3.

2013 A MAGAZINE FROM SCA ON TRENDS, MARKETS AND BUSINESS

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(is
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Digging into the expectations
of four new dads
Papa
talk
THE WAR
OVER
WATER
Freshwater the most
valuable commodity
in the world
New life for
old by-products
Ashes
transformed
into land
Billy Allen and his
daughter Grace.
2 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
Youtube.com/
SCAeveryday shows
commercials and videos from SCA’s
press conferences, presentations
and interviews with executives and
employees.
Facebook.com/SCA
is intended to attract
talent, engage users and provide
information in a way that comple-
ments sca.com.
Twitter.com/SCAeveryday
provides continious commu-
nication from SCA with a focus on 
sustainability.
Slideshare.com/
SCAeveryday
is for investors and analysts, who
can download presentations from
quarterly reports and annual general
meetings.
Scribd.com/
SCAeveryday
makes some 50 publications available,
including SCA’s sustainability report,
its Hygiene Matters report and
Shape magazine.
Instagram/SCAeveryday
SCA photos from all across
the globe.
Contributors
Shape is a magazine from SCA,
primarily geared toward customers,
shareholders and analysts, but also
for journalists, opinion leaders and
others interested in SCA’s business
and development. Shape is
published four times a year. The next
issue is due in January 2014.
Publisher
Joséphine Edwall-Björklund
Managing Editor
Marita Sander
Editorial
Anna Gullers,
Ylva Carlsson, Inger Finell
Appelberg
Design
Markus Ljungblom, Kristin Päeva
Appelberg
Printer
Sörmlands Grafiska AB,
Katrineholm
Address
SCA, Corporate Communications,
Box 200, 101 23 Stockholm,
Sweden.
Telephone +46 8 7885100
Fax +46 8 6788130
SCA Shape is published in Swedish, English,
Spanish, German, French, Dutch and Italian.
The contents are printed on GraphoCote
90 grams from SCA. Reproduction only by
permission of SCA Corporate Communica-
tions. The opinions expressed herein are
those of the authors or persons interviewed
and do not necessarily reflect the views of
the editors or SCA. You can subscribe to SCA
Shape or read it as a pdf at www.sca.com.
Address changes can done at
www.sca.com/subscribe or by e-mailing
sophie.brauner@sca.com
Cover photo:
Pontus Höök
SCA’S SOCIAL MEDIA SITES
A good dad shows his
kids love and respect.
He guides them carefully
through life while letting
their personality blossom.
It is important to have fun
along the way. Make sure
you have the right level
of childishness, not too
much, not too little. Don’t
try to ride a tricycle, that is
usually a bad idea. Don’t
throw water balloons
when there are other
adults around. You may
hit one of them. No matter
what, live in the moment,
the moments might not
come back.
Pontus Höök
Photographer, USA, dad to Olivia, 7 and Alicia, 2.
3.2013 A MAGAZINE FROM SCA ON TRENDS, MARKETS AND BUSINESS
• O
u t l o o k: SC
A through the lens of L
e n n a r t N i l s s o n •
throughthelens
of L
e n n a r t N i l s s o n
The horse whisperer
(is a man called Tobbe)
Digging into the expectations
of four new dads
Papa
talk
THE WAR
OVER
WATER
Freshwater the most
valuable commodity
in the world
New life for
old by-products
Ashes
transformed
into land
Billy Allen and his
daughter Grace.
“ What makes a good dad?”
Being a good dad is
spending time with your
child. Whether it’s making
half an hour each evening
to read a good-night story
or teaching your little one
how to make pancakes in
the kitchen, experienced
dads know their children
value nothing more highly
than contact with – and
interest from – their
parents. Putting down the
smart phone, forgetting
about work for a while
and making yourself
available to your kids is
an investment.
Daniel Dasey
Writer, Sweden, dad to Gabriella, 4 and Benjamin, 2.
06. The ripple efect
Freshwater is a scarce commodity. Access to clean water is
quickly becoming the next big challenge for the world economy.
14. Giddy-up!
Tobbe Larsson has a special affinity for horses. He uses words
and common sense instead of a whip.
22. From the ashes
Waste products like ash and sludge are being used
to build roads and create new land.
26. Daddy dearest
Becoming a parent changes your life. Meet four dads discussing
the magic of fatherhood.
32. Window to the past
In the 1950s, photographer Lennart Nilsson documented
sawmills and plants along Sweden’s Gold Coast.
… how Team SCA did at the ocean race Rolex Fastnet? Find out on page 4.
DO YOU KNOW...
CONTENTS
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12 HOURS with Kristy Chew – page 38
SHAPE UP pages 20–21
NEWS FROM SCA pages 40–43
ALSO...
A TISSUE BRAND
caring for elephants
40
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oooooooooooooooooooorl rl rl rl rl rl rl rl rl rl l rl rl rl rrrl rrrr d d d dd d d dd dd ddd ddd dddddddd ec ec ec ec ec ec ec ec ec ec ec ec ec ec ec eec ec ec c ec eccon on on on on on on on on on on on on on oon on on n on on nn onom om om om om om om om om om om om om om om m om ommm om m om m om mm o y. y. y. y. y. y. y. yy. yy. y. y. yyy. yyyyy. yy
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4 SCA SHAPE 3 2013 4 44 44 44444444444444444444444444444 SCA SCA SCA SCA SCA SCA SCA SCA SCAA SCAAA SCC SCA SCA SCA SCA SCA SCA SCAA CA CA CA CA C SCAA CC SHA SHA SHA SHA SHA SHA HAA SHA SHA SHA SHA SHA SHA SHA H SHA SHA SHA SHA HA SHA H SHA SHA SHA SHA SHA SSHA SSHAAAAA H S A S APE PE PE PE PE PE PE PE PE PE PEE PE PE PE PE PE PE PPPPE PE PEEEE PPEE PEEE P 33333333333333333333333 201 201 201 01 201 201 201 01 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 20 20 20 201 20 0001 000 20 2011 01 0 201 20 20 20 20 22201 20 220 20 3333333333333333333333
UPDATED
Business news from SCA
TEAM SCA beat the Abu Dhabi Ocean
Racing team on corrected time in the
Rolex Fastnet Race in August. Abu Dhabi
is one of the competitors in the next Volvo
Ocean Race.
“It was really cool to match up with the
Abu Dhabi boys,” says Sophie Ciszek,
part of SCA’s all-female crew. “I think
we did pretty well against them despite
them having both a larger crew and big-
ger spinnaker. But this was a good result
for our frst race despite pretty tricky
conditions.”
Richard Brisius, managing director for
Team SCA, was pleased after the race:
“This was our frst big training goal
and happily we achieved our objective.
This is just the frst step of our journey,
and now the debriefng process begins.
We will take the lessons from this race
back to Lanzarote, our training base, and
continue to work on the program.”
SCA women
triumphant
P
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Team SCA at the
finish of the Rolex
Fastnet Race in
Plymouth, England,
August 14, 2013.
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 5
AN AGREEMENT has been signed for
SCA Timber Supply UK to provide a range
of planed softwood products to the Travis
Perkins Group, starting in 2014. “We will
be investing immediately £5 million in new
facilities on Humberside, dedicated to
producing builders’ merchant products,”
says Anders Ek, Acting Managing Direc-
tor SCA Timber Supply UK.
The Travis Perkins Group is Britain’s
largest builders’ merchant.
BEST
SUSTAINABILITY
REPORT
SCA HAS produced the
best sustainability report
on the Stockholm Stock
Exchange. This was the
conclusion of the environ-
mental news magazine
Miljörapporten, which
examined all 58 companies
on the Stockholm Stock
Exchange’s Large Cap list.
SCA took first place for
its sustainability report,
which according to the
jury links the company’s
business strategy with
stakeholders’ views on the
challenges of sustainability.
The jury felt that SCA’s sus-
tainability report makes a
clear connection between
sustainability, business
benefit and social respon-
sibility.
“For those who ask what
is the purpose of sustain-
ability reports and whether
they have any purpose at
all, the report from SCA is
a clear proof of how com-
panies can turn mandatory
reporting into strategi-
cally effective sustainabil-
ity measures,” the jury
concluded.
SCA Sustainability Report
2012
“The king of
toilet paper,
darling of the
markets”
French newspaper Le Monde
in July, describing SCA.
A BRASILIAN tree planting project, SCA’s
Velvet tissue ‘Three Trees promise’ has been
honored with two prestigious international
CSR Excellence Awards. Four million new
trees have been planted in Brazil thanks to
SCA’s UK Tissue brand Velvet and the ‘Three-
Trees promise’. SCA is funding the planting
and growing of indigenous trees through its
partnership with the ethical forestry company
Amata. The annual awards are organized by
PPP – Partners in Protecting the Planet – a
group of businesses that encourage the posi-
tive impact of businesses on their staff, sup-
pliers, communities and  environment.
Tree planting
project awarded
SCA HAS DECIDED to make a public cash
offer for the Chinese tissue company Vinda.
The offer is conditional on SCA achieving an
ownership share of Vinda in excess of
50 percent. SCA is currently the second larg-
est shareholder of Vinda, which is listed on the
Hong Kong Stock Exchange.
SCA will offer HKD 11.00 (SEK 9.29) per
share, corresponding to a premium of ap-
proximately 34.5 percent based on the aver-
age closing price over the past 30 trading
days. The offer corresponds to a market
capitalization of approximately SEK 9.4 bil-
lion for all shares in Vinda.
SCA became a part owner in the tissue
manufacturer in 2007, and currently has a
21.7 percent holding in the company with two
representatives on its Board of Directors.
Vinda is the third largest tissue company in
China, the world’s second largest tissue mar-
ket. In 2012, Vinda’s sales rose 26 percent
and amounted to approximately
SEK 5 billion. The company’s operating mar-
gin was 12.9 percent.
SCA to make an
offer for Vinda
Investment
in softwood
products
FOCUS: WATER
Access to clean water will be the next big
challenge for the global economy. There
simply isn’t enough freshwater. Population
growth, urbanization and climate change
are about to make water the most valuable
commodity in the world. Water has
become the new oil.
challenge
The growing water
text SUSANNA LINDGREN photos GETTY IMAGES
6 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
  S
CARCITY OF WATER may seem odd on a
planet where 70 percent of the surface is
covered by water. However, 97.5 percent of
all the water on earth is seawater. Most of the
remaining 2.5 percent is frozen in glaciers
or the polar ice caps, while lakes, rivers and other
surface water account for only 1 percent of the poten-
tially usable freshwater. UN fgures show that water
scarcity already afects most continents and more
than 40 percent of our planet.
“If all the water in the world would ft into a
10-liter container, all the accessible freshwater
in our rivers and lakes would fll a one-milliliter
measuring spoon,” says Gustaf Olsson, a profes-
sor in Industrial Automation at Lund University in
Sweden.
In recent years he has focused his research on
how water scarcity brings to light the conficting
interests competing for water. By 2025, the United
Nations estimates, 1.8 billion people will be living
in regions with absolute water scarcity, and by
2050 more than 2 billion people in 48 countries will
lack suf cient water, which makes the question of
water access even more pressing.
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 7
There are two main reasons for the increasing
water scarcity: climate change and the growing
world population. We can already see the impact
of climate change in more extreme weather condi-
tions. In southern Europe and the western United
States, rivers are running dry in the summer,
while central Europe has recently experienced the
worst fooding in decades. India is seeing plenty of
rainfall, but the water is falling so intensely that it
can’t be managed properly, and in eastern Asia the
monsoon can no longer be predicted.
“We see more rain, more fooding and more and
longer droughts, which most likely are connected
to global warming,” Olsson says.
With the world population increasing by about
a million people each week, the water challenge
is not getting any smaller. The growing numbers
of people, most of them concentrated in the cities,
will need both water and sanitation. These needs,
combined with improved standards of living in
many parts of the world, will inevitably lead to
greater demand for energy.
“All types of energy require water, for exploit-
ing, extracting, refning or processing,” Olsson
points out. “This creates a confict. Most people
realize that it takes a lot of energy to treat and
pump water, but they don’t necessarily see how
much water is required to create the energy for
doing it.”
Olsson points to the construction of two of
the world’s largest coal-fred thermal plants in
South Africa. “Of course the country needs energy,
WATER
“ It’s no longer energy that’s
our biggest challenge – it’s
water. Water has already
become our new oil.”
Gustaf Olsson
High water on the Rhine
in Cologne, Germany
8 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
47%
By 2030, 47 percent
of the world ‘s popu-
lation will be living
in areas of high
water stress. The
increase will mainly
occur in developing
countries, which
already have limited
access to adequate
sanitation facilities.
World Water
Development Report,
WWDR, 2012
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 9
but the energy company has water priority no
matter what,” he says. “The extraction of the coal
will have a huge impact on a river, something that
will afect everyone living in the area. All the time
we have to consider rising conficts. For example,
in order to extract gas and oil in dry areas in the
US Southwest, large volumes of water have to be
trucked or pumped from deep underground. This
creates both a large carbon footprint and severe
competition with agriculture.”
CONFLICTING INTERESTS over water are noth-
ing new. Turkey, Syria, Iraq and Iran have argued
for years over the use of the water in the Tigris and
Euphrates rivers. Africa has seen increased tensions
surrounding the use of the water in the River Nile.
“During the droughts in the US in 2012, harvests
failed,” Olsson says. “In fve weeks the price of corn
increased by 40 percent, which created two types
of complaints, those who complained about rising
ethanol prices and those who saw the price of food
increase – another example of conficting interests.”
Water resources impact almost all aspects of the
economy: health, food production, industry and
sustainable development. With increasing water
scarcity, the issues of water, energy and food have to
be addressed in an integrated manner.
“Water must have a price,” Olsson says. “The
problem is that we don’t seem to see the value
of water. In most places there is no relationship
between prices and access to drinking water. Every
human being needs between 20 and 25 liters per day
for their personal needs. That should be a human
right. But it’s not a human right to waste water. It’s
not a human right to wash your car when you live in
the desert. Even so, water is cheaper in Las Vegas,
where there is a shortage of water, than in Sweden
where it is plentiful.”
Many countries have already imposed progressive
water charges. In China, Greece and Malaysia, for
example, the last cubic meter costs more than the frst.
“If you don’t put a price on water there is no incen-
tive for saving,” Olsson says. “Three-quarters of the
freshwater in the world is used for agriculture, and
in many places it isn’t used wisely. In the American
Midwest the groundwater is so low that you have to
pump it more than 100 meters. In parts of India the
groundwater is sinking by 10 meters per year. There
is surface water in the rivers and lakes, but it is so
badly polluted that it can’t be used even for irriga-
tion. That’s not sustainable.”
Aquifers are replaceable, but the water deep
down takes hundreds of years to replenish. There
are only three ways to increase access to fresh-
water, Olsson says: drill even deeper to access
groundwater, treat contaminated water or desali-
nate seawater. According to the International
Desalination Association, more than 300 million
people rely on desalinated water for their daily
needs. Some of the biggest plants are located on
the Arabian Peninsula.
“It’s no longer energy that’s our biggest chal-
lenge – it’s water,” Olsson says. “Water has already
become our new oil.”
“ Water must
have a price.
The prob-
lem is that
we don’t
seem to see
the value
of water.”
Gustaf Olsson
but the energy company h
matter what,” he says. “T
70%
Global population
growth predicts an
increase in food
demand of 70 percent
by 2050. Increasing
agricultural input will
substantially increase
both water and energy
consumption, leading
to increased competi-
tion among water-using
sectors.
UNESCO
Three-quarters of the
freshwater in the world is
used for agriculture.
10 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
  W
ATER PLAYS an important role in
nearly every step of the paper manu-
facturing process. SCA uses about
210 million cubic meters of water
annually at its plants around the
world. Water is used to transport fber during the
paper production process and as cooling water,
with the breakdown between the two being 60–40.
The cooling water has little or no impact on SCA’s
water footprint. It’s the process water, the main
part of the other 60 percent, that has been the
focal point for the environmental department at
SCA for many years. This water is being treated
before emitted.
“Our main target is to reduce both the amount
of water we use by employing new and more envi-
ronmentally sound techniques, and to make sure
the ef uent is cleaned and treated in a sustainable
way,” says Patrik Isaksson, vice president for envi-
ronmental afairs at SCA.
By using globally acknowledged methods from
the World Resources Institute in combination
with internal assessments, SCA has identifed nine
sites in six geographic areas of water shortage. The
Sahagún tissue paper mill in Mexico is located in
one such water-stressed area.
“Our mill in Sahagún is situated next to Mexico
City’s metropolitan area, where water is scarce
Water matters
especially in Mexico
Water matters. Every year millions of cubic
meters of water pass through SCA’s paper
mills around the world. Paper production
requires a lot of water and SCA has estab-
lished ambitious water targets to use it as
intelligently and sustainably as possible –
especially in countries like Mexico, where
water really matters.
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 11
FOCUS: WATER
“ Our main
target is to
reduce both
the amount
of water
we use by
employ-
ing new and
more envi-
ronmen-
tally sound
techniques.
Patrik Isaksson
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Part of the waste water
treatment process which
allows great savings on
the use of fresh water in
the Sahagún plant.
and therefore expensive,” says Roberto Deleón,
plant manager at Sahagún.
Sahagún, inaugurated in the beginning of 2011,
is the newest of all SCA plants worldwide. It was a
turnkey project and came with a standard water-
handling system, and several measures have been
taken to reduce the amount of freshwater it uses.
“Once we had stabilized production, the idea
was to optimize ef ciency and the use of water,”
Deleón says. “Initially we used 25 cubic meters of
water per ton of produced tissue.”
IF ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS weren’t enough,
the cost of water would be suf cient incentive to
reduce the amount of water used. With each cubic
meter of water costing 12 pesos (94 US cents), the
price of water per ton of paper was nearly 24 US
dollars. For each reduction of one cubic meter of
water per ton of paper produced, the annual sav-
ings amount to nearly 60,000 dollars.
“We were using a considerable amount of water
in the deinking plant, where the recycled paper we
use is made into pulp,” Deleón says. “By closing one
design loop we could reuse water from the second
stage of the papermaking process for pulp making.”
90%
Improved sanitation
and safe drinking
water would reduce
diarrhea by nearly
90 percent.
WHO
Through this action, and by closing the loop in
the vacuum systems in the plant, Deleón and his
colleagues managed to reduce water consump-
tion from 25 to 18 cubic meters per ton of paper
produced. A third action – closing the loop on the
sealing system for all pumps in pulp production
as well as in the paper machine – further reduced
consumption to 15.7 cubic meters per ton
“Our fnal target is 10 cubic meters per ton in
2016,” Deleón says. “To reach that we have to start
dealing with circulation rates and ionic charges,
which technically is more challenging, but we will
get there one step at a time.”
By the end of 2012, Sahagún had reduced its
§water consumtion by 15 percent. The plant has
its own water treatment plant, using a biological
system to reduce the organic content in the ef uent
water. This means that the Sahagún plant already
meets the challenging new water targets set up by
SCA, which say that all pulp and paper mills should
be provided with mechanical and biological
treatment of wastewater by 2015. Of the Group’s
40 pulp and paper mills, 38 have installed and 1
is in the process of installing biological ef uent
treatment plants.
FOCUS: WATER
12 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
Plant manager Roberto Deleón and his team has managed to reduce water usage from
25 to 18 cubic meters per ton of paper produced.
ACCESSIBLE WATER RESOURCES are
distributed extremely unevenly between
regions, making their use a local issue,
unlike climate change, which is a global
issue. Reducing water usage in a region
with good access to water does not
improve the situation in regions with
water scarcity. Most SCA mills, corre-
sponding to 97.5 percent of the Group’s
water use, are located in areas with ade-
quate access to water. SCA has decided
to focus water-saving efforts in regions
experiencing water scarcity, and the
Group has set a target to reduce usage
in water-stressed areas by 10 percent by
2015, with 2010 as a reference year.
Although SCA’s water usage in the
identified countries and regions – Italy,
Spain, Mexico, Colombia, Australia, and
the southwestern US – only accounts
for 2.5 percent of the company’s overall
usage, planned reductions will make a big
difference locally. By year-end 2012, water
usage in these regions had declined by
3.4 percent. Former Georgia-Pacific sites
are not included in the water usage target.
These will be surveyed in 2013.
The number of people living in water-stressed areas is
rising, and developing countries are affected the most.
WATERSTRESSED
REGIONS
In SCA’s view, the value of the water footprint at the product level is
complex and difficult to make comparable because access to water
varies dramatically around the world. What may be regarded as high
consumption in one location could be entirely negligible in another.
WATER FOOTPRINT
A WATER FOOTPRINT MEASURES the total
water used to produce goods and services
by an individual, business or nation. For
example, to produce one kilogram of beef
you need 10,000 to 20,000 liters of water.
The average world citizen consumes
1,564 cubic meters of water per year. In
the US the average consumption is 2,895
cubic meters. A water footprint’s impact
depends on where the water is extracted
and when. If it comes from a place where
water is already scarce, the consequences
for freshwater habitats, species and liveli-
hoods can be severe.
Source: WWF
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14 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
10 QUESTIONS
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 15
Calling
all horses
Tobbe Larsson travels the world
with his horses, performing to
huge audiences in arenas like
Wembley Stadium in London and
the Stockholm Globe Arena.
Relying on words instead of whip
and stirrup, he manages to control
the animals completely.
text JONAS REHNBERG
photos STAFFAN JOHANSSON
16 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
10 QUESTIONS
W
hat’s so special about horses?
Humans and horses have a shared
history. For thousands of years they
have carried us through battle,
hunting and exploration, and this
has created a unique bond between us. They are
universal creatures and they all speak the same
language no matter where they’re from. You can
communicate with a horse from any country or
background if you know how to do it – wild horses,
too. In areas like Spain and the Middle East,
there’s a tremendous pride in owning a horse. It’s
a bit odd that it has become almost exclusively a
girls’ hobby in Sweden but in no other country.
The biggest Swedish magazine about horses even
changed its name to Penny Girl recently.
The fact that horses became my favorites is
more of a coincidence. We lived in the country-
side, not on a farm but in an ordinary house. I had
animals of almost every kind there is, from guinea
pigs and dogs to stick insects, and I got my own
horse when I was seven.
Can you talk to them?
– I can read and interpret their signals and com-
municate with them by using body language as
well as my voice. There’s really nothing dramatic
about it. It’s like training a dog. In the past, the
horse was a member of the household, just as
dogs still are, and if you couldn’t control your
horse back then, you ran the risk of being killed
in combat. The fact that I’m dyslexic contributes
to my af nity with animals, since communica-
tion with them is based on means other than the
written word. To me it was liberating to learn that
communication beyond writing and speaking was
possible.
Your main passion lies in so-called freedom training.
What’s that?
– It’s about controlling a loose horse without
riding it and barely touching it, relying instead on
communicating with your personality, your eyes,
voice, movements and body language. If you ride
it, you can always exert physical pressure to have
your way, but not in freedom training. You also get
very attached to freedom horses, because you have
developed a very special bond without which you
couldn’t control them so precisely.
Do horses really enjoy being trained?
– With freedom training, there’s not a chance
they would follow my instructions if they didn’t
enjoy what they were doing, since I cannot exert
any physical pressure. They also wouldn’t put up
with being on tour for eight months with up to fve
shows every weekend if they didn’t think it was fun
at all. But you have to design “tricks” that the horse
can pull of -– if it’s too dif cult for them, they get
tired. On the other hand, they beam with pride
when they succeed. A horse that understands what
you want it to do, and is able to do it, is a happy
horse.
Can anyone who copies your moves control the
horses in the same way?
– No. Sometimes someone from the audience
joins me in the ring to emulate my moves, but the
horse just turns to look at me like, “What’s going
on here?”
How should an amateur communicate with
a strange horse?
– Basically, horses are nice, friendly animals.
They are not naturally aggressive and don’t want
to attack you, but be careful not to stand in the
wrong place. A horse weighs half a ton and can
easily hurt you. When playing with each other,
horses may be quite rough, biting and kicking, but
humans are too fragile for that, even if we wear a
helmet and a vest. Show respect but not insecurity
or fear. Don’t be pushy. Let the horse make the frst
move, then let it follow you. It’s a herd animal.
I heard you are friends with the crown prince of Dubai?
– Yes, he frequently comes here for horse train-
ing. I go down there a couple of times every month.
You have your own television show. What’s it about?
– “Pony Emergency” is about horse owners
who are unable to handle their horses. Often the
“ I’m such a bad loser that I don’t
participate in activities I can’t be
sure of winning.”
Name: Tobbe Larsson
Age: 38
Lives: In a vicarage
built in 1863 in Sjörup,
Skåne, in southern
Sweden.
Tobbe Larsson
“ I can
read and
interpret
their
signals
and com-
municate
with them
by using
body
language
as well as
my voice.”
18 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
Tobbe Larsson has a special
affinity for horses, dating
from when he got his first
one at age seven.
COZY IN THE STALL
SCA has developed stall
bedding pellets for horses
made of pure sawdust.
When moisture is added
to the pellets, they expand
to 2-3 times their original
size, quickly disintegrate
into sawdust and pro-
vide a soft but stable, as
good as dust-free bed-
ding surface in the stall.
The bedding product has
also demonstrated highly
positive results for horses
previously suffering from
pressure sores.

Tobbe Larsson is an ambas-
sador for SCA’s stable pel-
lets, which he also uses for his
horses.
“It’s important to me that my
horses enjoy a comfortable and
healthy environment, and I want
my stable to be light, fresh and
easy to manage,” Larsson says.
The pellets provide the horses
with a soft, cozy bed on which
to rest. They are a completely
natural product with no artificial
additives. Stall bedding pel-
lets are available for deliv-
ery throughout the Swedish
mainland.
10 QUESTIONS
reason is that they have focused so much
on training for contests that they forget
the importance of everyday activities
and learning the basic but necessary
commands. Spend a lot of time with your
horse and get to know it.
Despite your equine skills, you have never
entered a professional competition. Why?
– I’m such a bad loser that I don’t
participate in activities I can’t be sure
of winning. It’s odd that I’m actually
less nervous when performing in huge
arenas than I am before a smaller crowd.
Perhaps it’s because one can’t really see
the individuals in an arena like Wembley,
which is so huge that I ride a golf cart
to the stage.
Have you ever wanted to train other
animals?
– No. I have a dog, but it can’t do
anything on command.
Lotus Professional devient Tork.
Vous trouverez vos produits d’hygiène Lotus Professional habituels
avec de nouveaux noms et emballages Tork.
En tant que société leader dans les produits d’hygiène, Tork partage
le même engagement à comprendre vos besoins afin de vous rendre
la vie au travail étonnamment simple.
Pour en savoir plus, visitez www.tork.fr
SCA HYGIENE PRODUCTS
AFH Professional Hygiene Europe
Roissypole le Dôme - Bât 7
95761 Roissy CDG Cedex
France
Tout ce que vous aimez
chez Lotus Professional
®

se retrouve maintenant
chez Tork
®
20 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
SHAPE UP
Check out what’s happening
outside SCA.
SHAPE UP
Check out what’s happening
outside SCA
Living art

WALLS DON’T have to be boring. A grow-
ing trend features “green walls” – plants
as vertical gardens. Creating leafy green
indoor walls affects our minds and sense
of well-being. Some experts say that
people work better, are happier and
don’t suffer from as much stress when
surrounded by plants. At a workplace
the plants also help clean the air. The
master of vertical gardens is French
botanist Patrick Blanc, who wants plants
and buildings to live in harmony. One of
his best-known works is the living wall
at the Musée du Quai Branly in Paris.
Blanc’s Vertical Garden System can be
implemented anywhere, indoors or out-
doors, and in any climatic environment.

www.verticalgardenpatrickblanc.com
PETER MORGAN, a marine biologist and
sanitation innovator from Zimbabwe,
has been named the winner of the 2013
Stockholm Water Prize. The committee
awarding the prize cited his work in pro-
tecting the lives and health of millions of
people through improved sanitation and
water technologies.
Morgan has invented a wide range of
simple, smart and low-cost water and
sanitation technologies, used today by
millions of people worldwide.
“Many currently existing solutions
to provide clean water and sanitation
are unafordable, impractical and out of
reach for the world’s poorest people,” the
Stockholm Water Prize Committee said
in its citation. “As a result of Dr. Morgan’s
pioneering work to develop practical wa-
ter and sanitation technologies for those
most in need, countless communities
now enjoy safer water, a cleaner environ-
ment and quality of life.”
Local communities can use Morgan’s
solutions to build and sustain them-
selves. For each of his
technologies, he has
also developed a wide
range of training and
educational materi-
als that enable local
practitioners to install,
maintain and improve
them.
Simple water solutions for the poor
Peter Morgan
P
H
O
T
O
:

P
A
T
R
I
C
K

B
L
A
N
C


A
R
H
I
T
E
C
T
:

J
E
A
N

N
O
U
V
E
L
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 21
Back to the future: old newspa-
pers return to their roots as logs.
Estrogen
can prevent
infections
Estrogen stimulates the
production of the body’s own
antibiotic. It also strength-
ens the cells in the urinary
tract, according to a new
study from the Karolinska
Institutet in Sweden. Urinary
tract infections are among
the most common diseases,
affecting over half of all
women at some point in their
lives. The new results show
that estrogen supplements
may help menopausal women
ward off recurrent urinary
tract infections.
2.5
billion people in the world did
not have access to adequate
sanitation facilities at the end
of 2011. That is 36 percent
of the world’s population.
Sanitation is scarcest in sub-
Saharan Africa, Oceania and
South Asia.
Source: www.unicef.org
Recycling
all around
NewspaperWood is a material invented by the
Dutch designer Mieke Meijer. The process takes
newspapers, which are made from wood, and
reconstitutes them into logs that can be cut,
milled and sanded like ordinary wood. When
a NewspaperWood log is cut, the layers of
paper appear like wood grain or the rings of
a tree. The product is licensed by the Dutch
design studio Vij5.

www.vij5.nl/KrantHout_S_EN.html
A JAPANESE SHOWER ROBOT could make it
easier for old or disabled people to manage
their hygiene without assistance. The user
lies downs in a shower compartment and
is washed by the robot, which adjusts the
sprinkles to the person’s shape and size. Ro-
bots might be a solution for dealing with the
world’s growing elderly population. Today
toilets are available in some countries that
help to wash people who are incapable of
using toilet paper.
Robots for
hygiene care
Did you
know that
…women are significantly more
likely than men to recommend a
restaurant based on messages
from environmental causes
or charities*
*According to a joint research study
between SCA and the US National
Restaurant Association.
22 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
TECHNOLOGY
A
SHES AND OTHER by-products from a pair
of SCA pulp and paper mills will help
to create new land needed by an SCA
sawmill as part of a 10-year-long project
that began in 2012. The efort involves
using the residue products to fll in an area of the
sea equivalent to 15 professional soccer pitches.
Each year, the Swedish paper and pulp indus-
try produces about 200,000 tons of boiler ash
and 220,000 tons of a waste product called green
liquor dregs (GLD). Both of these products can be
FROM ASHES
Former waste products like ash and
sludge from forestry mills become new
roads and help to build new land.
text ULF WIMAN illustration NILS-PETTER EKWALL
ÖSTRAND PULP MILL
GREEN LIQUOR DREGS
ASHES
ORTVIKEN PAPER MILL
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 23
used on an industrial scale to create land where
none existed before, according to Patrik Halling,
SCA vice president for technology.
“We have done this successfully at SCA’S
Ortviken paper mill and Östrand pulp mill, and
are currently involved in a large project at SCA’S
Tunadal sawmill,” Halling says.
The Tunadal sawmill is located near Sundsvall
on the Baltic coast, 380 kilometers north of
Stockholm. The project will create 100,000
square meters of land in the Alnö strait that the
sawmill needs for storing timber and for future
expansion.
Since November 2012 the mill has seen a con-
tinuous stream of heavy trucks, each with a 30-ton
load of rocks used to construct an 860-meter-long
pier. The pier, built with 750,000 tons of rocks,
will mark of the new land. To ensure its stability,
a ditch six meters deep and 30 meters wide has
been dredged in the clay sea bottom.
As project manager Magnus Jinnerot of SCA
explains, “It is technically complicated to fll
to new land
Green liquor dregs from
Östrand pulp mill and boiler
ash from Ortviken paper
mill from the new land area
needed to expand the busi-
ness of Tunadal sawmill.
TUNADAL SAWMILL
24 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
TECHNOLOGY
rock on a poor foundation, especially when you
don’t see what you’re doing. We had to constantly
use sonar.”
Once the pier has been fnished and sealed, the
second phase will start in late summer of 2013.
Each year for the next 10 years, the newly produced
lagoon will be flled with some 26,000 tons of ash
and 10,500 tons of sludge from the Ortviken mill,
and with 10,300 tons of ash and 22,500 tons of GLD
from the Östrand mill.
Jinnerot says the mix of ash, GLD and sludge
works well as construction material. “Once it’s in
the water, it becomes so stable that the sawmill can
build roads and lighter buildings such as ware-
houses on top,” he says.
LAND BUILDING in water is time-consuming
and complex, but SCA calculates that it is still
better than transporting the waste products for
disposal. And it creates land required to expand
its businesses.
“This method brings several advantages,”
Jinnerot says. “We get the land that we need and
don’t have to pay fees for disposing the waste prod-
ucts. And as both Ortviken and Östrand are close to
Tunadal, we avoid long, costly transports, making it
a more eco-sound solution to boot.”
If it was purer, the ash could be used to produce
concrete. Other possible uses considered were
forest fertilization and road construction. But the
volumes required in these applications are rela-
tively small, so much of the waste would still have
ended up in waste facilities.
Ever-tougher environmental regulations and
taxes have driven the search for sustainable and
cost-efective ways to recycle these residuals.
SCA had considered various ways of dispos-
ing of the waste products from the Ortviken
and Östrand mills, an estimated 73,000 tons in
2014. “On average, Ortviken alone produces 70
tons of ash every day of the year,” Halling says.
“Given the costs and environmental issues, we
decided that building land at Tunadal was the
best solution.”
“ We get the
land that we
need and
don’t have
to pay fees
for putting
the waste
products in
a dump.”
Magnus Jinnerot, SCA
PROCESSING
WASTE
PRODUCTS
Almost 1 million tons of
ash, green liquor dregs
(GLD) and sludge from
SCA’s Ortviken paper
mill and Östrand pulp
mill will be used for
building new land for the
Tunadal sawmill.
The ash from the Ort-
viken mill is the result of
forest industry by-prod-
ucts such as bark and
chips that are burned
to produce steam and
hot water for production
and heating. The sludge
is a waste product from
the mill’s paper coating
process.
At Östrand a process
for recovering chemi-
cals produces the GLD,
while the ash is a biofuel
boiler residue product.
The project at Tunadal sawmill will create 100,000 square meters of land that the sawmill needs
for storing timber and for future expansion.
FEATURE
26 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 27
MARKET
“ Seeing my
wife hold
our daughter
for the frst
time was my
most special
moment.”
Billy Allen
BECOMING A PARENT changes
your life forever. Children not only
give you lots of joy, but they also
provide you with a lifetime of paren-
tal worry. Shape met with four new
dads from four parts of the world
to talk about fatherhood. Traditions
vary throughout the world, but no
matter where you live the magic
moments seem to be the same.
The
magic
of fatherhood
text DANIEL DASEY AND ANNA GULLERS
photos PONTUS HÖÖK AND SVANTE ÖRNBERG
28 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
MARKET
What were your expectations before the
arrival of the baby?
I always wanted to be a dad and a young dad.
The big expectations were how my wife and I
were going to work on keeping our relationship
going and try to take care of our baby. We knew
that we were going to get a lot less sleep and not
so much time for activities and date nights and
things like that.
Did anything in particular take you by surprise?
One surprise was the frst two nights in the
hospital, how nervous I was. As much as you read
that your baby can’t be broken, you’re watching her
every second. The frst night was by far the most
nerve-racking. Another thing we didn’t expect was
that we got nervous around nighttime, because all
worries kind of got magnifed and we had to make
sure she was sleeping.
Anything you would have preferred to know before
the arrival of your child?
The nice thing in our day and age is we have
phones and computers and iPads. If we want to
know something we Google it. Rather than worry-
ing about it or calling a doctor, you just look it up on
the Internet and go, “Okay, my baby is doing what
normal babies do.”
Did you and your partner attend any parental
education before the birth?
We did a Lamaze class a birthing class and we
also did an infant-care class. It’s run by a nurse
in Albany who’s been in labor and delivery for
years, and that helped ease our minds about a lot
of things. It answered our questions about car-seat
safety and things like that.
What would you say is the biggest challenge as
a parent?
So far the biggest challenge has been trying to
stay healthy and eat healthily. We were both divi-
sion-one college athletes, so we like our exercise.
Another challenge is just trying to keep her happy.
Sleeping is one of the bigger challenges, but she’s
already doing pretty well at that.
What characterizes a good dad?
For a new dad, encouraging your wife or the
mother of the baby is important. There’s not a
lot I can do at this stage with the baby, but you
“ The frst night was by far the most
nerve-racking.” Billy Allen
can be there for your wife, be encouraging. And
you can be tender with the little one. Most dads
are so rough and tough, so you can just be tender
and quiet.
What do you want to convey to your child?
We’re very religious, so that’s a big part, a
huge goal in our eyes. Education is key, and hard
work. Those three things will get you a long way
in life. Christian values and morals that’s what
we most want to convey, and the other things
will follow.
Have you been on parental leave? How long?
I’m a graduate student, so I do research and
go to school. I took about a week and a half of
from school. My wife was of for eight weeks,
so I didn’t need to take of too much time. But
since then my wife has gone back to work, and
I’ve taken in total two days of to stay home and
watch the baby.
Which part of childcare do you actively take part in?
Right now it’s mostly supporting the mom.
She does the majority of the work, but I change
diapers. When I’m at home with the baby all day,
I’ll do everything. We have bottles to give to her
with milk. At night when the baby’s up for more
than 20 or 30 minutes and can’t get back to sleep,
I’ll get up and take her into another room and try
to get her to sleep so her mom can get some sleep.
What’s a magic moment for you as a parent?
Seeing my wife hold our daughter for the frst
time was my most special moment. It was very
emotional. There’s a little baby you get to have.
We asked everyone to get out of the room so we
could meet our daughter.
USA
Name: Billy Allen, 25
Family: Wife Cait, baby
daughter Grace born in
March 2013
Lives: Delmar, New York,
USA (near Albany)
Hobbies: Sports, working
out, cooking
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 29
What were your expectations before the
arrival of the baby?
That life would continue as before. I thought I
knew what being a parent involved, but both my
life and attitude changed at once.
Did anything in particular take you by surprise?
That the baby slept so much at frst. I imagined
crying and sleepless nights. Instead, life was domi-
nated by lots of sweet moments and closeness.
Anything you would have preferred to know before
the arrival of your child?
No, I don’t think you need that much infor-
mation. A parent experiences constant change,
which I’ve now realized will continue throughout
childhood.
Did you and your partner attend any parental
education before the birth?
No.
What would you say is the biggest challenge as
a parent?
Living up to your vision. You also have to realize
daily that you have an enormous responsibility,
while you also have to be able to enjoy the moment
and make the most of being a dad.
What characterizes a good dad?
Being sensitive to the child, coping with the
blows of parenthood. You have to allow yourself
to “let go” of the child so that they can explore and
fnd their own way. Acting consistently so that the
child feels secure in having someone to rely on.
What do you want to convey to your child?
Being open to change and curious about life, as
well as showing respect for others. Nothing is con-
stant people age and die, and situations change.
Have you been on parental leave? How long?
Yes, with the frst two children. The plan is to be
at home for six months with Alexander when he
starts preschool. I’ll be the one settling him into
preschool.
Which part of childcare do you actively take part in?
Everything except breastfeeding!
What’s a magic moment for you as a parent?
Receiving a smile that demands nothing in
return. Coming home and talking to the child and
feeling unconditionally that “this is going to be
fne, Dad loves you.”
“ The biggest challenge is living
up to your vision.” Simon Nordlund
SWEDEN
Name: Simon Nordlund, 33 
Family: Anita Buczko (part-
ner), Samuel 6, Rebecca 3,
Alexander, born in March
Lives: Lerum, Sweden
Hobbies: The family, nearby
activities, soccer, golf.
30 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
FEATURE
What would you say is the biggest challenge as a
parent?
To be able to change completely the way of life
you had before. Once you have a child, your life
doesn’t belong only to you. You have to learn how
to share and give instead of just take.
What characterizes a good dad?
A sense of responsibility, the ability to pass on
experience and the readiness to educate your
children.
What do you want to convey to your child?
I would like to teach my children to be attentive
to other people’s needs, overcome life’s dif culties
and be willing to excel in all kind of activities.
Have you been on parental leave? How long?
No, in Russia there’s a more traditional approach
where the mother stays home and takes care of the
baby. Men should go on hunting and protecting the
family.
Which part of childcare do you actively take part in?
I feel comfortable with every little thing about
baby care, but my key competence is rocking them
to sleep.
What’s a magic moment for you as a parent?
To see how your children grow and improve
their skills day by day. When they take their frst
steps and say their frst words, every day can bring
you something new and special. The thing is to be
able to recognize the moment.
What were your expectations before the
arrival of the baby?
I had no clear idea what I was about to face.
I was expecting new responsibilities, and I took
that very seriously. But since I knew our frst child
would be a boy, I was already thinking how I could
share my experiences, like doing sports and all
kinds of male stuf. With Polina it was diferent.
I knew that the frst year with the baby means lots
of sleepless nights, putting your own wishes aside.
Doing simple things is enough, like just relaxing
in the evening or doing nothing on the weekends.
Knowing we were expecting a girl, I thought about
buying dresses and decorating the room in pink.
I felt pretty confdent, as I considered myself an
experienced father who knew how to change a
diaper and rock the baby to sleep.
Did anything in particular take you by surprise?
Every child is unique and special. You never
know how diferent your life will become. Polina’s
behavior was very diferent from her older
brother’s, so the whole family had to adapt to her
temperament, which was much more demanding.
Instead of buying pink-and-white dresses I had
to spend hours with a crying baby while trying to
check my son’s homework.
Anything you would have preferred to know before
the arrival of your child?
I thought I knew everything. Now I understand
that we don’t manage our babies they manage us.
Did you and your partner attend any parental educa-
tion before the birth?
My wife did. That was a requirement of the hos-
pital where she wanted to have our daughter. As for
me, I focused more on how to prepare our son, who
used to be the center of the family, for the arrival of
his new sister. When parents are expecting a new
baby they concentrate on it so much that the older
children in the family may feel less loved. Staying
attentive to the older children is no less important
than being prepared for the new baby.
“ Instead of buying pink-and-
white dresses I had to spend
hours with a crying baby.”
Maxim Barkov
RUSSIA
Name: Maxim Barkov, 39
Family: Wife Marina, son
Ilya, 10 and daughter Polina,
2 1/2
Lives: Moscow, Russia
Hobbies: Sports, travel,
photography, painting,
home improvement.
NEW GLOBAL
BABY BRAND
PLATFORM
SCA has launched
a new global baby
brand platform Love
Every Moment. The
concept includes
brand positioning,
communication
platform and pack
design. A global
toolkit of launch
assets has been
created, ranging
from tv commercials
and print to digital
and PR elements.
The brand platform
is now being rolled
out globally, starting
with Russia and the
Nordic countries
spring 2013.
MARKET
FEATURE
What were your expectations before the
arrival of the baby?
We hoped that our baby girl would be healthy
and delivered safely. As for my wife, I hoped she
wouldn’t sufer from too much pain during the
delivery. I also hoped that my baby girl would have
fair skin and big eyes like her beautiful mother.
Did anything in particular take you by surprise?
This is my second child. After a few hours of
contractions and pain, my wife was still
struggling, and according to the doctor there was
a risk of “shoulder dystocia.” We knew nothing
about this, so rather than take any risks we decided
on an emergency cesarean. This was a bad surprise
for us.
Anything you would have preferred to know before
the arrival of your child?
My wife has experienced hemorrhoids before,
and the doctor said she would sufer from them
again after delivery. And yes, it has happened.
Did you and your partner attend any parental educa-
tion before the birth?
No. We learned from books and magazines and
the experiences of relatives and friends who have
A “BIBLE” FOR
PARENTS TO BE
For more than 40 years
Libero, SCA’s baby care
brand, has published
a book on pregnancy,
childbirth and parent-
hood for future parents
in Denmark, Norway,
Sweden and Finland.
There are two editions
of the book: one for first-
time parents and another
for those who have had
babies before. The books
are in the process of be-
ing translated to reach
additional geographic
regions. Other SCA mar-
kets have shown interest
in translating the book
into their local languages.
Read the book or down-
load it in English:
www.libero.se/du-just-
nu/Graviditetsbok
“ The unexpected magic moment for me
came one day when I came home feeling
tired and frustrated...” Lim Soom Min
been through childbirth.
What would you says is the biggest challenge as
a parent?
Taking care of the child during the night and yet
having to wake up early to go to work. Also chang-
ing dirty diapers.
What characterizes a good dad?
Patience and understanding, respect and
honoring your wife in her role as mother.
What do you want to convey to your child?
I would like her to be a kind, polite and lovable
girl as well as a truthful person. I hope my girl
grows up healthy.
Have you been on parental leave? How long?
Yes, I took one week of leave.
Which part of childcare do you actively take part in?
I take part in bathing, changing diapers and let-
ting my baby sleep.
What’s a magic moment for you as a parent?
The unexpected magic moment for me came one
day when I came home feeling tired and frustrated
with my workload, and she seemed to know what I
was feeling. As I was hugging her, she touched my
face gently and smiled at me.
MALAYSIA
Name: Lim Soom Min, 34
Family: Wife Ng Yan Ling,
son Shawn Lim Ze Xuan,
3 years old, daughter Stella
Lim Jin Ee, born Dec. 2012
Lives: Seremban, Malaysia
Hobbies: Badminton,
fishing, travel
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GRAVIDITET, FÖRLOSSNING OCH DEN STÖRRE FAMILJEN
Hur gör jag för att dela min kärlek mellan flera barn? Hur gör jag för
att tillgodose barnens olika behov? Få svar och hitta goda råd.
2013
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GRAVIDITET, FÖRLOSSNING OCH DEN NYA FAMILJEN
Vad händer under graviditeten? Hur får jag en bra start på amningen?
Hur är den första tiden som förälder? Få svar och hitta goda råd.
2013
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SCA SHAPE 3 2013 31
32 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 33
The timber yard and sawmill
in Holmsund.
Picturing
the
future
More than half a century ago the noted
photographer Lennart Nilsson set off on a
photo reportage journey along the
Gold Coast of Norrland in northern Sweden.
In SCA’s many plants and sawmills lay
Sweden’s future – the “green gold” that was
to make the country rich and improve the
lives of its citizens.
text SARA BERGQVIST photos LENNART NILSSON
A world photographer

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34 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
Log intake at the Essvik sulphite mill.
HEN THE SWEDISH lyric poet Elias Sehlstedt
stood looking across Sundsvall Bay in 1852, he
was struck by the large number of sawmills.
“I saw sawmill after sawmill wherever I looked,”
he observed. Sundsvall Bay was one of the world’s
most sawmill-intensive areas in Sehlstedt’s time,
but the area was hit hard after Sweden’s Kreuger
crash in the 1930s. A number of sawmills were
closed down and many people lost their jobs.
SCA, whose entire operations were located in
Norrland at that time, was forced to implement
tough rationalization programs. These programs,
which focused on increased ef ciency, industri-
alization and processing, were unpopular at frst.
But it was soon clear that the move saved whole
communities from ruin. At the time of Lennart
Nilsson’s journey in the 1950s, the poor communi-
ty of Holmsund near Umeå had been transformed
into a model community with full employment.
Journalist Mons Mossner, who collaborated
with Nilsson on the photo reportage for Se (See)
magazine, wrote that 4 million Swedish kronor
had been invested solely for the well-being of SCA
Loading pulp bales from the
Östrand sulphate mill.
“ I saw
sawmill
after
sawmill
wherever
I looked.”
W
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 35
OUTLOOK
MUNKSUND PAPER MILL,
PITEÅ: Containerboard
(packaging paper).
MUNKSUND SAWMILL, PITEÅ:
One of Sweden’s largest
sawmills.
OBBOLA PAPER MILL, UMEÅ:
Containerboard.
RUNDVIK SAWMILL,
NORDMALING:
Sawn timber products of Nordic
spruce. Large exports to the US.
Major new investments this year.
BOLLSTA SAWMILL,
BOLLSTABRUK: Sweden’s
largest and most competitive
sawmill.
ÖSTRAND PULP MILL, TIMRÅ:
Kraft pulp for manufacture of
hygiene products, tissue and
publication papers. One of the
foremost pulp mills in Europe.
ORTVIKEN PAPER MILL,
SUNDSVALL: The world’s fifth-
largest publication paper mill.
High-grade paper accounts for
two-thirds of operations. Major
new investments in recent years.
TUNADAL SAWMILL,
SUNDSVALL: Now Sundsvall’s
only sawmill, competing
with Bollsta to be Sweden’s
largest sawmill.
SCA’S
OPERATIONS
TODAY FROM
PITEÅ TO
SUNDSVALL
Wood intake, the wood house
at the Östrand sulphate mill.
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 37
OUTLOOK
employees. The Holmsund workers could
attend courses and had comfortable new
homes, churches, cinemas, hobby facili-
ties and a sports center. But when SCA’s
headquarters relocated from Stockholm
to Sundsvall 1949*, the sales department
was distressed to fnd that the area lacked
a golf course.
“When they heard there wasn’t a golf
course, there was nearly a revolution,”
says Björn Lyngfelt, vice president of
communications at SCA. “That’s why SCA
built the frst golf course in Sundsvall.”
T
he Gold Coast that Nilsson
photographed is the coastal strip
between Sundsvall and Umeå,
stretching some 400 to 700
kilometers north of Stockholm.
The area is still of major importance to
Sweden’s forest industry. Here are some
of Sweden’s – and in some cases Europe’s
– largest and most competitive saw-
mills, pulp mills and paper mills. Some
50 sawmills previously located around
Sundsvall Bay have been replaced by a
single sawmill that produces consider-
ably more than the others had produced
jointly. SCA sawed its last log in the mod-
el community of Holmsund in early June
this year. But the closure of this sawmill
with around 40 employees is hardly
likely to impact the region in the same
way as last century’s rationalization pro-
grams. Since the series of articles in Se
was written, nearby Umeå has become a
university city and it is now bigger than
Sundsvall.
“Here we have the Obbola paper mill,
which is celebrating its centenary this
year,” Lyngfelt says. “Then some dis-
tance further south we have the Rundvik
sawmill, which is actually celebrating
150 years. And Holmsund has a port
and freight terminal, which is also very
important for other businesses and which
SCA continues to operate.”
* SCA’s headquarters moved back to
Stockholm in 1993.
LENNART NILSSON
Lennart Nilsson, born in 1922, is con-
sidered one of the world’s most eminent
photographers. He is particularly noted
for his groundbreaking images of in
vivo human embryos. He succeeded
at an early stage in photographing the
fetus in the uterus, which resulted in
his 1965 book A Child Is Born. Prior to
that, he worked for many years as a
photojournalist for Swedish magazines
including Se (See) and Vecko-Journalen
(Weekly Record) and later for Life
magazine. Nilsson has also worked as
a court photographer and has received
many Swedish and international
honors and awards.
Family life in a home built by SCA with a view of the Östrand mill from the kitchen window.
Removing wood from storage in the timber yard.
SCA built cottages for the use of its employees.
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38 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
When SCA needed crew members for two
yachts competing in a Swedish off-shore race,
employees from around the world stepped up
to the challenge. Kristy Chew from Malaysia was
among those who enjoyed the adrenalin rush.
text JÖRGEN OLSSON photo RICK TOMLINSON
SCA had two boats
participating in the
race: SCA People and
SCA Nature. They were
among some 250 boats
and crews from
11 countries in the race.
Both SCA boats com-
pleted the race safely
and successfully. Of the
40 boats in the SRS A
class, SCA Nature fin-
ished in 30nd place and
SCA People in 35th.
SCA IN THE ÅF
OFFSHORE RACE
The waters in the middle
of Stockholm crowded
with yachts, waiting for
the starting gun.
Baltic
challenge
for SCA
employees
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 39
12 HOURS
  S
CA WILL TAKE on a major sailing challenge
next year when it enters a professional,
all-female crew in the 2014-15 Volvo Ocean
Race. As a way of engaging employees in its
sailing commitment, the company recently
brought together staf from around the world to
take part in a more modest sailing event.
A group of 17 SCA colleagues from 10 countries
around the world arrived in Stockholm in late
June to participate in a sailing challenge in the
Baltic Sea, the ÅF Ofshore Race, also known as
“ I love all outdoor
activities, so whenever
there is an opportunity
I just do it. I have always
loved challenges.”
KRISTY CHEW
Age: 46
Lives: Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia
Family: Single
Work: Quality assur-
ance manager at SCA
Malaysia. Responsible
for developing and
maintaining systems to
support business units
to achieve their quality
targets.
Outdoor CV: Red
Crescent, Malaysia
Reserve Army Force,
diving, hiking, swim-
ming, water rafting
and kayaking. She runs
marathons, biathlons
and adventure races
and plays games like
tennis, netball and
basketball.
the Round Gotland Race. One of them was Kristy
Chew from Malaysia.
“Sailing is not a common sport in Malaysia,”
she says. “I love all outdoor activities, so when-
ever there is an opportunity I grab it. I have always
loved challenges.”
The two SCA teams had three days to train to-
gether before the start. The days were marked by
intensive training and a steep learning curve, but
the teams came together quickly. “The terminol-
ogy was a bit dif cult at frst, but by the end of the
training we understood each other well,” Kristy
says.
“Within a short period of time we managed to
build trust, helped each other through the train-
ing, met all the challenges and then completed the
race in the shortest possible time safely.”
For Kristy, coming from tropical Malaysia, the
hardest part of the race was the cold weather, but
having many layers of clothes helped to overcome
that problem.
“Completing the race together with the team
really added another chapter to my life,” she says.
“I proved to myself that I could do it, although I did
not know exactly what would happen in the begin-
ning. This experience proved that my belief is right
– teamwork can move a mountain.”
40 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
News from SCA
SCA INSIDE
News from SCA
Protecting
the elephants
SCA’S INCONTINENCE brand TENA was
launched in Ghana in 2012. Over 230 health care
professionals were invited to attend a launch con-
ference in Ghana in May 2013, including doctors,
nurses, pharmacists, health workers, representa-
tives of the Ghana Pharmacy Association, as well
as healthcare officials from Nigeria, Ivory Coast,
Kenya and Gabon. The highlight of the launch
event was an interactive three-hour training
session conducted by SCA UK Training Man-
ager Donna Wilson. She emphasized how TENA
improves the quality of life for patients, and that
it can reduce the workload for caregivers and still
have a positive impact on budgets.
TENA LAUNCH IN GHANA
care h c
Kenya and G
event was a
THE DRYPERS BRAND is expanding
its baby toiletries range in Southeast
Asia with the addition of two new
products: baby oil and baby lotion.
The addition of Drypers Baby Oil and
Drypers Baby Lotion completes the
Drypers baby care toiletries range.
Oil and lotion for
Malaysian babies
THE SCA BRAND OKAY, which markets kitchen
towels in France, has been actively engaged
in protecting African elephants for the past
three years. The African elephant has been the
symbol of the brand for more than six years.
With Okay’s support, activities were organized
in 250 schools in 2012, while 25 “nature school
classes” were given near an elephant reserve in
the west African country of Burkina Faso.
SCA DE INSIDE
News
ng
hants
g
THE SCA BRAND OKAY h markets kitchen , which Y
tively engaged towels in France, has been act
nts for the past in protecting African elephan
hant has been the three years. The African eleph
than six years. symbol of the brand for more t
es were organized With Okay’s support, activitie
5 “nature school in 250 schools in 2012, while 25
ephant reserve in classes” were given near an el
urkina Faso. the west African country of Bu
FEATURE
w
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 41
SURVIVORS OF THE Ya’an earthquake in Chi-
na’s Sichuan province in April received hygiene
products and cash donated by SCA employees
and matched by SCA. The donation included
TENA and Dr. P incontinence products, Tempo
tissue and Sealer baby diapers, handled out
to and through China Foundation for Disabled
Persons (CFDP).
Necessities for
earthquake victims
RUNNERS AND WALKERS of all
ages joined in the TENA Run Walk
in Mexico to show that age and
incontinence are no barriers to
physical activity. More than 10,500
people joined together to break
taboos around bladder weakness
and support family integration
through physical activities.
Mexican families
in TENA race
SCA’S TISSUE mill in Ortmann, Austria, has found a way
to recycle its waste material by turning it into pallets. The
innovative project is the result of a cooperative effort
between Ortmann and the Interuniversity Research Insti-
tute for Agrobiotechnology (IFA) in Tulln, and it intends to
show how to make new products by recycling tissue resi-
due fibers through extrusion or other similar processes.
The extrusion method is a well-known way to form mate-
rial. Today, waste material from Ortmann is used in the
construction industry.
SCA receives
the certificate
for the fifth year
in a row.
Germany’s
Top
Employer
No need to waste
SCA’S TISSUE mill in Ortmann, Austria, has f
to recycle its waste material by turning it into
innovative project is the result of a coopera
between Ortmann and the Interuniversity R
tute for Agrobiotechnology (IFA) in Tulln, a
show how to make new products by recyc
due fibers through extrusion or other sim
The extrusion method is a well-known wa
rial. Today, waste material from Ortmann
construction industry.
FEATURE
42 SCA SHAPE 3 2013
SCA INSIDE
GU YUN XIANG, a farmer in the
Ningxia desert in China, has
been planting trees in the region
for more than 14 years in an
effort to stop the desert from
expanding into nearby villages.
SCA has donated 4,000 trees
to the effort, and SCA employ-
ees, suppliers, distributors and
consumers traveled to Ningxia to
help her plant the seedlings.
Gu started out with no experi-
ence and no financial support,
and in the first year all of her
planted trees died. The setback
did not discourage her, though.
She borrowed money from banks
and learned how to plant trees in
desert areas without irrigation.
A decade later, she has planted
thousands of trees, and their
survival rate has increased to 70
percent.
To reach out to and engage
people in the activity, Tempo
Hong Kong and Tempo China en-
couraged users of Facebook and
the Chinese microblogging site
Sina Weibo to follow and forward
a message to support the tree
planting effort. For every 10 sup-
porters, SCA donated one tree.
The Shanghai Morning Post also
wrote a full-page story about it.
4,000 trees donated
to female farmer
FOR PEOPLE IN THE UK interested in TENA
products, a pilot project has improved the infor-
mation available online. New illustrations make
it easy to see the advantages of the products
rather than just depicting the packages. More
countries will soon implement this new way of
managing product information online.
 www.tena.co.uk
Crystal clear
product info
A group of 17 of SCA employees, suppliers, distributors and consumers helped
Ms. Gu to plant hundreds of trees in two days
“ Ms. Gu shares SCA’s passion
for sustainability and that
is the reason we decided to
support her.”
Wesley Chiu, General Councel, SCA
ONLINE
PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT in publication papers
and improved printing techniques are overturn-
ing old truths. Previously wood containing papers
could not be used for certain applications, but to-
day they can compete with woodfree alternatives.
This was the result of a survey in which 200
respondents were asked to compare the per-
ceived quality of an advert printed on two different
papers: GraphoInvent, a new uncoated, wood
containing paper from SCA, and a woodfree
uncoated paper in the high quality segment. Half
of the respondents chose GraphoInvent as the
superior paper, while only one-third chose the
woodfree uncoated paper. An expert panel was
also asked to evaluate the different papers, with
34 out of 38 respondents preferring GraphoInvent.
GraphoInvent has been developed for commer-
cial printing, catalogs and magazines.
New truths
about paper
SCA HAS INAUGURATED its first forestry and
versatility park. It is situated in Peltovaara in
northern Sweden. The park is part of a large forest
area with greater diversity than other forests and
covers 3,100 hectares. The initiative, a part of the
company’s nature and environmental work, is the
first in a series of parks to come.
Preserving
nature
THE BABY BRAND Drypers
has launched a mobile
app that allows parents
in Malaysia to turn their
baby’s babble into musical
moments. The Drypers Baby
Babble Moments mobile
app is available for down-
load at Goo gle Playshop for
Android smartphones.
Turn babble
into music
“THE TRUTH,” a humorous video
commercial made by SCA’s feminine
care brand Bodyform, won the pres-
tigious Gold Lion award at the Cannes
Lions International Festival of Creativ-
ity in the cyber category. The video
has received more than 4 million views
on YouTube and has been featured in
newspapers around the world. You
can see it on YouTube: just search for
The Truth + Bodyform.
Gold Lion
for Truth tale
SCA SHAPE 3 2013 43
FLATTENED TOILET ROLLS in a new
package from SCA save storage space
and improve the products’ carbon foot-
print. The new package, launched in
France, is a joint effort between SCA and
the retail chain Système U. When they’re
unpacked, the rolls regain their normal
shape. The package’s nearly rectangular
format optimizes pallet filling, reducing
transportation costs.
Squeezed
rolls in France
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