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Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin
Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the
Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa
Martin Weihs 1 , Anna Meyer-Weitz 2 , Keith Appolis 3 , Friederike Baasner-Weihs, 1 Sihle Ntlangu 1
Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin

1 Automotive Industry Development Centre Eastern Cape, GIZ, 2 University of KwaZulu-Natal, 3 Independent Researcher

Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin
Background
Background
Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin
Results
Results
Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin

The AIDC EC has been implementing HIV&AIDS workplace programmes (WPP) in more than 15 supplier companies of the Nelson Mandela Bay automotive sector. An average HCT uptake of more than 80% was achieved in all companies. Employees tested HIV positive in the workplace are normally directed to access treatment, care and support services. Often, only assumptions could be made that HIV positive employees access these services and little is known of their experiences after testing.

Aims
Aims

The

Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin

aim

of

the

study was to investigate the

primary

experiences of employees once tested HIV positive in the

workplace with regard to the various challenges they face and ways of coping pertaining to psychological support, regular medical follow-up and ART adherence where relevant.

Methodology: Sampling
Methodology: Sampling
Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin

A qualitative in-depth study was conducted amongst 66 HIV positive employees in 6 automotive supplier companies in the Nelson Mandela Bay in which workplace programmes and HCT initiatives have been implemented by the AIDC EC during 2011 and 2012. Convenience sampling was used by the nurse responsible for the HCT to recruit HIV positive employees for participation in the study.

Demographic characteristics of the sample

Table 1. Characteristics interviewees (N= 66)

Characteristic

%

Table 1. Characteristics interviewees (N= 66) Characteristic %
Table 1. Characteristics interviewees (N= 66) Characteristic %

Age in years

18-29

22.03

30-39

42.37

40-49

28.81

50-64

6.78

Sex

Female

58.3

Male

41.7

Employment status

Contractor

31

Permanent

41.4

Unemployed

27.6

Marital status

Married

31

Unmarried

58.6

Living with a partner

10.3

Highest education reached

High school

44.1

Matric

39

College

11.9

University

5.1

Medical aid membership

Yes

32.2

No

67.8

Age in years 18-29 22.03 30-39 42.37 40-49 28.81 50-64 6.78 Sex Female 58.3 Male 41.7
Age in years 18-29 22.03 30-39 42.37 40-49 28.81 50-64 6.78 Sex Female 58.3 Male 41.7
Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin

Methodology: Measures

A semi-structured interview schedule with open ended questions was used. Participants were interviewed at least twice. Ethical approval was obtained from the University of KwaZulu Natal.

Methodology: Analysis
Methodology: Analysis
Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin

All interviews were transcribed verbatim for the purpose of data analysis. The computer software package Atlas.ti was used to manage and code the data. No specific research question informed the data analysis, instead thematic analysis was conducted (Braun & Clarke, 2006). The entire data set was systematically processed and any interesting aspects were identified so as to form the basis for repeated themes across the data set. Direct quotations illustrated these identified themes and analysis was then conducted on a purely semantic level. Analysis was conducted within realistic/essentialist paradigms and motivations:

experience and meanings were thus theorised in a straight-forward way because a largely unidirectional relationship was assumed between meaning, experience and language (Potter & Wetherell, 1987).

Figure 1: Identified disclosure categories

Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin
Conclusion
Conclusion
Preliminary results from the “forced disclosure“ category • P1: “I could die of embarrassment at being
Preliminary results from the “forced disclosure“ category
P1:
“I
could
die
of
embarrassment
at
being
so

brutally exposed. I felt naked, stripped of my pride”.

Situation: Nursing staff loudly announce the HIV patients to their queue in

the public clinic: “Those in need of CD4 checks or ARV’s

queue here”. P1 avoids clinics and reneges on treatment protocols.

P2: “I felt discriminated by the nurses in the clinic

and the general lay out at the clinic creates that, for

example, people who are HIV sit on one side that’s

obvious that people would know that we are HIV

positive”.

P3

was

forced

to

disclose

HIV

status

to

this

committee or lose the job. Situation: At the resumption of 2012,

P3 experienced health problems, which culminated in several short periods of

hospitalization and minor surgeries. Towards the end of 2012 “a pattern of absenteeism” seemed to emerge which had P3 “monitored” for a “behaviour” of absenteeism. With the medical staff not consulted by management, as P3 was medically booked off, P3 was summoned for disciplinary discussions followed by termination of employment. P3 was reinstated after disclosure.

P4 was forced to disclose HIV status at P4’s child’s

school. Situation: Forced disclosure of child’s status at school so as to inform teacher.

The company’s wellness officer had to disclose P5’s HIV status to three police officers. Situation: P5 had to work

overtime over weekends, the end results of which was protracted argument with physical overtones. The police were called in and P5 was taken into custody from Sunday to Tuesday. “I had not taken my meds for two days when I reached the (company’s) wellness officer”.

P6: “I had disclosed my status without my consent to the (new) boyfriend I recently broke up with”, “I sometimes feel lonely as if no one cares”, “I do not trust certain people in my life”. Situation: P6’s former partner

disclosed P6’s status to the family of P6’s new partner. The new partner left P6 being pregnant.

Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin

The preliminary results of the “forced disclosure” category show how vulnerable some employees are once tested HIV positive in an environment that is not sufficiently prepared to guarantee confidentiality of HIV status.

The results strongly indicate that HIV&AIDS workplace programmes’ efforts and investments are undermined by forced disclosures .

Demeaned and enraged do not fully capture the extend of participants’ experiences and the length of therapy needed to get them to a wholesome resolution of their experienced trauma due to forced disclosure.

Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin

Recommendations for the AIDC EC- GIZ programme

Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin

WPP implementers need to consider that the

success of

WPP also

strongly depends on the

employees

have

to

a environment HIV

positive

interact with.

Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin

Clear procedures and control mechanisms need to be in place in the workplace to guarantee confidentiality of employees’ HIV status.

Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin

Feedback from HIV positive employees to identify challenges needs to be integrated into WPP monitoring systems.

Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin

WPP implementers together with all stakeholders that are linked to the WPP need to make sure that identified challenges are addressed.

Acknowledgements
Acknowledgements
Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin

This work was conducted in 2012-2013 during a

project run

by

the

Automotive

Industry

Development Centre Eastern Cape (AIDC EC) and the German Development Cooperation (GIZ) in cooperation with the UKZN. Many thanks to the AIDC EC and GIZ.

Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin
Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin
Feedback from HIV Positive Employees of the Automotive Industry in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa Martin