility owner tried
to dissuade the parents of a 5-year-old stu-
dent from involving authorities after a male
classmate touched the girl inappropriately
and even joked about being invited to the
“kids’ wedding,” according to a civil lawsuit
filed by the family.
The suit also claims Mary Johnson, the
owner of Happy Hall School on Santa Inez
Day care sued over dismissing
inappropriate touching of child
Mother takes issue with San Bruno facility’s response
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Burlingame City Council
wants Off the Grid food truck
events to remain after local busi-
nesses requested it be shifted to
Broadway so customers aren’t
taken away from the main com-
mercial strip.
The council last night directed
staff in a 4-1 vote, with
Councilman Jerry Deal voting no,
to prepare a letter for the mayor’s
signature requesting Caltrain to
extend the agreement with Off the
Grid for use of the Broadway
Caltrain parking lot located adja-
cent to the Broadway train station
at California Drive and Carmelita
Avenue, but shifting it to Tuesday
night and asking for yearly city
review of the company.
Off the Grid features street food
vendors and began operating in
the parking lot at the Broadway
Caltrain station 5 p.m.-8 p.m.
Thursday nights this fall. While
its final event this season was Dec.
5, it has caused concern from some
local business owners who believe
the trucks are pulling customers
City wants
Off the Grid
to stay put
Burlingame votes to keep market at
same location, but on Tuesday nights
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
Volunteers Austin Perez and Johnny Daher take a Hula-Hoop break from their distribution duties at Samaritan
House’s facility in San Mateo lest Saturday. Throughout the holiday season, more than 1,500 volunteers, along
with donors from the community,help Samaritan House provide assistance to those in need.During the entire
month of December, they will distribute food, toys and coats to thousands of low-income individuals and
families.
GIVING CAN BE FUN
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Students at Community Day School meditate during a
morning Quiet Time session.
See QUIET, Page 8
See SUIT, Page 8
See GRID, Page 20
See OIL, Page 20
S.F. 49ER FB IS
OUT FOR YEAR
SPORTS PAGE 11
Man who killed son
for insurance sentenced
WATERLOO, N.Y. — A 53-year-old
upstate New York man who killed his
son for the insurance money has been
sentenced to 15 years to life in prison.
Karl Karlsen was sentenced Monday
afternoon after pleading guilty in
November to a charge of second-degree
murder in the death of 23-year-old Levi
Karlsen.
Prosecutors said Karlsen killed his
son in 2008 by shifting a truck off its
jacks as the younger man worked
underneath on the family’s Finger
Lakes property in Romulus.
Karlsen was the sole beneficiary of
Levi’s insurance policy and received
$700,000 in the settlement.
Investigators in Calaveras County
have also been reviewing the 1991
death of Karlsen’s former wife,
Christina Karlsen, in a fire.
Flights delayed,
canceled at San Jose airport
SAN JOSE — Flights at Mineta San
Jose International Airport have been
delayed and canceled after a pipe burst
and flooded parts of a terminal.
Airport spokeswoman Rosemary
Barnes says a hot water line ruptured in
Terminal Aaround 2:15 a.m. Monday.
Water flooded the baggage claim and
security areas, forcing officials to shut
them down. Passengers were being
checked in at airline counters before
being taken to Terminal B on shuttle
buses for security screening.
Barnes said one checkpoint lane at
the terminal reopened by 8:50 a.m.,
but screening was limited.
The flooding caused several flight
delays and a few cancellations. The ter-
minal serves carriers, including
American, Delta, JetBlue, United, U.S.
Airways, Virgin American and Volaris.
The cause of the rupture was under
investigation.
Girl is brain dead after
surgery to remove tonsils
OAKLAND — A 13-year-old
Northern California girl is brain dead
after going into surgery to remove her
tonsils.
KGO-TV reported Sunday that Jahi
McMath’s family is demanding
Oakland Children’s Hospital conduct
an investigation after she went into
cardiac arrest and died, before being
brought back by hospital staff. Jahi is
brain dead and on life support.
Doctors said the surgery would help
with Jahi’s sleep apnea, but there were
complications during her recovery last
week. Her mother Nailah Winkfield
said Jahi had “actual clots” sliding out
of her mouth, which her mother was
told to catch in a cup for hospital staff
to measure.
A hospital spokeswoman said in a
statement that any surgery is risky and
that the hospital would investigate
what happened. She didn’t provide
details on the surgery.
Stores have free rein
to recoup shoplifting losses
NEW YORK — Outside the view of
paying customers, people accused of
shoplifting at Macy’s huge flagship
store are escorted by security guards to
cells in “Room 140,” where they can
be held for hours, asked to sign an
admission of guilt and pay hundreds in
fines, sometimes without any conclu-
sive proof they stole anything.
As shoppers jam stores ahead of the
December holidays, claims of racial
profiling at department stores in New
York have helped expose the wide lati-
tude that laws in at least 27 states give
retailers to hold and fine shoplifting
suspects, even if a person hasn’t yet
technically stolen anything, is wrong-
ly accused or criminal charges are
dropped.
“You must remember, these people
are not police officers; they are store
employees,” said Faruk Usar, the attor-
ney for a 62-year-old Turkish woman
who sued Macy’s, which some cus-
tomers say bullied them into paying
fines on the spot or harassed them with
letters demanding payment. “When
they are detained, they are not yet even
in a real jail.”
Industrywide, more than $12 billion
is lost to shoplifting each year. The
laws, which vary on strictness and fine
amounts, allow stores to try to recoup
some losses.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actor Bill Pullman
is 60.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1938
German chemists Otto Hahn and Fritz
Strassmann discovered nuclear fission
by splitting the nuclei of uranium
into lighter elements while perform-
ing experiments in Berlin.
“A fool and his money are soon parted, but
you never call him a fool till the money is gone.”
— Author unknown
Comedian-actor
Eugene Levy is 67.
Actress Milla
Jovovich is 38.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A worker collects items to pack into boxes at Amazon’s logistics center in Graben near Augsburg, Germany.
Tuesday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 60s.
East winds 5 to 10 mph...Becoming south
in the afternoon.
Tuesday night: Mostly clear in the
evening then becoming partly cloudy.
Patchy fog. Lows in the upper 40s. South
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Wednesday: Partly cloudy in the morn-
ing then becoming mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morn-
ing. Highs in the mid 50s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly cloudy in the evening then
becoming partly cloudy. Breezy. Aslight chance of showers
in the evening. Lows in the mid 40s. Northwest winds 20 to
30 mph. Chance of showers 20 percent.
Thursday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 50s.
Thursday night through Monday: Mostly clear.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1777, France recognized American independence.
I n 1830, South American patriot Simon Bolivar died in
Colombia.
I n 1865, Franz Schubert’s Symphony No. 8, known as the
“Unfinished” (because only two movements had been com-
pleted) was performed publicly for the first time in Vienna,
37 years after the composer’s death.
I n 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright of Dayton, Ohio, con-
ducted the first successful manned powered-airplane flights
near Kitty Hawk, N.C., using their experimental craft, the
Wright Flyer.
I n 1925, Col. William “Billy” Mitchell was convicted at
his court-martial in Washington of insubordination for
accusing senior military officials of incompetence and crim-
inal negligence; he was suspended from active duty.
I n 1933, in the inaugural NFL championship football
game, the Chicago Bears defeated the New York Giants, 23-
21, at Wrigley Field.
I n 1944, the U.S. Army announced it was ending its poli-
cy of excluding Japanese-Americans from the West Coast.
I n 1957, the United States successfully test-fired the Atlas
intercontinental ballistic missile for the first time.
I n 1959, Stanley Kramer’s anti-nuclear war drama “On the
Beach,” starring Gregory Peck and Ava Gardner, premiered
on all seven continents (including Antarctica).
I n 1979, in a case that aggravated racial tensions, Arthur
McDuffie, a black insurance executive, was fatally injured
after leading police on a chase with his motorcycle in
Miami. (Four white police officers accused of beating
McDuffie were later acquitted, sparking riots.)
I n 1981, members of the Red Brigades kidnapped Brig.
Gen. James L. Dozier, the highest-ranking U.S. Army offi-
cial in southern Europe, from his home in Verona, Italy.
(Dozier was rescued 42 days later. )
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
TOXIN DECAY CHURCH BECKON
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: She was going to try the spicy hot wings, but
she — CHICKENED OUT
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
CNUPH
NIDYK
NOPHOC
VEEBAR
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
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Answer
here:
Actor Armin Mueller-Stahl is 83. Pope Francis is 77.
Singer-actor Tommy Steele is 77. Rock singer-musician Art
Neville is 76. Actor Bernard Hill is 69. Actor Ernie Hudson is
68. Political commentator Chris Matthews is 68. Actress
Marilyn Hassett is 66. Actor Wes Studi is 66. Pop musician
Jim Bonfanti (The Raspberries) is 65. Actor Joel Brooks is
64. Rock singer Paul Rodgers is 64. Rhythm-and-blues singer
Wanda Hutchinson (The Emotions) is 62. Actor Barry
Livingston is 60. Country singer Sharon White is 60.
Producer-director-writer Peter Farrelly is 57. Rock musician
Mike Mills (R.E.M.) is 55.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Gorgeous
George, No. 8, in first place;Winning Spirit, No. 9,
in second place; and Money Bags,No.11,in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:48.55.
6 8 0
19 24 26 27 70 12
Mega number
Dec. 13 Mega Millions
14 25 32 33 41 34
Powerball
Dec. 14 Powerball
3 4 23 26 31
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
0 7 7 1
Daily Four
4 5 1
Daily three evening
10 12 18 22 31 2
Mega number
Dec. 14 Super Lotto Plus
3
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
601 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Hours: Mon.- Sat. 10am to 7pm
Sun. Noon to 6pm
Phone: 650.588.0388
Wish
List!
E V E RY T HI NG
MARKE D
DOWN!
We Don’t Meet
Our Competition,
We Create It
WESTERN
FURNITURE
AND
MATTRESS
WESTERN
FURNITURE
AND
MATTRESS
Make your Holiday
SAN MATEO
Disturbance. Aloud male voice was heard
screaming “Help” on the 1600 block of
South Amphlett Boulevard before 8:48 a.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 10.
Burglary. A garage door was broken into
and items were stolen on the 800 block of
North Amphlett Boulevard before 7:43 a.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 10.
Burglary. Awindow of a home was smashed
on the 300 block of South Ellsworth Avenue
before 8:11 p.m. Monday, Dec. 9.
Hit-and-run. A vehicle was hit on the
1700 block of West Hillsdale Boulevard
before 7:08 p.m. Monday, Dec. 9.
FOSTER CITY
Petty theft. An employee reported that
$100 was stolen from the safe on Shell
Boulevard before 3:28 p.m. Wednesday, Dec.
11.
Propert y f or destructi on. A woman
asked police officers to pick up a BB gun that
she found in her attic on Rigel Lane before
1:54 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 11.
Vandalism. Abench at Turnstone Park has
been spray painted at Turnstone Court before
10:22 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 11.
Police reports
Santa?
A Foster City man reported to police
that he heard his front door open, his
dog bark and a man saying “oh oh”
before 6:27 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 10.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The former finance director of a Menlo
Park seminary and university and her secre-
tary will stand trial in April for allegedly
taking more than $200,000 and stealing a
donated Mercedes Benz.
Jennifer Margaret Morris, 58, is charged
with four counts of felony embezzlement.
Her former secretary, Evelyn D. Vallacqua,
45, is charged with three embezzlement
counts for allegedly helping issue several
improper reimbursement checks to her boss
and accepted unauthorized severance pay-
ments from St. Patrick’s Seminary and
University.
Both women pleaded not guilty to all
charges and were sched-
uled for trial April 7.
The seminary launched
an audit after learning
Morris used her personal
credit card for reimbursed
work purchases to accu-
mulate airline miles. The
audit reportedly uncov-
ered that, between
October 2006 and 2012,
Morris made $166,000 worth of unautho-
rized personal purchases for which she also
reimbursed herself from seminary funds and
overpaid herself at least $36,000 from 2011
to 2012.
Prosecutors also claim
Morris stole a donated
1982 Mercedes Benz by
registering the vehicle in
her name and chargi ng
the registration and main-
tenance costs back to the
seminary.
Vallacqua is accused of
helping Morris with the
reimbursement and also
received severance pay-
ments although she never left the semi-
nary’s employment.
Morris is free from custody on a $200,000
bail bond while Vallacqua is free on
$10,000.
Alleged seminary embezzlers get April trial
Jennifer Morris
Evelyn
Vallacqua
Woman in fatal S.F. crash
facing manslaughter charge
Awoman is facing a vehicular manslaugh-
ter charge in a crash on a San Francisco
street that killed a teenager and injured six
others. Police say 58-year-old Jennie Zhu
was driving at speeds as high as 80 mph
when she rear-ended a minivan on Sept 27.
Prosecutors announced on Monday that she
will be arraigned later in the week on vehicle
manslaughter and reckless driving charges.The
crash killed 16-year-old Kevin San and injured
his mother and sister, all of whom were in the
minivan. Three people in a catering van that
was also struck were also injured.
Zhu has been free on $300,000 bail. A
phone listing for her could not be found.
Around the Bay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BIG SUR — A wildfire burning Monday
in the Big Sur area of California destroyed
at least 15 homes and forced about 100
people to evacuate as it chewed through
dry vegetation on its way toward the
ocean. No injuries were reported.
The fire burned about 500 acres in the
Pfeiffer Ridge area of Los Padres National
Forest near state Highway 1, Los Padres
National Forest spokesman Andrew
Madsen said.
Madsen said the fire destroyed the home
of Big Sur Fire Chief Martha Karstens.
Officials were hopeful that they could con-
tain the blaze within the next couple of
days.
The Red Cross has set up an overnight
shelter for people who have been dis-
placed by the fire, Madsen said.
Big Sur is a popular tourist destination
along the Central California coast with
high-end resorts and beautiful views of the
Pacific Ocean.
Residences were scattered in the path of
the fire that was being battled by 300 fire-
fighters. Officials also brought in air
tankers and helicopters.
The cause of the fire was under investiga-
t i on.
A wildfire so late in the year is unusual
but not surprising given that California is
in the midst of the driest calendar year on
record.
A lightning-sparked wildfire in 2008
forced the evacuation of Big Sur and black-
ened 250 square miles before it was con-
tained. That blaze burned more than a
dozen homes.
Big Sur fire destroys 15 homes, forces 100 to flee
4
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Sobriety checkpoint triggers
car chase, struggles with DUI suspects
South San Francisco police arrested five people on drunk-
en driving charges during a busy sobriety checkpoint on
Saturday night that included a near miss involving a fleeing
red light runner and struggles with intoxicated drivers.
At the checkpoint, which was set up on Westborough
Boulevard from 9 p.m. Saturday to 2 a.m. Sunday, officers
screened 820 vehicles, police said.
In addition to the five DUI arrests, police also cited and
arrested 16 drivers for being unlicensed or driving with a
suspended license. Another 17 drivers were cited, police
said.
One of the DUI arrests involved a driver who was alleged-
ly under the influence of a combination of alcohol and sus-
pected synthetic marijuana. That driver allegedly became
combative with police, and was also arrested on suspicion
of resisting arrest, police said.
Another driver allegedly ran a red light, struck a stop sign
and nearly hit an officer before fleeing, according to police.
That driver was stopped after a short chase and arrested on
suspicion of DUI and evading a police officer, police said.
During another stop, a passenger got out of a car and
allegedly became combative with officers. The passenger
was arrested on suspicion of being drunk in public.
And another driver was arrested on an outstanding DUI
warrant.
South San Francisco police will be conducting three addi-
tional checkpoints in the coming year.
Shots fired, stash of marijuana
found in Old Town neighborhood
South San Francisco police are searching for a suspect
vehicle after shots were fired and a stash of marijuana was
found Friday night in the Old Town neighborhood.
Officers responded to Hickory Place and Armour Avenue
around 9:15 p.m. on Friday after a witness reported hearing
what sounded like two gunshots in the area, police said.
On arriving at the scene, police said they found shattered
window glass and a substantial amount of marijuana on the
west side of Hickory Place, behind 840 Olive Ave.
Neighbors reported seeing a white, four-door sedan with a
shattered front passenger window driving backward north
on Hickory Place, police said.
The vehicle was last seen driving north on Linden Avenue.
Anyone with information on this suspect vehicle or inci-
dent is asked to call South San Francisco police at (650)
877-8900 or to the anonymous tip line at (650) 952-2244.
Local briefs
Ida Lee Giovannoni
Ida Lee Giovannoni, of San Bruno,
died Dec. 12, 2013. She was 91.
She was the daughter of the late
Eugene and Adeline Giovannoni and is
survived by her sister Jean Shelley
(her husband Kenneth); nieces and
nephews, Lee Kocjan (her husband
Jim), Kirk Shelley (his former wife,
Amy Joost) and Lynn Proctor (her hus-
band David); great-nieces and
nephews, Michelle, Matthew and
Marlene Malchow, Daniel Kocjan,
Amanda, Christian and Madison
Shelley and Christina Proctor.
Ida was a native of Fresno and was
brought up in San Francisco. She lived
in San Mateo County for more than 40
years and retired as a Superior Court
clerk from the San Mateo County court
system.
At her request, private family servic-
es will be held with committal at Holy
Cross Cemetery in Colma.
Arrangements are under the direction
of Chapel of the Highlands, Millbrae
(650) 588-5116.
Irene Pardee Degl’Innocenti
Irene Pardee Degl’Innocenti died
peacefully Friday, Dec. 13, 2013.
Irene grew up in Syracuse, N.Y., and
attended Stanford University receiving
a master’s degree in civil engineering.
Irene had a 38-year career with PG&E.
She was a lifelong Girl Scout troop
leader, and coordinator of the Redwood
City Fourth of July Parade. Irene took
part in many lineage societies, and
played the piccolo in the Stanford
Marching Band.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be
made to the Stanford Buck Cardinal
Club or the Stanford Marching Band. A
vigil will be offered 7 p.m. Thursday,
at Crippen & Flynn Woodside Chapel,
400 Woodside Road, with a 10 a.m.
Friday funeral mass at St. Matthias
Catholic Church, 1685 Cordilleras
Road, both in Redwood City.
Obituaries
SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL
San Mateo police Officer Dave Johnson, left, and other volunteers served dinner to the 16 formerly homeless residents at
InnVision Shelter Network’s Vendome Hotel in San Mateo last night.The holiday meal was catered by police Officer Scott
Olcese’s family owned restaurant and retired downtown police Officer Robert Anderson joined to support those he helped
place at the Vendome during his tenure. Mayor Robert Ross also handed out chocolate to the residents.
VENDOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS
5
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE
KATHERINE A. MCMILLAN
Katherine A. McMillan died peacefully surrounded by her
children, on Tuesday, December 10. She was 89 years old.
Born in Worcester, MA, Katherine was the last of nine
children born to Irish immigrants, John Patrick Trumble
and Margaret Kearns Trumble. She graduated from
Sacred Heart Academy as the valedictorian of her class.
Dedicating her life to others, Katherine attended Saint
Vincent School of Nursing and finished her training as a
registered nurse as an ensign in the United States Navy.
Over the course of her marriage to Robert Neal
McMillan they had three children. Moving to Redwood
City in 1956, Katherine began a 30-year career at
Sequoia Community Hospital. She had a great respect
for her profession and infused those with whom she
worked with the same pride and dedication.
After retirement from Sequoia, she went on to establish
the day care center at St. Pius Church, where over a
ten-year period she cared for hundreds of children who
learned to use words like ‘bubbler’ and ‘pocket book’.
Her devotion to her faith was a constant in her life. She
gave tirelessly to the St. Pius Parish where she made
many life-long friends.
Continuing her service to others, Katherine was
appointed to the Health Plan of San Mateo County, working to improve access to quality
health care for the needy. A proud Redwood City resident she had many good times with the
Fun After Fifty group before moving to San Carlos where she enjoyed senior living at The Elms.
She was affectionately known as Mrs. Mac, but she was most proud of becoming Mama,
the moniker her grandsons bestowed on her. All her boys attended Junipero Serra High
School where she was embraced and loved. She was the first woman to receive the Serra
In Via award, given to a non-alumnus who exemplifies a true dedication to the service of
others. She was also delighted to be crowned the first and only homecoming queen at
Serra. She spent hours crocheting yellow and blue scarves worn by many Serra fans. She
loved sitting in the stands cheering on her grandsons Sean and Kenny. She was a rabid
sports fan who loved the Red Sox, Patriots, 49ers and the SF Giants. She was a strong
woman, proud of her Irish heritage, and possessed of a sly wit and a deep faith.
She is survived by her daughters Katherine (Kate Marie), Mary, her son Bobby (Julie), and her
beloved grandsons, Sean and Kenny. The family would like to thank the wonderful care their
mother received from Kaiser Hospice and from Roxan Bartolo her compassionate care giver.
A mass will be held at St. Pius Church at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, December 17, with a
reception to follow in the Fitzsimmons Center at the church. In lieu of flowers, the family
requests that donations be made in Katherine’s memory to the Junipero Serra High School
Padre Annual Fund or to the St. Pius Children’s Center.
Obituary
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOUNTAIN VIEW— California could be a
model for national economic growth after
cutting public programs, raising taxes on
the wealthy and continuing to invest in
infrastructure, California Gov. Jerry Brown
said Monday.
“People were calling it a failed state,”
Brown said. “But the fact is, from a $27 bil-
lion deficit we now have a very significant
surplus that can continue for many years to
come.”
Brown was interviewed by James Bennet,
editor-in-chief of The Atlantic, before an
audience of about 100 technology business
leaders at a Silicon Valley summit focusing
on innovation.
Brown noted that the Silicon Valley was a
source of innovation and revitalization for
California.
“This is still a very yeasty place,” he said,
drawing laughs. “Far from decline we’re in a
very creative stage of our national history. ”
Brown warned that the largest pitfall is
the fact that small special-interest groups
can interfere with efforts for broader nation-
al change.
Brown says state on
track, future bright
By Paul Elias
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — A state judge on Monday
ordered paint companies to pay 10
California cities and counties $1.1 billion
to remove lead from millions of older
homes.
Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge
James Kleinberg found that Conagra
Grocery Products Co., NL Industries Inc.
and the Sherwin-Williams Co. marketed
paint they knew was harmful to children.
Atlantic Richfield Co. and DuPont Co.
were found not liable.
The industry has faced similar lawsuits
across the country but has won most of
them.
Kleinberg’s verdict came after a five-
week trial without a jury. The companies
have 15 days to object to the tentative rul-
ing, which the judge can alter.
“There is a clear and present danger that
needs to be addressed,” Kleinberg wrote in
his 110-page decision. “The defendants
sold lead paint with actual and constructive
knowledge that it was harmful.”
Lead-based paints were barred from the
U.S. market in 1978, but millions of
homes painted before then still pose a
health risk.
The industry argued that it never deliber-
ately sold a harmful product and that the
old paint is no longer a significant public
health risk. The companies argued that
children diagnosed with lead poisoning
could have gotten sick from sources other
than paint.
“The existence of other sources of lead
exposure has no bearing on whether lead
paint constitutes a public nuisance,”
Kleinberg wrote in today’s opinion. “It
does not change the fact that lead paint is
the primary source of lead poisoning for
children in the jurisdictions who live in
pre-1978 housing.”
Bonnie Campbell, a spokeswoman for
the companies, said the paint manufactur-
ers will urge the judge to overturn his deci-
sion. Failing that, she said the companies
will seek a mistrial. If the judge upholds
his verdict, Campbell said the companies
will appeal.
Campbell said the verdict unfairly penal-
izes companies for marketing lead-based
paint in good faith before the health risks
were known. She said the current owners of
pre-1978 painted homes should be respon-
sible for removing the lead.
“The decision rewards scofflaw landlords
who are responsible for the risk to chil-
dren from poorly maintained lead paint,
and it conflicts with and threatens to upend
California’s lead poisoning prevention
programs, which work,” Campbell said.
“This decision is more likely to hurt chil-
dren than help them, and it will likely dis-
rupt the sale, rental and market value of all
homes and apartments built before 1978.”
Exposure to lead is linked to learning
disabilities and other health problems,
especially in children. Some 60,000 chil-
dren under the age of 6 suffered from lead
poisoning between 2007 and 2010 alone
in the jurisdictions who filed the lawsuit,
the judge noted.
Data from the 2010 census show that
close to 5 million homes at issue in the
lawsuit were built before lead paint was
banned in 1978. Homes built before then
are presumed to have been painted with
lead paint.
The case has taken 13 years to reach trial
because of objections from the industry,
but appeals courts have allowed it to pro-
ceed. It alleges the manufacturers knew of
lead-paint dangers starting in the 1890s
but still sold it to consumers without
health warnings.
The ten cities and counties awarded dam-
ages Monday are the counties of Santa
Clara, Alameda, Los Angeles, Monterey,
San Mateo, Solano, and Ventura, and the
cities of Oakland, San Diego and San
Francisco.
Judge: Paint companies to
pay state, cities $1.1 billion
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Gov.Jerry Brown speaks at a news conference in Los Angeles.
“The decision rewards scofflaw
landlords who are responsible
for the risk to children from
poorly maintained lead paint,
and it conflicts with and
threatens to upend California’s
lead poisoning prevention
programs, which work. ...This
decision is more likely to hurt
children than help them.”
— Bonnie Campbell, a
spokeswoman for the paint companies
6
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
It’s all here − the teachers, the traditions, the perfect class
size, the all-girls setting. It’s Notre Dame High School,
and it’s as amazing as the students themselves.
Apply Online
www.ndhsb.org
Notre Dame High School
1540 Ralston Avenue Belmont, CA 94002 650-595-1913 ext. 310
Final Application Date:
January 14, 2014
L sal on & col or gr oup
2 2 3 S o u t h S a n Ma t e o Dr i v e
S a n Ma t e o , CA 9 4 4 0 1
Te l e p h o n e 6 5 0 . 3 4 2 . 6 6 6 8
www. l s a l o n . c o m
by
I
n collaboration with the San
Mateo County Office of
Education, SamTrans i s
launching its annual “Art Takes a
Bus Ride” program, which allows
students to display their creative
visions aboard transit vehicles.
Students submit art, and the winning
entries will be on display as a wrap on
a SamTrans bus that will run through
the service area for approximately
one year. Student artwork will also be
featured on ad cards inside all
SamTrans buses.
This year’s theme is “SamTrans:
See The County, ” a motif aimed to
encourage students to depict the vari-
ous sights and landmarks throughout
the Peninsula. The use of bold, rich
colors and a variety of media, includ-
ing water color, acrylic, crayon and
collage, are encouraged.
You can download the 2014 Art
Takes a Bus Ride entry form at sam-
trans.com. The deadline for entries is
Feb. 24, 2014. Winners will be
revealed at the May 2014 SamTrans
Board of Direct ors meeting.
San Mateo County teachers interest-
ed in more information and how to
submit student entries can call Buena
Dandanat 802-5339 or email bdan-
dan@smcoe.org.
***
The Junipero Serra Award was
presented to the Rev. Tommy Ki ng
’74 on Nov. 26 during a special mass
celebrating the 300th birthday of the
Rev. Junipero Serra. The Junipero
Serra Award is the highest honor
given to a Serra High School
alumnus.
King was honored for his unwaver-
ing support of St . Boni f ace
Churc h in San Francisco’s Tenderloin
neighborhood. He comforts and
encourages people who are struggling
every day. Gracious and compassion-
ate, King has dedicated his life to
helping those in need. His unwaver-
ing support of his community has
made a significant difference in the
lives of thousands of people.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Angela Swartz. You can contact her at (650)
344-5200, ext. 105 or at angela@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Students at Westborough Middle School in South San Francisco participated in Hour of Code computer science programming
events during the Dec. 9 Computer Science Education Week.
The Rev.Tommy King
Feds grant Navy
permit for sonar
training in Pacific
By Julie Watson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — Environmental organizations filed a law-
suit Monday against the National Marine Fisheries Service
to demand it force the Navy to consider alternatives to its
five-year plan that will intensify its sonar use off Southern
California and Hawaii.
Earthjustice, representing several groups, filed the lawsuit
in federal court in Honolulu, only hours after the federal
agency announced it had decided to grant the Navy permits
to move ahead with its plans for training and testing in the
Pacific.
Navy officials estimate its activities would have a negli-
gible impact on marine mammal populations.
Environmentalists dispute that and favor creating zones
that would be off-limits to biologically sensitive areas.
They also want the Navy to avoid training in certain spots
seasonally when they are rich in marine life.
“The science is clear: sonar and live-fire training in the
ocean harms marine mammals,” said Marsha Green of Ocean
Mammal Institute, which is among the groups suing. “There
are safer ways to conduct Navy exercises that include time
and place restrictions to avoid areas known to be vital for
marine mammals’ feeding, breeding and resting.”
The Navy estimates that its activities could inadvertently
kill 186 whales and dolphins off the East Coast and 155 off
Hawaii and Southern California, mostly from explosives.
It calculates more than 11,000 serious injuries off the East
Coast and 2,000 off Hawaii and Southern California, along
with nearly 2 million minor injuries, such as temporary
hearing loss, off each coast. It also predicts marine mam-
mals might change their behavior — such as swimming in a
different direction — in 27 million instances.
NMFS granted the permits for the Atlantic and Gulf of
Mexico last month. The Pacific permit was the final one.
Environmentalists won a small victory in September
when a federal judge ruled the marine fisheries agency did not
consider the latest science when it granted permits last year.
In Monday’s ruling, the agency said it will review the lat-
est scientific data yearly with the Navy to determine if
enough is being done to mitigate the risks.
“The Navy is committed to complying with environmen-
tal laws and protecting the environment,” Navy spokesman
Kenneth Hess said when asked about the lawsuit.
Reported mass strandings of beaked whales have
increased around the world since the military started using
sonar more than half a century ago. The sounds can scare
animals into shallow waters where they can become disori-
ented and wash ashore.
Aside from beachings, biologists are concerned about
prolonged stress from changes in diving, feeding and com-
munication habits. Only in the past decade have scientists
had the technology to closely monitor the behavior of
whales and dolphins.
NATION 7
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted. One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State & Local taxes associ-
ated with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The
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acting in violation of the rules; or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike manner. Entry constitutes agreement for use of name & photo for publicity purposes. Employees of the
Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire Pros and Original Nick’s are not eligible to win. Must be at least 18 years of age. Call with questions or for clarification (650) 344-5200.
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whatsoever for injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.
THE DAILY JOURNAL
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and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
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along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point
total on the Monday night game of the week. If there’s a tie on that total, then a random drawing
will determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certificates to Redwood
General Tire Pros and Original Nick’s. The Daily Journal Pigskin Pick’em Contest is free to play.
Must be 18 or over. Winners will be announced in the Daily Journal.
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also drop off your entries to our office by Friday at 5 p.m. sharp.
Send entry form to: 800 S. Claremont Street, #210, San Mateo, CA 94402. You may enter as many
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your privacy.
By Fredric J. Frommer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — In a ruling with poten-
tially far-reaching consequences, a federal
judge declared Monday that the National
Security Agency’s bulk collection of mil-
lions of Americans’ telephone records like-
ly violates the U.S. Constitution’s ban on
unreasonable search. The ruling, filled with
blistering criticism of the Obama adminis-
tration’s arguments, is the first of its kind
on the controversial program.
Even if NSA’s “metadata” collection of
records should pass constitutional muster,
the judge said, there is little evidence it has
ever prevented a terrorist attack. The collec-
tion program was disclosed by former NSA
systems analyst Edward Snowden, provok-
ing a heated national and international
debate.
U.S. District Court Judge Richard Leon
granted a preliminary injunction against the
collecting of the phone records of two men
who had challenged the program and said
any such records for the men should be
destroyed. But he put enforcement of that
decision on hold pending a near-certain
government appeal, which may well end up
at the Supreme Court.
The injunction applies only to the two
individual plaintiffs, but the ruling is likely
to open the door to much broader challenges
to the records collection and storage.
The plaintiffs are Larry Klayman, a con-
servative lawyer, and Charles Strange, who
is the father of a cryptologist technician
who was killed in Afghanistan when his hel-
icopter was shot down in 2011. The son
worked for the NSA and support personnel
for Navy SEAL Team VI.
Leon, an appointee of President George
W. Bush, ruled that the two men “have a sub-
stantial likelihood of showing” that their
privacy interests outweigh the govern-
ment’s interest in collecting the data “and
therefore the NSA’s bulk collection program
is indeed an unreasonable search under the
Constitution’s Fourth Amendment.”
“I have little doubt that the author of our
Constitution, James Madison, who cau-
tioned us to beware ‘the abridgment of free-
dom of the people by gradual and silent
encroachments by those in power, ’ would be
aghast,” he declared.
In addition to civil liberties critics, big
communications companies are unhappy
with the NSA program, concerned about a
loss of business from major clients who are
worried about government snooping.
President Barack Obama will meet Tuesday
with executives from leading technology
companies. The meeting was previously
scheduled, but the NSAprogram is sure to be
on the agenda, and now the court ruling will
be in the mix.
After the ruling, Andrew C. Ames, a
spokesman for the Justice Department’s
National Security Division, said in a state-
ment, “We’ve seen the opinion and are
studying it. We believe the program is con-
stitutional as previous judges have found.
We have no further comment at this time.”
Snowden, in a statement provided to
reporter Glenn Greenwald and obtained by
the Associated Press, said, “I acted on my
belief that the NSA’s mass surveillance pro-
grams would not withstand a constitutional
challenge and that the American public
deserved a chance to see these issues deter-
mined by open courts. Today, a secret pro-
gram authorized by a secret court was, when
exposed to the light of day, found to violate
Americans’ rights. It is the first of many. ”
Klayman said in a telephone interview
that it was a big day for the country.
“Obviously it’s a great ruling and a correct
ruling, and the first time that in a long time
that a court has stepped in to prevent the
tyranny of the other two branches of gov-
ernment,” he said.
The Obama administration has defended
the program as a crucial tool against terror-
ism.
But in his 68-page, heavily footnoted
opinion, Leon concluded that the govern-
ment didn’t cite a single instance in which
the program “actually stopped an imminent
terrorist attack.”
“I have serious doubts about the efficacy
of the metadata collection program as a
means of conducting time-sensitive investi-
gations in cases involving imminent
threats of terrorism,” he added.
He said was staying his ruling pending
appeal “in light of the significant national
security interests at stake in this case and
the novelty of the constitutional issues.”
The government has argued that under a
1979 Supreme Court ruling, Smith v.
Maryland, no one has an expectation of pri-
vacy in the telephone data that phone com-
panies keep as business records. In that rul-
ing, the high court rejected the claim that
police need a warrant to obtain such records.
But Leon said that was a “far cry” from the
issue in this case. The question, he said, is,
“When do present-day circumstances — the
evolutions in the government’s surveil-
lance capabilities, citizens’ phone habits,
and the relationship between the NSA and
telecom companies — become so thorough-
ly unlike those considered by the Supreme
Court 34 years ago that a precedent like
Smith simply does not apply? The answer,
unfortunately for the government, is now. ”
He wrote that the court in 1979 couldn’t
have imagined how people interact with
their phones nowadays, citing the explo-
sion of cellphones. In addition, he said, the
Smith case involved a search of just a few
days, while “there is the very real prospect
that the (NSA) program will go on for as
long as America is combatting terrorism,
which realistically could be forever!”
Leon added: “The almost-Orwellian tech-
nology that enables the government to
store and analyze the phone metadata of
every telephone user in the United States is
unlike anything that could have been con-
ceived of in 1979.”
The judge also mocked the government’s
contention that it would be burdensome to
comply with any court order that requires the
NSA to remove the plaintiffs from its data-
base.
Mega Millions jackpot
climbs to $586 million
DES MOINES, Iowa — The Mega Millions
jackpot inched toward a U.S. lottery record
Monday as it soared to $586 million amid a
frenzy of ticket purchases, raising the possi-
bility that the prize could pass the once-
unthinkable $1 billion mark by Christmas
Eve should nobody win before then.
Paula Otto, executive director of the
Virginia Lottery and lead director for Mega
Millions, said ticket sales are ahead of pro-
jections for Tuesday’s drawing, increasing
the likelihood it could shatter the current
record of $656 million, set in a March 2012
Mega Millions drawing.
That was enough for Drew Gentsch to buy
one ticket Monday morning. The attorney
from Des Moines never plays, but the bal-
looning jackpot was too good to pass up.
“I think it’s ridiculous but you have to
dream big,” he said. “The odds of winning are
so low, there’s no real reason to play. But it’s
fun to do so once in a while.”
The large Mega Millions prize is the prod-
uct of a major game revamp in October that
dramatically lowered the odds of winning the
jackpot. If a winner isn’t selected Tuesday
night and it rolls over past the next drawing
scheduled Friday night, Otto predicts the
jackpot will reach $1 billion — an unheard of
amount for Mega Millions or Powerball, the
nation’s two main lottery games.
No suspicious devices
found at Harvard after email
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Four buildings on
Harvard University’s campus were evacuated
Monday after police received an email claim-
ing that explosive devices may have been
hidden inside, but after hours of searches and
disruptions to final exams, no suspicious
devices were found.
The buildings were evacuated and access to
Harvard Yard was restricted after the email was
received at about 8:40 a.m. Monday, shortly
before students were set to begin final exams.
Investigators from several agencies
searched the buildings for hours and cleared
students to return to all four by mid-after-
noon. One of the buildings was a freshman
dormitory; classes are held in the other three.
In a statement to the Harvard community,
Harvard Executive Vice President Katie Lapp
said that the buildings were evacuated “out of
an abundance of caution” and that activities
at the Ivy League school in Cambridge were
returning to normal.
Judge: NSA program is
likely unconstitutional
REUTERS
A National Security Agency data gathering facility is seen in Bluffdale, about 25 miles south
of Salt Lake City, Utah.
Around the nation
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don’t close your eyes even when you’re
sleeping.”
Community Day School students’ atti-
tudes toward the program have changed
since it first began. An independent film
crew even came by during the morning ses-
sion to record the process. The meditation
is encouraged, but not considered mandato-
ry. Principal R. Marshall Burgamy said ini-
tially students were concerned it wouldn’t fit
their street personas.
“I thought it was weird and funny,” said
one student following a meditation ses-
sion. “I didn’t take it seriously. It helped me
with my problems at home and controlling
my anger.”
Data backs up the student improvement,
Sequoia administrators say. According to
data from Center for Wellness and
Achievement in Education, the number of
suspensions was cut in half from 13 per 100
students in 2006-07 to six per 100 students
in 2010-11 at San Francisco’s Visitacion
Valley Middle School over a five-year peri-
od. Truancy rates, defined as having more
than three unexcused absences or being
tardy more than three times per year, have
dropped by 61 percent, from 18 percent of
students in 2006-07 to just 7 percent in
2010-11.
Results of the Quiet Time program in
Oakland and San Francisco include
improved school-wide grade point average,
increased attendance, decreased suspen-
sions and school violence, reduced student
anxiety and psychological distress,
increased self-esteem, higher standardized
test scores, decreased burnout and stress in
teachers and administrators, increased emo-
tional intelligence and increased coping
ability in adults.
Another Community Day School student
said it also helped him control his anger at
home.
“At home I used to blow up quick,” he
said. “I’m more calm now and my reaction
to situations is different.”
“Meditation is my medicine,” said one,
while another said he feels better since the
meditation and no longer comes to school
with an attitude. One put a hood on and
pulled his hair in front of his face as a cur-
tain of space, said Li.
Burgamy, who is stepping down when the
semester ends, said as a former military
member and Type A personality, he never
expected he could do this meditation him-
self.
“It allows for more resiliency and flexi-
bility both mentally and physically,” he
said. “Students have told me it’s a time to be
free outside of struggles with their family
and friends. It’s an important thing to be
working on their emotional intellect.”
Teacher Jason Kinser said he just didn’t
think this would work as well as it did.
There are about 30 students, all of color
and lower socioeconomic backgrounds,
enrolled in the Community Day School that
focuses on helping transition students back
into the district. Now, 19 are eligible for
readmission into regular district schools,
such as Redwood High School, in January
2014. The number of students in the pro-
gram has been reduced significantly, as the
number of expulsions has decreased from
125 students in the 2008-09 school year to
just 36 students in the 2012-13 school
year. About 10 to 12 students will need to
continue to serve their expulsion terms in
January 2014; these students will be trans-
ferred to Gateway, a San Mateo County
Community School. The success of the
comprehensive high schools in retaining
students has eradicated the need for the dis-
trict to run its own program, according to a
staff report.
“We’ve put ourselves out of business in a
positive way,” Burgamy said. “Attendance
is up, discipline is down, there’s been no
suspensions since it started, grades are up
and self-reported attitudes are up.”
Pamela Kurtzman, director of grants and
programs for the Sequoia Healthcare
District, said she would like to see more
funding from the school district or another
source go to Redwood High School or
another school in the district. She would
also like to be able to follow the students
from Community Day School’s progress.
At first, she said Quiet Time sounded a little
hokie pokie to her, but the kids really seem
to love it and are benefiting from it.
“The research was really intriguing,” she
said. “We were looking for something
unique that might make a difference. There
is real promise for having something like
this as an elective for most comprehensive
schools. It’s still a little early to make any
decisions. We have a really tight budget and
our annual expenses are pretty tight.”
Noah Schechtman, director of school pro-
grams for the Center for Wellness and
Achievement in Education, said Quiet Time
has many practical uses.
“For a student that is coming to school
with a very high stress level having that
kind of support and education you could see
it as a prerequisite to learn effectively,” he
said. “It can sound like a luxury, but it sup-
ports social and emotional learning and is a
stress management technique.”
Those involved in the program would like
to see it in a variety of schools.
“We’re finding stress is not unique to low-
income populations,” Schechtman said.
“There’s different kinds of stress; be it pres-
sure to get into Stanford (University) or to
commit crime.”
School district staff will bring recom-
mendations for proposed utilization of the
Green Street site in East Palo Alto at a future
board meeting. The Quiet Time program at
the school wraps up at the end of this
semester.
Continued from page 1
QUIET
Avenue, lied to other school parents about
the circumstances after a state agency man-
dated she alert them and acted as though
police officers doing follow-up investiga-
tion were “simply there for career day. ”
“The letter makes it sound like it was once
and only two kids playing doctor. That’s not
what happened,” said the girl’s mom, identi-
fied as Jane Roe to protect her daughter’s
identity.
The girl, who had been enrolled at Happy
Hall School since 2010, left 30 days shy of
the 2012 school year end because of inci-
dents and is still processing what happened
with the boy and the school, Roe said.
Roe said she was driving with her daughter
when the girl shared that in April 2012 a
boy in her class had taken off her clothes
and touched her inappropriately.
“My jaw dropped,” she said.
The parents also learned the girl allegedly
had the same thing happen numerous times
previously in several on-campus locations
like a play yard tunnel and log cabin, behind
a cupboard door and under a table when the
children were unsupervised.
Roe said she told Johnson in a tearful
meeting and was shocked that the owner did-
n’t seem to understand her responsibility as
a mandated reporter. Johnson refused to
remove the boy from the school or the girl’s
play group and instead argued it “was not
always in the families’ best interest to get
the authorities involved.” The suit also
claims Johnson “had the gall” to jokingly
tell the mother to “be sure to ‘invite her to
the [kids’] wedding.’”
“I was just floored. I couldn’t believe it
because she was certainly not reacting to
this the way I was, that this was a viola-
tion,” Roe said.
On April 27, the California Department of
Social Services validated claims the girl’s
personal rights were violated by lack of
supervision and issued a written investiga-
tive report including recommendations like
that staff remind children about inappropri-
ate behavior and send parents a letter.
The April 30 letter from Johnson said a
family reported their child being touched
but did not specify how many times. The let-
ter also said the parents met with a pediatri-
cian and therapist who recommended the
girl remain at the school.
Roe took issue with both.
“It makes it sound like this was two kids
playing doctor. It was not,” Roe said. “And
her therapist specifically said she should
not go back to the school if the boy is
there.”
Following the state investigation, the
school repositioned some of its equipment
so that it could see the students at all times.
Roe and her husband pulled the girl out of
the school about a month shy of the school
year but Johnson did not refund any of the
$1,100 monthly tuition, the suit stated.
The girl couldn’t say goodbye to her
friend and teachers and birthday parties were
off limits because they didn’t know if the
boy would be there, Roe said.
This past summer, Roe said her daughter
and the boy ended up at the same summer day
camp after which she reached out to his par-
ents about the earlier alleged incidents.
It was the first they had heard of it, Roe
said.
Roe said she is frustrated and alarmed by
the situation not just for her own child but
out of concern for what issues might need
resolution on the boy’s behalf or other chil-
dren who might be put in similar circum-
stances.
Johnson was not available for comment.
The interim director returned an inquiry but
did not respond to questions about the law-
suit. Happy Hall was established in 1951
and serves children 18 months to sixth-
grade. Johnson began as executive director
in 1976 followed by owner in 1990, accord-
ing to the school’s website.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
SUIT
OPINION 9
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Anna Eshoo,
Mike Honda and Zoe Lofgren
N
o one who lives on the
Peninsula and in the Santa
Clara Valley can question the
importance of open spaces and gor-
geous landscapes to our quality of
life, the water we drink, the air we
breathe and our very identity.
Preserving these treasured areas is
synonymous with life itself.
Over the last several decades, our
region has enjoyed astonishing eco-
nomic growth and has welcomed mil-
lions of new residents. Acreage that
may have once been used for dairy
farming is now home to advanced
manufacturers, innovative software
companies and clean energy startups.
This growth has been immensely
valuable to our economy and job cre-
ation, but it has not come without
challenges for maintaining open
spaces.
Thankfully, 40 years ago this year a
group of visionary citizen activists
recognized the potential of our
region’s unprecedented growth and
development — for better and worse.
They understood that action had to be
taken if our region’s unspoiled lands
were to be preserved for future genera-
tions. With voter approval, they
established the Midpeninsula
Regional Open Space District and
began the work of preserving open
spaces for the benefit of our communi-
ties. Twenty years later, the Santa
Clara County Open Space Authority
embraced a similar mission to protect
the valley and has been promoting
open space, environmental preserva-
tion and public recreation ever since.
Through the
explosion of
growth in the
1970s and ’80s, a
tech revolution that
transformed the
local economy and
our community
identity in the
’90s, and the Great
Recession of the
last decade, Midpen
and the authority
have worked tire-
lessly to protect
open spaces. Both
districts have lever-
aged modest fund-
ing to bring in mil-
lions more in pri-
vate, state and fed-
eral dollars, allow-
ing them to pur-
chase open space
and preserve it.
Together, they now
protect more than
78,000 acres in two
counties, and they
keep working to add more as opportu-
nities arise. Their work has also
helped farmers and ranchers carry on a
proud local heritage of agriculture.
But Midpen and the authority con-
tinually face new challenges that
require a recommitment to their cause.
Pollution continues to threaten our
air, water and land, and the ever-pres-
ent danger of major wildfires has been
exacerbated by years of budget cuts to
fire prevention services. Both must
confront these challenges and plan
for the coming decades. Success
requires a clear vision, a specific plan,
adequate funding and, most important,
the support and involvement of the
public. Everyone is impacted.
It’s important to celebrate the
remarkable successes of the
Midpeninsula Regional Open Space
District and the Santa Clara Valley
Open Space Authority and what their
work has contributed to our region’s
health, environment and quality of
life. But we must also use this occa-
sion as a call to action. We fully sup-
port both districts as they continue to
protect open spaces and serve our res-
idents for another 40 years. And we
urge all residents to visit our region’s
wonderful open spaces, breathe in the
clean air and take in the awesome
beauty they offer.
Join us in celebrating the fore-
sight of those citizen activists from
40 years ago and the organizations
that have carried out their vision
which distinguishes our region as one
of the most naturally beautiful metro-
politan regions in the world, as well
as a place that embraces the values of
preserving and protecting lands for
generations to come.
Anna Eshoo represents District 18 in
the U.S. House of Representatives,
Mike Honda represents District 17 and
Zoe Lofgren represents District 19.
Honoring Silicon Valley’s open space districts
Boston Herald
W
hat does it say about the
state of Russia today
when the official state
news agency is dissolved to make
way for another that presumably will
toady up more reliably to President
Vladimir Putin?
RIA Novosti, which had acquired a
certain credibility for fact-based
reporting, must have been too credi-
ble and too serious for its govern-
ment sponsor.
So with a flick of his pen, Putin
dissolved RIA Novosti and
announced the creation of Rossiya
Segodnya (Russia Today) to be head-
ed by former news anchor Dmitry
Kiselyov, a Putin loyalist and unre-
pentant homophobe (who has made
public comments demanding homo-
sexuals be banned from donating
organs for transplants).
Reporting on its own demise, RIA
said in its English-language version
of Putin’s actions, “The move is the
latest in a series of shifts in Russia’s
news landscape which appear to
point towards a tightening of state
control in the already heavily regu-
lated media sector. ”
Putin’s decree said the main focus
of Rossiya Segodnya “is to high-
light abroad the state policy and
public life of the Russian
Federation.”
Just what the world — and Russia
— needs more of: propaganda.
Russian media is already replete with
happy talk and trivia passing for
“news.” Its television programming
— which remains influential in all
Russian-speaking elements of the
old Soviet Union, including Central
Asia — gives new meaning to the
old term “vast wasteland.”
Is it any wonder that hundreds of
thousands of Ukrainians have taken
to the streets — and tore down a
statue of Lenin last weekend — to
protest the turn toward Moscow of
their own president? The old Soviet
handwriting is on the wall. But a
generation raised with new freedoms
and new ways of communicating
wants no part of it.
An American president who actual-
ly stood for American values would
hear their pleas and tell them they
still have a friend in the United
States.
Back to USSR
Deck the halls, and
maybe some others
‘T
is the season to deck the halls. Of course, as
with most holidays that turn falalalala into
fisticuffs, the December holiday season also
seems to be a pretty good time to deck somebody else, or
at least think strongly about doing so. Blame the extra
brandy in the egg nog. Blame the elbowing mall crowds.
Blame St. Nick himself. Blame folks thinking the
biggest balls in the room aren’t those festooning the
Christmas tree. But regardless of which mischievous elf
is behind this year’s naughty list, seems for some revel-
ers the only yule log worth having is the one aimed at
somebody else’s head.
Or maybe one’s own.
In China, a 38-year-old
man leapt to his death at a
mall after his girlfriend
insisted they continue shop-
ping, according to pub-
lished reports. Supposedly
the couple had shopped for
five hours before he leapt. Is
this shop till you drop or
just proof that retail therapy
isn’t quite the same as a cou-
ple’s secession? All joking
aside, witnesses said the
man told the girlfriend —
who was after yet another pair of shoes — that she had
more than she could wear in a lifetime. She replied by
calling him cheap and accusing him of ruining
Christmas. Obviously. Eventually the man ended the spat
with a seven-story plummet.
The mall spokesman said, and I can’t make this up this
level of dry understatement, “This is a tragic incident but
this time of year can be very stressful for many people.”
Stressful indeed.
What about the stress of putting on just the perfect
show?
South Carolina police were called to a home to break up
a fight between three female relatives — ages 76, 61 and
24 — who pushed and yelled over decorating the family
tree. Seems two of the ladies went to work on the tree
while the third went to actual work. Obviously a no-no.
She must have wanted a say on where to drape the gar-
land. At the end of the scuffle, police said the family
made amends, that is after an ambulance was called
because the eldest of the ladies worried about her blood
pressure.
Those with rock-solid views on the winter holidays
have plenty to test the limits of their blood pressure
without family members bickering over the best tree top-
per. First there’s Megyn Kelly insisting Santa is white
which will either annoy you for the narrow race view or
annoy you that the conversation is even news.
Then there’s the new “holiday stamps” which includes
Kwanzaa and Hanukkah but somehow leaves out
Christmas. The contingent that gets angry at “X-mas”
and “Happy Holidays” and “winter break” probably just
blew a blood vessel. In the post office’s defense, the ad
for the stamps does show a gingerbread house along with
the Hanukkah candles and the open book of Kwanzaa but
there is no actual holiday named spelled out. Frankly,
what else did people think the gingerbread house repre-
sented — Labor Day?
But if saying “Merry Christmas” is a key ingredient to
the holidays, head over to Texas where a Republican state
representative is sponsoring a measure removing legal
risks from exchanging holiday greetings in classes and
protects holiday symbols at school. The law also makes
it unconstitutional for schools to favor one religion over
the other and yet, interestingly, is named in the honor of
Christmas.
I guess when you send out that news, don’t use a
postage stamp.
And then there are those who think the bit about the
holidays being merry and bright means a good old-fash-
ioned shiner. And by those I mean Santa.
Over the weekend, about eight men partying it up at a
New York SantaCon took the idea of Christmas spirits a
little too literally and ended up brawling with each other
in the snow. Then, they did what any good Santa would
do. They posted the footage on YouTube so that every-
body tired of stop motion animation Rudolph flicks and
“AChristmas Story” can start a new holiday viewing ritu-
al.
Sadly for this bunch of St. Nicks, not to mention some
of these other pre-holiday bruisers, their celebrating
came a tad too early. Hold off until Dec. 26 and they can
at least claim to be actively observing Boxing Day.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-
5200 ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,884.57 +129.21 10-Yr Bond 2.877 +0.01
Nasdaq 4,029.52 +28.54 Oil (per barrel) 97.29
S&P 500 1,786.54 +11.22 Gold 1,240.60
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Monday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Exxon Mobil Corp., up $1.91 at $97.22
The oil and gas company’s stock hit an all-time high after Goldman Sachs
raised its investment rating on Exxon’s shares to “Buy.”
Herbalife Ltd., up $6.45 to $74.83
A re-audit of more than three years of the nutritional supplement
company’s financial results found no need for material changes to its
prior statements.
AerCap Holdings N.V., up $8.24 at $33.17
The aircraft leasing company is buying American International Group
Inc.’s aircraft leasing business in a $5.4 billion deal.
Ryder System Inc., up $2.07 at $69.76
The truck leasing company said its board has approved the repurchase
of up to 2 million shares of its common stock.
Nasdaq
Expedia Inc., up $3.15 at $65.88
Shares of the online travel company rose after a UBS analyst said that
Expedia is on the track for long-term growth.
LSI Corp., up $3.05 at $10.96
Chipmaker Avago Technologies Ltd. is buying LSI for $6.6 billion to help
strengthen its position in the enterprise storage market.
NuPathe Inc., up $1.09 at $3.39
Medical device developer Endo Health Solutions Inc. plans to buy the
migraine treatment maker for about $105 million.
Solta Medical Inc., up 83 cents at $2.92
Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc.said it plans to buy the medical
device systems maker for about $250 million.
Big movers
By Joshua Freed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stocks raced higher after two down
weeks, as investors warmed up to the
idea that the economy is getting better.
Stocks have fallen lately after good
economic news as investors worried
that the Federal Reserve would think
its stimulus was no longer needed.
But Monday’s gains, driven by two
corporate deals and a strong report on
manufacturing, suggested that
investors are focused more on growth
and less on the central bank’s
actions.
For a while, investors felt, “‘Oh my
goodness, we won’t be able to sur-
vive without Fed support.’ But people
are actually seeing that things really
are getting better,” said Brad
McMillan, chief investment officer
for Commonwealth Financial.
The Fed meets for two days begin-
ning Tuesday, and officials could sig-
nal when the Fed will dial back the
stimulus that has helped boost the
stock market this year.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose 129 points, or 0.8 percent, to
close at 15,884.57, after rising
almost 175 points in the morning.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose
11 points, or 0.6 percent, to
1, 786. 54. The Nasdaq composite was
higher by 28 points, or 0.7 percent,
at 4,029.52.
The gains ended what had been a
four-day losing streak for the S&P
500 index, beginning the week on
the upbeat note after two down
weeks.
Two major deals caught investors’
attention: Chipmaker Avago
Technologies is buying LSI Corp. for
$6.6 billion. Avago rose $4.45, or
10 percent, to $50.10, while LSI rose
$3.05, or 39 percent, to $10.96.
AIG is selling its aircraft leasing
business for about $5.4 billion to
Dutch leasing company AerCap. AIG
has been selling major assets after
getting a bailout during the financial
crisis. Its shares rose 55 cents, or 1
percent, to $50.28.
The Avago-LSI deal helped make
tech stocks the biggest gainers
among the 10 industries in the S&P
500. Others winners included com-
puter hard drive makers Western
Digital and Seagate, which benefited
from analyst upgrades.
Of those 10 industries, only con-
sumer staples fell.
Also Monday, the Federal Reserve
said factory production accelerated in
November as auto production surged.
The gains in manufacturing could
help boost economic growth.
Just last week, such positive
reports made investors nervous. They
feared the Fed would think the econo-
my was doing so well that its $85 bil-
lion in monthly bond-buying was no
longer needed.
The Fed will release a statement and
projections for the economy
Wednesday. Economists are almost
unanimous in believing the Fed will
not begin winding down its stimulus
program yet.
This year’s stock rally has been
fueled by that stimulus, higher corpo-
rate earnings, and a slow but steady
recovery in the U.S. economy. All of
the big indexes are up more than 20
percent.
Karyn Cavanaugh, market strate-
gist with ING U.S. Investment
Management, said she doesn’t expect
such large returns next year — maybe
more like 10 percent.
“But that’s actually good for
investor confidence,” she said.
“When they see these big huge num-
bers, I think they look at it with kind
of a jaded eye and think, ‘Is that real-
ly sustainable? Maybe it’s already
run its course so I want to get out.”’
Energy stocks rose, led by Tesoro,
which runs refineries and gas sta-
tions. It was up $2.07, or 4 percent,
at $58.37. Exxon Mobil rose $1.91,
or 2 percent, to $97.22 after being
upgraded by Goldman Sachs.
Stocks rise on signs of stronger economy
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Google may be
gearing up to build robots that resemble
props in science-fiction movies as the
ambitious Internet company expands
into yet another technological frontier.
To gather the expertise and research it
needs, Google has purchased eight
companies that specialize in robotics
this year. The acquisitions are being
assembled into a new robotics division
headed by Andy Rubin, who oversaw
Google’s development of Android, now
the world’s leading mobile operating
system.
Google Inc. added more pieces to its
growing toolbox of robotics late last
week with the purchase of Boston
Dynamics, a military contractor that
has raised intrigue by releasing videos
of its inventions in recent years. Those
inventions include a four-legged robot
capable of galloping past Olympian
sprinters and a jumping contraption
that can leap onto tall buildings.
Another video of a creepy-looking four-
footed machine has been watched more
than 15 million times since it was post-
ed on Google’s YouTube site five years
ago.
Besides designing animal-like
robots, Boston Dynamics also has
been working on humanoids as part of a
$10.8 million contract with the U.S.
government’s Defense Advanced
Research Projects Agency, or DARPA.
Boston Dynamics’ links to the U.S.
military has inspired comparisons of
its work with the ruthless cyborgs that
overthrew humans in the “Terminator”
movies. Founded in 1992 by former
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
professor Marc Raibert, Boston
Dynamics says it is dedicating to
“changing your idea of what robots can
do.”
Google confirmed the Boston
Dynamics purchase on Monday, but
declined to reveal any other informa-
tion, including the sales price.
Rubin, though, evidently views the
Waltham, Mass., company’s technolo-
gy as a key to Google’s robotics plans.
“The future is looking awesome,”
Rubin wrote about the acquisition in a
message posted on his Twitter account
late Friday, after news of the deal leaked
out.
Google deal adds to company’s robotics toolbox
Obama to meet with
tech CEOs amid NSA concerns
WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama will meet
Tuesday with executives from leading technology compa-
nies, including Google, Twitter and Apple.
The White House says the meeting will focus on efforts
to repair the Obama administration’s HealthCare.gov
website and reforming government information technol-
ogy. Leaks related to National Security Agency’s surveil-
lance programs are also on the agenda. Obama will also
discuss ways government and tech can partner to grow the
economy.
A number of the companies attending, including
Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and Facebook, are urging
Obama to curb surveillance programs after the extent of
the information the U.S. collects through their systems
was revealed. Several companies are introducing more
encryption technology to shield users’ data from govern-
ment spies and other prying eyes.
CEOs from Netflix, Comcast, LinkedIn, Etsy and AT&T
will also join Tuesday’s session.
U.S. regulators sue online lender CashCall
WASHINGTON — Federal regulators have sued online
lender CashCall Inc., its owner and two related compa-
nies, accusing them of collecting money that consumers
didn’t owe.
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau alleged in
its suit filed Monday that CashCall made loans that vio-
lated licensing rules, interest-rate caps or both in at least
eight states.
The Anaheim-based company disputes the allegations
and plans to fight them in court. Through its lawyers,
CashCall says the CFPB exceeded its congressional man-
date by attempting to cap interest rates.
CashCall, its subsidiary WS Funding and collection
agency Delbert Services Corp. are owned by J. Paul
Reddam, a philosophy professor-turned-businessman
who gained fame last year when his horse, I’ll Have
Another, won the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness
Stakes.
Union to begin voting this week on UC contract
LOS ANGELES — Voting is set to begin on a contract
for more than 12,000 researchers, technical employees
and health care professionals who work for the University
of California — a deal one labor observer said Monday
could serve as a guidepost for other unions still trying to
hammer out agreements with the system.
The tentative deal on the four-year contract was recent-
ly reached between UC and negotiators for the University
Professional & Technical Employees union. The vote by
members is expected this week.
The agreement prevents the creation of a two-tiered
pension system that would have pushed back retirement
benefits from age 60 to 65.
Business briefs
By Joe McDonald
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIJING — Apple Inc. might have a
chance to pep up cooling iPhone sales
in China if it finally can reach a deal
with the world’s biggest phone carrier.
Once China’s must-have gadget, the
iPhone has seen its explosive popular-
ity squeezed as the market filled with
lower-priced rivals from Samsung to
ambitious local brands. Some analysts
say anybody who wants an iPhone and
can afford it already has one.
That might change if Apple can gain
access to China Mobile Ltd.’s network
and a new pool of potential customers.
After a yearslong courtship, there
are signs the two corporate giants
might finally be edging toward a
deal. The Wall Street Journal said it
could be announced as early as this
week, though China Mobile
spokespeople have said the compa-
nies were still talking.
On Monday, China Mobile’s website
was taking orders for a mystery phone
called “Ming Xing,” or Bright Star. It
showed a handset silhouette like that
of an iPhone but gave no brand name.
The timing looks right. Just as
Apple’s sales growth in China cools,
China Mobile received approval Dec.
5 to start operating the world’s fourth-
generation network and needs to mar-
ket it.
Possible China deal could pep up iPhone sales
“Y
ou shocked the world!” That’
how Sacred Heart Prep foot-
ball coach Pete Lavorato start-
ed his post-game meeting with his team
following the Gators’ stunning 42-7 win
over El Cerrito in the Northern California
Division III regional championship game
at De Anza High in Richmond Saturday
night, sending the Gators to the Southern
California for the
state championship
game.
And as Lavorato
would tell reporters
later, it was no fluke.
The team no one had
heard of — let alone
given a chance —
dominated the North
Coast Section’s best
the way it had all sea-
son: suffocating
defense and virtually
unstoppable offense.
While El Cerrito
featured a quartet of players already commit-
ted to Division I college programs, the
Gators featured a better team, which proved
to be the difference. Unlike the college or
pro level, a lesser-talented team can beat
teams known more for its individual talent
in high school for one simple reason,
which Lavorato explained.
“It’s not about Xs and Os,” Lavorato said.
“It’s about execution.”
The Gators out-executed the Gauchos in
every facet of the game, which is why I
gave SHP a shot to beat El Cerrito, one of
the few who did. No one, other than the
SHP team and Gator Nation, gave the small,
private school from Atherton much of a
chance to win. But the Gators had full faith
in their scheme and abilities. If nothing
else, the Gators were going to make sure
the Gauchos know they were in a game, win
or lose.
“We said, ‘We belong here.’ We saw an
undisciplined team and we thought we could
take them,’” said SHP’s Ben Burr-Kirven
1390 El Camino Real, Millbrae 94030
Reservations (650) 742-1003
(located in La Quinta Hotel. Free Parking)
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
Serving Lunch & Dinner
Featuring Wagyu Beef
imported from Japan
<<< Page 12, David Shaw says
he’s staying on The Farm
Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2013
PRO BOWL DRAFT?: JERRY RICE LAYS OUT A PLAN >> PAGE 13
SHP proves
it belonged
See LOUNGE, Page 14
By John Horgan
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Sacred Heart Prep’s appearance in this
weekend’s Division III California
Interscholastic Federation State
Championship Bowl Game in Carson marks
the first time in almost 90 years that a San
Mateo County prep football team has been
in this position.
The last county team to capture (or play
for) a state football title of any kind was San
Mateo High School way back in 1926.
Calvin Coolidge was president and a three-
bedroom house in Belmont would set you
back $5,000 that year.
The Bearcats of Coach Clifford Mitchell
won the Golden State’s prep football crown
by shutting out Covina of Southern
California, 20-0.
The game was played at what would soon
be Burlingame High School’s new facility
on Oak Grove Avenue. The Burlingame cam-
pus was still an annex of San Mateo in
1926. Burlingame became a separate school
during the 1927-28 academic year.
An estimated 9,000 fans managed to
shoehorn their way in to the Burlingame
field to view the championship proceed-
ings, according to reports at the time.
In 1926, the Bearcats posted a 9-1-1 over-
all record, with only a 13-0 loss to Lick-
Wilmerding of San Francisco and a 7-7 tie
See 49ERS, Page 14
Miller likely out for year
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — Do-everything 49ers
fullback Bruce Miller is expected to miss
the remainder of the regular season and the
playoffs with a left shoulder blade injury
sustained during Sunday’s win at Tampa Bay.
“It doesn’t look good. It looks like he has
an injury to his scapula,” coach Jim
Harbaugh said Monday. “He does so many
things in the protection, in the run game,
receiving out of the back field. He is a mul-
titalented, multi-use player. Special teams
contributor on two, three phases. It’s a
loss.”
While the 49ers have “a pretty good idea”
how long Miller will need to recover,
Harbaugh declined to say except for “it’s
something he’ll heal from.”
Former Stanford fullback Owen Marecic
was expected at team headquarters to under-
go a physical and conditioning test with the
intent of re-signing him to help fill the void
if all goes well during the visit. Marecic
spent a stint with the team from Sept. 17 to
Oct. 2.
“Owen Marecic’s hopefully en route and
we’ll look at our options,” Harbaugh said.
“The possibility of signing Owen Marecic,
Anthony Dixon (also could play fullback).
Then we could get creative with some other
guys on the team.”
After Sunday’s 33-14 victory, Miller had a
tough time using the arm. He took a hard hit
from Buccaneers safety Keith Tandy after a
10-yard catch midway through the fourth
quarter.
Miller has been a key blocker for 1,000-
yard rusher Frank Gore, and has 25 catches
for 243 yards for the 49ers (10-4), who are
riding a four-game winning streak as they
prepare for next Monday night’s game
against Atlanta in a rematch of the NFC
championship game and the finale at
Candlestick Park.
Third-year pro Miller’s job is among the
most crucial in the running game. Miller
worked to convert from college defensive
end to NFL fullback.
USA TODAY SPORTS
Bruce Miller, right, injured his s houlder in San Francisco’s win over Tampa Bay.
San Mateo was first to claim a state title
See STATE, Page 14
Ravens beat Lions
18-16 on Tucker’s 6 field goals
DETROIT — Justin Tucker’s career-long
61-yard field goal with 38 seconds left lift-
ed the Baltimore Ravens to an 18-16 win
over the Detroit Lions in a Monday night
matchup with major playoff implications.
Ravens rookie safety Matt Elam sealed
the victory with an interception —
Matthew Stafford’s third of the night.
Stafford threw a 14-yard touchdown pass
to Joseph Fauria with 2:21 left, putting
Detroit ahead 16-15. But the Lions were
unable to make a 2-point conversion and
couldn’t prevent Baltimore from setting up
its sensational kicker for his sixth field
goal of the game and 33rd in a row.
The defending Super Bowl champion
Ravens (8-6) are in control of an AFC wild
card following their fourth straight win.
Detroit (7-7) has hurt its playoff chances
by losing four of its last five.
SPORTS 12
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — David Shaw has a message
for anybody who believes he’s going to
leave Stanford for the NFL after this season:
no chance.
The Cardinal coach said
Monday night that the
growing mention of his
name for NFL jobs is
“very flattering.”
He said he was bothered
by the speculation last
year but now “it’s just a
testament to being a real-
ly good college football
program.”
“No matter what I say, the rumors aren’t
going to stop,” Shaw said. “It doesn’t bother
me. Every good football program in the last
15 years, after two good years, the head
coach is going to be rumored to go some-
place else. I take it as a compliment.”
Shaw was promoted from offensive coordi-
nator after Jim Harbaugh left for the San
Francisco 49ers in January 2011. While
Harbaugh built the foundation for the pro-
gram’s renaissance, Shaw has taken his alma
mater to even greater heights.
Shaw has led Stanford to a 34-6 record in
three seasons, going to three straight BCS
bowls and winning the past two Pac-12
titles. The fifth-ranked Cardinal (11-2) will
go for their second straight Rose Bowl vic-
tory against No. 4 Michigan State (12-1) on
Jan. 1.
The day Shaw became Stanford’s head
coach, he said he never wanted to interview
for another football job again. Asked if he
still felt that way, Shaw said: “Absolutely.”
“I think when he says to the media that
he’s found his dream job, he’s one of the
coaches that I truly believe what he’s say-
ing,” senior safety Ed Reynolds said. “It’s
his alma mater. His dad (Willie Shaw)
coached here (as an assistant). He’s been
around this environment for so long. He
knows what he’s getting and I think he’s def-
initely in a spot where he feels comfortable
for him and his family.”
Shaw agreed to what the school termed a
“long-term contract extension” after last sea-
son. Shaw has declined to discuss details of
his contract but has said repeatedly that he
wants his three young children to grow up
around Stanford.
Despite Shaw’s insistence on staying, his
background and success running pro-style
systems makes him a natural candidate for
NFL teams.
Shaw had been an assistant in the NFL for
Philadelphia, Oakland and Baltimore before
joining Harbaugh as an assistant at the
University of San Diego, then following him
to Stanford before the 2007 season.
Harbaugh’s success at the next level — tak-
ing the 49ers to the NFC championship
game and the Super Bowl in his first two sea-
sons — has only generated more conversa-
tions about Shaw’s potential in the NFL.
Shaw won Pac-12 Coach of the Year honors
his first two seasons. Arizona State’s Todd
Graham won the award this year, though
Shaw’s Cardinal routed the Sun Devils twice,
including in the Pac-12 championship game.
Stanford lost the Fiesta Bowl in an over-
time thriller to Oklahoma State in Shaw’s
first season — and Andrew Luck’s last. Shaw
still led Stanford to its first Rose Bowl win in
41 years when the Cardinal beat Wisconsin
without the school’s record-setting quarter-
back last season.
All of 41 years old, Shaw has showed the
ability to bond with players in ways even
Harbaugh couldn’t, understanding as he does
the intricacies of a rigorous academics uni-
versity that practically raised him: as a
coach’s son, student, player, assistant
coach, husband and father — he even pro-
posed to his wife, Kori, outside of Stanford’s
Memorial Church.
When he started coaching, Shaw said he
set his sights on the NFL. After spending
time as an assistant in the pros, he said he’s
happy at Stanford now.
“That’s also just kind of how I am. If I’m
going to start doing something, I’m going
to see if I can be as good as I can be and go
as high as I can go,” Shaw said.
“So I thought about being a head coach. I
didn’t necessarily set a plan for it. I know
growing up in this business you can’t ever
plan to be a head coach. You either have the
opportunity or you don’t. The opportunity
thankfully came my way here (at Stanford)
and it’s been great here ever since.”
Shaw not interested in leaving Stanford for NFL
David Shaw
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FRANKFURT, Germany — Vitali
Klitschko is leaving boxing to concentrate
on Ukrainian politics and his role as an
opposition leader.
Klitschko vacated his WBC world heavy-
weight title on Monday and said he doesn’t
expect to fight again as he pursues a presi-
dential bid in his home country, where citi-
zens have been protesting for weeks in Kiev
over President Viktor Yanukovych’s deci-
sion to shun closer ties with the European
Union and push his country toward Russia.
The World Boxing Council proclaimed
Klitschko a “Champion Emeritus,” a move
that would allow him to challenge the new
champion directly should he wish to resume
his career.
“This offer makes it theoretically possible
to return to the ring, which I cannot imagine
at all happening as things stand now, ”
Klitschko said in a statement. “I am now con-
centrating on the politics in Ukraine, I feel
people need me there.”
Klitschko is a lawmaker and chairman of
the opposition party Udar (Punch) and
intends to run for president in 2015.
Klitschko has taken an active part in the
rallies, urging his countrymen to continue
their fight to turn the ex-Soviet republic into
a genuine Western democracy.
“This is not a revolution. It is a peaceful
protest that demands justice,” Klitschko told
The Associated Press in an interview earlier
this month. “The people are not defending
political interests. They are defending the
idea of living in a civilized country.”
The 42-year-old Klitschko has a 45-2
record, with 41 KOs. His younger brother
Wladimir holds the other significant heavy-
weight belts.
“My brother Wladimir will be responsible
for further sporting successes,” the older
Klitschko said Monday.
Vitali has not fought since September
2012, when he made the 10th defense of his
belt with a fourth-round stoppage of previ-
ously unbeaten Manuel Charr.
“With the current extreme and delicate
political situation in the Ukraine, Vitali has
answered his country’s call to fight for human
rights and equality. Accordingly, Vitali will
not be able to provide the WBC with a pre-
dictable time-frame to return to the ring,” the
WBC said.
Vitali Klitschko leaves boxing to pursue politics
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — Chiney Ogwumike scored
24 of her 32 points in the first half and No.
6 Stanford won its eighth straight, beating
New Mexico 74-41 on Monday night.
Mikaela Ruef had 10 rebounds and blocked
three shots for the Cardinal (9-1), who host
No. 3 Tennessee on Saturday.
Bryce Owens scored 12 points, all on 3-
pointers, to lead the Lobos (4-5), who fell
to 2-11 against teams ranked in the top 10.
New Mexico, which ranks second in the
Mountain West Conference in scoring
defense and first in rebounding margin, last
beat a top 10 team eight years ago.
Ogwumike scored Stanford’s first 10
points and 23 of its first 25 before she was
replaced by Erica McCall with 9:52 left in
the first half.
New Mexico’s 6-foot-4 freshman post
player Kianna Keller made her fourth start of
the season and did everything she could to
slow down Ogwumike, who became the fifth
member of Stanford’s 2,000-point, 1,000-
rebound club with her fifth point of the
game.
Keller is in the lineup because of season-
ending injuries to three of the Lobos’ front
line players, including sophomore Whitney
Johnson and junior Ebony Walker.
Ogwumike, who blocked four shots, was
10 of 15 from the field in the first half as
Stanford took a 40-21 lead.
Ogwumike, who had seven rebounds to
pass her sister Neka into third place on the
school’s all-time list, left the game for good
with 10:30 remaining.
The Lobos, who had a two-game winning
streak snapped, were within 7-5 before the
Cardinal went on a 20-2 run to open a 20-
point lead midway through the first half.
New Mexico kept the game relatively
close for the first 7 minutes of the second
half by dominating the offensive boards and
getting second chance points.
Owens and Brooke Allemand hit3-point-
ers to cut Stanford’s lead to 16, the closest
the Lobos would get the rest of the way.
Looking ahead to Tennessee, Stanford
owns consecutive wins over the Lady Vol s
and will be looking for a third straight for
the first time in a series that dates to the
early 1990s.
Ogwumike and No. 6 Stanford
women take down New Mexico
Sports Brief
Manning realizes
his comeback inspires others
ENGLEWOOD, Colo.— Peyton Manning
says he’s not sure he’s deserving of the
2013 Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the
Year honor but is glad to be in such elite
company that includes the likes of former
Tennessee women’s basketball coach Pat
Summitt.
The Broncos quarterback was recognized
at a banquet at Sports Authority Field on
Monday night.
Manning has led Denver to an 11-3 record
this season, his second with the Broncos
after missing the 2011 season with
Indianapolis because of neck troubles that
affected his right triceps. He has thrown 47
touchdown passes, three shy of Tom Brady’s
NFL season record, with two games remain-
i ng.
Manning is the fourth NFL quarterback to
take the honor in the past nine years, fol-
lowing Brady in 2005, Brett Favre in 2007
and Drew Brees in 2010. LeBron James was
the winner last year.
“It means a great deal and for one, I really
accept this award on behalf of a lot of peo-
ple that have helped me,” Manning said. “I
realized that being injured and coming back
from an injury and playing is probably a
large reason why I received this award.
SPORTS 13
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA— The defense allowed Jamaal
Charles repeatedly to take short passes and
run untouched down the field for scores. The
offense kept giving the ball away no matter
who played quarterback. Even the special
teams had its share of miscues.
It all added up to a 56-31 loss to the
Kansas City Chiefs on Sunday that might
not have been the most lopsided of the sea-
son for the Oakland Raiders but was possi-
bly the most distressing.
With every facet of the team struggling in
a fourth straight loss, it’s making it tougher
to make the case that the Raiders (4-10) are
making progress in year two under coach
Dennis Allen and general manager Reggie
McKenzie.
“We’re not in the blame game. We’re not
in the pointing fingers game. That’s for
everybody else to do,” Allen said Monday.
“Our job is to come together as a group,
coaches and players. We’re in the solution
business, not in the creating problem busi-
ness. And that’s what we’ve got to go work
to do.”
The biggest problems of late have been
on a defense that was the strength of this
team the first half of the season. The Raiders
allowed the most points in franchise histo-
ry to the Chiefs with much of the damage
coming on short passes that turned into big
gains.
Charles scored on three screen passes that
covered 49, 39 and 16 yards to go along
with a 71-yard score on a downfield pass.
That was part of a 195-yard receiving day
that was the best for a running back in 14
years.
In all, Alex Smith completed 17 of 20
passes for 287 yards but 223 of those yards
came after the catch, according to Pro
Football Focus, as the Raiders were never in
position to make plays.
“We’ve got to recognize that those things
are coming,” Allen said. “We’ve got to do a
great job of tackling in space. That’s an area
that we’ve got to work to improve on,
because we can’t let screens behind the line
of scrimmage go for big gains like that.”
That has become a disturbing trend in
recent weeks as the Raiders have been
picked apart by Nick Foles, Ryan
Fitzpatrick, Geno Smith and Alex Smith
while allowing a league-high 34.7 points
per game the past seven weeks.
“It’s very concerning and it’s frustrating
because at times we’ve played really good
defense,” Allen said. “We’ve played out-
standing defense at times this year. ”
While the offense scored a season-high
31 points, the play wasn’t much better than
the defense with Matt McGloin throwing
four interceptions and losing a fumble and
Terrelle Pryor also throwing an intercep-
tion.
McGloin started and played 65 snaps,
while Pryor got in for 15 in a seemingly
haphazard rotation aimed at catching the
defense off-guard. On one drive, the Raiders
went from McGloin to Pryor and back to
McGloin. It paid off in a touchdown but the
offense found little rhythm for most of the
game.
McGloin won the job by playing mostly
mistake free in his first start against
Houston but has been careless with the ball
of late with seven interceptions and one
lost fumble the past four games.
He has done well at avoiding sacks, tak-
ing just five in five starts with only Peyton
Manning getting sacked fewer times per
dropback. He also leads the NFL with 15
pass plays of at least 25 yards since becom-
ing the starter, which is a big reason why he
will start again this week despite the
turnovers.
“Matt’s our starting quarterback,” Allen
said. “I think he’s earned that right and he’s
gone in and played well. He didn’t play well
(Sunday). He made some mistakes. ... It’s
tough to learn from those rookie mistakes
and those young mistakes.”
Even the special teams got into the prob-
lems, allowing a 50-yard kickoff return to
open the game and then having Taiwan
Jones lose a fumble on a kickoff return with
Oakland trailing 42-31 late in the third quar-
ter.
NOTES: RB Darren McFadden is expected
back at practice Wednesday after missing
the past two games with an ankle injury. . . .
S Charles Woodson (ribs), TE Jeron Mastrud
(wrist) and LB Miles Burris (ankle) all suf-
fered minor injuries in the game.
Raiders showing
signs of regression
By Oskar Garcia
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HONOLULU — Hall of Fame wide receiver
Jerry Rice says he has a draft strategy
mapped out for picking his Pro Bowl squad
and wants quarterback Peyton Manning and
linebacker Robert Mathis on his side.
Rice told reporters
Monday he plans to take
a balanced approach to
selecting his players for
the Jan. 26 game and
expects rival alumni cap-
tain Deion Sanders to
focus on defense.
“I can tell Deion is
afraid of me,” said Rice,
taking a light swipe at
Sanders for being unable to make a confer-
ence call to discuss their role in the game
because of travel complications.
As alumni captains, Sanders and Rice have
final say on the selections for each of the
Pro Bowl teams. The two-day draft is a
departure from the game’s traditional AFC
vs. NFC format, with a schoolyard-style
selection process modified with several
twists.
Rice says he expects the game to be a
throwback to battles he and the former
defensive played out when they were all-
stars in the NFL. He says he wants bragging
rights and knows Sanders wants the same.
“I’m really trying to keep up on all these
players,” Rice said. “I’ve never been in a
war room but I think I have a feel for what
they go through now. ”
Rice said he most likely plans to take
skill position players in the early rounds —
selecting from among quarterbacks, wide
receivers and perhaps running backs — but
keep things balanced with defense.
“For me it has to be 50-50 and I believe
you win with defense,” Rice said. “And some
of these guys that are really making state-
ments right now like Robert Mathis, Robert
Quinn, Mario Williams, all these guys ...
I’m thinking defense.”
Manning and Mathis are in the running to
be active player captains based on voting
by fans. The top vote-getter on offense will
be paired with the second-highest defensive
pick and the top defensive pick with the sec-
ond-highest offensive selection.
“If those guys happen to be in the Super
Bowl, then all of a sudden I have to reassess
everything and look at these other guys,”
Rice said. Players in the Super Bowl one
week later do not play in the Pro Bowl.
When Rice and Sanders arrive in Hawaii,
they’ll flip a coin with the winner deciding
whether they want to pick their pair of cap-
tains or have first pick among the rest of the
88 Pro Bowlers.
The rest of the draft will play out over two
days, with 30 players on each team picked
during a three-hour live draft Jan. 22 at a
beachside estate in Oahu’s popular Ko Olina
resort area. Each team will select a third
quarterback in the last round and the team
that picks second will be allowed to force a
trade on the other team after the draft ends.
Rice said he’s been disappointed with the
play in the Pro Bowl the last few years and
is hoping the new format will allow the
players to gain better chemistry. He said
he’s looking for players who will come in
excited to play hard, put on a good show for
fans and help him beat Sanders.
“The main focus for me is going to be to
go out there to kick his butt,” he said.
Rice maps out draft plan
for picking Pro Bowl team
Jerry Rice
Sports Brief
Aside from the injuries and some losses
Harbaugh would like back, this is almost
the script Harbaugh had in mind for the
December stretch run.
The reigning NFC champion Niners are
surging with a much healthier roster at last
— despite the tough loss of Miller.
“We’re playing good ball,” Aldon Smith
said. “We just keep getting better. ”
Harbaugh didn’t have an update on wide
receiver Michael Crabtree’s injured left
hand, which he hurt during the fourth quarter
but didn’t consider serious.
Harbaugh didn’t seem overly concerned.
“He seemed good after the ballgame and
on the flight home,” he said.
And regarding Gore’s tender ankle,
Harbaugh said he, too, was walking well
afterward when the running back came to
visit with the coach on the plane.
With kicker Phil Dawson extending his
franchise-record streak of made field goals
to 24, is it time to extend his contract
beyond this year?
“Let me do that right now, ‘Phil, stay
beyond this season,”’ Harbaugh said with a
chuckle. “I’ve been remiss in asking in ask-
ing him to do that. Let me officially ask him
to stay beyond this season. Absolutely, I’m
glad you brought it up, 24 straight field
goals. He has been a top-notch guy, too, on
the team from the day he got here. ... Pay
the man.”
Notes: The 49ers were thrilled to see for-
mer teammate and practice squad S Michael
Thomas intercept a fourth-down pass by
Tom Brady in the end zone with 2 seconds
left Sunday to seal Miami’s 24-20 victory
over the Patriots. Another one of
Harbaugh’s former Stanford players, they
traded text messages afterward. “It brought a
smile to everybody’s face as we saw that,”
Harbaugh said. “Everybody’s just happy for
his success.”
Workers at Brazil World
Cup stadium walk off job
RIO DE JANEIRO — News
reports say construction workers
have walked off the job at the
World Cup stadium in Brazil’s jun-
gle city of Manaus after a worker
fell 115 feet to his death.
The G1 Internet portal said the
stoppage has brought all work on
the stadium to a halt.
The G1 report cited a labor union
representing construction workers
as saying the stadium’s estimated
1,800 workers walked off the job
early Monday to protest safety
conditions and what they
described as pressure to speed up
the project. Amazonas state gov-
ernment officials have denied
applying pressure to accelerate the
work.
The work stoppage follows a
Sunday decision by a Manaus court
that froze work in all areas where
laborers need to be high above the
ground.
SPORTS 14
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
following his 161-yard, four-touchdown
night. “Win or lose, we were going to
make them respect us. I think they respect
us (now).”
Now, the Gators prepare for Corona Del
Mar-Newport Beach for the Division III
state title. Once again, it’s likely not many
people will give SHP a chance. But El
Cerrito knows firsthand not to underesti-
mate the gritty Gators.
In fact, one of the El Cerrito coaches
gave Lavorato and the Gators a vote of con-
fidence.
“We got beat up. You guys should win
state.”
***
Mark Martella has been a fixture on the
Sacred Heart Prep sidelines all season long.
The father of Gators wide receiver Mitch
Martella, Mark Martella spent the season
as a parent photographer, taking pictures
of the team — including his son.
Unfortunately, Mark Martella hasn’t had
a lot of chances to get photos of his son
making plays. Because the Gators employ
a run-heavy offense, receivers are usually
limited to blocking for most of the game.
Saturday night, however, Mitch Martella
made his biggest play of the season and his
dad was there to capture it on his camera’s
memory card. Midway through the fourth
quarter with SHP leading 35-7, the Gators
faced a fourth-and-long at the El Cerrito 47-
yard line. Eschewing a punt, Lavorato
decided to go for it. Quarterback Mason
Randall dropped back to pass and targeted
Mitch Martella, who had a step on his
defender. Randall released the pass down-
field where the El Cerrito defensive back
got a hand on the ball.
He tipped the ball up, however, and as he
fell, Mitch Martella kept his eye on the
ball and made a juggling catch in stride.
The Gauchos defense caught up to him
inside the 10-yard line, but Martella bulled
his way into the end zone for the score and
an exclamation point on the Gators’ 42-7
victory.
I hope dad got the shot.
***
One of the highlights of the Del Oro-
Serra Nor Cal Division I championship
game Friday night came during pregame,
when Serra student Soane Mafi sang the
national anthem.
In a deep bass (baritone?) voice, Mafi
added some soul to “The Star Spangled
Banner,” which was a nice change from all
those who try to use an eight-octave range
to sing the song.
Mafi got a lot of love from the Serra side-
line following his performance and I want-
ed to let him know that I was watching —
and listening.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
with Palo Alto spoiling an otherwise stellar
season.
San Mateo roared through the post-season
playoffs that year. Mitchell’s crew beat
Pacific Grove, Berkeley and Lodi by scores
of 40-6, 20-7 and 40-14 respectively during
the Northern California portion of the tour-
nament.
The victory over Covina turned out to be
more of the same sort of domination. San
Mateo’s key players included Joe Fena,
Gene Hurd, Bill Hardeman and Kessler
Taylor (a transfer from Oregon).
At that time, there were no enrollment
divisions in CIF football competition.
There was just one set of playoff brackets,
one in the north and one in the south. At the
end, it was winner-take-all, regardless of
school size.
That has changed.
Six-hundred-student Sacred Heart Prep,
the second-place finisher in the Peninsula
Athletic League’s Bay Division, is playing
in Division III, one of four enrollment-
based divisions. There is also an Open
Division which is set aside for what are
regarded as the state’s elite teams.
Technically, without an actual playoff
system to determine true state champions in
California, the bowl setup is regarded as the
next best thing.
No matter. Win or lose, the little Atherton
Catholic school, now a gaudy 13-1, is mak-
ing local sports history.
Continued from page 11
STATE
Continued from page 11
49ERS
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Are you ready to rumble?
Well, the winter season may be
young, but Menlo-Atherton’s is
already in mid-season form appar-
ently. Wilson went 4-0 to capture
the 138-pound wrestling title at
the Golden Gate Invitational host-
ed by Washington-San Francisco.
Wilson was also named “Most
Outstanding Middleweight.”
While Wilson was busy being a
monster on the mat, Sacred Heart
Prep’s Ben Burr-Kirven continues
to wreck havoc on the football
field. And he’ll be at it for at least
one more week. The Gators
unleashed the full effect of Burr-
Kirven, who led the Gators to the
Nor Cal Division III champi-
onship. He rushed for 161 yards
and four touchdowns in a 42-7 win
over El Cerrito. On defense, he was
a part of 17 tackles – 11 of which
were solo tackles. He also recorded
a sack and forced a fumble.
The Honor Roll will heat up real-
ly soon with plenty of basketball
news. But already there have been
some noteworthy performances to
share.
Royce Branning of Menlo-
Atherton basketball lit up Half
Moon Bay for 29 points during the
Bears’ 65-62 loss to the Cougars
in the Burlingame Lions’ Club
tournament. Branning earned all-
tournament honors.
Half Moon Bay got the last
laugh, though. Behind Corey Cilia
and his 33 points during the cham-
pionship game, the Cougars took
down the Panthers to win the tour-
nament title. Cilia was named to
the all-tournament team. The
Panthers’ Frankie Ferrari and Nick
Loew were also selected.
Danny Mahoney, a Serra senior
guard, scored 18 points and handed
out five assists as the Padres hand-
ed Aragon a 66-51 loss. Sean
Watkins wasn’t too far behind
with 16 points. In that same game,
Toby Liebergesell of Aragon led
all scorers with 20.
Jaylend Jones scored 15 points
in a cross-divisional PAL game
against Hillsdale. Terra Nova won
53-44.
In girls’ basketball, Anisah
Smith of Carlmont basketball now
has five straight games with 20
points or more with a pair of big
performances last week. She
scored 28 in a Scots win over
Oceana and followed that up with a
29-point performance in a victory
over Yerba Buena.
Emma Pastorino and Kaylin
O’Leary of Notre Dame-Belmont
earned all-tournament team nods at
the Valley Christian Dublin tour-
ney after the Tigers took third
place at the Valley Christian
Dublin tournament. Earlier in that
tournament, the entire Notre Dame
defense put on a show. They kept
St. Elizabeth to just 10 points in a
47-point win. Camryn McNab
scored 16 points in that win while
Sam Requilman added 10 with five
steals.
Meghan Holland went off for 28
points and Riley Hemm added 18
in a Gator victory. They were both
named to the all-tournament team.
Holland also had a 14-point game
against Aragon earlier in the week.
In the consolation champi-
onship of the Tera Nova
Tournament, Menlo came back
from a four-point deficit at half-
time to beat Piedmont Hills 62 to
52. Menlo was led by all-tourna-
ment player Hannah Paye who had
22 points including five three-
pointers. In addition to Paye,
sophomore McKenzie Duffner
contributes a double double with
15 points and 10 rebounds.
in girls’ soccer, Menlo defeated
Burlingame 2-0. Fifteen minutes
into the second half, Amanda
McFarland scored off a corner kick
from Chandler Wickers. Wickers
then scored unassisted in the
34th minute on a 25 yard shot that
found the upper corner of the goal.
Schuyler Tilney-Volk had 9
saves in goal for Menlo, earning
her second consecutive shutout.
And finally in some late fall sea-
son Honor Roll news, Sofia
Caryotakis and Jessica Heilman
were named to the Central Coast
Section First Team representing
Division I after their superb sea-
sons for the Menlo-Atherton
girls’ water polo team.
Kristen Denney (Carlmont),
Francesca Gilles (M-A) made the
second team. Samantha Hartman
(M-A) was named Honorable
Mention.
In Division II, Caitlin Stuewe
was named the CCS Player of the
Year with teammates Morgan
McCracken and Kelly Moran earn-
ing First Team honors. They were
joined by Burlingame’s Nikki
Reynolds.
Second Team members included:
Maddy Johnston and Malaika
Koshy (SHP) with Lauren Kerrigan
(SHP) and Micaela White (Half
Moon Bay) were named Honorable
Mention.
Honor Roll heats up
with basketball play
By Barry Wilner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The National
Institutes of Health, with partial
funding by the NFL, has chosen
eight projects to receive support in
researching concussions.
Two $6 million grants will be
given to a cooperative partnership
focused on long-term changes in
the brain years after a head injury
or after multiple concussions. The
partnership includes the National
Institute of Neurological Disorders
and Stroke (NINDS); the Eunice
Kennedy Shriver National Institute
of Child Health and Human
Development (NICHD); and multi-
ple academic medical centers.
The NIH also will provide just
over $2 million for start-ups of
sports-releated concussion proj-
ects. If the early results are encour-
aging, they may become the basis
of more comprehensive projects.
The NIH institutes responsible
for managing these grants are
NINDS, NICHD, and the National
Institute on Deafness and Other
Communication Disorders
(NIDCD).
“We need to be able to predict
which patterns of injury are rapidly
reversible and which are not,”
Story Landis, director of NINDS,
said in a statement. “This program
will help researchers get closer to
answering some of the important
questions about concussion for our
youth who play sports and their
parents.”
The NFL did not have a role in
which organizations received the
grants. Those decisions were made
by the NIH.
“We are optimistic that these
research projects will help advance
the understanding of the complex
issues involving traumatic brain
injury,” said Jeff Miller, the NFL
senior vice president of health and
safety policy.
The cooperative awards bring
together two teams of independent
scientists to study and compare the
brains of donors who were at high
or low risk for developing long-
term effects of traumatic brain
injury.
Ten neuropathologists from
eight universities will meet to
develop standards for diagnosis.
Four teams will correlate brain
scans with changes in brain tissue,
which could lead to using such
advanced brain imaging techniques
to diagnose chronic effects of trau-
matic brain injury in people who
are still alive.
NFL and NIH award grants
for concussion research
Sports Brief
SPORTS 15
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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2
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1
2
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in
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EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Boston 12 14 .462 —
Toronto 9 13 .409 1
Brooklyn 9 15 .375 2
New York 7 17 .292 4
Philadelphia 7 19 .269 5
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 18 6 .750 —
Atlanta 13 12 .520 5 1/2
Washington 10 13 .435 7 1/2
Charlotte 10 14 .417 8
Orlando 8 17 .320 10 1/2
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 20 4 .833 —
Detroit 12 14 .462 9
Chicago 9 14 .391 10 1/2
Cleveland 9 14 .391 10 1/2
Milwaukee 5 19 .208 15
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 19 4 .826 —
Houston 16 9 .640 4
Dallas 14 10 .583 5 1/2
New Orleans 11 11 .500 7 1/2
Memphis 10 13 .435 9
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Portland 21 4 .840 —
Oklahoma City 19 4 .826 1
Denver 14 9 .609 6
Minnesota 12 13 .480 9
Utah 6 21 .222 16
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 16 9 .640 —
Phoenix 14 9 .609 1
Golden State 13 12 .520 3
L.A. Lakers 11 13 .458 4 1/2
Sacramento 7 15 .318 7 1/2
Monday’sGames
Detroit 101, Indiana 96
Brooklyn 130, Philadelphia 94
Boston 101, Minnesota 97
Miami 117, Utah 94
Atlanta 114, L.A. Lakers 100
Washington 102, New York 101
Orlando 83, Chicago 82
San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, Late
Tuesday’sGames
Portland at Cleveland, 4 p.m.
Sacramento at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Denver, 6 p.m.
New Orleans at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday’sGames
Utah at Orlando, 4 p.m.
Indiana at Miami, 4 p.m.
Charlotte at Toronto, 4 p.m.
Detroit at Boston, 4:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Washington at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m.
Portland at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
New York at Milwaukee, 5 p.m.
Memphis at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Houston, 6:30 p.m.
New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 33 22 9 2 46 92 70
Montreal 35 20 12 3 43 88 75
Tampa Bay 33 19 11 3 41 90 80
Detroit 35 15 11 9 39 89 94
Toronto 35 17 15 3 37 98 102
Ottawa 35 14 15 6 34 99 113
Florida 34 12 17 5 29 78 109
Buffalo 33 7 23 3 17 55 96
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 35 24 10 1 49 108 75
Washington 33 18 12 3 39 105 97
Carolina 34 14 13 7 35 79 94
N.Y. Rangers 34 16 17 1 33 76 91
Philadelphia 33 14 15 4 32 76 91
New Jersey 34 13 15 6 32 78 85
Columbus 34 14 16 4 32 87 95
N.Y. Islanders 34 9 19 6 24 83 118
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 36 24 7 5 53 135 101
St. Louis 32 22 6 4 48 112 76
Colorado 32 22 9 1 45 94 75
Minnesota 35 19 11 5 43 81 81
Dallas 32 15 12 5 35 92 99
Nashville 33 16 14 3 35 77 92
Winnipeg 35 15 15 5 35 93 102
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 35 23 7 5 51 111 89
Los Angeles 34 22 8 4 48 94 68
San Jose 33 20 7 6 46 108 82
Vancouver 35 20 10 5 45 98 83
Phoenix 32 18 9 5 41 104 100
Calgary 33 13 15 5 31 86 106
Edmonton 35 11 21 3 25 93 120
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Monday’sGames
Pittsburgh 3,Toronto 1
Winnipeg 3, Columbus 2
Ottawa 3, St. Louis 2, OT
Colorado 6, Dallas 2
Tuesday’sGames
Calgary at Boston, 4 p.m.
Winnipeg at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
Florida at Toronto, 4 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m.
Phoenix at Montreal, 4:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m.
San Jose at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Chicago at Nashville, 5 p.m.
Vancouver at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Colorado at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday’sGames
Ottawa at New Jersey, 4:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 5 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 8 6 0 .571 364 349
Dallas 7 7 0 .500 393 385
N.Y. Giants 5 9 0 .357 251 357
Washington 3 11 0 .214 305 434
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 10 4 0 .714 359 270
Carolina 10 4 0 .714 328 208
Tampa Bay 4 10 0 .286 258 324
Atlanta 4 10 0 .286 309 388
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 8 6 0 .571 406 391
Green Bay 7 6 1 .536 353 362
Detroit 7 7 0 .500 362 339
Minnesota 4 9 1 .321 363 425
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Seattle 12 2 0 .857 380 205
San Francisco 10 4 0 .714 349 228
Arizona 9 5 0 .643 342 291
St. Louis 6 8 0 .429 316 324
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 10 4 0 .714 369 311
Miami 8 6 0 .571 310 296
N.Y. Jets 6 8 0 .429 246 367
Buffalo 5 9 0 .357 300 354
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Indianapolis 9 5 0 .643 338 319
Tennessee 5 9 0 .357 326 355
Jacksonville 4 10 0 .286 221 399
Houston 2 12 0 .143 253 375
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 9 5 0 .643 354 274
Baltimore 8 6 0 .571 296 277
Pittsburgh 6 8 0 .429 321 332
Cleveland 4 10 0 .286 288 362
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Denver 11 3 0 .786 535 372
x-Kansas City 11 3 0 .786 399 255
San Diego 7 7 0 .500 343 311
Oakland 4 10 0 .286 295 393
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Thursday’sGame
San Diego 27, Denver 20
Sunday’sGames
Minnesota 48, Philadelphia 30
Atlanta 27,Washington 26
San Francisco 33,Tampa Bay 14
Seattle 23, N.Y. Giants 0
Chicago 38, Cleveland 31
Indianapolis 25, Houston 3
Buffalo 27, Jacksonville 20
Miami 24, New England 20
Kansas City 56, Oakland 31
Carolina 30, N.Y. Jets 20
Arizona 37,Tennessee 34, OT
St. Louis 27, New Orleans 16
Green Bay 37, Dallas 36
Pittsburgh 30, Cincinnati 20
Monday’sGame
Baltimore 18, Detroit 16
Sunday, Dec. 22
Tampa Bay at St. Louis, 10 a.m.
Indianapolis at Kansas City, 10 a.m.
Denver at Houston, 10 a.m.
Miami at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, 10 a.m.
Dallas at Washington, 10 a.m.
Cleveland at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m.
Minnesota at Cincinnati, 10 a.m.
NFL GLANCE
@Tampa
10a.m.
FOX
12/15
vs.Atlanta
5:40p.m.
ESPN
12/23
@Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/29
Playoffs
vs. Chiefs
1:05p.m.
CBS
12/15
@Chargers
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/22
vs.Denver
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/29
@L.A.
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/19
vs.Minn.
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/12
@Nashville
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/14
@St.Louis
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/17
vs. Colo.
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/23
vs. Dallas
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/21
vs.NOLA
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/17
vs.Dallas
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/11
vs.Houston
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/13
@Phoenix
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/15
vs.Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/21
vs. Spurs
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/19
@Phoenix
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/27
@Denver
6p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/23
TUESDAY
Boy’ basketball
TerraNovaat Lynbrook,6:30p.m.;Capuchinoat Jef-
ferson, 7 p.m.
Girls’ soccer
Hillsdale at Crystal Springs, 3:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Boys’ basketball
Crystal Springs at Bay School-SF,5:30 p.m.; Andrew
Hill at Sequoia, 6 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Mt. Eden-Hayward at Capuchino, 7:30 p.m.
THURSDAY
Boys’ basketball
Capuchino vs. Santa Cruz at Palma tournament, 5
p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Newark Memorial at Woodside, 5:30 p.m.; Sequoia
at Branham, 7 p.m.
Girls’ soccer
South City at Aragon, 2:45 p.m.; King’s Academy at
Notre Dame-Belmont, 3:15 p.m.; South City at
Wilcox, 3:30 p.m.
Boys’ soccer
Carlmont at Santa Clara, 3:15 p.m.
FRIDAY
Boys’ basketball
Sacred Heart Prep vs. Oak Grove at DJ Frandsen
tournament;Lowell at Mills,Crystal Springs at Alma
Heights, 6 p.m.; Serra at Burlingame, San Mateo at
Westmoor, 7 p.m.; Menlo School at Menlo-Ather-
ton, 7:30 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Capuchino at Jefferson, 5:30 p.m.
Girls’ soccer
Los Gatos at San Mateo, 3:30 p.m.
Burlingame tournament
Carlmont vs. Sacred Heart Prep, 3 p.m.
Boys’ soccer
El Camino at Sequoia, 3 p.m.
SATURDAY
Boys’ basketball
Santa Clara at Hillsdale, 1:30 p.m.; Saratoga at Carl-
mont, Burlingame at Monte Vista-Cupertino, 2:30
p.m.; St.Ignatius at Aragon,3 p.m.; Menlo School at
Half Moon Bay,Westmoor at Woodside, 7 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Carlmont at Half Moon Bay, 2 p.m.; Kennedy-Rich-
mondatWoodside,Hillsdaleat SouthCity,5:30p.m.
Girls’ soccer
Notre Dame-Belmont at Valley Christian, 11 a.m.
Burlingame tournament
Aragon vs. Mills, 9:30 a.m.
Menlo-Atherton vs. Los Altos, 11 a.m.
Hillsdale vs. Mt.View, 2:30 p.m.
Woodside vs. Los Altos, 4 p.m.
Boys’ soccer
Valley Christian at Serra, 11 a.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
DETROIT TIGERS — Announced RHP Luis Marte
and INF Danny Worth cleared waivers and were
sent outright to Toledo (IL).
KANSAS CITYROYALS — Agreed to terms with
INF Omar Infante on a four-year contract.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Agreed to terms with
INF Jared Goedert on a minor league contract.
National League
ARIZONADIAMONDBACKS—AcquiredRHPAd-
dison Reed from the Chicago White Sox for INF
Matt Davidson.
ATLANTABRAVES — Agreed to terms with RHP
Gavin Floyd and RHP Brandon Beachy on one-year
contracts.
CHICAGOCUBS—AgreedtotermswithLHPWes-
ley Wright on a one-year contract.
COLORADO ROCKIES — Agreed to terms with
LHP Boone Logan on a three-year contract. Desig-
nated RHP Collin McHugh for assignment.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Agreed to terms with
INF Mark Ellis on a one-year contract.
TRANSACTIONS
16
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Russia: Aug. 21 Syria
chemical attack was ‘staged’
UNITED NATIONS — Russia on Monday
lashed out at the U.S. and its allies on the U.N.
Security Council over who is to blame for
chemical weapons attacks in Syria this year.
Russia’s ambassador told the council that
the dramatic Aug. 21 attack that led to Syria
agreeing to give up its chemical stockpile was
“staged” and a “large-scale provocation.”
Vitaly Churkin compared it to the “manipu-
lation of public opinion” that led up to the
U.S. invasion of Iraq. He read reporters the
statement he read to council members.
The current council president, French
Ambassador Gerard Araud, told reporters only
that members had an “acrimonious
exchange.”
The spirited session came as the council
received its first briefing from Secretary-
General Ban Ki-moon on the final report of a
U.N. inspection team that last week said
chemical weapons probably were used in Syria
several times.
Bachelet has big win
in Chile presidential vote
SANTIAGO, Chile — President-elect
Michelle Bachelet vowed on Monday to initi-
ate profound social changes in Chile, a day
after winning the seat with the biggest victo-
ry in eight decades.
Analysts, however, noted that the 41 per-
cent voter turnout was the lowest since Chile’s
return to democracy, suggesting she’ll need to
move deliberately, not radically, when she
begins her second turn in office next year.
Bachelet will be sworn in March 11, giving
outgoing President Sebastian Pinera nearly
three more months in office. They shared an
hourlong breakfast at Bachelet’s home
Monday to discuss the transition.
Around the world
By Sameer N. Yacoub
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD — Adouble car bombing and a
shooting killed 34 Shiite Muslims on pil-
grimage in Iraq on Monday, the deadliest in
a wave of attacks across the country that left
at least 65 dead. It was the bloodiest day of
violence in nearly two months.
Police officials said the worst attack took
place Monday night in the southern
Baghdad suburb of al-Rasheed, when two car
bombs struck a group of Shiite pilgrims
walking to the holy Shiite city of Karbala,
killing 23 and wounding 55.
Hundreds of thousands of Shiite pilgrims
are making their way to the city to com-
memorate Arbaeen, the end of 40 days of
mourning following the anniversary of the
death of the Prophet Muhammad’s grand-
son, Imam Hussein, a revered Shiite figure.
Earlier in the day, gunmen opened fire on a
bus in Mosul that was carrying Shiite pil-
grims traveling also to Karbala, killing 11
and wounding eight. Mosul is located about
360 kilometers (225 miles) northwest of
Baghdad.
Sunni Muslim insurgents in Iraq frequent-
ly attack Shiites, who they consider infi-
dels. Usually, Shiite marches to holy cities
are poorly protected by Iraqi security forces.
In other violence on Monday, a group of
suicide bombers launched a brazen attack on
a police station in the town of Beiji, a for-
mer insurgent stronghold 250 kilometers
(155 miles) north of Baghdad, where a sui-
cide bomber rammed his explosives-laden
car into the main gate of the town police
station.
That explosion paved the way for three
other suicide bombers who were on foot to
storm inside and blow themselves up in the
building, a police officer said. Eight police-
men, including an officer, were killed while
five were wounded in the attack, he said.
Later in the morning, several bombings
hit different parts of Baghdad and northern
Iraq, police said.
In southeastern Baghdad, a parked car
bomb ripped through a parking lot, killing
six civilians and wounding 12.
Another parked car bomb went off in the
central Salhia neighborhood near the heavi-
ly fortified Green Zone where key govern-
ment offices and foreign embassies are
located. That attack killed five civilians and
wounded 14.
Wave of attacks kill 65 people in Iraq
By Tendai Musiya and Alan Clendenning
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JOHANNESBURG — Just when it seemed
the scandal over the bogus sign language
interpreter at Nelson Mandela’s memorial
had run its course, a cousin and three friends
say he was part of a mob that accosted two
men found with a stolen television and
burned them to death by setting fire to tires
placed around their necks.
Thamsanqa Jantjie never went to trial
for the 2003 killings when other suspects
did because authorities
determined he was not
mentally fit to stand
trial, the four told the
Associated Press
Monday. They spoke on
condition of anonymity
because of the sensitivi-
ty of the fake signing
fiasco, which has
deeply embarrassed
South Africa’s govern-
ment and prompted a high-level investi-
gation into how it happened.
Their account of the killings matched a
description of the crime and the outcome for
Jantjie that he himself described in an inter-
view published by the Sunday Times news-
paper of Johannesburg.
“It was a community thing, what you call
mob justice, and I was also there,” Jantjie
told the newspaper.
Jantjie was not at his house Monday, and
the cousin told AP Jantjie had been picked
up by someone in a car Sunday and had not
returned.
Fake signer at Mandela event accused in mob attack
Thamsanqa
Jantjie
REUTERS
An Iraqi policeman looks at a damaged vehicle
after a car bomb attack in Baghdad.
17
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Many immigrants
hesitate to seek health insurance
HOUSTON — The new health insurance
system is stoking fears among immigrant
families that applying for coverage could
draw the attention of immigration authori-
ties.
Immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally
cannot participate in the system. But
many of them have relatives who are
American citizens or legal residents and
are eligible.
Since the system debuted in October,
immigrant advocates and federal officials
have been working to reassure families
that insurance information will not be
shared with enforcement agencies.
The effort has brought changes in the
main health care website and a memo from
immigration authorities promising not to
go after anyone based on insurance paper-
work.
Of the nearly 40 million people in the
U.S. who were born elsewhere, about a
third lack health insurance.
By Lauran Neergaard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — There’s more disappoint-
ing news about multivitamins: Two major
studies found popping the pills didn’t protect
aging men’s brains or help heart attack sur-
vivors.
Millions of Americans spend billions of
dollars on vitamin combinations, presum-
ably to boost their health and fill gaps in
their diets. But while people who don’t eat
enough of certain nutrients may be urged to
get them in pill form, the government
doesn’t recommend routine vitamin supple-
mentation as a way to prevent chronic dis-
eases.
The studies released Monday are the latest
to test if multivitamins might go that extra
step and concluded they don’t .
“Evidence is sufficient to advise against
routine supplementation,” said a sharply
worded editorial that accompanied Monday’s
findings in the journal Annals of Internal
Medicine.
After all, most people who buy multivita-
mins and other supplements are generally
healthy, said journal deputy editor Dr.
Cynthia Mulrow. Even junk foods often are
fortified with vitamins, while the main nutri-
tion problem in the U.S. is too much fat and
calories, she added.
But other researchers say the jury’s still
out, especially for the country’s most com-
monly used dietary supplement — multivita-
mins that are taken by about a third of U.S.
adults, and even more by people over the age
of 50.
Indeed, the U.S. Preventive Services Task
Force is deliberating whether vitamin supple-
ments make any difference in the average per-
son’s risk of heart disease or cancer. In a draft
proposal last month, the government adviso-
ry group said for standard multivitamins and
certain other nutrients, there’s not enough
evidence to tell. (It did caution that two sin-
gle supplements, beta-carotene and vitamin
E, didn’t work). Afinal decision is expected
next year.
“For better or for worse, supplementation’s
not going to go away,” said Dr. Howard Sesso
of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in
Boston. He helps leads a large multivitamin
study that has had mixed results — suggest-
ing small benefits for some health conditions
but not others — and says more research is
needed, especially among the less healthy.
Still, “there’s no substitute for preaching a
healthy diet and good behaviors” such as
exercise, Sesso cautioned.
As scientists debate, here are some ques-
tions and answers to consider in the vitamin
aisle:
Q: Why the new focus on multivita-
mi ns?
A: Multivitamins have grown more popu-
lar in recent years as research showed that
taking high doses of single supplements
could be risky, such as beta-carotene.
Multivitamins typically contain no more
than 100 percent of the daily recommended
amount of various nutrients. They’re market-
ed as sort of a safety net for nutrition gaps;
the industry’s Council for Responsible
Nutrition says they’re taken largely for gen-
eral wellness.
Q: What are the latest findings?
A: With Alzheimer’s on the rise as the pop-
ulation ages, Harvard researchers wondered if
long-term multivitamin use might help keep
older brains agile. They examined a subset of
nearly 6,000 male doctors, age 65 or older,
who were part of a larger study. The men were
given either multivitamins or dummy pills,
without knowing which they were taking.
After a decade of pill use, the vitamin-tak-
ers fared no better on memory or other cogni-
tive tests, Sesso’s team reported Monday in
the journal Annals of Internal Medicine.
Q: Did that Harvard study find any
other benefit from multivitamins?
A: The results of the Physicians Health
Study II have been mixed. Overall it enrolled
about 15,000 health male doctors age 50 and
older, and the vitamin-takers had a slightly
lower risk of cancer — 8 percent. Diet and
exercise are more protective. They also had a
similarly lower risk of developing cataracts,
common to aging eyes. But the vitamins had
no effect the risk for heart disease or another
eye condition, Sesso said.
Q: Might vitamins have a different
e ffect on people who already have
heart disease?
A: As part of a broader treatment study, a
separate research team asked that question.
They examined 1,700 heart attack survivors,
mostly men, who were given either a special
multivitamin containing higher-than-usual
doses of 28 ingredients or dummy pills. But
the vitamins didn’t reduce the chances of
another heart attack, other cardiovascular
problems, or death.
Q: What about women?
A: Research involving postmenopausal
women a few years ago also concluded multi-
vitamins didn’t prevent cancer or heart dis-
ease. But it wasn’t nearly as rigorous a study
as Monday’s research, relying on women to
recall what vitamins they used.
Do vitamins block disease? Some disappointing news
Health brief
HEALTH 19
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Matthew Perrone
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — After more
than 40 years of study, the U.S.
government says it has found no
evidence that common anti-bacter-
ial soaps prevent the spread of
germs, and regulators want the
makers of Dawn, Dial and other
household staples to prove that
their products do not pose health
risks to consumers.
Scientists at the Food and Drug
Administration announced
Monday they are revisiting the
safety of triclosan, the sanitizing
agent found in soap in countless
kitchens and bathrooms. Recent
studies suggest triclosan and simi-
lar substances can interfere with
hormone levels in lab animals and
spur the growth of drug-resistant
bacteria.
The government’s preliminary
ruling lends new support to outside
researchers who have long argued
that the chemicals are, at best,
ineffective and at worst, a threat to
public health.
“The FDA is finally making a
judgment call here and asking
industry to show us that these
products are better than soap and
water, and the data don’t substanti-
ate that,” said Stuart Levy of Tufts
University School of Medicine.
While the rule only applies to
personal hygiene products, it has
implications for a broader $1 bil-
lion industry that includes thou-
sands of anti-bacterial products,
including kitchen knives, toys,
pacifiers and toothpaste. Over the
last 20 years, companies have
added triclosan and other cleaners
to thousands of household prod-
ucts, touting their germ-killing
benefit s.
Under a proposed rule released
Monday, the agency will require
manufacturers to prove that anti-
bacterial soaps are safe and more
effective than plain soap and
water. Products that are not shown
to be safe and effective by late
2016 would have to be reformulat-
ed, relabeled or removed from the
market.
“I suspect there are a lot of con-
sumers who assume that by using
an anti-bacterial soap product they
are protecting themselves from ill-
ness, protecting their families,”
said Sandra Kweder, deputy director
in the FDA’s drug center. “But we
don’t have any evidence that that
is really the case over simple soap
and water. ”
A spokesman for the cleaning
product industry said the FDA
already has “a wealth of data”
showing the benefits of anti-bacte-
rial products.
Monday’s action affects virtual-
ly all soap products labeled anti-
bacterial, including dish and hand
soaps and body washes.
FDA: Anti-bacterial soaps may not curb bacteria
The Food and Drug Administration says it has found no evidence that
common anti-bacterial soaps prevent the spread of germs.
DATEBOOK 20
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TUESDAY, DEC. 17
San Mateo County Newcomers
Club Luncheon. Noon. Wedgewood
Banquet Room, Crystal Springs Golf
Course, 6650 Golf Course Drive,
Burlingame. Bring unwrapped toys.
RSVP deadline was Wednesday, Dec.
11. For more information call 477-
2562.
Teen Study Hall. 3:30 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Ages 12 to 19. For more
information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 18
Shop Whole Foods Market San
Mateo 5 percent Day to benefit
Samaritan House. 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Whole Foods Market, 1010 Park
Place, San Mateo. Free. For more
information email marcy@samari-
tanhousesanmateo.org.
Job Search Review Panel
Sponsored by Phase2Careers. 10
a.m. to noon. Foster City Community
Center, 1000 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster
City. Free. For more information go
to www.phase2careers.org.
Twitter and YouTube information
session. 10:30 a.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Previous computer and
Internet skills recommended. For
more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Admission is
free, but lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation call 430-6500 or go to san-
mateoprofessionalalliance.com.
Christmas Tours. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Plymire-Schwarz House Museum,
519 Grand Ave., S. San Francisco. For
more information call 875-6988.
Teen Movie: ‘Fast & Furious 6.’ 3:30
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Popcorn will
be served. Rated PG-13. Ages 12 to
19. For more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Las Posadas. 6 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library Oak Room, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. Come to a library
program that celebrates a Latin
American cultural tradition for the
whole family with a candlelight pro-
cession, music, refreshments, stories
and crafts. Free. For more informa-
tion call 522-7838.
The Delta Wires (Club Fox Blues
Jam). 7 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $5 per per-
son. For more information call (877)
435-9849 or go to www.clubfoxr-
wc.com.
The Nutcracker. 7 p.m. Carrington
Hall, Sequoia High School, 1201
Brewster Ave., Redwood City. $25 for
adults and $15 for children. For more
information go to peninsuladancea-
cademy.com.
Holiday Songs and Stories. 7 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. Free. For more
information email conrad@smcl.org.
David Hockney: A Bigger
Exhibition Art Docent Lecture. 7
p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Part of the Millbrae Library
de Young Museum Docent Program.
Free. For more information call 697-
7607.
THURSDAY, DEC. 19
San Mateo AARP Chapter 139
Christmas Luncheon. Noon. San
Mateo Elks Club, 229 W. 20th Ave.,
San Mateo. John Siracusa will per-
form Christmas songs. $25. For more
information call Barbara at 345-
5001.
Movies for School Age Children:
‘Polar Express.’ 3:30 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
call 522-7838.
Peninsula Recruitment Mixer
Sponsored by Phase2Careers. 4
p.m. to 7 p.m. Silicon Valley
Community Foundation, 1300 S. El
Camino Real, San Mateo. $10. For
more information email ronviscon-
ti@sbcglobal.net.
Holiday Jazz Cabaret featuring
Jackie Gage, Kay Kostopoulos and
Frances Fon. 7:30 p.m. Club Fox,
2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $15
per person. For more information
call (877) 435-9849 or go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
FRIDAY, DEC. 20
Keeping your emotional bearings
during the holidays. 7:30 a.m. to
8:30 a.m. Crystal Springs Golf Course
— Wedgewood Room, 6650 Golf
Course Drive, Burlingame. Dr. Mark
Howard will be speaking on how to
cope with one’s emotions during the
holiday season. This event is spon-
sored by the Rotary Club of San
Mateo. $15 includes breakfast. For
more information call 515-5891.
Christmas Party with Dancing
with the ‘Swing Shift’ Band. 10:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road.
There will be a ham lunch. $5. For
more information call 616-7150.
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. The Museum
of American Heritage (MOAH), The
Bay Area Lego User Group (BayLUG)
and Bay Area LegoTrain Club
(BayLTC) are co-hosting the 2013-14
Lego Holiday display at MOAH. Enjoy
a variety of Lego creations made by
members of the club, featuring train
layouts, Bay Area landmarks, castles,
miniature cities, sculptures and
more. Admission is $2. Exhibit runs
through Jan. 19 on Friday, Saturday
and Sunday.
Salsa Spot with Grupo Mazacote. 8
p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $15 per person. For
more information call (877) 435-
9849 or go to www.clubfoxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, DEC. 21
Hardly Strictly Blue Oaks. 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Bill and Jean Lane
Education Center at Edgewood Park,
6 Old Stage Coach Road, Redwood
City. Free. For more information
email scostabatis@redwoodcity.org.
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. The Museum
of American Heritage (MOAH), The
Bay Area Lego User Group (BayLUG)
and Bay Area LegoTrain Club
(BayLTC) are co-hosting the 2013-14
Lego Holiday display at MOAH. Enjoy
a variety of Lego creations made by
members of the club, featuring train
layouts, Bay Area landmarks, castles,
miniature cities, sculptures and
more. Admission is $2. Exhibit runs
through Jan. 19 on Friday, Saturday
and Sunday.
Christmas Tours. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Plymire-Schwarz House Museum,
519 Grand Ave., S. San Francisco. For
more information call 875-6988.
Devils Canyon Brewery Ninth
Annual Holiday Hootenanny. 4
p.m. to 11 p.m. 935 Washington St.,
San Carlos. For more information call
(415) 557-7670.
Bay Pointe Ballet’s ‘Nutcracker.’ 4
p.m. San Mateo Performing Arts
Center. 600 N. Delaware St., San
Mateo. $30 to $60. For more informa-
tion www.baypointeballet.org.
‘Portraits of Christmas.’ 7 p.m.
Crystal Springs Theatre, 2145 Bunker
Hill Drive, San Mateo. Presented by
the Crystal Springs Players. A series
of vignettes to explore Christmas
and its meaning; dessert potluck fol-
lows. Free.
Free Christmas Play. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Crystal Springs United Methodist
Church, 2145 Bunker Hill Drive, San
Mateo. Free. For more information
call 345-2381.
Elvin Bishop (Two Full Sets). 8 p.m.
Club Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood
City. $25 per person. For more infor-
mation call (877) 435-9849 or go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
SUNDAY, DEC. 22
A Christmas Music Celebration.
10:30 a.m. Calvary Lutheran Church,
401 Santa Lucia Ave., Millbrae. Free.
For more information call 588-2840.
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. The Museum
of American Heritage (MOAH), The
Bay Area Lego User Group (BayLUG)
and Bay Area LegoTrain Club
(BayLTC) are co-hosting the 2013-14
Lego Holiday display at MOAH. Enjoy
a variety of Lego creations made by
members of the club, featuring train
layouts, Bay Area landmarks, castles,
miniature cities, sculptures and
more. Admission is $2. Exhibit runs
through Jan. 19 on Friday, Saturday
and Sunday.
Bay Pointe Ballet’s ‘Nutcracker.’ 2
p.m. San Mateo Performing Arts
Center. 600 N. Delaware St., San
Mateo. $30 to $60. For more informa-
tion www.baypointeballet.org.
A Downton Abbey Christmas. 2
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas. A viewing of the
Season 3 Christmas special will be
accompanied by tea and cookies.
Period dress encouraged but not
required. For more information con-
tact conrad@smcl.org.
THURSDAY, DEC. 26
Broadway by the Bay Presents: ‘It’s
a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio
Play.’ Fox Theatre, 2215 Broadway,
Redwood City. Through Dec. 29. For
more information call 579-5565.
Off the Grid: Burlingame. 5 p.m. to
9 p.m. Broadway Caltrain Station on
California Drive and Carmelita Ave.,
Burlingame. There will be a 10-ven-
dor lineup. For more information call
(415) 274-2510.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
that does not levy such a fee on oil
pumped from private land, which could
generate billions of dollars a year for
the state budget.
Proposals for an oil tax have stalled
repeatedly amid pressure from oil com-
panies, which are major donors to law-
makers’ campaigns. But Steyer said he
believes the current Legislature is more
progressive and collaborative than in
the past.
“I don’t understand why the politics
are hard here,” he said in a telephone
interview. “Who is going to stand up in
the town square and say that we should-
n’t have a tax on this?”
Tupper Hall, a spokesman for the
Western States Petroleum Association,
which represents oil companies, said
Steyer is wrong to compare California
with other states that have such a tax.
He said oil companies generate a lot of
revenue through other fees, including
$500 million a year in state royalties
and billions of dollars annually in roy-
alties paid to private landowners for oil
extracted on their property.
Hall said an extraction tax would mean
more imported oil, decreased invest-
ment in the state’s oil infrastructure and
job losses.
“After understanding the implications
of raising taxes on energy production,
Californians have rejected all of those
proposals and they will reject this one,”
Hall said.
State Sen. Noreen Evans, D-Santa
Rosa, already has pending legislation
that would impose a 9.5 percent per-bar-
rel tax on oil, but it stalled in a legisla-
tive committee this year.
Her spokeswoman, Teala Schaff, said
Evans hopes to find more support for the
bill in 2014. But she noted that the cur-
rent makeup of the Legislature includes
more moderate Democrats who are
loathe to oppose the business commu-
nity, which has opposed such efforts.
Continued from page 1
OIL
away from brick-and-mortar business-
es down the street.
Recently, the Broadway Business
Improvement District proposed to
move Off the Grid to Broadway
between Chula Vista and Capuchino
avenues on Tuesday nights for a 90-day
trial after businesses objected. Matt
Cohen, owner of Off the Grid, present-
ed a petition to keep the business in
Burlingame. The company’s prefer-
ence is to stay at its current location.
The traffic, if Broadway were closed
for Off the Grid, could be a potential
nightmare, police said.
“It really is like synchronized swim-
ming when you’re shutting down an
area like that,” said Burlingame police
Sgt. Don Shepley. “We would need to
get signage and traffic direction. If we
look at what it takes to shut
[Broadway] down, it would be six offi-
cers at six and a half hours and it comes
out to $4,700 per event. If the police
department were to absorb it, it would
be a little less.”
On the other hand, the Broadway
Business Improvement District wrote a
letter to the council requesting an
environmental impact report of hav-
ing Off the Grid at the Broadway
Caltrain station. It states the business
district has noise, litter, sanitation
and poor food safety concerns that the
staff report prepared by Community
Development Director Bill Meeker did-
n’t include.
“There has been considerable politi-
cal shilly-shallying about the matter
with one government entity stating
one thing, Caltrain, and another, the
city of Burlingame, another,” the let-
ter states. “In the meantime, the city of
Burlingame is putting at risk the very
backbone of its community that func-
tions hour-by-hour, day-by-day, year
in and year out.”
Meeker said this land is unclassified,
meaning it is not zoned for any partic-
ular type of use, since it is owned by a
government entity, Caltrain, and isn’t
subject to an EIR.
Vice Mayor Nagel suggested it would
be good to talk with the Broadway
businesses on how to bring in more
customers. Closing down Broadway
would cause too many congestion
issues, safety issues and high costs.
“One big eye opener for me is that
Off the Grid isn’t a casual business,”
Nagel said. “This is not the case of a
casual business that’s trying to move
in. The bigger problem I’ve seen from
this is the merchants on Broadway are
not prepared to deal with the sophisti-
cation of this business.”
Councilman Jerry Deal, who voted
against the letter, said the Broadway
idea seemed like a great idea, but has
since realized it’s not feasible. He said
he can’t support it being on Broadway
or at the Caltrain station.
“I’m going to stick up for the mer-
chants themselves,” he said. “I’ve got
a 35-year history of knowing the mer-
chants on Broadway. A lot of these
merchants are holding on by a tiny bit.
It’s sure not a viable business model
that helps Broadway in any shape or
form.”
Meanwhile, Councilman Ricardo
Ortiz said he would support some way
to bring synergy between Broadway
merchants and Off the Grid.
The public came to speak out about
the matter. Two fourth-graders in the
neighborhood spoke in support of
keeping Off the Grid in Burlingame.
Derek Daniels, a senior at
Burlingame High School, said if the
city closes Broadway for a market it’s
going to conceivably have a backup of
cars.
“Off the Grid has become a huge part
of culture in this area,” Daniels said.
“It’s one of the only places in the com-
munity where you can find pulled pork
sandwich, spring rolls and creme
brulee all within 20 meters of each
other. ”
Other discussed the sense of commu-
nity the market brings and that they
don’t believe Off the Grid competes
with the businesses on Broadway.
Resident Ray Marshall said the resi-
dents want it to stay in town and the
Broadway business district is being a
little petty.
Off the Grid currently pays $750 a
month between Caltrain and the
California Public Utilities
Commission for the space, said
Caltrain spokeswoman Jayme
Ackemann. Off the Grid works to
develop markets that are both located
in urban cores of cities and use spaces
that are not easily activated effectively
throughout the day. This fits with the
Broadway Caltrain location since the
train doesn’t stop there during week-
days. The agreement with Caltrain
extends into December and the con-
tract is on hold while issues worked out
with the merchants, Ackemann said.
In other city business, the council
approved changes to the historic
preservation covenant as it was previ-
ously accepted for the Post Office
property located at 220 Park Road. The
first states the California Office of
Historic Preservation will not be a
covenant holder and asked it be
removed from administration of the
covenant. Second, the office has asked
the good cause clause be removed from
the covenant. As originally drafted,
this clause would have permitted the
covenant holders to modify or cancel
the restrictive provisions of the
covenant for good cause and following
notice to the public.
Additionally, the council voted to
send a letter to the California
Department of Transportation stating
the city wants it to adopt the most
cost-effective option with incremental
changes to the intersection on
Floribunda Avenue and El Camino
Real. The letter states that, “in the
strongest terms, the city objects to
adding the turn signal lane on historic,
cultural and aesthetic grounds ... any
improvements should be made with the
least possible impact to the environ-
ment.” The project is a controversial
safety project that could remove her-
itage eucalyptus trees if a left turn sig-
nal lane is installed.
Continued from page 1
GRID
COMICS/GAMES
12-17-13
MONDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
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Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Livy’s 1002
4 Family men
8 “Soapdish” star
12 Put a stop to
13 Margarine
14 Right, on a map
15 Outshone
17 Actress Fey
18 Subject
19 Wall decor
20 Skipper’s OK
22 Blank space
23 Freud rival
26 Oxford or pump
28 Vase, often
31 To — — (exactly)
32 “The Bells” poet
33 Dazzle
34 Maude of TV
35 Nest egg letters
36 Prolific auth.
37 Former JFK arrival
38 Projector part
39 Druid
40 Smidgen
41 Still
43 Eye-related
46 Windowsill
50 Burnoose wearer
51 — the issue
54 Golfer’s cry
55 Nourish
56 Battery size
57 Trade punches
58 Knowledge
59 Inc. cousin
DOWN
1 Run into
2 Unit of length
3 Not in use
4 Snow White’s friend
5 Capp and Jolson
6 Aberdeen’s river
7 Piece of turf
8 Organize (2 wds.)
9 Tresses
10 Middies’ sch.
11 And others (abbr.)
16 Likeness
19 Ginnie or Fannie
21 Glimpsed
22 Take it slow (2 wds.)
23 Elbows
24 Sporty trucks
25 Dapper
27 Trombone
28 Chimp expert Goodall
29 Errant GI
30 Tore apart
36 Did something
38 Shellac resin
40 Rome’s river
42 Give the slip
43 Bumblers
44 Brace
45 Scarlett’s home
47 Watch’s face
48 Pesky bug
49 Mild rejoinder
51 Calgary Stampeder org.
52 Zodiac sign
53 Above, to Tennyson
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2013
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Sudden career
changes may shock you. A dyspeptic feeling may be
the result of anxiety. You need to find healthy ways to
blow off steam. It’s important to take care of yourself.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Keep business and
pleasure separate, or damaging gossip could affect
your reputation. Right now, honesty and discernment
are your best bet. Use your skills wisely.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Now is the time to
marshal your energy and finally meet some of the
goals you’ve set for yourself. You now have everything
you need to succeed. It’s time to get started.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Emotional upheaval
regarding a family issue may ruin your plans. A
move or change to your home will be beneficial.
Let your intuition guide you. Your decisions will be
right on the money.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — It’s a good day to take
a trip. If you maintain an open mind and engage in
discussions with the right people, you will learn a lot.
Now’s the time to expand your mind.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Be willing to lend
a hand to colleagues. You will gather meaningful
intelligence and new skills through courses or
apprenticeships at this time. Education and
enlightenment will go hand in hand.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — If you allow yourself to
be impulsive, your flippant nature may compromise a
partnership. Get out and have fun. Look into activities
that will stimulate you mentally and physically.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You’ll find your
responsibilities difficult to bear. Do your best to make
improvements that will benefit the whole family. Make
a point of asking for help if it’s needed.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — If you’re clear about your
intentions, you can take romance to the next level. Plan
to share some private time with your partner so that
you may discuss future plans.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Emotions will be difficult
to control at home. Take one step at a time and remain
impartial during conflicts. Your pragmatic approach
will win out. Seek wisdom from someone you respect.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Travel will result
in new friendships and the gain of valuable
information. Changes in personal matters should be
accepted, not challenged. Things will turn out to be
better for you in the long run.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Your possessive
attitude may feel oppressive to your partner. Avoid
placing demands on those you love. Now is the time
to give others space while you work on yourself.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
º work well with others
º Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
º A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED -
\San Mateo. Cleaning, washing, prepare
for meal (no cooking), take care of whole
house. $20 per hour, 2-3 hours per day,
5pm-7pm. Send resume by mail: Attn:
Connie, 3130-3132 Diablo Ave, Hayward
CA 94545.
110 Employment
CUSTOMER CONTACT -
OUTSIDE POSITION
FULL TIME/PART TIME
$15.62 per hour start
to $35 per hour
with bonuses
Full training and expenses
Mr. Connors (650)372-2810
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
110 Employment
GOOD NITE INN – Redwood City
is hiring for the following positions:
Full-Time Room Attendants- Starting at
$8.45/hr., $8.70 after 90-days.
Full-time Guest Service Agents- Starting
at $9.50/hr., $9.75 after 90-days
Good Benefits and quarterly bonus plan.
Apply in person or online at:
www.goodnite.com (see careers)
Call: 650-365-5500
M/F/D/V & EOE
110 Employment
INSPECTOR / HOME -
DO YOU HAVE
A LADDER?
DRAW A DIAGRAM?
USE A TAPE MEASURE?
CAMERA?
Full training, to do inspections
for our 28 year old company.
Good pay. And expenses.
Mr. Inez, (650)372-2813
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
OPERATIONS
ASSISTANT I
$2700 - $4000 monthly
Excellent Benefits
High School Diploma or GED
General custodial services,
event and conference
assistance
Apply to:
www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp/
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
OPERATIONS
ASSISTANT II
$2700 - $4000 monthly
Excellent Benefits
High School Diploma or GED
General custodial services,
event and conference
assistance
Supervisory experience required
Apply to:
www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp/
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 525155
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME AND GENDER
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
RåEDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Fred Ahokava Afemui Jr Taione
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Fred Ahokava Afemui Jr
Taione filed a petition with this court for a
decree changing name and Gender as
follows:
Present name: Fred Ahokava Afemui Jr
Taione
Propsed Name: Kathryn Christine Annal-
ette Taione
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on January 8,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 11/22/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 11/21/2013
(Published, 12/03/13, 12/10/2013,
12/17/2013, 12/24/2013)
ÅCASE# CIV 525414
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
RåEDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Diana Kardash and Eugene Kardash
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Diana Kardash and Eugene
Kardash filed a petition with this court for
a decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Uladzislau Kardash
Proposed Name: Vladislav Kardash
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on January 16,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 11/25/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 11/22/2013
(Published, 11/26/13, 12/03/2013,
12/10/2013, 12/17/2013)
23 Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
SOUTH BAYSIDE WASTE MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY
SAN MATEO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA
NOTICE INVITING SEALED PROPOSALS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed proposals or bids will be publicly opened, examined and
announced on Friday, December 20, 2013 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM. by the Facility Opera-
tions Manager of the South Bayside Waste Management Authority, 610 Elm Street, Suite 202,
San Carlos, California, for THE SHOREWAY ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER – TRANSFER STA-
TION FLOOR RESURFACING.
All Contractors and Subcontractors shall be properly licensed by the Contractors State License
Board and possess the necessary license classifications for the work they perform under this
project.
Bidders and their subcontractors must possess a current City of San Carlos business license fol-
lowing the award of the Contract.
Bids may be delivered or mailed to the South Bayside Waste Management Authority’s office at
the above address.
Bid submittal shall include a complete description of the materials to be furnished, and methods
of installation, in sufficient detail to allow for evaluation for conformity with the requirements of the
Technical Provisions.
The principal items of work are the resurfacing of the concrete floor within the transfer station, us-
ing concrete and application methods described in the Technical Provisions to provide wear re-
sistance.
Work will be done and progressive payments made in cash in accordance with and as more par-
ticularly described in the plans and specifications therefore and Standard Specifications of the
City of San Carlos approved by the SBWMA Chair and on file in the office of the South Bayside
Waste Management Authority.
Bids must be accompanied by a Proposal guarantee amounting to ten percent of the bid as de-
scribed in the specifications. Said guarantee shall be forfeited to the Authority in case the bidder
depositing the same does not, within thirty (30) days after written notice that the contract has
been awarded to him (1) enter into a contract with the Authority and (2) furnish Performance and
Payment Bonds as described in the specifications.
The Authority reserves the privilege of rejecting any and all proposals or to waive any irregulari-
ties or informalities in any proposals or in the bidding.
No bidder may withdraw his proposal for a period of forty-five days after the date set for opening
of proposals.
Time of completion for this work is Thirty (60) Calendar Days.
The Authority has determined the general prevailing rate of per diem wages in the locality in
which this work is to be performed for each craft or type of work needed to execute the contract
to be as published by the State of California. Department of Industrial Relations, Division of La-
bor Statistics and Research, a copy of which is on file in the office of the City Engineer of the City
of San Carlos.
It shall be mandatory upon the Contractor to whom the contract is awarded and upon any sub-
contractor under him to pay not less than the said specified rates to all workmen employed by
them in the execution of the contract.
Plans and specifications, forms of proposals, bonds and contracts may be inspected or obtained
in person at the office of the South Bayside Waste Management Authority or by email request to
Hilary Gans at hgans@rethinkwaste.org. Company Name, contact name, full address and phone
number must accompany request.
For the South Bayside Waste Management Authority:
/s/ Cyndi Urman
Secretary to the Board of Directors of the SBWMA
Dated: December 6, 2013
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 525474
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
RåEDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Carol Donnelly Peterson
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Carol Donnelly Peterson filed
a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Carol Donnelly Peterson
Propsed Name:Carel Donnelly Peterson
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on January 23,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 12/12/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 12/11/2013
(Published, 12/17/13, 12/24/2013,
12/31/2013, 01/07/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258646
The following person is doing business
as: Complete Carpet & Upholstery
Cleaners, 751 Laurel Street # 538, SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: David M. Mercu-
rio, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN.
/s/ David Mercurio /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/26/13, 12/03/13, 12/10/13, 12/17/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258538
The following person is doing business
as: Coaching for Couples, Relationship
Renaissance, 141 Wellesley Cresent
#205,Redwood City, CA 94962 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Doug-
las Rosestone and Olivia Rosestone,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by Co-Partners. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/01/2013.
/s/ Douglas Rosestone/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/26/13, 12/03/13, 12/10/13, 12/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258503
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Chang & Chen Associates, 386
Convention Way, Redwood City, CA
94065 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: 1) Nam Chen Chang 214 La
Esprial ORINDA, CA 94563, 2) Fwei Mei
Chang 214 La Esprial, ORINDA, CA
94563, 3) Yung-Lin Chen, 35815 Mar-
shall Hutts Rd., Rio Hondo, TX 78583, 4)
Li-Chun Tai Chen, 35815 Marshall Huts
Rd., Rio Hondo, TX 78583, 5) Alan Ten-
lien Chen, 2240 Britannia Dr., San Ra-
mon, CA 94582, 6) Janemei Hsu Chan,
2240 Britannia Dr., San Ramon. CA
94582, 7) Tsung-Chi Lai, No. 42, Lane
225 Ming-Chu West Road, Taipei, Tai-
wan, TW 10374, 8) Lien-Chu Chen Lai,
No. 42, Lane 225 Ming-Chu West Road,
Taipei, Taiwan, TW 10374, 9) Kuo_Uan
Chen, No. 128, Da-Chu Street, Taipei,
Taiwan, TW 70055 10) Chuang-Yuh
Hwang, No. 128, Da-Chu Street, Taipei,
Taiwan, TW 70055. The business is con-
ducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN 06/01/2001.
/s/ Nam Chen Chang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/03/13, 12/10/13, 12/17/13, 12/24/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258640
The following person is doing business
as: Julie Amber Publications, 120 W. 3rd
Ave., Apt. 107 SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Witold S. Kolankowski, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN .
/s/ Witold S. Kolankowski /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/03/13, 12/10/13, 12/17/13, 12/24/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258708
The following person is doing business
as: Yessir!, 1542 Jasmine Street, SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Yessir!, LLC,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 06/20/2013.
/s/ Masahiro Miyata /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/10/13, 12/17/13, 12/24/13, 12/31/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258788
The following person is doing business
as: Out West Antiques, 707 Bellevue
Ave., DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Out
West Global, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN .
/s/ Qi Zheng /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/17/13, 12/24/13, 12/31/13, 01/07/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258788
The following person is doing business
as: Excel Equestrian, 4040 Woodside
Rd., WOODSIDE, CA 94062 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mandy
Emily Alamillo, 22306 City Centerm Hay-
ward, CA 94541. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN .
/s/ Mandy Emily Alamillo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/17/13, 12/24/13, 12/31/13, 01/07/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258787
The following person is doing business
as: Coldwell Banker Infiniti Group, 1435
Huntington Ave., Suite 310 SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Bez Group,
Inc, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN
12/03/2013.
/s/ Edward C. Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/17/13, 12/24/13, 12/31/13, 01/07/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258706
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Mindful Money Management 2)
MIndful Fiduciary Services , 63 Bovet
Road # 333, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
MIndful Details LLC. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN .
/s/ Kathryn A. Uros /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/17/13, 12/24/13, 12/31/13, 01/07/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258700
The following person is doing business
as: Vintage at Heart Thriftshop, 2130
Coast Hwy., PACIFICA, CA 94044 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Jamie Lynn Quirk, Po Box 718, Redwood
City, CA 94064. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN 11/01/2013.
/s/ Jamie Lynn Quirk /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/17/13, 12/24/13, 12/31/13, 01/07/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258690
The following person is doing business
as: Technalysis Research, LLC, 1136
Halsey Blvd., Foster City, CA 94404 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Technlysis Research, LLC. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN.
/s/Robert E. O’Donnell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/17/13, 12/24/13, 12/31/13, 01/07/14).
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: BC515508
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): Eugene Anthony Rah, an
Individual; and Does 1Through 10 inclu-
sive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo
esta demandando el demandante):
Garment Line, Inc.
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
203 Public Notices
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
Los Angeles
111 North Hill St.
Los Angeles, CA 90012
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
S. Young Lim, Esq., (SBN 126679)
Park & Lim
3530 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 1300
LOS ANGELES, CA 90010
(213)386-5595
Date: (Fecha) Jul. 17, 2013
John A. Clanke, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
December 3, 10, 17, 24, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
210 Lost & Found
295 Art
ART: 5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”,
signed Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all.
650-345-3277
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! (650)430-6556
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
(650)430-6556
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL REFRIGERATOR great for of-
fice or studio apartment . Good condition
$40.00 (650)504-6058
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 (650)591-3313
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, (650)787-8600
120 Foreign (70), U.S. (50) USED Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$5.00 all, 650-787-8600
24
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 RARE Volumes of Lewis & Clark Expe-
dition publish 1903 Excellent condition,
$60 Both, OBO, SOLD
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., SOLD
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
MAHJONG SET 166 tiles in case good
condition $35.00 call 650-570-602
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TONKA EXCAVATOR, two arms move,
articulated,only $22 (650)595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
BOX FULL TOYS Original Pkg., 40’s -
50’s, $90 for all (650)365-3987
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 SOLD
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
NIKON FG SLR body w 3 Vivitar zoom
lenses 28-70mm. 28-219 & 85-205, Ex-
cell Xond $ 99 (650)654-9252
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SAMSUNG, FLAT screenTV, 32” like
new! With Memorex DVD player, $185
(650)274-4337
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(SOLD
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO (650)515-2605
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINNING ROOM table with chairs excel-
lent condition like new. $99.00 (650)504-
6058
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50 SOLD
304 Furniture
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
END TABLES 2 Cabinet drum style ex-
cellent condition $90 OBO (650)345-
5644
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $200 OBO
(650)368-6674
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $85
RETAIL $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, SOLD
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable
coast $600.00 sacrifice $80.00
(650)504-6058
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 SOLD
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72” tall x 13”
wide, $20 (650)591-3313
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
TWINE BED including frame good con-
dition $45.00 (650)504-6058
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. (650)322-2814
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GAS STOVE - Roper, Oven w 4 Burners,
good condition $95 (650)515-2605
306 Housewares
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO SOLD!01976533
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
MONOPOLY GAME - rules, plastic real
estate, metal counters, all cards and pa-
per money $10 (650)574-3229
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 (650)368-0748
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW 18VOLT Drill/Driver w/ light,
warranty, only $29.99 (650)595-3933
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
16 BOOKS on Histoy if WWII Excllent
condition $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BALANCING SANTA, Mint condition,
Santa rocks back/forth, 20 in high, sturdy
metal, snowman, chimney, $12.00
(650)578-9208
BLACK LEATHER Organizer, Unop-
ened, Any Year, Cell Holder, Wallet, Cal-
ender., In Box $12 (650)578-9208
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
310 Misc. For Sale
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRIC IMPACT wrench sockets
case warranty $39.95 (650)595-3933
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FRONT LOADER, bucket & arm move,
articulated $12.50 (650)595-3933
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX BATH TOWELS(3) 26"x49",
watermelon color $15 (650)574-3229
MARTEX HAND TOWEL(5) 15"x28", wa-
termelon color $10 (650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
310 Misc. For Sale
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$40. (650)873-8167
VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN
black/gold/white floral on aqua $10
(650)574-3229
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR no brand $65
(650)348-6428
FENDER BASSMAN 25 watt Bass am-
plifier. $50. 650-367-8146
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
K MANDOLIN - A Style, 1940’2 with
Case, $50 firm SOLD!
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
SOLD!
NEAPOLITAN MANDOLIN With case
sounds good $75 (650)348-6428
OLD USED Tube Amplifer, working con-
dition $25 SOLD!
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 SOLD!
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $10
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
25 Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Butter square
4 Young newts
8 Most gentle
14 Brew that may be
pale or dark
15 Baseball family
name
16 Environmentally
friendly auto
17 Canasta, e.g.
19 Coke competitor
20 Hot-dish holder
21 Fleischer of the
Bush White
House
22 Train stopping at
every sta.
23 Exasperate,
metaphorically
27 Barbecue fare
30 Roamed without
restraint
31 “The Simpsons”
storekeeper
32 Agitate
33 Most characters
on “The Big Bang
Theory”
37 ’60-’70s Canadian
folk-rock icon
41 “That’s not in the
script!” evoker
42 Competes
43 Capote nickname
44 Not at all deceitful
47 Honeyed liquor
48 The same as it
was hundreds of
years ago, say
52 Stimpy’s sidekick
53 Promise to pay,
for short
54 Bottom, to baby
58 Uphill climb
60 Spontaneous
gathering, and a
hint to the starts
of 17-, 23-, 37-
and 48-Across
62 Bald spot coverer
63 “__ Misbehavin’”
64 Plains tribe
65 Takes an oath
66 Butterfly catchers
67 __ Antonio
DOWN
1 Diplomat’s goal
2 Banned apple
spray
3 Garr of “Tootsie”
4 More than willing
5 Old-style clothes
presser
6 Alley prowler
7 “Peggy __ Got
Married”: 1986
film
8 Intense fear
9 Traffic backup
causes
10 Comfy shoe
11 Food-poisoning
bacteria
12 Manicure spot
13 Liner notes listing
18 Redbox rentals
21 DOJ enforcer
24 Resort WSW of
Boulder
25 Add some pep to
26 Coral formation
27 Ravi Shankar
genre
28 Apple with tunes
29 Folksy Ives
32 “The Bucket List”
director
34 Repetitive
learning
35 Toon explorer with
a monkey friend
named Boots
36 It may be ear-
piercing
38 Rodrigo __ de
Vivar: El Cid
39 Basic idea
40 Reluctant to
commit
45 Govt. securities
46 Sch. with a
Brooklyn
campus
47 Interlock, as
gears
48 Houses with
Greek letters
49 Plant anew
50 Just as planned
51 Mandatory items
55 Managed care
gps.
56 Minuscule
amount
57 Dark, to a poet
59 Anti-pollution org.
60 Cooling device
61 Prevaricate
By Steve Blais
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
12/17/13
12/17/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. SOLD
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB LOUNGE exercise machine cost
$100. sell for $25. Call 650-570-6023
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
LOOKING TO PURCHASE A TOTAL
GYM Price Negotible. SOLD
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
SMALL TRAMPOLINE $5.00 call 650-
570-6023
318 Sports Equipment
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
SOLD!
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. SOLD
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $45., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
335 Garden Equipment
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
SOLD
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
2 WALKABOUT ROLLATORS 4
Wheeled Rollators, hand brakes, seats
back rest, folds for storage, transport.
$50 each SOLD!
INVERSION TABLE relieves pressure
on back. Cost $100.00 sell for $25.
(650)570-6023
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
studios and 1 bedrooms, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)592-1271
REDWOOD CITY 1 bedroom apartment
$1350. month, $1000 deposit, close to
Downtown RWC, Absolutely no animals.
Call (650)361-1200
SAN MATEO Complete remodeled 2
bdrm 1 bath. Includes parking spot.. Wa-
ter and garbage paid. . $2500/month +
dep. 6503025523
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,900 OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2,400 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
GMV ‘03 .ENVOY, SLT , 4x4, excellent
condition. Leather everything. 106K
miles. White. $7,800 (650)342-6342
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services • General
Errands • Event Help
$65 Holiday Special,
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Concrete
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTERS AND ROOF
REPAIR
• New Installation seamless,
• Cleaning and Screening,
• Commercial and Residential
Power Washing
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
Gutters
GUTTER
CLEANING
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
27 Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
Furniture
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
28
Tuesday • Dec. 17, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL