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Programs of the

FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE


20132014

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission


MyFWC.com

Contents
4 6

FWRI at a Glance FWRI Locations

8 Marine Fisheries Research

20 Freshwater Fisheries Research 30 Wildlife Research 42 Ecosystem Assessment and Restoration 52 Information Science and Management 66 Partnerships 72 Publications
On the cover: An FWRI biologist releases a 20-pound alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) as part of a telemetry study looking at the species habitat use and movement in Northwest Floridas Escambia River. Data collected during the study will provide a foundation for future studies to estimate population size.

60 Office of the Director

78 20132014 Budget

96 Current Grant Awards

Gil McRae, Director


FW C Fis h and Wild life Resea rch Ins titute

The magnificent resources of the state of Florida support numerous multi-billion dollar industries that form the foundation of our states economy. Our world-renowned beaches, spectacular variety of fish and wildlife, diverse habitats, and navigable waters attract businesses and visitors alike. There is no mistaking the fact that economic prosperity, quality of life for Floridians, and the satisfaction of our many visitors are all dependent on a healthy environment. Floridas ecosystems support fishing and hunting, nature viewing, and other recreational and commercial activities easily exceeding $20 billion in value annually. Despite the natural wonders surrounding us in Florida, too many people view the natural world as somehow separate from their everyday life. This is especially true for young people, many of whom are less connected to the outdoors than in previous generations. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) operates under the reality that people are a part of our ecosystems, not separate from them. As one of the most rapidly growing states in the nation, Florida faces many environmental challenges in the years ahead and it is critical that managers adopt forward-looking, informed management policies to protect critical resources and balance competing demands for limited resources. These management decisions must be driven by sound scientific information. Planning and conducting research to provide this information is the core of the Fish and Wildlife Research Institutes (FWRI) mission.

As the research division within FWC, FWRI operates programs statewide that focus on obtaining the wide-ranging data and information needed by fish, wildlife, and ecosystem resource managers. We have established many collaborative partnerships with other government, academic, non-profit, and private fish and wildlife research institutions. Our programs are diversely funded from user fees such as hunting and fishing licenses, specialty license plates, grants, and state general revenue and are organized to rapidly provide the vital scientific information necessary to conserve and protect Floridas precious natural resources. This annual science programs document provides an overview of our major programs and is intended to present readers with an enhanced understanding of the scope and purpose of the technical information we produce. This summary document cannot convey the details of each project within our programs. Additional information is available on our Web site. Thank you for your interest in FWRI and the health of Floridas resources. I assure you that FWRI will continue to focus on the most pressing needs relative to our resources. We encourage you to become an active participant with us in the wise management of our fish and wildlife and their habitats and encourage you to provide us with issues, concerns, and comments related to our programs and our mission.

Fish and Wildlife Research Institute


Total Budget: $50,122,207 Staff: 614
GDTF (1.32%) CARLTF (0.52%) GENERAL REVENUE (5.22%) PRTF (0.69%)

at a glance...

FGTF (32.38%)

Funding Sources

MRCTF (34.72%)

SGTF/ GRANTS (0.95%) SGTF (7.44%) STMTF (4.45%) NGWTF (5.04%) MRCTF/ GRANTS (7.22%) NGWTF/ GRANTS (0.05%)

Fund Terms
CARLTFConservation/Recreation Lands Program Trust Fund FGTFFederal Grants Trust Fund GDTFGrants and Donations Trust Fund MRCTFMarine Resources Conservation Trust Fund MRCTF/GrantsMarine Resources Conservation Trust Fund Grants Program NGWTFNongame Wildlife Trust Fund NGWTF/GrantsNongame Wildlife Trust Fund Grants Program PRTFFlorida Panther Research and Management Trust Fund SGTFState Game Trust Fund SGTF/GrantsState Game Trust Fund Grants Program STMTFSave the Manatee Trust Fund 4

Office of the Director


Science Programs
Marine Fisheries Research
Keys Fisheries Research Keys Marine Laboratory Marine Fisheries Biology Marine FisheriesDependent Monitoring Marine FisheriesIndependent Monitoring Marine Fisheries Stock Assessment Marine Fisheries Stock Enhancement

Freshwater Fisheries Research


Freshwater Fisheries Biology Freshwater Fisheries Resource Assessment

Wildlife Research
Avian Research Marine Mammal Research Marine Turtle Research Reptile and Amphibian Research Terrestrial Mammal Research

Ecosystem Assessment and Restoration


Fish and Wildlife Health Habitat Research Harmful Algal Blooms Research

Information Science and Management


Center for Biostatistics and Modeling Center for Spatial Analysis Research Information Services Socioeconomic Assessment

Research Operations
Budget Office Facilities Management

FWRI AT A GLANCE

FWRI Locations
Holt Quincy 2 Pensacola Panama City 2 Eastpoint Cedar Key Eustis DeLeon Springs Gainesville Tallahassee 2 Jacksonville

a look inside...

3 Melbourne St. Petersburg Port Manatee 2 Lakeland

Legend
One FWRI location in this city 2
(number of locations indicated on dot)

Multiple FWRI locations in this city

Port Charlotte

Tequesta

Naples

Long Key Marathon

Cedar Key Senator George G. Kirkpatrick Marine Laboratory 11350 SW 153rd Court Cedar Key, FL 32625 DeLeon Springs DeLeon Springs Field Laboratory 5450 US Highway 17 DeLeon Springs, FL 32130 Eastpoint Apalachicola Field Laboratory 350 Carroll Street Eastpoint, FL 32328 Eustis Eustis Freshwater Fisheries Research Laboratory 601 West Woodward Avenue Eustis, FL 32726 Gainesville Gainesville Freshwater Fisheries Field Office 7386 NW 71st Street Gainesville, FL 32653 Gainesville Wildlife Research Laboratory 1105 SW Williston Road Gainesville, FL 32601 Holt Blackwater Fisheries Laboratory 8384 Fish Hatchery Road Holt, FL 32564 Jacksonville Marine Fisheries Research Alumni River House 2800 University Boulevard North Jacksonville, FL 32211 Marine Mammal Research Jacksonville Zoo Field Laboratory 370 Zoo Parkway Jacksonville, FL 32218

Lakeland FWC Southwest Regional Office 3900 Drane Field Road Lakeland, FL 33811 Long Key Keys Marine Laboratory PO Box 968 Mile Marker 68 , US Highway 1 Long Key, FL 33001 Marathon South Florida Regional Laboratory 2796 Overseas Highway, Suite 119 Marathon, FL 33050 Melbourne Indian River Field Laboratory 1220 Prospect Avenue Suite 285 Melbourne, FL 32901 Melbourne Beach Field Laboratory Sebastian Inlet State Recreation Area 9700 South A1A Highway Melbourne, FL 32951 Melbourne Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory 2595 McGraw Avenue Melbourne, FL 32934 Naples Big Cypress Field Office 298 Sabal Palm Road Naples, FL 34114 Panama City FWC Northwest Regional Office 3911 Highway 2321 Panama City, FL 32409 Pensacola Pensacola Field Office (LE) 1101 East Gregory Street Pensacola, FL 32502

Port Charlotte Charlotte Harbor Field Laboratory 585 Prineville Street Port Charlotte, FL 33954 Port Manatee Stock Enhancement Research Facility 14495 Harllee Road Port Manatee, FL 34221 Quincy Joe Budd Field Office 5300 High Bridge Road Quincy, FL 32351 St. Petersburg Headquarters 100 Eighth Avenue SE St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Marine Mammal Pathobiology Laboratory 3700 54th Avenue South St. Petersburg, FL 33711 Tallahassee Bryant Building 620 South Meridian Street Tallahassee, FL 32399 Koger Center Marathon Building 2574 Seagate Drive Suite 250 Tallahassee, FL 32301 Tequesta Tequesta Field Laboratory 19100 SE Federal Highway Tequesta, FL 33469

FWRI LOCATIONS

Fish tagging is a method used by FWRI researchers to collect data on saltwater and freshwater fish populations. Tagging studies provide biologists and resource managers with the information needed to better manage Floridas marine and freshwater fisheries. During the tagging process, the safety and well-being of captured fish is top priority. The researcher shown here uses a venting tool to release gas from a tagged gag groupers swim bladder, making it easier for the fish to swim back to its normal habitat depth.

Marine Fisheries Research


Luiz Barbieri, Section Administrator | Luiz.Barbieri@MyFWC.com

Marine Fisheries Research


The waters along Floridas coastline attract millions of recreational anglers and thousands of commercial fishers. Marine Fisheries Research biologists study the fish and invertebrates found in the states saltwater environments, gathering data important for the management of these species. The sections research includes collecting and analyzing fishing data, monitoring species status and abundance, investigating biological information, and breeding and rearing certain species to enhance or rebuild their populations.

a look inside...

Top: A biologist uses a stereomicroscope to view features of a fish that are not easily seen by the naked eye. Scientists use stereomicroscopes for dissections and examinations of the surface of solid objects. They provide a three-dimensional view of the specimen under magnification. Bottom: Angler interviews provide data that is crucial for managing Floridas recreational fisheries. FWRI field staff conduct intercept surveys at boat ramps and other fishing access points to gather data that helps researchers and managers monitor the sustainability of fisheries and the effectiveness of conservation measures.
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Top: FWRI staff count bay anchovies, one of the most abundant fishes found in Florida estuaries. Researchers gather data on fish populations in estuaries around the state to help determine the health of these important ecosystems. Keeping state estuaries healthy is crucial for the long-term growth and sustainability of Floridas recreational and commercial fisheries. Bottom: Scientists in FWRIs genetics laboratory are involved in many projects, including the Tarpon Genetic Recapture Study. Anglers help collect skin cell samples from tarpon they catch, and geneticists can use DNA from the cells to determine whether the same fish has been captured more than once. The study provides important information on tarpon movement patterns and recapture rates in the recreational fishery.
MARINE FISHERIES RESEARCH 11

Above: Researchers visit a line nursery in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary to select nursery-reared corals to plant on nearby reefs. This effort aims to restore populations of threatened acroporid species, which include staghorn and elkhorn corals. Coral restoration is crucial for the longterm growth and sustainability of Floridas reef systems. Right: FWRI researchers attach an acoustic tag to the back of a spiny lobster caught near Garden Key in the Dry Tortugas. These tags transmit information to underwater receivers, allowing researchers to track the movements of the lobsters as they feed, hide from predators, mate and spawn.
12 PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

Marine Fisheries Research


Program Budget: $20,695,087 Staff: 268 Funding Sources
Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program; Department of the Army/Army Corps of Engineers; Florida Department of Agriculture; Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission; Martin County; Mote Marine Laboratory; National Fish and Wildlife Foundation; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Sarasota Bay Estuary Program; South Florida Water Management District; Southwest Florida Water Management District; St. Johns River Water Management District; Suwannee River Water Management District; Tampa Bay Estuary Program; The Nature Conservancy; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; U.S. Geological Survey; University of Florida; University of North Carolina; University of South Florida; Wildlife Foundation of Florida
FGTF (50.4%) MRCTF (45.5%)

at a glance...

GDTF (0.5%)

MRCTF/ GRANTS (3.6%)

A research scientist adds food to an experimental feeder for intensive larval red drum culture. This fish rearing takes place at FWRIs Stock Enhancement Research Facility in Manatee County, where researchers investigate the potential for marine fish stock enhancement in Florida waters.
MARINE FISHERIES RESEARCH 13

Researchers record population data and measure catch-and-release survival of goliath grouper in the central-eastern Gulf of Mexico to shed light on the status of this species.
At up to 8 feet long and 800 pounds, the goliath grouper certainly lives up to its name. As the largest grouper in the Gulf of Mexico, its no surprise anglers seek the thrill of catching one of these giants. Though they make an impressive catch, goliath grouper have been protected from harvest in U.S. waters since 1990 because of a dramatic population decline. The goliath grouper population in Florida
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Assessment of Gulfs largest grouper a goliath-sized task


appears to be rebounding, and NOAA Fisheries Service removed goliath grouper from the species of concern list in 2006. As a result, some anglers are pushing for the fishery to be reopened, but goliath grouper remains protected from harvest because of uncertainty about its population status. FWRI biologists are conducting a study of the goliath

grouper population along Floridas central west coast that may help answer some questions about its status. Because goliath grouper remain protected from harvest, researchers are not able to collect data in some of the traditional ways, including landings data or collecting specimens for analysis. As a result, biologists are literally diving into the study and fishing for answers that will

help managers determine if this fishery can support harvests. Since 2007, researchers have conducted SCUBA surveys at artificial and natural habitats at different water depths to assess each site and record the number of goliath grouper present. They found goliath grouper prefer artificial reefs over natural bottom habitat at all depths. This observation will not only help managers identify areas of highest fishing pressure, but also help researchers focus future goliath grouper studies on these habitats. Researchers use an underwater video camera to document the fish and a laser device fitted to the camera to estimate fish size. Based on size estimates, most of the fish observed in the study area are between 6 and 15 years old. Goliath grouper can live into their 40s, suggesting the population in the central-eastern

A diver maintains a receiver that records when fish fitted with an acoustic tag are in the area. Gulf is relatively young and in the early stages of recovery. Biologists are also looking into the effects of catch-andrelease fishing on goliath grouper at different depths. Researchers and volunteer anglers use rod and reel or hand line to catch goliath grouper. Researchers then fit the fish with an acoustic tag, which allows them to monitor survival and track behavior and movement patterns after release. The majority of tagged goliath grouper have survived for many months or longer. This indicates deaths from catchand-release fishing in water less than 100 feet deep are not a major factor when fish are quickly released after being handled and vented properly, as they are during the study. All observations are preliminary, as researchers are still collecting and analyzing data. What theyre learning about goliath grouper biology and distribution will help future stock assessments. Study results will help managers predict how the goliath grouper population could respond to potential new regulations or changes in fishing pressure.
MARINE FISHERIES RESEARCH 15

This Goliath grouper has been fitted with a tag that has large numbers so divers can identify the fish. It also has a small acoustic tag attached behind the ID tag that allows researchers to track the fishs movements.

Researchers enlist citizen-scientists in red snapper tagging program


Anglers help collect red snapper population data off Floridas east coast. Results will guide future research and help managers sustain the fishery.
south U.S. Atlantic coast has been closed to harvest in federal waters since 2010. The closure was enacted to protect the population from too much fishing pressure and allow red snapper to increase in numbers. The absence of red snapper harvests affected fishers and diners, alike. But researchers saw the absence of something else biological Whether at home or a fancy restaurant, seafood lovers savor the opportunity to dine on red snapper, which has long been popular Florida fare. Naturally, this popularity benefits commercial and forhire fishers who harvest red snapper. However, aside from brief openings in 2012 and 2013, the red snapper fishery off the data collected from harvested fish. Researchers have a basic understanding of red snapper biology and behavior, but there is much more to learn and they needed an efficient way to collect population data essential for guiding management decisions. So in 2011, FWRI researchers began the Florida

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Cooperative East Coast Red Snapper Tagging Program, which is anchored by the participation of anglers who are familiar with the fishery and pursue red snapper for catchand-release. These anglers, or citizen-scientists, actively take part in data collection by tagging red snapper and filling out data sheets. The data-collection area stretches two-thirds of the way down Floridas Atlantic coast from the Georgia border. FWRI researchers recruit interested anglers in the study area and provide them with training and tagging kits. They then rely on the citizen-scientists to go catch some fish and data. Before anglers tag and release red snapper, they record

location of the catch, water depth and habitat type. Anglers also measure each fishs length, record bait and hook types used, and note the fishs condition when released. Researchers also tag along on charter and commercial trips, funded by the Gulf and South Atlantic Fisheries Foundation, Inc., to conduct additional tagging. Each tag has a phone number printed on it so when anglers catch tagged fish they can report them to the FWC Angler Tag Return Hotline. Anglers provide researchers the tag number, date and location of the catch, and a length measurement. Researchers offer rewards to anglers to encourage reporting because each time a tagged fish is reported, they learn a little

more about its movements and growth. Through this partnership, researchers aim to learn more about the distribution of Atlantic red snapper, what habitats they prefer, and track their movements and growth rates. The results will help lay the foundation for long-term monitoring efforts that include the in-depth research needed to fully understand the biology and behavior of red snapper and other reef fish. Whats revealed during this tagging program and future studies will be invaluable to managers as they work toward sustaining a healthy red snapper population that can support more opportunities for anglers and seafood lovers.

Left: FWRI staff and commercial fishermen target red snapper during a directed research cruise aboard a commercial vessel out of Port Canaveral, Florida. Right: A researcher tags a red snapper collected during a directed research cruise out of Ponce Inlet, Florida.

MARINE FISHERIES RESEARCH

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Getting to the bottom of stone crab population trends


Floridas commercial stone crab fishery averages between 2 and 3 million pounds of claws per season and provides 99 percent of all landings in the U.S. The fishery, which includes the Florida stone crab (Menippe mercenaria) and Gulf stone crab (M. adina), is unique in that only the claws are harvested. Animals are returned to the water alive after claw removal, unlike most other fisheries. The drawback of this harvesting method is biologists cannot obtain stone crab population data directly from the harvest because the crabs are returned to the water, preventing researchers from recording important details about the animals such as gender, size, health, and number of crabs harvested. Without these data, it is difficult for fisheries managers to develop strategies that address biological trends in this valuable commercial fishery. To address this information need, Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI) researchers are conducting a long-term fishery-independent monitoring

Researchers are conducting a long-term fishery-independent monitoring program to better understand stone crab population dynamics in Florida.

program to better understand the factors that lead to annual fluctuations in stone crab catch. FWRI biologists monitor eight locations in two regions along Floridas west coast, as most of the states stone crab landings occur on this coast. The southwest region, found offshore of the Everglades and Florida Keys, includes Pavilion Key, Oxfoot Bank, Harbor Keys and Sawyer Key. The northwest region, stretching from Tampa

Bay north to the southern edge of Floridas Big Bend, comprises Steinhatchee, Cedar Key, Homosassa and Tampa Bay. At each location, researchers set traps at four sites arranged inshore to offshore and service them every two weeks, year round. Researchers count the catch, determine each crabs sex and assess individuals for injuries. They measure carapace (shell) width and claw length; determine claw type and whether they are original

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Left: Researchers measure the carapace (shell) width of a small stone crab. Right: Researchers collect blood from a stone crab claw for genetic testing.

or regenerated; and collect a genetic sample. Researchers also record water characteristics at each trap site. Each month, traps are scraped and cleaned, and biologists count and measure juveniles that have settled on the traps. During stone crab season, Oct. 15 to May 15, researchers also visually scan the area around FWRI traps and count buoys to estimate fishing pressure. Researchers compare current observations to data collected in prior years of the monitoring program, which began in the southwest region in 2005 and northwest in 2006. Through comparison, staff can track recruitment areas where juveniles develop, juvenile settlement timing, how well crabs survive after declawing, reproductive development, population genetics and effects of various diseases. So far, they have noticed the size

composition of claws in the fishery is getting smaller. Because landings consist mostly of small- and medium-size claws, researchers suspect there may be fewer large crabs in the fishery. Observations during this monitoring program also

reinforce data from other studies showing most landings occur early and late in the season. Biologists are investigating the causes of these trends, as well as the possibility that mortality rates for declawed crabs may be higher than previously reported.

A researcher prepares to drop a stone crab trap.

MARINE FISHERIES RESEARCH

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For decades, biologists and anglers mistook the Choctaw bass for another black bass species, the spotted bass. Because the physical differences between the two species are hard to spot, the Choctaw bass wasnt recognized until scientists working in FWRIs genetics laboratory noticed a unique genetic profile among black bass samples. Pictured is a Choctaw bass caught during sampling in Holmes Creek, located in the Florida Panhandle.

Freshwater Fisheries Research


Jason Dotson, Section Administrator | Jason.Dotson@MyFWC.com

Freshwater Fisheries Research


The fish in Floridas lakes and rivers are an important natural resource. Fishing in these locations is a significant contributor to tourism and the states economy. Biologists with the Freshwater Fisheries Research section gather and analyze information about the populations and abundance of Floridas freshwater fish and invertebrate species. Section researchers combine the information they learn about these species with data from studies of habitats and human impacts to provide assessments to resource managers.

a look inside...

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This page: Biologists use fyke nets to survey the populations of small freshwater fish species living in shallow water. As part of a long-term monitoring project, FWRI researchers collect data on fish communities from 30 lakes throughout Florida. Monitoring these nearshore environments and the small fish that inhabit them will help researchers assess the overall health of each freshwater system. Opposite, top: The FWC cooperates with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to evaluate stocking success of striped bass in the St. Johns River. Researchers use angler surveys along with photo estimation of Morone species (both striped bass and hybrid striped bass) to track year-to-year changes in the population. To get the best estimate, they conduct photo surveys when fish gather in areas such as Silver Glen Springs that serve as thermal refuges during the summer. Opposite, bottom: Researchers at the Blackwater Research and Development Center in Holt, Florida are developing techniques to identify host fish for freshwater mussel reproduction. Larval mussels attach themselves to the gills of host fish and remain attached for several weeks until theyre juveniles. Then they fall off the host and settle into the sediment where they begin their journey to adulthood. Learning more about the host fish freshwater mussels depend on will be vital to conservation of the 14 threatened or endangered mussel species found in Northwest Florida.
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Above: In 2008, FWRI freshwater fisheries biologists began a project to improve survival rates for hatchery-raised largemouth bass released in the wild. Researchers conditioned hatchery fish by placing them in ponds so they learn to seek out prey and hone their survival skills. Right: Biologists collect black crappie on Lake Wauberg, just south of Gainesville, as part of a study to determine the size and age of female black crappie when they reach sexual maturity. FWRI biologists perform similar work at Lake Istokpoga, near Lake Okeechobee. Black crappie populations are different at each lake, so including both locations in the study helps biologists determine the range of the species sexual maturity patterns in Florida. Biologists will use data from this study in black crappie stock assessments across the state.
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Freshwater Fisheries Research


Program Budget: $3,812,714 Staff: 51 Funding Sources
St. Johns River Water Management District; Southwest Florida Water Management District; U.S. Department of the Interior
FGTF (43.3%)

at a glance...

GDTF (0.5%)

NGTF (3.0%)

SGTF (47.8%)

SGTF/ GRANTS (5.4%)

Electrofishing is a common method FWRI researchers use to sample fish populations on Floridas freshwater systems. An electrofishing boat uses a generator to produce an electric current that temporarily stuns the fish, allowing researchers to collect the fish with minimal stress or injury. Researchers then measure and record each fishs length and weight, and tag fish or take blood samples if needed.
FRESHWATER FISHERIES RESEARCH 25

Evaluatin g the influence of the T rophyCatch program


Researchers are tracking whether the reward-based program leads to anglers releasing more trophy-sized largemouth bass.
Florida is considered the Fishing Capital of the World, in part because of the Florida strain of largemouth bass, which is renowned for producing trophy-sized fish. For years, anglers have considered bass fishing in Florida an opportunity to catch that once-in-a-lifetime bass. In fact, Florida largemouth bass are held in such high regard that they have been stocked in other states and
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countries to provide anglers more opportunities to catch trophy-sized fish. Freshwater fisheries managers take great care to prevent other bass species from interbreeding with the Florida largemouth bass, helping preserve the unique genetics that make it one of the most sought-after freshwater species in the world. But to protect this resource, managers must also be mindful of angler

behavior. Those lucky enough to catch a trophy-sized Florida largemouth often harvest the fish, perhaps to have it mounted above their fireplace. The downside of this continued harvest is that it could produce a population of smaller fish and lead to less trophy-catch opportunities, which would diminish the international appeal of freshwater fishing in Florida.

So in 2012, the FWC initiated the TrophyCatch program to encourage catchand-release of trophy-sized largemouth bass weighing 8 pounds or more by offering anglers incentives such as replica mounts, clothing and gift cards to sporting goods retailers. By reducing harvests of fish this size, this program aims to increase opportunities for anglers to experience the thrill of catching a trophy-sized largemouth bass in Florida. Now, managers need a way to determine whether or not the TrophyCatch program is effective. Thats why FWRI researchers are comparing the catch rates and harvest rates of trophy-sized largemouth bass from before the TrophyCatch program to those recorded after its launch. During this five-year research project, FWRI researchers and partners are capturing and tagging trophysized largemouth bass at Florida lakes, ponds and rivers open to public fishing. Researchers carefully select sites based on location, size and angler use to ensure they are representative of all largemouth bass fishing opportunities in Florida. At the conclusion of the spring 2013 sampling season, the project included 70 water bodies in 26 counties. When researchers collect trophy-sized largemouth bass, they measure and weigh the fish. They then fit each with an external dart tag before release. Each tag has a unique identification number and a phone number for anglers to call to collect a $100 reward. When anglers report the catch of a tagged bass, researchers

A largemouth bass is weighed (top), tagged (middle) and released (bottom). note whether they harvested or released the fish. Researchers also ask whether anglers are aware of the TrophyCatch program and whether they plan to register and participate in the program to become eligible for incentives. The results of this study will help managers determine if the TrophyCatch program incentives are having the desired effect on harvest rates. If the TrophyCatch program works as planned, it should help increase opportunities for anglers to hook a trophy-sized largemouth bass in Florida. More people catching more big Florida largemouth bass would ultimately strengthen the states reputation as the Fishing Capital of the World.
FRESHWATER FISHERIES RESEARCH 27

Small freshwater fish darting out of sight in Florida


Two-year study on the southern tessellated darter will lay the groundwork for conservation of this species in north-central Florida.
A team of researchers has been trekking through the dense vegetation of the Ocklawaha River basin in north-central Floridas Marion and Putnam counties to search small streams for a fish in troubled waters. Theyre looking for the southern tessellated darter a small freshwater fish that has been historically found at six locations in the basin. In recent years, however, this fish has only been consistently collected at one location. In 2010, experts with the FWC, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommended listing the southern tessellated darter as a state-listed threatened species because of its small known geographic range and low population numbers in Florida. This prompted the FWC to draft a conservation action plan to secure the Florida population to the point that these fish are present throughout their historic range. But to achieve this, we must first learn more about darter population numbers, find out where these fish are located and identify what habitats they

prefer. In 2012, FWRI began a two-year collaborative study with the USGS and the University of Florida to collect this information and lay the groundwork for carrying out the plan. To determine where these darters currently occur in Florida, researchers are using two techniques to search for them at randomly-selected locations throughout the Ocklawaha River basin. At sites

where researchers can wade in the stream, one researcher uses a backpack electrofisher to apply a small electrical current to the water and stun the fish. Meanwhile, two other researchers stretch a seine net across the stream to collect all the fish that float downstream. At deeper sites, researchers conduct snorkeling surveys to visually count and attempt to catch southern tessellated darters with nets.

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FWC biologists measure the water velocity and depth of Cedar Creek, while a University of Florida fisheries technician measures the streams width. At each site, researchers count any southern tessellated darters collected or observed. Before releasing collected darters, researchers also obtain a tissue sample from each so they can analyze the genetic differences between fish in the same stream, those in different streams and those in the Florida and Georgia populations. Managers will use this genetic analysis to evaluate whether it would be feasible to introduce fish from larger populations into areas where the species is rare or no longer seen. Researchers also record the habitat characteristics at each site, including canopy cover, stream width, bottom type, water depth and velocity, and any structure present. Revealing which types of habitat these darters use will help managers determine where to focus habitat restoration and protection efforts. So far, researchers have only collected southern tessellated darters where these fish have been found in recent years. After researchers determine where darters are present and what habitats they prefer, they will revisit sites where they were able to collect these fish and conduct additional sampling to estimate population numbers in those areas. Researchers will share what they learn with managers and work collaboratively to develop strategies to sustain Floridas southern tessellated darter population.

SEE MORE ONLINE


Click here to view a Flickr photo set of this project.

FRESHWATER FISHERIES RESEARCH

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A female Florida panther runs off into the Picayune Strand State Forest in Collier County after being released by FWC biologists. The panther was fitted with a GPS collar so researchers can monitor habitat use, survival, reproduction, interactions with other panthers, cause of death and more. Managers rely on this tracking data to improve conservation strategies designed to help the species recover.

Robin Boughton, Section Administrator | Robin.Boughton@MyFWC.com

Wildlife Research

Wildlife Research

a look inside...

From the tiny beach mouse to the not so tiny right whale, Florida is home to a wide array of wildlife species. Biologists with the Wildlife Research section monitor the status of Floridas birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians including species important to hunters such as deer, alligator and waterfowl, and imperiled species such as the Florida panther and the Florida manatee. Wildlife managers rely on the information this research provides to develop conservation and restoration plans that ensure the long-term persistence of Floridas wildlife populations.

Top: North Atlantic right whale Catalog #3692 and calf sighted eight miles off Floridas Nassau Sound on February 24, 2013. Researchers documented 19 mother-calf pairs in the waters off of the southeast U.S. coast during the 2012-2013 calving season. This was the last aerial survey sighting off Florida during the season. Bottom: Mottled ducks have inhabited Florida for thousands of years. Floridas mottled ducks are unique, differing genetically, behaviorally and ecologically from populations in Louisiana and Texas. But interbreeding, or hybridization, with feral mallards threatens their existence as a distinct species. Thats why FWRI wildlife biologists developed a plan to help maintain the genetic purity of the species. The plan includes three priorities: developing methods to accurately identify pure mottled ducks from hybrids; creating a system to minimize contact between feral mallards and mottled ducks; and educating the public about hybridization. These priorities will form the framework for the long-term preservation of an important Florida waterfowl species.
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Bielefeld

Above: During a night-light survey, an observer shines a spotlight to illuminate the eyes of any alligators in the area. A recorder then counts the animals and places them in size categories. Researchers use these surveys to estimate alligator population numbers in Florida. Left: An FWRI wildlife biologist prepares to release an alligator snapping turtle back into the Suwannee River. During a two-year study, researchers weighed, measured and tagged alligator snapping turtles, gathering information needed to determine the species distribution and population size in the Suwannee River.
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Above: Wildlife biologists are paying close attention to three species of bats that roost in Florida caves, monitoring for the presence of white nose syndrome (WNS). The disease was first discovered in 2006 and can sometimes be identified by scarring on the wing tissue of bats. No reports of WNS have been documented in Florida, but biologists continue to learn more about the disease and focus monitoring and conservation efforts on preventing it from affecting Floridas native bat species. Right: FWRI researchers fit a Florida black bear with a GPS tracking collar that will allow them to collect real-time data on its movements. Researchers will also weigh, measure and mark the bear for future identification. This research is part of an ongoing investigation of bear movements in Camp Blanding and the Ocala to Osceola wildlife corridor.
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Wildlife Research
Funding Sources

at a glance...
GDTF (1.1%) FGTF (13.5%) SGTF (10%)

GR (3.1%)

PRTF (2.2%)

Program Budget: $9,435,021 Staff: 108


Army Corps of Engineers; Disney Wildlife Conservation Fund; Florida Power and Light Company; John H. Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance; Marine Mammal Center; National Fish and Wildlife Foundation; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Raymond James Trust; Sea Turtle Conservancy; Tampa Electric Company; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; University of South Florida; Wldlife Conservation Society; Wildlife Foundation of Florida

MRCTF (26.1%)

STMTF (23.0%) NGWTF (19.9%) MRCTF/ GRANTS (1.1%)

FWRI wildlife biologists release a loggerhead sea turtle into the Gulf of Mexico after attaching a satellite transmitter to track the turtles movements as part of a study of loggerhead foraging habitat on the West Florida Shelf. Data collected includes water temperature, dive patterns and precise locations. Tracking the turtles movements will help the FWC manage marine fisheries the loggerhead depends on for food.
WILDLIFE RESEARCH 35

Researchers identify need for American oystercatcher habitat restoration


When homeowners owe more on their home loan than what the house is worth, their mortgage is considered underwater. This can create a number of financial problems for the homeowner. Recently, a threatened Florida shorebird species habitat began slipping underwater in a different, but no less troubling, way. Each year, the second-largest wintering U.S. population of American oystercatchers flocks to Floridas Big Bend region, with most of the birds gathering in Dixie, Levy and north Citrus counties along the Gulf of Mexico. These shorebirds depend on the oyster reefs here for food and shelter critical to their winter survival. But recent declines in available oyster reef habitat created concerns about the future of the American oystercatcher, which already has a small and declining population. This prompted FWRI researchers to find out which oyster reefs are most beneficial to the shorebirds and what part of the reef they are using to help managers determine how and where to focus restoration efforts.

Restoring oyster-reef habitat critical to conservation of this threatened shorebird species.

In 2011, FWRI researchers and a partner at the University of Florida began the first phase of the study conducting field work from November to March when American oystercatchers are wintering in the Big Bend region. They observed the birds habitat use and movement patterns, and documented food availability and what American oystercatchers ate. Researchers paid very close

attention to the birds habitat selection and recorded detailed descriptions of the oyster reefs, including distance from shore, elevation above the water and percentage of vegetation and oysters present. They also noted how American oystercatchers use these oyster reefs during different environmental conditions, including height of tide, wind strength and wave action.

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Researchers learned American oystercatchers use oyster reefs closer to shore as feeding grounds, while reefs further from the shoreline provide a place to roost, or rest, and avoid predators. Despite the decline of oyster reef availability, food resources are not currently an issue for American oystercatchers. These shorebirds are primarily threatened by the lack of roost sites during high-tide. Not only are these oysterreef roost sites scarce during high tide, but erosion and sea level rise are further reducing their availability. Researchers concluded that preserving and improving these hightide roost sites and potentially

constructing new roosting habitat should help American oystercatchers survive the winter. In the second phase of this study, researchers will collaborate with land managers, local oyster harvesters and scientists who study oysters to implement a restoration plan. They will then monitor how American oystercatchers respond to learn whether more and enhanced roosting habitat improves the shorebirds winter survival. If so, this habitat restoration strategy can be applied at other locations to help the Big Bend wintering population of American oystercatchers begin to increase.

One aspect of researchers detailed study of oystercatcher habitat involved using a laser level and benchmarks of known elevation to determine the elevation of oystercatcher feeding habitat.

For each foraging bird observed, researchers sampled four points within a meter from the birds initial foraging point. The quadrat (PVC square) was placed at each of these four points and all live and dead oysters within the quadrat, as well as any mussels, were counted (left). Researchers also measured (right) all the live oysters within the quadrat at one of the four sampling locations.

WILDLIFE RESEARCH

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FWRIs marine mammal team rescues sick and injured manatees throughout Florida.
The Florida manatee is a symbol of the Sunshine State. Tourists flock to view this native species designated the states official marine mammal in Floridas waterways. But the manatee also holds another designation: endangered species. While they have no natural predators, manatees face human-related threats like watercraft strikes and entanglement, and natural threats like cold weather and red tide. FWRI staff members respond to and rescue manatees in distress. The marine mammal team is highly trained to safely and efficiently capture and handle manatees, which typically weigh several hundred to several thousand pounds. Responders are part of FWRIs Marine Mammal Research Program. Rescue teams work out of field stations in St. Petersburg, Port Charlotte, Tequesta, Melbourne and Jacksonville; responding to distressed manatees in an assigned multicounty coverage area. To enhance response capabilities and reduce initial response time, FWRI also coordinates with other conservation partners to rescue manatees. From the moment an observer reports a sick or injured manatee commonly through the FWCs Wildlife Alert hotline

Rescuing Florida manatees

38

A rescued manatee is transported to a rehabilitation facility.

(888-404-3922) rescuers prepare for action. A biologist follows up by phone, getting specific details from the observer about the manatees condition, location and behavior. Once the biologist determines a rescue may be necessary, an FWC Law Enforcement officer or another first responder goes to the scene to stay with the distressed manatee until the assembling rescue team can arrive. Though no rescue is typical, rescuers normally use a specially designed boat and deploy a heavy-duty seine net from the back, encircling the manatee. The motor is near the front of the boat, keeping the propeller from interfering with the rescue effort. Once the manatee is inside the nets perimeter, a team of rescuers carefully pulls the net back onto the boat. Rescuers then

bring the manatee, secured in the remainder of the net, safely onboard. For some cases, the rescue team may use the net to pull the manatee to shore, or for smaller manatees, they may use a specialized dip net. Once they capture a manatee, rescuers work to stabilize the animal and evaluate its health. In situations such as a fresh entanglement, rescuers are able to treat the manatee on scene and release it immediately. But further treatment is usually necessary, so rescuers use a truck to transport the manatee to a partner critical care facility. The Miami Seaquarium, SeaWorld Orlando and Tampas Lowry Park Zoo are Floridas only critical care rehabilitation facilities for rescued sick and injured manatees. FWRI responders and partners routinely attempt

more than 80 manatee rescues in a given year attempting 100 or more in 2010 and 2011 when manatees were affected by unusually cold winter temperatures. From September 2012 to April 2013, rescuers had to move especially fast to save manatees affected by a red tide in southwest Florida. Once exposed to the Florida red tide toxin, manatees can suffer acute toxic shock and drown if they are not rescued in time. With the publics help, FWRI, FWC Law Enforcement and partners brought 16 rescued manatees suffering from red tide effects to Lowry Park Zoo for rehabilitation. All but one survived. Those 15, along with dozens more manatees rescued over the years, are able to return to the wild thanks to the ongoing efforts of FWRI and its partners.

WILDLIFE RESEARCH

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Setting their sights on white-tailed deer breeding


Researchers investigate the timing and duration of white-tailed deer breeding activity to help managers refine hunting zones and seasons in Florida.
Its no surprise that deer hunters get a little more excited each year as the rut approaches. The rut is the white-tailed deers peak breeding time, when females are in heat and bucks are more active and less cautious. For hunters, understanding the timing of the rut improves their odds of encountering and potentially harvesting a deer. Game managers are equally interested in keeping an eye on white-tailed deer breeding cycles. Florida is currently divided into four management zones used to set hunting seasons to coincide with peak deer breeding activity in each area. In addition to enhancing harvest opportunities, setting hunting seasons with respect to breeding cycles protects the deer population. For example, managers can set season dates that minimize harvest of females with dependent young. Setting hunting seasons can be challenging in Florida, as the timing of deer breeding varies across the state by as much as seven months. In recent years, hunters voiced concerns about seasons in some areas not lining up properly with breeding activity. This raised the question: Should the FWC re-evaluate established seasons

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The boundaries depicted on this map document are approximate. This map document is intended for use only at the published scale. These data are intended for informational use only and should not be considered authoritative for navigation, engineering, legal, or other site-specific purpose. FWC does not assume any legal liability or responsibility arising from the use of this product in a manner not intended by the author.

Background Map: ESRI, Inc. web mapping service; world physical map

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17 Oct

Average conception (breeding) dates in Florida for white-tailed deer.

and zone boundaries in some areas? To help managers find answers, FWRI researchers studied white-tailed deer breeding from 2009 to 2013 in areas where little was known about breeding activity and areas where hunters voiced concerns. The primary study area encompassed Northwest Florida from the AlabamaFlorida border to Madison and Taylor counties. Researchers also sampled sites in southern and central Florida, including sites in Pasco and Lake counties. They conducted necropsies (animal autopsies) of more than 500 female deer, including those that were harvested by hunters. Researchers recorded their age, estimated breeding date for those that were pregnant

and assessed the deers general physical condition. The data showed a general east to west trend for timing of peak breeding activity in the Northwest Florida study area. White-tailed deer in Madison and Taylor counties bred primarily from mid-October to mid-November. Those in the westernmost counties, including Escambia, bred in mid-February. There were, however, considerable variations from this trend in the counties between, where breeding ranged from late December to early February. For the central study sites, researchers confirmed what hunters and managers in Pasco and Lake counties had reported deer in these areas are breeding later than surrounding populations. This

finding emphasizes the need for further investigation in areas where significant variation in breeding dates is suspected. Study results will help managers evaluate Floridas deer seasons and hunting zones to ensure they serve hunters and the species well that is, promoting harvest opportunities while protecting the deer population. Researchers will use what theyve learned to generate maps depicting dates of deer breeding activity, fawning period, and general deer herd health throughout the state. These resources will be posted on the FWC website so hunters can learn more about the science managers use to determine hunting regulations.

WILDLIFE RESEARCH

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A researcher collects coral demographic (population) data for the Coral Reef Evaluation and Monitoring Project, a long-term monitoring effort that began in 1996. At permanent monitoring stations, FWRI staff members identify each coral colony to species, measure them and record any diseases and partial colony mortality. With these data, researchers can assess the health and status of the population over time.

Ecosystem Assessment and Restoration


Leanne Flewelling, Subsection Administrator for Fish and Wildlife Health and Harmful Algal Blooms Research Leanne.Flewelling@MyFWC.com Amber Whittle, Subsection Administrator for Habitat Research Amber.Whittle@MyFWC.com

Ecosystem Assessment and Restoration


Floridas diverse fish and wildlife species face threats every day. Biologists with the Ecosystem Assessment and Restoration section track many of these threats. Researchers monitor harmful algal blooms including Florida red tide that can cause human health and economic problems, and monitor and investigate fish and wildlife diseases and dieoffs. Section researchers also evaluate the status of habitats, providing data that aid in preservation, management and restoration decision-making.

a look inside...

Above: A Fish and Wildlife Health scientist conducts a necropsy on a goliath grouper that died as a result of cold stress. Opportune sampling during natural events allows researchers to learn more about protected species. Right: A researcher handles water containing Karenia brevis, the organism responsible for Florida red tides. Harmful algal bloom researchers recently demonstrated that bacteria play an important role by making otherwise unavailable nutrients accessible to this organism. This finding improves our understanding of the conditions affecting the formation of red tides. High nutrient content is one of several major factors influencing red tide events.
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Above: FWRI scientists collect water samples to measure trace elements found in tidal creeks along the Little Manatee River, which empties into Tampa Bay. These measurements will be combined with trace element analysis of snook otoliths (earstones) to discover which tidal creeks make the best nurseries for juvenile snook. Left: A researcher conducts field sampling on Lake Istokpoga in Highlands County to collect data for comparing plant communities before and after herbicide treatments. This research will help determine which treatment strategy achieved better results for improving fish and wildlife habitat conditions.
ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION 45

Above: A researcher uses a dissecting microscope to observe abnormalities found in frog larvae as part of an ongoing statewide amphibian disease study focused on conservation of Floridas amphibians. With help from other state agencies, local governments and municipalities, FWRI researchers aim to provide a complete picture of amphibian health in Florida. Right: Researchers monitor native plant species at the Triple N Ranch Wildlife Management Area in Osceola County. FWRI staff has monitored this site for the FWCs Division of Habitat and Species Conservation for more than 10 years, identifying potential negative impacts to native plant communities from cattle grazing.
46 PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

Ecosystem Assessment and Restoration


Program Budget: $6,796,216 Staff: 85 Funding Sources
Conserve Wildlife Conservation Trust Fund; Florida Department of Environmental Protection; Florida Sea Grant; FWC Florida Wildlife Legacy Initiative - State Wildlife Grants Program; FWC Habitat and Species Conservation (HSC) Aquatic Habitat Restoration and Enhancement; FWC HSC Terrestrial Habitat Conservation and Restoration; FWC Hunting and Game Management - Deer Section; Georgia Aquarium; Mote Marine Laboratory; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; National Fish & Wildlife Foundation - Tampa Bay Environmental Fund; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); National Park Service, Dry Tortugas; NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service; South Florida Water Management District; St. Johns River Water Management District; Tampa Bay Estuary Program; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; U.S. Geological Survey
GDTF (1.5%) CARLTF (2.5%) SGTF (3.8%) MRCTF/ GRANTS (4.9%)

at a glance...

FGTF (26.5%)

GR (34.2%)

MRCTF (24.7%)

PRTF (1.9%)

A researcher examines slides of tissues from red drum reared at the FWCs saltwater hatchery in Manatee County. Health examinations are performed before hatchery fish can be stocked in the wild.
ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION 47

Researchers are taking the first steps to develop new methods for identifying and tracking harmful algal bloom species in the Gulf of Mexico.
Have you ever been at the beach during a Florida red tide? If so, the toxins of the Florida red tide organism, Karenia brevis, may have caused you to cough, sneeze and tear up. You may also have noticed dead fish washed ashore. Though the effects of Florida red tide and other harmful algal blooms can stretch for miles, thousands of these tiny cells can fit into a single drop of water. During blooms, managers need timely information about exactly which harmful algal species, if any, are present to decide whether to close a beach or a shellfish harvesting bed. Because these decisions have human health and financial implications, managers need all the facts to make the right call. But many of these organisms are highly similar in appearance to less toxic or nontoxic species and cannot be identified using only a microscope. To facilitate identification of these species, researchers at FWRI are developing lab-based tools that use genetic information to better characterize harmful algal species in water samples.

New genetic tools will improve h armful algal species identification

A student intern prepares algae DNA for sequence analysis.

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PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

Each algal species has unique genetic characteristics that can be used to distinguish it from other species. Researchers are generating DNA sequences, or mapping the genetic differences, of harmful algal species in the Gulf of Mexico. They compare the DNA sequences to those of other algal species to confirm species identifications or detect new species. Researchers are also designing new genetic tools that will recognize the DNA sequences of specific harmful algae. These tools will give researchers the ability to quickly and accurately identify and quantify these species in field samples. Researchers anticipate that such genetic tools will help track harmful species and pinpoint the key environmental processes that trigger blooms. By integrating these genetic tools into FWRIs red tide monitoring and research efforts, researchers aim to improve early detection of toxic blooms and better inform decision-makers during blooms in Floridas coastal waters. Enhancing these capabilities will help public officials protect the health of humans and respond quickly to events that threaten marine life. Furthermore, learning more about the triggers of blooms could help us mitigate their effects.

Top: A researcher uses a genetic screening method to identify and quantify the Florida red tide species, Karenia brevis. Bottom: Chains of Pseudo-nitzschia cells, a toxic diatom, labeled with a species-specific, fluorescent DNA stain.

ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION

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Researchers getting to the root of Florida seagrass health and trends


Monitoring project comprises the efforts of researchers and more than 100 partners tracking seagrass communities at more than 30 locations across Florida.
Did you know that Floridas bays and nearshore waters are home to more than 2 million acres of seagrass beds? Thats nearly twice the size of the entire state of Delaware. These seagrass beds are an important component of Floridas marine environment. They help maintain water clarity, stabilize bottom sediments and provide food and shelter for a variety of fish and wildlife. Depending on where you are in Florida, seagrass coverage may be expanding, declining or stable. Its important for biologists to monitor these trends because they provide clues about the overall health of the marine environment. For years, a number of organizations throughout the state have independently monitored seagrass trends in their areas. But data from these locations were not often shared or combined, making it difficult for researchers to provide an overall picture of seagrass health across Florida. Thats why FWRI researchers initiated the

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Seagrass Integrated Mapping and Monitoring (SIMM) project in 2009. This ongoing statewide project combines the efforts of more than 100 partners tracking seagrasses at more than 30 locations across Florida. FWRI researchers monitor seagrasses at locations where no local program exists. The SIMM project is rooted in sharing, combining and comparing data from all of these locations. These integrated data provide scientists, resource managers, elected officials and other stakeholders an up-to-date summary of seagrass health and trends statewide. Researchers and partners primarily collect SIMM data using two methods aerial mapping and in-water monitoring. They conduct aerial mapping every two to 10 years to detect changes in seagrass coverage across large areas over time. In-water monitoring is performed at each location every year to reveal what is going on in Floridas seagrass communities

Seagrass coverage in Florida coastal waters and trends in seagrass acreage.

at a smaller scale. This frequent monitoring helps researchers quickly identify trends such as changes in seagrass species distribution that could indicate potential losses. Every two years, researchers publish a statewide report to share updated information for each study location. Within each chapter, contributors from each location provide a report card of seagrass status and a map of the distribution of seagrass beds. This resource is made available online so the information can be easily accessed and shared. Researchers update individual chapters in the report as needed to keep the online version as current as possible. FWRI researchers will soon enhance

these online resources by making all in-water monitoring data available and by providing links to databases maintained by SIMM partners. Researchers can use these resources to track seagrass health across Florida and detect losses before they become widespread. This data synthesis helps resource managers respond quickly to protect and conserve seagrasses. Resource managers and responders can also use this information during major environmental events. When the Deepwater Horizon oil spill occurred, SIMM partners provided pre-impact imagery, maps and monitoring data to assist in response and damage assessment efforts.

East Coast

Panhandle

Big Bend to Springs

South Florida

Southwest Florida

Distribution of seagrass acreage in Florida coastal waters.

ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION

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Center for Spatial Analysis staff use mapping technology that helps researchers conduct marine, freshwater and terrestrial related research. One example is using side-scan sonar to map the bottom of the Chipola River as part of a study of shoal bass habitats and spawning behavior. Once the map was created, the researcher in the photo conducted an accuracy assessment.

Information Science and Management

Henry Norris, Section Administrator | Henry.Norris@MyFWC.com

Information Science and Management


Researchers in this section address complex natural resource issues by integrating ecological, cultural and socioeconomic information using statistical and spatial analysis techniques. Staff develop maps and model distribution patterns of fish and wildlife, identify lands and waters that are conservation priorities, and assess economic impacts of recreational activities. The sections database experts, statisticians, research librarians, specimen collection managers, outreach specialists and scientific editor provide additional support to FWC scientists and managers.

a look inside...

Above: An FWRI intern conducts a post-burn assessment at Bell Ridge Longleaf Mitigation Park. Staff used the data collected to calibrate post-burn satellite imagery, which will be used to map the extent and intensity of the prescribed fire. Right: To provide a better picture of the current state of patch reefs in the Florida Keys, FWRI Center for Spatial Analysis researchers started a project to map reefs in the Upper, Middle and Lower Keys, and determine their coral cover. The team used satellite data to map the number, location and size of patch reefs throughout the Keys, and then divers (like the one pictured) recorded the percentage of live coral cover for each. These data are valuable to researchers and managers trying to keep these important habitats healthy.
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A technician sorts specimens from the Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) Trawl Survey Project. Specimen Information Services staff identify the invertebrate specimens that Fisheries-Independent Monitoring staff collect during SEAMAP research trawls. Subsequently, the specimens are preserved and catalogued for additional taxonomic research.
INFORMATION SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT 55

Above: Nearly 10,000 people attended the three days of MarineQuest 2013, the 19th annual open house of the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI). Each year at MarineQuest, visitors of any age can explore Floridas fish and wildlife and their habitats at FWRI headquarters in downtown St. Petersburg. Right: Research Information Center staff members organize reference materials, including professional journals, stand alone reports, government documents, research publications and books. They obtain, maintain and distribute these materials to fulfill the literature needs of FWRI staff and the public, making sure useful and current scientific information is accessible to those who need it. Opposite page: Staff participates in an oil spill preparation drill with representatives from NOAA, U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies. Here, participants are viewing the results of an oil spill characteristics model.
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Information Science and Management


Program Budget: $4,231,684 Staff: 59 Funding Sources
Coastal Protection Trust Fund; Environmental Protection Agency; EPA Gulf of Mexico Program; Florida Department of Environmental Protection; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; South Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association; Southwest Florida Water Management District; State Wildlife Grants Program; U.S. Coast Guard; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Wildlife Foundation of Florida
CARLTF (1.94%) SGTF (10.11%) FGTF (22.24%)

at a glance...

PRTF (0.04%)

MRCTF (42.66%)

NGWTF (9.65%)

MRCTF/ GRANTS (13.36%)

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT

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58

Making dollars and sense of saltwater recreational fishing


An FWRI economist is trying to estimate how saltwater recreational fishing affects Floridas economy.
We know scientists can put a tag on a fish to track its movement and behavior. But is it possible to put a price tag on fishing activity associated with a marine fish species? Thats what an economist with FWRI is trying to do. Its no secret anglers buy boats, rods and reels, tackle and other fishing gear. But saltwater recreational fishing may be associated with other spending, including hotel stays, car rentals and food purchases. These, too, need to be considered to fully understand what saltwater recreational fishing contributes to Floridas economy. The task of capturing this information required a massive data collection effort that was not possible using traditional survey methods. It would have simply cost too much and taken too long. FWRI researchers and partners at Michigan State University and Florida A&M instead used Web-based surveys to learn about anglers fishing habits and related spending. An FWRI economist will convert angler responses into economic estimates that will be extremely useful to FWC decision-makers. For example, if the FWC wants funding to build a new hatchery to improve fishing opportunities for a certain marine fish, managers will be able to show legislators what the return on investment could be. Also, when managers are considering new fishing regulations, they will be informed how increasing or decreasing fishing opportunities could affect the economy. In 2012, researchers recruited a representative sample of resident and nonresident anglers who held a valid Florida saltwater recreational fishing license to join the Florida Saltwater Fishing Panel. After completing a brief online registration form, panelists had access to monthly Web-based surveys. To encourage participation, anglers who completed monthly surveys received coupons for fishing and boating purchases at West Marine. The monthly surveys recorded where anglers fished, how much they fished, which species they targeted and how much money they spent on fishing trips. Another one-time survey captured fishing-related purchases such as boats, rods and reels, and tackle. More than 23,000 anglers registered to participate in the panel. Over the course of eight months, licensed Florida residents completed more than 11,500 monthly surveys, while licensed nonresident anglers completed more than 3,000. Survey responses will be weighted based on where anglers live and the type of license they have to ensure the panel is representative of all licensed recreational anglers. An economist with FWRI is using the data from these surveys to estimate what saltwater recreational fishing activity contributes to Floridas economy. FWC decision-makers can use study results to make dollars and sense of management policies and natural or manmade disasters that could reduce or increase saltwater recreational fishing activity and associated spending.

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT

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FWRI Director Gil McRae gives a presentation on stock assessments at an FWC Commission meeting in Pensacola.

Office of the Direc tor


Gil McRae, FWRI Director | Gil.McRae@MyFWC.com

Office of the Director


Program Budget: $5,817,773 Staff: 43

a look inside...
FGTF (0.3%) CARLTF (0.1%) STMTF (2.9%) NGWTF (4.0%) SGTF (7.1%) GDTF/GRANTS (0.6%) GR (0.5%) PRTF (0.4%)

The Office of the Director is responsible for managing a budget of more than $50,000,000, which supports all programs and operations of the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI). FWRIs director leads the science sections and oversees Institute-wide functions, such as Research Operations, which provides facilities and budget-related support. More than 600 staff members make up FWRI. FWRIs headquarters, located in downtown St. Petersburg, is home base to nearly half of its employees. More than 20 field stations enable other FWRI staff members to be strategically located throughout the state near the resources they study.

MRCTF/ GRANTS (32.9%)

MRCTF (51.2%)

A grants office staff member reviews requirements of a grant award to track due-dates for reports. These nonscientific employees support the Institutes scientific mission by reminding researchers of reporting requirements and submitting reports on their behalf.
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Monitoring North F loridas natural resources


Researchers are strategically located in the Jacksonville area to study marine mammals, marine turtles and marine fisheries.
It is said that distance makes the heart grow fonder and familiarity breeds contempt. This may be true when speaking of love. For researchers, however, it could be said that distance leaves their hearts to wonder and familiarity promotes sound science. Florida is a large state with a variety of habitats that are home to an even greater diversity of animals. FWRI researchers are strategically stationed throughout the state at more than 20 locations close to the natural resources they study. In addition to being close to important research interests, FWRI researchers at field stations are often able to form mutually beneficial partnerships with other research and conservation organizations. One such location, Jacksonville, is home to researchers monitoring marine fisheries, marine mammals and marine turtles. Marine Fisheries Research Because of its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean and three large river estuaries, Jacksonville is a perfect location from which to track marine fish species from birth to adulthood. Many of these fish begin their lives in estuaries and bays, where they grow and develop before moving offshore as adults. Since 2001, marine fisheries researchers in Jacksonville have been keeping an eye on juvenile fish populations in the St. Johns, Nassau and St. Marys River estuaries as part of a statewide monitoring program. Researchers also collect data from offshore surveys on reef fish. Researchers use these two sources of information to produce population estimates managers use to sustain fisheries with appropriate season lengths, bag limits and size limits. Thanks to a partnership with Jacksonville University, researchers are located right on the bank of the St. Johns River and a short drive from the other two estuaries. In 2010, researchers moved into a jointuse Marine Science Research Institute on the universitys campus. They now work under the same roof as other research and conservation organizations, offering opportunities for collaboration.

Marine fisheries researchers use a 70-foot net to sample small, juvenile fish as part of routine estuarine monitoring.
OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR 63

Marine Mammal Research When asked about work, sometimes people say, Its been a zoo, lately. For FWRI marine mammal researchers in Jacksonville, work is always a zoo because theyre based at the Jacksonville Zoo Field Lab. These researchers are responsible for rescue and recovery of marine mammals, especially the North Atlantic right whale and Florida manatee, which are both endangered. Right whale researchers support NOAA Fisheries with monitoring and recovery of the right whale population, which is estimated to be at least 450 individuals. The coastal waters near Jacksonville are part of the only known right whale calving area, so researchers conduct aerial surveys to count mother-calf pairs to record new additions to the population. They also monitor population numbers by photographing

Researchers look for endangered North Atlantic right whales during an aerial survey off St. Augustine. and identifying individual right whales. In addition to monitoring, researchers help rescue entangled right whales and communicate whale locations through an early warning system to help prevent vessel-whale collisions. Manatee researchers coordinate the northeast section of a statewide rescue and recovery network. They are responsible for rescuing injured and sick manatees and transporting them to partner rehabilitation facilities. Researchers also recover dead manatees and conduct necropsies (animal autopsies) to determine cause of death and identify threats to these animals. Manatee researchers in Jacksonville also conduct genetics studies and use photoidentification to monitor the manatee population in northeast Florida. When marine mammal researchers are conducting field work, they rely on volunteers to

Marine mammals researchers work to free an entangled dolphin in the St. Johns River in downtown Jacksonville.

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assist with rescue and recovery operations. For instance, if a stranded manatee is reported while researchers are in the field, they know the zoos Marine Mammal Rescue Team and other volunteers will be ready to assist with the rescue. Marine Turtle Research Marine turtle researchers are also based at the Jacksonville Zoo, as northeast Florida is an important location in the Florida Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network. The network is a statewide effort to document and investigate the causes of strandings sea turtles that have washed ashore or are floating, dead or alive. All five sea turtle species found in

the waters around Florida are either threatened or endangered. Identifying the threats to these species and figuring out how to lessen their effects are important steps in helping these populations recover. So when sea turtles are found stranded, researchers want to find out why. The stranding and salvage network relies heavily on members of sea turtle conservation organizations. FWRI researchers encourage members to participate, train them and coordinate their responses to strandings. A number of these organizations in the Jacksonville area have partnered with FWRI. When a stranded sea turtle is reported to the FWCs Wildlife Alert Hotline, an FWRI researcher

at the closest network location quickly responds or coordinates a response by partners. When turtles are found dead, responders record details about the animal and location. Researchers may also conduct necropsies on recently deceased turtles to determine cause of death. Turtles found alive are rescued and transported to the closest permitted rehabilitation center. FWRIs presence in Jacksonville is a great example of maximizing the two Ps proximity and partners. Being close to resources is often fundamental to researchers ability to study them, and forming key local partnerships further enhances their capacity to do so.

Fulfilling the mission of the Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network can sometimes take researchers outside the Jacksonville area. In 2010, Jacksonville sea turtle researchers teamed up with commercial charter boat fishermen to help rescue oilimpacted sea turtles in the waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR

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Partnerships
ABQ BioPark Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Alachua Audubon Society American Museum of Natural History Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve Archbold Biological Station Atlantic Coastal Cooperative Statistics Program Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Auburn University Audubon of Florida Avian Research and Conservation Institute Bat Conservation International Bay County, Florida- Restore Act Coordinator Bermuda Aquarium, Museum and Zoo Berry College Bethune-Cookman University Department of Integrated Environmental Science Big Cypress National Preserve Biscayne Bay Environmental Center Bonefish & Tarpon Trust Boston University Brevard Zoo Broward County Public Schools Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement - Mapping and Boundary Branch California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Caribbean Stranding Network Cedar Key National Wildlife Refuge Center for Snake Conservation Century Commission for a Sustainable Floridathe Critical Lands and Waters Identification Project Charlotte County Animal Control Charlotte CountyNatural Resources Division Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance Cincinnati Zoo City of Marianna, Florida Clearwater Marine Aquarium Coastal Plains Institute Collier County Pollution Control and Prevention Department Columbus Zoo Conservancy of Southwest Florida Cornell UniversityHuman Dimensions Research Unit Dauphin Island Sea Lab Defenders of Wildlife Disneys Animal Kingdom Dolphin Research Center Ducks Unlimited Duke University Eastern Kentucky University Eckerd College Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park Emerald Coast National Wildlife Refuge Environmental Protection Commission of Hillsborough County Escambia CountyCommunity and Environment Department Florida A&M University Florida A&M University Graduate Council Florida Aquarium Florida Army National Guard Florida Atlantic University Florida Bat Conservancy Florida Caribbean Science Center

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Florida Coastal Ocean Observing System Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) FDACSDivision of Aquaculture Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) FDEPCoastal Management Program FDEPDivision of Law Enforcement FDEPDivision of Recreation and Parks FDEPDivision of State Lands FDEPFlorida Geological Survey FDEPOffice of Coastal and Aquatic Managed Areas FDEPOffice of Greenways and Trails FDEPOffice of Technology and Information Services FDEPOuter Continental Shelf Program Florida Department of Health (FDOH) FDOHDivision of Environmental Health Florida Department of RevenueSurvey and Mapping Office

Florida Department of State (FDOS)Division of Historical Resources FDOSDivision of Library and Information Services Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) FDOTEnvironmental Management Office Florida Division of Emergency Management Florida Forest Service Florida Gulf Coast University Florida Institute of Oceanography Florida Institute of Technology Florida LakeWatch Florida Museum of Natural History Florida Natural Areas Inventory Florida Oceans and Coastal Council Florida Ornithological Society Florida Park Service Florida Power & Light Florida Sea Grant Florida State Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation Florida State University

Florida Wildlife Federation George Mason University Georgia Aquarium Georgia Department of Natural Resources Governors South Atlantic Alliance Greenwater Laboratories Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council Gulf Coast Joint Venture Gulf County Gulf of Mexico Alliance Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council Gulf of Mexico University Research Collaborative Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission Gulf World Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies Harvard University

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Partnerships (cont.)
Hernando Audubon Society Hillsborough County Hubbs SeaWorld Research Institute Idaho State University Illinois Natural History Survey Indian River Lagoon National Estuary Program InoMedic Health Applications, Inc. (IHA)Environmental Protection Interagency Ocean Observation CommitteeData Management and Communications International Crane FoundationNorth America Jackson County Jacksonville University Jacksonville Zoo James Cook University Lake County Water Authority Lee County Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Louisiana State University Manatee County Manatee CountyDepartment of Animal Services Massachusettes Institute of Technology Medical University of South Carolina and Hollings Marine Lab Miami Seaquarium Michigan State University Missouri Department of Conservation Mote Marine Laboratory Museu Nacional/UFRJDept. Invertebrados Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASAAmes Research Center NASAEarth Science NASAGoddard Space Flight Center NASAKennedy Space Center (KSC) NASAKSC Ecological Program, IHA Environmental Services NASAStennis Space Center National Audubon Society National Cancer Institute National Cancer Research Institute National Fish and Wildlife Foundation National Museum of Natural History National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) NOAAFlorida Keys National Marine Sanctuary NOAANational Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service NOAANational Marine Fisheries Service NOAANational Ocean Service NOAANational Weather Service NOAAOffice of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research NOAAU.S. Integrated Ocean Observations System National Park Service (NPS) NPSBiscayne National Park NPSCanaveral National Seashore NPSDry Tortugas National Park NPSEverglades National Park NPSGulf Islands National Seashore NPSTinucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve National Undersea Research Center

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Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County Natural History Museum Vienna, Austria NatureServe Nemours Wildlife Foundation North Carolina State University Northwest Florida Water Management District Nova Southeastern University (NSU) NSUNational Coral Reef Institute Ocean Conservancy Okeechobee CountyEmergency Management Old Dominion University Orange County Environmental Protection Division Compliance and Waste Management Section Oregon State University Palm Beach County Palm Beach Zoo Penn State University (PSU) PSUPennsylvania Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Pinellas County Pinellas County Department of Environment and Infrastructure

Pinellas CountyPublic Works Pinellas CountyParks and Recreation Department Princeton University Puerto Rico Manatee Conservation Center Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve Saint Andrew Bay Resource Management Association San Antonio Zoo San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research Sanibel Sea School Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation Santa Fe College Sarasota Bay Estuary Program Sarasota County Sea Turtle Conservancy SeaWorld Orlando Skidaway Institute of Oceanography Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Snook & Gamefish Foundation Solutions To Avoid Red Tide, Inc.

South Atlantic Fishery Management Council South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) South Carolina Sea Grant South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force South Florida Museum South Florida Water Management District Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association Southeast Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study Southeast Florida Coral Reef Initiative Southeast Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Southeastern Bat Diversity Network Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study Southeastern Fisheries Association, Inc. Southwest Florida Water Management District St. Johns River Water Management District St. Joseph Sound Anglers Club

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Partnerships (cont.)
State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry Stony Brook University Suwannee River Water Management District Tall Timbers Research Station Tampa Bay Estuary Program Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council Tampas Lowry Park Zoo Texas Christian University Texas Parks and Wildlife Department The Field Museum The Nature Conservancy The Orianne Society Tufts University U.S. Air Force U.S. Army Corps of Engineers U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) USCG Auxiliary USCG District 7 MSU Charleston USCG District 7 MSU Savannah USCG District 7 Sector Jacksonville USCG District 7 Sector Key West USCG District 7 Sector Miami USCG District 7 Sector San Juan USCG District 7 Sector St Petersburg USCG District 8 Sector Mobile U.S. Coral Reef Task Force U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) USDA, APHISVeterinary Services USDA, APHISWildlife Services U.S. Department of Defense U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) USEPAGulf Ecology Division Laboratory USEPAGulf Ecology Division Laboratory USEPAGulf of Mexico Program USEPAGulf of Mexico Program U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) USFWSDivision of Migratory Bird Management USFWSEndangered Species Program USFWSFlorida Peninsular Landscape Conservation Cooperative USFWSGulf Coastal Plains and Ozarks Landscape Conservation Cooperative USFWSNational Conservation Training Center USFWSNational Wildlife Refuge System U.S. Food and Drug Administration U.S. Forest Service U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) USGSCoastal and Marine Science Center USGSCooperative Wildlife Research Units USGSEarth Resources Observation and Science Center USGSFlorida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit USGSNational Spatial Data Infrastructure USGSNational Wetlands Research Center USGSNational Wildlife Health Center USGSPatuxent Wildlife Research Center

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USGSSirenia Project U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Universidad Nacional Autnoma de MxicoInstituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnologa University of Adelaide University of British Columbia University of California, Davis University of California, Los Angeles University of Central Florida (UCF) UCFCollege of Education University of Charleston University of Florida (UF) UFCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences UFCollege of Public Health and Health Professions UFCollege of Veterinary Medicine UFFlorida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit UFH. T. Odum Center for Wetlands UFInstitute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) UFIFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation University of Georgia

University of Louisiana at Lafayette University of Miami (UM) UMRosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science University of Michigan University of North Carolina at Wilmington University of North Florida University of North Texas University of Rhode Island University of South Alabama University of South Florida (USF) USFCollege of Marine Science USFDepartment of Integrative Biology USFEnvironmental Science And Policy Program USF St. PetersburgCollege of Business University of Southern Mississippi (USM) USMGulf Coast Research Laboratory University of Tennessee University of Virginia University of West Florida University of Windsor

University of Wisconsin Villanova University Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University White Oak Conservation Center Wildife Foundation of Florida Wright State University Zoo Miami

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Research publications
Andrade, H., J. Santos, and R. Taylor. 2013. Life-history traits of the common snook Centropomus undecimalis in a Caribbean estuary and largescale biogeographic patterns relevant to management. Journal of Fish Biology, 24 pp. Published Online. doi:10.1111/ jfb.12123 Ault, Jerald S., Steven G. Smith, James A. Bohnsack, Jiangang Luo, Natalia Zurcher, David B. McClellan, Tracy A. Ziegler, David E. Hallac, Matt Patterson, Michael W. Feeley, Benjamin I. Ruttenberg, John Hunt, Dan Kimball, and Billy Causey. 2013. Assessing coral reef fish population and community changes in response to marine reserves in the Dry Tortugas, Florida, USA. Fisheries Research 144:28-37. Bartareau, Tad, Dave Onorato, and Deborah Jansen. 2013. Growth in body length and mass of the Florida panther: An evaluation of different models and sexual size dimorphism. Southeastern Naturalist 12(1):27-40. Bauduin, Sarah, Julien Martin, Holly H. Edwards, Olivier Gimenez, Stacie M. Koslovsky, and Daniel E. Fagan. 2013. An index of risk of co-occurrence between marine mammals and watercraft: Example of the Florida manatee. Biological Conservation 159:127-136.
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Baumstark, Ren, Barnali Dixon, Paul Carlson, David Palandro, and Keith Kolasa. 2013. Alternative spatially enhanced integrative techniques for mapping seagrass in Floridas marine ecosystem. International Journal of Remote Sensing 34(4):1248-1264. Bertelsen, Rodney D. 2013. Characterizing daily movements, nomadic movements, and reproductive migrations of Panulirus argus around the Western Sambo Ecological Reserve (Florida, USA) using acoustic telemetry. Fisheries Research 144:91-102. Bjorndal, Karen A., Barbara A. Schroeder, Allen M. Foley, Blair E. Witherington, Michael Bresette, David Clark, Richard M. Herren, Michael D. Arendt, Jeffrey R. Schmid, Anne B. Meylan, Peter A. Meylan, Jane A. Provancha, Kristen M. Hart, Margaret M. Lamont, Raymond R. Carthy, and Alan B. Bolten. 2013. Temporal, spatial, and body size effects on growth rates of loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in the Northwest Atlantic. Marine Biology, 11 pp. doi: 10.1007/ s00227-013-2264-y Blewett, David A., Philip W. Stevens, and Marvin E. Call. 2013. Comparative ecology of euryhaline and freshwater predators in a subtropical floodplain river. Florida Scientist 76:166-190.

Blewett, David A. and Philip W. Stevens. 2013. The effects of environmental disturbance on the abundance of two recreationally important fishes in a subtropical floodplain river. Florida Scientist 76(2):191-197. Bonde, Robert K., Andrew Garrett, Michael Belanger, Nesime Askin, Luke Tan, and Carin Wittmich. 2012. Biomedical health assessments of the Florida manatee in Crystal River - providing opportunities for training during the capture, handling, and processing of this endangered aquatic mammal. Journal of Marine Animals and Their Ecology 5(2): 17-28. Buzzelli, Christopher, Melanie Parker, Stephen Geiger, Yongshan Wan, Peter Doering, Daniel Haunert. 2012. Predicting system-scale impacts of oyster clearance on phytoplankton productivity in a small subtropical estuary. Environmental Modeling & Assessment, Published Online: DOI 10.1007/s10666-0129338-y Call, Marvin E., Dawn R. Sechler, Steven Canter, and Philip W. Stevens. 2013. Freshwater fish communities and habitat use in the Peace River, Florida. Florida Scientist 76(2):150-165.

Cooper, Wade T., Luiz R. Barbieri, Michael D. Murphy, and Susan K. LowerreBarbieri. 2013. Assessing stock reproductive potential in species with indeterminate fecundity: Effects of age truncation and size-dependent reproductive timing. Fisheries Research 138:31-41. Delany, Michael F., Bill Pranty, and Richard A. Kiltie. 2013. Painted bunting abundance and habitat use in Florida. Southeastern Naturalist 12(1): 61-72. Dellinger, Timothy A., Martin J. Folk, and Marilyn G. Spalding. 2013. Copulatory behavior of non-migratory whooping cranes in Florida. The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 125(1):128-133. Deutsch, Charles J. and John E. Reynolds III. 2012. Florida manatee status and conservation issues. In Ellen M. Hines et al. (Eds.) Sirenian Conservation: Issues and Strategies in Developing Countries. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, pp. 23-35. Diemer Berish, Joan E., Richard A. Kiltie, and Travis M. Thomas. Long-term population dynamics of gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus) in a pine plantation in northern Florida. 2012. Chelonian Conservation and Biology 11(1):50-58.

Dobbins, D.A., R.L. Cailteaux, S.R. Midway, and E.H. Leone. 2012. Long-term impacts of introduced flathead catfish on native ictalurids in a north Florida, USA, river. Fisheries Management and Ecology 19:434-440. Fauquier, Deborah A., Leanne J. Flewelling, Jennifer Maucher, Charles A. Manire, Victoria Socha, Michael J. Kinsel, Brian A. Stacy, Michael Henry, Janet Gannon, John S. Ramsdell, and Jan H. Landsberg. 2013. Brevetoxin in blood, biological fluids, and tissues of sea turtles naturally exposed to Karenia brevis blooms in central west Florida. Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 44(2):364-375. Fauquier, Deborah A., Leanne J. Flewelling, Jennifer M. Maucher, Martha Keller, Michael J. Kinsel, Christine K. Johnson, Michael Henry, Janet G. Gannon, John S. Ramsdell, and Jan H. Landsberg. 2013. Brevetoxicosis in seabirds naturally exposed to Karenia brevis blooms along the central west coast of Florida. Journal of Wildlife Diseases 40(2):246-260. Flaherty, Kerry E. and Cameron B. Guenther. Seasonal distribution and abundance of blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) in the Tampa Bay Estuary. 2011. Gulf of Mexico Science 2:91-110.

Flaherty, Kerry E., Brent L. Winner, Julie L. Vecchio, and Theodore S. Switzer. 2013. Spatial and size distribution of red drum caught and released in Tampa Bay, Florida, and factors associated with postrelease hooking mortality. Gulf and Caribbean Research 25:2941. Flamm, Richard Owen, John Elliot Reynolds III, and Craig Harmak. 2012 Improving conservation of Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris): Conceptualization and contributions toward a regional warm-water network management strategy for sustainable winter habitat. Environmental Management, Published Online: DOI 10.1007/ s00267-012-9985-4. Garrison, Elina P., J. Walter McCown, Mark A. Barrett, and Madan K. Oli. 2012. Denning ecology of Florida black bears in north-central Florida. Southeastern Naturalist 11(3): 517-528. Gerlach, Trevor J., Amara H. Estrada, Ivan S. Sosa, Melanie Powell, Herbert W. Maisenbacher, Martine de Wit, Ray L. Ball, and Michael T. Walsh. 2013. Echocardiographic evaluation of clinically healthy Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris). Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 44(2):295-301.
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Research publications (cont.)


Guenther, Cameron B. and Timothy C. MacDonald. 2012. Comparison of estuarine salinity gradients and associated nekton community change in the lower St. Johns River Estuary. Estuaries and Coasts 35:14431452. Hallac, David E., John H. Hunt, Douglas Morrison, Alice Clarke, Tracy A. Ziegler, William C. Sharp, and Robert Johnson. 2013. Development of a collaborative science plan to evaluate the conservation efficacy of a no-fishing, no-anchor marine reserve in Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida, USA. Fisheries Research 144:15-22. Harris, Reed, Curtis Pollman, William Landing, David Evans, Donald Axelrad, David Hutchinson, Steven L. Morey, Daren Rumbold, Dmitry Dukhovsky, Douglas H. Adams, Krish Vijaraghavan, Christopher Holmes, R. Dwight Atkinson, Tom Myers, and Elsie Sunderland. 2012. Mercury in the Gulf of Mexico: Sources to receptors. Environmental Research 119:42-52. Henrichs, Darren W., Paula S. Scott, Karen A. Steidinger, Reagan M. Errera, Ann Abraham, and Lisa Campbell. 2013. Morphology and phylogeny of Prorocentrum texanum sp. nov. (Dinophyceae): A new toxic dinoflagellate from the Gulf of Mexico coastal waters exhibiting two distinct morphologies. Journal of Phycology 49:143-155. Hirama, Shigetomo and Blair Witherington. 2012. A loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) preying on fish within a mixed-species feeding aggregation. Chelonian Conservation and Biology 11(2):261-265. Hostetler, Jeffrey A., David P. Onorato, Deborah Jansen, and Madan K. Oli. 2013. A cats tale: the impact of genetic restoration on Florida panther population dynamics and persistence. Journal of Animal Ecology 82:608-620. Ley, J.A., and M.S. Allen. 2013. Modeling marine protected area value in a catch-and-release dominated estuarine fishery. Fisheries Research 344:60-73. Lowerre-Barbieri, Susan K., Sarah Walters, Joel Bickford, Wade Cooper, and Robert Muller. 2013. Site fidelity and reproductive timing at a spotted seatrout spawning aggregation site: individual versus population scale behavior. Marine Ecology Progress Series 481:181-197. Martin, Julien, Holly H. Edwards, Matthew A. Burgess, H. Franklin Percival, Daniel E. Fagan, Beth E. Gardner, Joel G. Ortega-Ortiz, Peter G. Ifju, Brandon S. Evers, and Thomas J. Rambo. 2012. Estimating distribution of hidden objects with drones: From tennis balls to manatees. Plos One 7(6): 8 pp. Maxwell, Kerry E., Thomas R. Matthews, Rodney D. Bertelsen, and Charles D. Derby. 2013. Age and size structure of Caribbean spiny lobster, Panulirus argus, in a no-take marine reserve in the Florida Keys, USA. Fisheries Research 144:84-90. Millie, David F., Gary R. Weckmand, William A. Young II, James E. Ivey, Hunter J. Carrick, and Gary L. Fahnenstiel. 2012. Modeling microalgal abundance with artificial neural networks: Demonstration of a heuristic Grey-Box to deconvolve and quantify environmental influences. Environmental Modelling & Software 38:27-39. Moravec, Frantiek, Micah Bakenhaster, and Isaure de Buron. 2013. A new gonadinfecting species of Philometra (Nematoda: Philometridae) from the Atlantic Spanish mackerel Scomberomorus maculatus (Scombridae) off the Atlantic Coast of Florida and South Carolina. Journal of Parasitology 99(2):290-296.

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Moss, Jessica, Donald Behringer, Jeffrey D. Shields, Antonio Baeza, Alfonso AguilarPerera, Phillippe G. Bush, Clement Dromer, Alejandro Herrera_Moreno, Lester Gittens, Thomas R. Matthews, Michael R. McCord, Michelle T. Schrer, Lionel Reynal, Nathanial Truelove, and Mark J. Butler. 2013. Distribution, prevalence, and genetic analysis of Panulirus argus virus 1 (PaV1) from the Caribbean Sea. Diseases of Aquatic Organisms 104:129-140. Moyer, Ryan P., T. Shay Viehman, Gregory A. Piniak, and Dwight K. Gledhill. 2012. Linking seasonal changes in benthic community structure to seawater chemistry. Proceedings of the 12th International Coral Reef Symposium, Cairns, Australia. 5 pp. Norton, Shelley L., Tonya R. Wiley, John K. Carlson, Amanda L. Frick, Gregg R. Poulakis, and Colin A. Simpfendorfer. Designating critical habitat for juvenile endangered smalltooth sawfish in the United States. Marine and Coastal Fisheries: Dynamics, Management, and Ecosystem Science 4:473-480. Poulakis G. R., P. W. Stevens, A. A. Timmers, C. J. Stafford, and C. A. Simpfendorfer. 2012. Movements of juvenile endangered smalltooth sawfish,

Pristis pectinata, in an estuarine river system: use of non-mainstem river habitats and lagged responses to freshwater inflowrelated changes. Environmental Biology of Fishes 16 pp. Published Online. doi: 10.1007/ s10641-012-0070-x.

Sauls, Beverly and Oscar Ayala. 2012. Circle hook requirements in the Gulf of Mexico: Application in recreational fisheries and effectiveness for conservation of reef fishes. Bulletin of Marine Science 88(3):667-679.

Reed, John K., Charles Messing, Brian K. Walker, Sandra Brooke, Thiago B.S. Correa, Myra Brouwer, Tina Udouj, and Stephanie Farrington. 2013. Habitat characterization, distribution, and areal extent of deep-sea coral ecosystems off Florida, Southeastern U.S.A. Caribbean Journal of Science 47(1)13-30.

Scharer, Rachel M., William F. Patterson III., John K. Carlson, and Gregg R. Poulakis. 2012. Age and growth of endangered smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata) verified with LA-ICPMS analysis of vertebrae. Plos One 7(10):e47850, 8 pp.

Reynolds, John E. III., Benjamn Morales-Vela, Ivan Lawler, and Holly H. Edwards. 2012. Utility and design of aerial surveys for sirenians. In Ellen M. Hines et al. (Eds.), Sirenian Conservation: Issues and Strategies in Developing Countries. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida. Pp. 186-195

Schuler, Krysten L., David E. Green, Anne E. JusticeAllen, Rosemary Jaffe, Mark Cunningham, Nancy J. Thomas, Marilyn G. Spalding, and Hon S. Ip. 2012. Expansion of an exotic species and concomitant disease outbreaks: Pigeon paramyxovirus in free-ranging Eurasion collared doves. EcoHealth, 8 pp. Published Online. doi: 10.1007/s10393-0120758-6

Rodgers, James A., Jr., William B. Brooks, and Mark Barrett. 2012. Productivity and habitat modeling of wood storks nesting in north and central Florida. Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management 3(2): 252-265.

Schwarzer, Amy C., Jaime A. Collazo, Lawrence J. Niles, Janell M. Brush, Nancy J. Douglass, and H. Franklin Percival. 2012. Annual survival of red knots (Calidris canutus rufa) wintering in Florida. The Auk 129(4):725-733.

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Research publications (cont.)


Seyoum, Seifu, Brandon L. Barthel, Michael D. Tringali, Michelle C. Davis, Samantha L. Schmitt, Pam S. Bellotti, and Wesley F. Porak. 2013. Isolation and characterization of eighteen microsatellite loci for the largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, and cross amplification in congeneric species. Conservation Genetics Resources, 5 pp. Published Online. doi: 10.1007/s12686-0139885-9 Seyoum, Seifu, Michael D. Tringali, Brandon L. Barthel, Cecilia Puchulutegui, Michelle C. Davis, Angela B. Collins, and Matthew T. Craig. 2013. Isolation and characterization of 29 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the endangered Atlantic goliath grouper (Epinephelus itajara), and the Pacific goliath grouper (E. quinquefasciatus). Conservation Genetics Resources, 4 pp. Published Online. doi: 10.1007/ s12686-013-9892-x Shamblin, Brian M., Bonnie E. Berry, Denise M. Lennon, Anne B. Meylan, Peter A. Meylan, Mark E. Outerbridge, and Campbell J. Nairn. 2012. Tetranucleotide microsatellite loci from the critically endangered hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata). Conservation Genetic Research, 6 pp. Published Online. doi: 10.1007/s12686-012-9720-8 Shamblin, Brian M., Bonnie E. Berry, Denise M. Lennon, Anne B. Meylan, Peter A. Meylan, Mark E. Outerbridge, and Campbell J. Nairn. 2012. Tetranucleotide microsatellite loci from the critically endangered hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata). Conservation Genetic Research, 6 pp. Published Online. doi: 10.1007/s12686-012-9720-8 Shock, Barbara C., Adam J. Birkenheuer, Laura L. Patton, Colleen Olfenbuttel, Jeff Beringer, Daniel M. Grove, Matt Peek, Joseph W. Butfiloski, Daymond W. Hughes, J. Mitchell Lockhart, Mark W. Cunningham, Holly M. Brown, David S. Peterson, Michael J. Yabsley. 2012. Variation in the ITS-1 and ITS-2 rRNA genomic regions of Cytauxzoon felis from bobcats and pumas in the eastern United States and comparison with sequences from domestic cats. June 19, published ahead of print. 7 pp. Soto, Inia, Chuanmin Hu, Karen Steidinger, Frank MullerKarger, Jennifer Cannizaro, Jennifer Wolny, Sergio CerdeiraEstrado, Eduardo Santamariadel-Angel, Fausto Tafoya-delAngel, Porfirio Alvarez-Torres, Jorge Herrera Silveira, and Jeanne Allen. 2012. Binational collaboration to study Gulf of Mexicos harmful algae. Eos 93(5):49-50. Stith, B.M., D.H. Slone, M. de Wit, H.H. Edwards, C.A. Langtimm, E.D. Swain, L.E. Soderqvist, and J.P. Reid. 2012. Passive thermal refugia provided warm water for Florida manatees during the severe winter of 20092010. Sunda, William G., Cheska Burleson, D. Ransom Hardison, Jeanine S. Morey, Zhihong Wang, Jennifer Wolny, Alina A. Corcoran, Leanne J. Flewelling, and Frances M. Van Dolah. 2013. Osmotic stress does not trigger brevetoxin production in the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. PNAS, 6 pp. doi: 10.1073/ pnas.1217716110 Tolley, S. Gregory, Ashley Hurley, and Rachel Miner. 2013. Influence of freshwater inflow on reproductive capacity of the mud crab Eurypanopeus depressus inhabiting oyster reefs. Journal of Crustacian Biology 33(1): 36-41. Tremain, Derek M. and Douglas H. Adams. 2012. Mercury in groupers and sea basses from the Gulf of Mexico: Relationships with size, age, and feeding ecology. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 141:1274-1286. Trotter, Alexis A., David A. Blewett, Ronald G. Taylor, and Philip W. Stevens.

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2012. Migrations of common snook from a tidal river with implications for skipped spawning. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 141:1016-1025. Twiner, Michael J., Leanne J. Flewelling, Spencer E. Fire, Sabrina R. Bowen-Stevens, Joseph K. Gaydos, Christine K. Johnson, Jan H. Landsberg, Tod A. Leighfield, Blair MaseGuthrie, Lori Schwacke, Frances M. Van Dolah, Zhihong Wang, Teresa K. Rowles. 2012. Comparative analysis of three brevetoxin-associated bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) mortality events in the Florida Panhandle region (USA). Plos One 7(8):1-19. van der Hoop, Julie, Michael Moore, Andreas Fahlman, Alessandro Boconcelli, Clay George, Katharine Jackson, Carolyn Miller, David Morin, Thomas Pitchford, Teri Rowles, Jamison Smith, and Barb Zoodsma. 2013. Behavioral impacts of disentanglement of a right whale under sedation and the energetic cost of entanglement. Marine Mammal Science, 26 pp. doi: 10.1111/ mms.12042. Varner, Dana M., Ronald R. Bielefeld, and Gary R. Hepp. 2013. Nesting ecology of Florida mottled ducks using altered

habitats. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 8 pp. Published Online. doi: 10.1002/jwmg.536 Varner, Dana M., Ronald R. Bielefeld, and Gary R. Hepp. 2013. Nesting ecology of Florida mottled ducks using altered habitats. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 8 pp. Published Online. doi: 10.1002/jwmg.536 Walters, Sarah, Susan LowerreBarbieri, Joel Bickford, Jacob Tustison, and Jan H. Landsberg. 2013. Effects of Karenia brevis red tide on the spatial distribution of spawning aggregations of sand seatrout Cynoscion arenarius in Tampa Bay, Florida. Marine Ecology Progress Series 479:191-202. Wilkinson, Elliot B., Lyn C. Branch, Deborah L. Miller, and Jeffery A. Gore. 2012. Use of track tubes to detect changes in abundance of beach mice. Journal of Mammology 93(3):791-798. Witherington, Blair, Shigetomo Hirama, and Robert Hardy. 2012. Young sea turtles of the pelagic Sargassum-dominated drift community: habitat use, population density, and threats. Marine Ecology Progress Series 463:1-22.

Wong, Arthur W., Robert K. Bonde, Jessica Siegal-Willott, M. Andrew Stamper, James Colee, James A. Powell, James P. Reid, Charles J. Deutsch, and Kendal E. Harr. 2012. Monitoring oral temperature, heart rate , and respiration rate of West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) during capture and handling in the field. Aquatic Mammals 38(1):1-16. Wood, Lawrence D., Robert Hardy, Peter A. Meylan, and Anne B. Meylan. 2013. Characterization of a hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricate) foraging aggregation in a highlatitude reef community in southeastern Florida, USA. Herpetological Conservation and Biology 8(1):258-275. Yabsley, Michael J., Sarah E. Clay, Samantha E.J. Gibbs, Mark W. Cunningham, and Michaela G. Austel. 2013. Morphologic and molecular characterization of a Demodex (Acari: Demodicidae) species from white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). ISRN Parasitology, 7 pp. doi: 10.5402/2013/342918.

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20132014 Budget
GDTF (1.32%) CARLTF (0.52%) GENERAL REVENUE (5.22%) PRTF (0.69%)

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FGTF (32.38%)

Funding Sources

MRCTF (34.72%)

SGTF/ GRANTS (0.95%) SGTF (7.44%) STMTF (4.45%) MRCTF/ GRANTS (7.22%) NGWTF/ GRANTS (0.05%) NGWTF (5.04%)

Total Budget: $50,122,207


Total appropriations for FWRI in fiscal year 20132014 are $50,122,207 (includes adjustments through November 2013). Slight differences in the total of all programs represented in this document are due to overhead assessments to the programs. FWRI assesses overhead to programs to supplement operational costs of the Office of the Director, Budget Office, Outreach Coordination, and Facilities Management. Overhead assessments also fund services used Institute-wide such as the Research Information Center, Specimen Collections, and Computer and Network Support. The assessments are represented in this document as part of each program budget and are also represented in the costs of the Institute operations and services mentioned above.
78 PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

Marine Fisheries Research


Section Contact: Luiz Barbieri Luiz.Barbieri@MyFWC.com
The waters along Floridas coastline attract millions of recreational anglers and thousands of commercial fishers. Marine Fisheries Research biologists study the fish and invertebrates found in the states saltwater environments, gathering data important for the management of these species. The sections research includes collecting and analyzing fishing data, monitoring species status and abundance, investigating biological information, and breeding and rearing certain species to enhance or rebuild their populations.

Total Section Budget $20,695,087

#FTE MRCTF 80.0 MRCTF/ Grants GDTF 4.0 0.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $4,841,988 $175,203 $0 $3,048,246 $8,065,437 $2,458,535 $0 $0 $0 $2,458,535 $94,341 $0 $0 $0 $94,341

EXPENSE $1,265,228 $0 $0 $0 $1,265,228

EQUIPMENT $98,933 $0 $0 $0 $98,933

SPECIAL CATEGORIES $4,443 $544,452 $102,763 $5,452,921 $6,104,579

PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $8,763,468 $719,655 $102,763 $8,501,167 $18,087,053

OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $648,057 $32,474 $8,858 $1,918,645 $2,608,034

TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $9,411,525 $752,129 $111,621 $10,419,812 $20,695,087

FGTF 57.5 Totals 141.5

20132014 BUDGET

79

Administrative Costs
#FTE MRCTF FGTF Totals 3.0 0.0 3.0 FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $192,022 $0 $192,022 $242,252 $0 $242,252 $0 $0 $0 EXPENSE $29,195 $0 $29,195 EQUIPMENT $78,101 $0 $78,101 SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $120,495 $120,495 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $541,570 $120,495 $662,065 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $54,157 $102,612 $156,769 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $595,727 $223,107 $818,834

Keys Fisheries Research

Subsection Contact: John H. Hunt, John.Hunt@MyFWC.com Keys Fisheries Research encompasses a variety of research and monitoring programs focused on the recreationally and commercially important fish and invertebrate species inhabiting the Florida Keys ecosystems.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $243,529 $25,944 $269,473 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $1,298,519 $243,529 $25,944 $1,567,992 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $60,114 $45,287 $0 $105,401 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $1,358,633 $288,816 $25,944 $1,673,393

#FTE MRCTF 13.0 FGTF GDTF 0.0 0.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $833,163 $0 $0 $833,163 $199,421 $0 $0 $199,421 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $245,103 $0 $0 $245,103

EQUIPMENT $20,832 $0 $0 $20,832

Totals 13.0

Keys Marine Laboratory

Subsection Contact: John H. Hunt, John.Hunt@MyFWC.com This joint operation with the Florida Institute of Oceanography encourages and supports academic research programs that benefit the unique Florida Keys ecosystem.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $288,208 $288,208 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $19,454 $19,454 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $307,662 $307,662

#FTE MRCTF Totals 4.0 4.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $193,867 $193,867 $0 $0 $94,341 $94,341

EXPENSE $0 $0

EQUIPMENT $0 $0

80

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

Marine Fisheries Biology

Subsection Contact: Ryan Gandy, Ryan.Gandy@MyFWC.com Researchers collect and interpret data concerning the life history, biology, age structure, stock abundance and fishery characteristics of important commercial and recreational fish and invertebrate species in Florida.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $4,443 $74,465 $76,819 $774,927 $930,654 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $1,682,481 $74,465 $76,819 $1,546,599 $3,380,364 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $25,092 $7,817 $8,858 $317,289 $359,056 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $1,707,573 $82,282 $85,677 $1,863,888 $3,739,420

#FTE MRCTF 12.0 MRCTF/ Grants GDTF 0.0 0.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $798,640 $0 $0 $771,672 $1,570,312 $698,328 $0 $0 $0 $698,328 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $181,070 $0 $0 $0 $181,070

EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

FGTF 15.0 Totals 27.0

Marine Fisheries-Dependent Monitoring

Subsection Contact: Richard Cody, Ph.D., Richard.Cody@MyFWC.com Researchers collect and analyze data on the number of fish caught and the number of trips made by commercial and recreational fishers, using this information to monitor trends in marine fisheries throughout Florida. These data provide assessments of how management regulations affect harvest and fishers.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $2,672,126 $2,672,126 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $785,160 $3,431,712 $4,216,872 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $78,516 $817,032 $895,548 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $863,676 $4,248,744 $5,112,420

#FTE MRCTF 13.0 FGTF 15.5 Totals 28.5

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $666,438 $759,586 $1,426,024 $72,300 $0 $72,300 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $46,422 $0 $46,422

EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $0

Marine Fisheries-Independent Monitoring

Subsection Contact: Robert H. McMichael, Jr., Bob.McMichael@MyFWC.com Using statistically valid sampling methodologies, researchers capture, identify, count and release millions of fish each year to monitor the status and relative abundance of economically important fish and invertebrate species in six estuaries around the state.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $469,987 $1,520,979 $1,990,966 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $2,979,123 $645,190 $2,626,222 $6,250,535 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $297,912 $24,657 $533,813 $856,382 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $3,277,035 $669,847 $3,160,035 $7,106,917

#FTE MRCTF 29.0 MRCTF/ Grants 4.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $1,680,198 $175,203 $1,105,243 $2,960,644 $716,783 $0 $0 $716,783 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $582,142 $0 $0 $582,142

EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $0 $0

FGTF 20.0 Totals 53.0

20132014 BUDGET

81

Marine Fisheries Stock Assessment

Subsection Contact: Michael D. Murphy, Mike.Murphy@MyFWC.com Researchers integrate the physical, biological and fisheries data gathered in the Marine FisheriesIndependent Monitoring, the Marine Fisheries-Dependent Monitoring and the Marine Fisheries Biology programs to analyze Floridas marine fisheries stocks. This information is provided to marine fisheries managers.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $499,936 $499,936 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $49,994 $49,994 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $549,930 $549,930

#FTE MRCTF Totals 5.0 5.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $411,410 $411,410 $83,526 $83,526 $0 $0

EXPENSE $5,000 $5,000

EQUIPMENT $0 $0

Marine Fisheries Stock Enhancement

Subsection Contact: Chris Young, Chris.Young@MyFWC.com Biologists focus on breeding and rearing marine sport fish for release, as well as on evaluating the use of hatchery-reared animals as a management tool to enhance or rebuild coastal fisheries.
#FTE MRCTF FGTF Totals 1.0 7.0 8.0 FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $66,250 $411,745 $477,995 $445,925 $0 $445,925 $0 $0 $0 EXPENSE $176,296 $0 $176,296 EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $0 SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $120,865 $120,865 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $688,471 $532,610 $1,221,081 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $62,818 $102,612 $165,430 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $751,289 $635,222 $1,386,511

82

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

Fres hwater Fisheries Research


Section Contact: Jason Dotson Jason.Dotson@MyFWC.com
The fish in Floridas lakes and rivers are an important natural resource. Fishing in these locations is a significant contributor to tourism and the states economy. Biologists with the Freshwater Fisheries Research section gather and analyze information about the populations and abundance of Floridas freshwater fish and invertebrate species. Section researchers combine the information they learn about these species with data from studies of habitats and human impacts to provide assessments to resource managers.

Total Section Budget $3,812,714

#FTE NGTF -

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $0 $1,455,442 $0 $702,000 $0 $2,157,442 $75,100 $90,711 $0 $0 $0 $165,811 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $37,749 $143,000 $0 $0 $0 $180,749

EQUIPMENT $0 $60,073 $0 $0 $0 $60,073

SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 $197,687 $780,688 $18,740 $997,115

PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $112,849 $1,749,226 $197,687 $1,482,688 $18,740 $3,561,190

OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $0 $71,500 $9,978 $170,046 $0 $251,524

TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $112,849 $1,820,726 $207,665 $1,652,734 $18,740 $3,812,714

SGTF 25.0 SGTF/ GRANTS 0.0

FGTF 12.0 GDTF 0.0

Totals 37.0

20132014 BUDGET

83

Administrative Costs
#FTE SGTF Totals 2.0 2.0 FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $130,088 $130,088 $0 $0 $0 $0 EXPENSE $0 $0 EQUIPMENT $0 $0 SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $130,088 $130,088 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $0 $0 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $130,088 $130,088

Freshwater Fisheries Biology

Subsection Contact: Steve Crawford, Steve.Crawford@MyFWC.com Researchers study the life history, ecology and health of important Florida sport fish species and fish communities, and look at the effects of angler interactions and environmental factors. Together, these efforts provide managers necessary information to adequately protect freshwater fish communities.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 $0 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $112,849 $777,377 $890,226 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $0 $71,500 $71,500 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $112,849 $848,877 $961,726

#FTE NGTF SGTF Totals 8.0 8.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $0 $483,593 $483,593 $75,100 $90,711 $165,811 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $37,749 $143,000 $180,749

EQUIPMENT $0 $60,073 $60,073

Freshwater Fisheries Resource Assessment

Subsection Contact: Dick Krause, Dick.Krause@MyFWC.com Researchers collect population, life history, habitat and human impacts data on freshwater fish species and analyze them to provide assessments to resource managers.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $197,687 $780,688 $18,740 $997,115 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $841,761 $197,687 $1,482,688 $18,740 $2,540,876 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $0 $9,978 $170,046 $0 $180,024 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $841,761 $207,665 $1,652,734 $18,740 $2,720,900

#FTE SGTF 15.0 SGTF/ GRANTS 0.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $841,761 $0 $702,000 $0 $1,543,761 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

FGTF 12.0 GDTF 0.0

Totals 27.0

84

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

Wildlife Research
Section Contact: Robin Boughton Robin.Boughton@MyFWC.com
From the tiny beach mouse to the not so tiny right whale, Florida is home to a wide array of wildlife species. Biologists with the Wildlife Research section monitor the status of Floridas birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians including species important to hunters such as deer, alligator and waterfowl, and imperiled species such as the Florida panther and the Florida manatee. Wildlife managers rely on the information this research provides to develop conservation and restoration plans that ensure the long-term persistence of Floridas wildlife populations.

Total Section Budget $9,435,021

#FTE GR PRTF MRCTF MRCTF/ Grants 2.0 7.5 0.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $0 $124,730 $507,646 $0 $869,307 $938,607 $652,866 $0 $336,307 $3,429,463 $0 $34,410 $130,038 $0 $526,949 $401,436 $121,849 $0 $0 $1,214,682 $296,000 $0 $1,704,000 $0 $0 $325,000 $0 $0 $0 $2,325,000

EXPENSE $0 $36,993 $55,250 $0 $236,094 $358,900 $121,304 $0 $0 $808,541

EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $16,441 $0 $161,544 $39,341 $14,300 $0 $0 $231,626

SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 $0 $103,093 $0 $0 $0 $101,319 $768,835 $973,247

PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $296,000 $196,133 $2,413,375 $103,093 $1,793,894 $2,063,284 $910,319 $101,319 $1,105,142 $8,982,559

OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $0 $7,820 $47,560 $0 $84,073 $111,200 $34,075 $0 $167,734 $452,462

TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $296,000 $203,953 $2,460,935 $103,093 $1,877,967 $2,174,484 $944,394 $101,319 $1,272,876 $9,435,021

NGWTF 13.0 STMTF 15.0 SGTF 10.5 GDTF FGTF 0.0 6.0

Totals 54.0

20132014 BUDGET

85

Administrative Costs
#FTE NGWTF SGTF Totals 0.0 1.0 1.0 FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $0 $109,704 $109,704 $171,038 $0 $171,038 $0 $0 $0 EXPENSE $99,107 $2,204 $101,311 EQUIPMENT $3,200 $0 $3,200 SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 $0 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $273,345 $111,908 $385,253 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $0 $5,595 $5,595 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $273,345 $117,503 $390,848

Avian Research

Subsection Contact: Robin Boughton, Robin.Boughton@MyFWC.com Researchers provide data on the life history, population biology and ecology of Floridas bird species to aid managers in developing conservation plans and to assist recovery efforts.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 $35,529 $11,053 $46,582 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $707,623 $198,043 $35,529 $11,053 $952,248 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $43,427 $9,902 $0 $1,883 $55,212 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $751,050 $207,945 $35,529 $12,936 $1,007,460

#FTE NGWTF SGTF GDTF FGTF 8.0 2.0 0.0 0.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $531,283 $132,543 $0 $0 $663,826 $95,771 $12,000 $0 $0 $107,771 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $40,687 $40,500 $0 $0 $81,187

EQUIPMENT $39,882 $13,000 $0 $0 $52,882

Totals 10.0

Marine Mammal Research

Subsection Contact: : Leslie Ward, Leslie.Ward@MyFWC.com Researchers focus on key topics, from population assessment to behavioral ecology, to inform and help guide manatee and right whale conservation and recovery planning.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 $103,093 $0 $23,440 $558,268 $684,801 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $296,000 $1,924,209 $103,093 $2,063,284 $23,440 $737,076 $5,147,102 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $0 $0 $0 $111,200 $0 $86,195 $197,395 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $296,000 $1,924,209 $103,093 $2,174,484 $23,440 $823,271 $5,344,497

#FTE GR MRCTF MRCTF/ Grant 3.5 0.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $0 $216,026 $0 $938,607 $0 $178,808 $1,333,441 $0 $0 $0 $401,436 $0 $0 $401,436 $296,000 $1,704,000 $0 $325,000 $0 $0 $2,325,000

EXPENSE $0 $0 $0 $358,900 $0 $0 $358,900

EQUIPMENT $0 $4,183 $0 $39,341 $0 $0 $43,524

STMTF 15.0 GDTF FGTF 0.0 3.0

Totals 21.5

86

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

Marine Turtle Research

Subsection Contact: Anne Meylan, Ph.D., Anne.Meylan@MyFWC.com Researchers investigate the life history, population biology, ecology, behavior and migrations of sea turtles to guide conservation and recovery planning.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $136,560 $136,560 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $489,166 $294,059 $783,225 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $47,560 $79,656 $127,216 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $536,726 $373,715 $910,441

#FTE MRCTF FGTF Totals 4.0 3.0 7.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $291,620 $157,499 $449,119 $130,038 $0 $130,038 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $55,250 $0 $55,250

EQUIPMENT $12,258 $0 $12,258

Reptile and Amphibian Research

Subsection Contact: Allan R. Woodward, Allan.Woodward@MyFWC.com Researchers study a variety of topics related to amphibians and reptiles other than sea turtles, monitor species populations and support conservation efforts.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $248,059 $541,447 $0 $0 $789,506 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $12,403 $15,631 $0 $0 $28,034 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $260,462 $557,078 $0 $0 $817,540

#FTE NGWTF SGTF GDTF FGTF Totals 1.0 6.5 0.0 0.0 7.5

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $81,061 $351,698 $0 $0 $432,759 $107,926 $109,849 $0 $0 $217,775 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $26,990 $78,600 $0 $0 $105,590

EQUIPMENT $32,082 $1,300 $0 $0 $33,382

Terrestrial Mammal Research

Subsection Contact: Jeffery A. Gore, Ph.D., Jeff.Gore@MyFWC.com Researchers investigate the natural history, population biology, ecology and behavior of land-based mammals, providing current scientific information necessary for maintaining viable populations of Floridas native mammals.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 $0 $62,954 $42,350 $105,304 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $196,133 $564,867 $58,921 $62,954 $42,350 $925,225 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $7,820 $28,243 $2,946 $0 $0 $39,009 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $203,953 $593,110 $61,867 $62,954 $42,350 $964,234

#FTE PRTF NGWTF SGTF FGTF GDTF Totals 2.0 4.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 7.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $124,730 $256,963 $58,921 $0 $0 $440,614 $34,410 $152,214 $0 $0 $0 $186,624 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $36,993 $69,310 $0 $0 $0 $106,303

EQUIPMENT $0 $86,380 $0 $0 $0 $86,380

20132014 BUDGET

87

Ecosystem Assessment and Restoration


Section Contacts: Fish and Wildlife Health, Harmful Algal Blooms Research Leanne Flewelling Leanne.Flewelling@MyFWC.com Habitat Research Amber Whittle Amber.Whittle@MyFWC.com
Floridas diverse fish and wildlife species face threats every day. Biologists with the Ecosystem Assessment and Restoration section track many of these threats. Researchers monitor harmful algal blooms including Florida red tide that can cause human health and economic problems, and monitor and investigate fish and wildlife diseases and dieoffs. Section researchers also evaluate the status of habitats, providing data that aid in preservation, management and restoration decision-making.

Total Section Budget $6,796,216

#FTE General Revenue PRTF 0.0 1.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $0 $65,436 $1,380,561 $0 $189,909 $97,095 $39,855 $590,268 $2,363,124 $467,998 $45,196 $47,365 $0 $6,165 $0 $0 $0 $566,724 $396,418 $2,085 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $398,503

EXPENSE $146,298 $11,097 $60,746 $0 $41,389 $0 $0 $0 $259,530

EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $74,961 $0 $11,026 $0 $0 $0 $85,987

SPECIAL CATEGORIES $1,281,986 $0 $1,460 $314,506 $0 $74,842 $52,595 $1,011,098 $2,736,487

PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $2,292,700 $123,814 $1,565,093 $314,506 $248,489 $171,937 $92,450 $1,601,366 $6,410,355

OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $28,050 $6,000 $115,780 $19,146 $12,190 $0 $5,821 $198,874 $385,861

TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $2,320,750 $129,814 $1,680,873 $333,652 $260,679 $171,937 $98,271 $1,800,240 $6,796,216

MRCTF 21.0 MRCTF/ Grants SGTF CARLTF GDTF 0.0 3.0 2.0 1.0

FGTF 12.0 Totals 40.0

88

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

Administrative Costs
#FTE MRCTF SGTF Totals 3.0 0.0 3.0 FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $176,193 $0 $176,193 $12,000 $3,165 $15,165 $0 $0 $0 EXPENSE $56,039 $23,386 $79,425 EQUIPMENT $6,250 $0 $6,250 SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 $0 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $250,482 $26,551 $277,033 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $25,048 $1,328 $26,376 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $275,530 $27,879 $303,409

Fish and Wildlife Health

Aquatic Health Program Contact: Jan Landsberg, Ph.D., Jan.Landsberg@MyFWC.com Sport Fish Health Program Contact: Theresa Cody, Theresa.Cody@MyFWC.com Wildlife Health Program Contact: Mark W. Cunningham, DVM, Mark.Cunningham@MyFWC.com Researchers monitor, investigate the causes of and assist in the management of fish and wildlife diseases and die-offs. Staff members also conduct wildlife veterinary research.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 $18,356 $0 $52,595 $105,625 $176,576 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $123,814 $295,174 $18,356 $69,813 $52,595 $357,800 $917,552 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $6,000 $0 $918 $3,257 $0 $126,304 $136,479 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $129,814 $295,174 $19,274 $73,070 $52,595 $484,104 $1,054,031

#FTE PRTF MRCTF MRCTF/ Grants SGTF GDTF FGTF 1.0 4.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 5.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $65,436 $255,102 $0 $53,813 $0 $252,175 $626,526 $45,196 $35,365 $0 $3,000 $0 $0 $83,561 $2,085 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $2,085

EXPENSE $11,097 $4,707 $0 $8,000 $0 $0 $23,804

EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $0 $5,000 $0 $0 $5,000

Totals 11.0

20132014 BUDGET

89

Habitat Research

Coastal Wetlands Program Contact: Ryan Moyer, Ryan.Moyer@MyFWC.com Coral Habitat Program Contact: Rob Ruzicka , Rob.Ruzicka@MyFWC.com Seagrass Habitat Program Contact: Paul Carlson, Paul.Carlson@MyFWC.com; Penny Hall, Ph.D., Penny.Hall@MyFWC.com Freshwater Plants Program Contact: Craig Mallison, Craig.Mallison@MyFWC.com Upland Habitat Program Contact: Kent Williges, Kent.Williges@MyFWC.com Biologists collect and analyze freshwater, marine and upland habitat and species data to aid in effective preservation, management and restoration decision-making.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $1,460 $289,975 $0 $74,842 $889,107 $1,255,384 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $552,837 $289,975 $152,125 $171,937 $1,182,438 $2,349,312 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $55,138 $17,446 $7,606 $0 $57,126 $137,316 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $607,975 $307,421 $159,731 $171,937 $1,239,564 $2,486,627

#FTE MRCTF MRCTF/ Grants SGTF CARTF FGTF Totals 7.0 0.0 2.0 2.0 6.0 17.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $482,666 $0 $136,096 $97,095 $293,331 $1,009,188 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $0 $0 $10,003 $0 $0 $10,003

EQUIPMENT $68,711 $0 $6,026 $0 $0 $74,737

Harmful Algal Blooms Research

Subsection Contact: Alina Corcoran, Alina.Corcoran@MyFWC.com Staff monitor coastal waters for harmful algal blooms (HABs), working closely with other agencies to protect public health, release up-to-date status reports and generate short term forecasts of red tides. Researchers also study the Florida red tide organism and other HAB species to understand the environmental factors that influence blooms.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $1,281,986 $0 $6,175 $0 $16,366 $1,304,527 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $2,292,700 $466,600 $6,175 $39,855 $61,128 $2,866,458 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $28,050 $35,594 $782 $5,821 $15,444 $85,691 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $2,320,750 $502,194 $6,957 $45,676 $76,572 $2,952,149

#FTE General Revenue MRCTF MRCTF/ Grants GDTF FGTF Totals 0.0 7.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 9.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $0 $466,600 $0 $39,855 $44,762 $551,217 $467,998 $0 $0 $0 $0 $467,998 $396,418 $0 $0 $0 $0 $396,418

EXPENSE $146,298 $0 $0 $0 $0 $146,298

EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

90

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

Information Science and Management


Section Contact: Henry Norris Henry.Norris@MyFWC.com
Researchers in this section address complex natural resource issues by integrating ecological, cultural and socioeconomic information using statistical and spatial analysis techniques. Staff develop maps and model distribution patterns of fish and wildlife, identify lands and waters that are conservation priorities, and assess economic impacts of recreational activities. The sections database experts, statisticians, research librarians, specimen collection managers, outreach specialists and scientific editor provide additional support to FWC scientists and managers.

Total Section Budget $4,231,684

#FTE PRTF 0.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $0 $1,176,343 $0 $226,057 $389,193 $64,861 $514,018 $2,370,472 $0 $308,168 $0 $63,963 $0 $3,952 $0 $376,083 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $1,671 $170,712 $0 $101,293 $13,207 $0 $0 $286,883

EQUIPMENT $0 $15,621 $0 $0 $5,587 $0 $0 $21,208

SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $10,166 $564,107 $0 $0 $13,122 $384,786 $972,181

PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $1,671 $1,681,010 $564,107 $391,313 $407,987 $81,935 $898,804 $4,026,827

OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $74 $124,200 $1,322 $16,840 $19,900 $0 $42,521 $204,857

TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $1,745 $1,805,210 $565,429 $408,153 $427,887 $81,935 $941,325 $4,231,684

MRCTF 19.0 MRCTF/ Grants NGWTF SGTF CARLTF FGTF 0.0 4.0 6.0 1.0 9.0

Totals 39.0

20132014 BUDGET

91

Administrative Costs
#FTE PRTF MRCTF NGTF SGTF CARLTF Totals 0.0 4.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.0 FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $0 $282,265 $0 $0 $0 $282,265 $0 $13,861 $26,134 $0 $3,952 $43,947 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 EXPENSE $1,671 $62,131 $0 $0 $0 $63,802 EQUIPMENT $0 $5,621 $0 $5,587 $0 $11,208 SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $1,051 $0 $0 $9,281 $10,332 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $1,671 $364,929 $26,134 $5,587 $13,233 $411,554 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $74 $0 $0 $0 $0 $74 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $1,745 $364,929 $26,134 $5,587 $13,233 $411,628

Center for Biostatistics and Modeling

Subsection Contact: Erin Leone, Erin.Leone@MyFWC.com Researchers help to make scientific results more reliable and useful by providing statistical consulting support, developing study designs and statistical analysis plans, helping analyze scientific data and producing user-friendly software tools for statistical analysis, modeling procedures and information visualization.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 $0 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $155,894 $64,861 $220,755 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $7,575 $0 $7,575 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $163,469 $64,861 $228,330

#FTE SGTF CARLTF Totals 2.0 1.0 3.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $142,687 $64,861 $207,548 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $13,207 $0 $13,207

EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $0

Center for Spatial Analysis

Subsection Contact: Henry Norris, Henry.Norris@MyFWC.com Using computer mapping and geographic data analysis methods, researchers map habitats, model animal distributions, develop mapping applications and produce digital and hard-copy maps and graphics for distribution to natural resource managers and the public.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $8,430 $63 $384,716 $393,209 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $787,328 $63 $898,734 $1,686,125 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $77,890 $3 $36,623 $114,516 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $865,218 $66 $935,357 $1,800,641

#FTE MRCTF MRCTF/ Grants FGTF 6.0 0.0 9.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $388,372 $0 $514,018 $902,390 $294,307 $0 $0 $294,307 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $86,219 $0 $0 $86,219

EQUIPMENT $10,000 $0 $0 $10,000

Totals 15.0

92

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

Center for Spatial Analysis - Upland


#FTE MRCTF NGWTF SGTF CARLTF Totals 0.0 4.0 3.0 0.0 7.0 FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $0 $226,057 $178,936 $0 $404,993 $0 $37,829 $0 $0 $37,829 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 EXPENSE $11,362 $101,293 $0 $0 $112,655 EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 $0 $3,841 $3,841 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $11,362 $365,179 $178,936 $3,841 $559,318 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $1,136 $16,840 $8,947 $0 $26,923 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $12,498 $382,019 $187,883 $3,841 $586,241

Research Information Services

Subsection Contact: David Reed, David.Reed@MyFWC.com Staff coordinates the management of FWRI databases; oversees production and distribution of digital and hard-copy publications; implements statewide outreach programs presenting scientific information for public audiences; and oversees one of the largest collections of marine fish and invertebrate specimens in the southeastern U.S.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $564,044 $70 $564,114 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $515,706 $564,044 $70 $1,079,820 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $45,074 $1,319 $5,898 $52,291 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $560,780 $565,363 $5,968 $1,132,111

#FTE MRCTF MRCTF/ Grants FGTF Totals 9.0 0.0 0.0 9.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $505,706 $0 $0 $505,706 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $10,000 $0 $0 $10,000

EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $0 $0

Socioeconomic Assessment

Subsection Contact: David Harding, David.Harding@MyFWC.com Staff conduct economic studies that provide information to support management decisions such as determining whether to purchase lands for protection, determining economic consequences of raising fees and assessing the optimal location of a future boat ramp.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $685 $0 $685 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $1,685 $67,570 $69,255 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $100 $3,379 $3,479 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $1,785 $70,949 $72,734

#FTE MRCTF SGTF Totals 0.0 1.0 1.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $0 $67,570 $67,570 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $1,000 $0 $1,000

EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $0

20132014 BUDGET

93

Office of the Director


Section Contact: Gil McRae, FWRI Director Gil.McRae@MyFWC.com
The Office of the Director is responsible for managing a budget of more than $50,000,000, which supports all programs and operations of the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI). FWRIs director leads the science sections and oversees Institute-wide functions, such as Research Operations, which provides facilities and budget-related support. More than 600 staff members make up FWRI. FWRIs headquarters, located in downtown St. Petersburg, is home base to nearly half of its employees. More than 20 field stations enable other FWRI staff members to be strategically located throughout the state near the resources they study.

Total Section Budget $5,817,773

#FTE General Revenue PRTF MRCTF MRCTF/ Grants NGWTF STMTF SGTF CARLTF FGTF GDTF/ Grants 0.0 0.0 17.0 7.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $0 $0 $1,026,813 $399,301 $0 $0 $146,884 $0 $0 $0 $1,572,998 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $28,050 $13,926 $900,310 $0 $105,149 $111,200 $159,166 $0 $0 $0 $1,317,801

EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $0 $0 $4,735 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $4,735

SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $8,708 $1,052,617 $1,513,961 $120,034 $55,696 $107,103 $8,499 $14,688 $35,447 $2,916,753

PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $28,050 $22,634 $2,979,740 $1,913,262 $229,918 $166,896 $413,153 $8,499 $14,688 $35,447 $5,812,287

OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $5,486 $0 $5,486

TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $28,050 $22,634 $2,979,740 $1,913,262 $229,918 $166,896 $413,153 $8,499 $20,174 $35,447 $5,817,773

Totals 27.0

94

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

Office of the Director

Subsection Contact: Gil McRae, Gil.McRae@MyFWC.com The Director of FWRI leads the major science sections: Marine Fisheries Research, Freshwater Fisheries Research, Wildlife Research, Ecosystem Assessment and Restoration, and Information Science and Management. The Office of the Director also oversees Institute-wide functions such as Research Operations.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $8,708 $726,672 $210,573 $120,034 $55,696 $107,103 $8,499 $1,237,285 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $8,708 $1,183,696 $270,856 $120,034 $55,696 $169,528 $8,499 $1,817,017 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $8,708 $1,183,696 $270,856 $120,034 $55,696 $169,528 $8,499 $1,817,017

#FTE PRTF MRCTF MRCTF/ Grants NGWTF STMTF SGTF CARLTF Totals 0.0 6.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 8.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $0 $457,024 $60,283 $0 $0 $62,425 $0 $579,732 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Research Operations

Subsection Contact: Trang Nguyen, Trang.Nguyen@MyFWC.com The Research Operations Section supports the scientific activities of FWRI and consists of work groups such as Computer and Network Support, the Budget Office and Facilities Management. The Budget Office includes a small Grants Office that provides central-division coordination and support for securing grant-funded resources.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES $0 $0 $325,945 $1,303,388 $0 PROGRAM OPERATIONAL BUDGET $28,050 $13,926 $1,796,044 $1,642,406 $109,884 $111,200 $0 $14,688 $35,447 $1,679,468 $243,625 $14,688 $35,447 $3,995,270 OVERHEAD ASSESSMENT $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $5,486 $0 $5,486 TOTAL PROGRAM BUDGET $28,050 $13,926 $1,796,044 $1,642,406 $109,884 $111,200 $243,625 $20,174 $35,447 $4,000,756

#FTE General Revenue PRTF 0.0 0.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT $0 $0 $569,789 $339,018 $0 $0 $84,459 $0 $0 $993,266 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

EXPENSE $28,050 $13,926 $900,310 $0 $105,149 $111,200 $159,166 $0 $0 $1,317,801

EQUIPMENT $0 $0 $0 $0 $4,735 $0 $0 $0 $0 $4,735

MRCTF 11.0 MRCTF/ Grants NGWTF STMTF SGTF FGTF GDTF/ Grants 6.0 0.0 0.0 2.0 0.0 0.0

Totals 19.0

20132014 BUDGET

95

Current Grant Awards


Note: New awards and amendments to existing awards are received throughout the year
GRANT NAME Granting Agency Grant start date # State Wildlife Grant (SWG), administered by FWC, Division of Habitat and Species Conservation as of December 1, 2013

a look inside...

MARINE FISHERIES RESEARCH


CHARLOTTE HARBOR/LEMON BAY WATER QUALITY MONITORING Southwest Florida Water Management District May 7, 2001 HYDRO-BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR TAMPA BYPASS CANAL/ALAFIA RIVER WATER SUPPLY PROJECTS University of South Florida, College of Marine Science October 1, 2004 MONITORING POPULATIONS OF FISH AND MACROINVERTEBRATES IN FLORIDA BAY U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service May 30, 2006 AN INVESTIGATION OF FRESHWATER INFLOW EFFECTS ON FISH AND INVERTEBRATE USE OF THE HOMOSASSA RIVER ESTUARY University of South Florida, College of Marine Science March 1, 2007 JUVENILE FISH MONITORING - FISH ANALYSIS IN THE CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER ESTUARY South Florida Water Management District November 19, 2007 FISHERIES-INDEPENDENT MONITORING - DATA ANALYSIS FOR ESTERO BAY South Florida Water Management District November 20, 2007 ECONOMIC RELIEF TO FLORIDAS FOR-HIRE FISHING FLEET Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration December 1, 2007 96 PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014 $414,285 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $414,285 Total $671,616 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $671,616 Total

$450,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $450,000 Total

$122,338 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $122,338 Total

$20,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $20,000 Total

$20,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $20,000 Total

$460,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $460,000 Total

INVESTIGATION OF FRESHWATER INFLOW EFFECTS ON FISH AND INVERTEBRATES USE OF THE CRYSTAL RIVER ESTUARY University of South Florida, College of Marine Science June 1, 2008 COOPERATIVE REEF FISH RESEARCH AND MONITORING INITIATIVE FOR THE WEST FLORIDA SHELF U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration September 1, 2008 ENVIRONMENTAL DREDGING OF THE SEBASTIAN RIVER: FISH EFFECTS St. Johns River Water Management District October 1, 2008 HYDRO-BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR TAMPA BYPASS CANAL/ALAFIA RIVER WATER SUPPLY PROJECTS University of South Florida, College of Marine Science January 12, 2009 ST. JOHNS RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT FRESHWATER INFLOW EFFECTS ON FISHES AND INVERTEBRATES St. Johns River Water Management District March 19, 2009 CONTINUATION OF RELATIVE ABUNDANCE MONITORING AND SAMPLE PROCESSING OF SMALLTOOTH SAWFISH IN THE CHARLOTTE HARBOR ESTUARINE SYSTEM, FLORIDA U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration April 8, 2009 LEMON BAY FISHERIES-INDEPENDENT MONITORING PROJECT Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council April 27, 2009 CORAL REEF FISH SPAWNING AGGREGATION RESEARCH IN THE FLORIDA KEYS National Fish and Wildlife Foundation May 15, 2009 SARASOTA BAY FISHERIES-INDEPENDENT MONITORING SAMPLING Sarasota Bay Estuary Program June 24, 2009 EVALUATION OF LOBSTER GEAR MODIFICATIONS DESIGNED TO REDUCE THE MOVEMENT OF SPINY LOBSTER TRAPS U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration August 1, 2009

$115,709 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $115,709 Total

$1,670,833 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $1,670,833 Total

$57,508 Grantor $9,000 State/In-Kind $66,508 Total

$593,760 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $593,760 Total

$20,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $20,000 Total

$40,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $40,000 Total

$42,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $42,000 Total $136,294 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $136,294 Total

$225,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $255,000 Total $145,744 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $145,744 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

97

RECRUITMENT AND ADULT ABUNDANCE OF OYSTERS IN THE LOWER ST. LUCIE ESTUARY AND IN FRINGE HABITATS U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service September 1, 2009 A DIRECTED STUDY OF THE RECREATIONAL RED SNAPPER FISHERIES IN THE GULF OF MEXICO ALONG THE WEST FLORIDA SHELF U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration September 1, 2009 FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION, FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH/GULF STATES MARINE FISHERIES COMMISSION RECFIN/COM/FIN INFORMATION AND DATA MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration January 1, 2010 FEATHER SOUND RESTORATION Tampa Bay Estuary Program February 19, 2010 DEFINING FISH NURSERY HABITATS: AN APPLICATION OF OTOLITH ELEMENTAL FINGERPRINTING IN TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey April 1, 2010 SMALLTOOTH SAWFISH RESEARCH AND OUTREACH: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATIVE PROGRAM U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration June 1, 2010 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF MARINE ZONING IN THE FLORIDA KEYS NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration June 18, 2010 INCREASE INTERCEPT SAMPLING LEVELS FOR THE MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES STATISTICS SURVEY, FOR-HIRE METHODOLOGY OF THE CHARTER BOAT AND HEADBOAT FISHERY ON THE ATLANTIC COAST (FLORIDA PORTION) U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration August 1, 2010 EVALUATION OF GOLIATH GROUPER U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration August 1, 2010

$15,986 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $15,986 Total

$999,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $999,000 Total

$8,335,288 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $8,335,288 Total

$60,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $60,000 Total $20,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $20,000 Total

$1,490,898 Grantor $188,874 State/In-Kind $1,679,772 Total

$250,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $250,000 Total

$282,540 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $282,540 Total

$178,885 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $178,885 Total

98

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL: ASSESSING IMPACTS Florida Atlantic University August 13, 2010 AN ECOSYSTEM-BASED APPROACH TO EVALUATING THE BURDEN AND EFFECTS OF DIETARY MERCURY ON ATLANTIC BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS Florida Atlantic University September 23, 2010 BAY SCALLOP RESTORATION, EFFECTIVENESS AND EFFICIENCY Bay Shellfish Company October 1, 2010 IMPACTS OF THE 2010 DEEP-WATER HORIZON OIL SPILL ON ESTUARINE BOTTLENOSE DOLPHIN POPULATIONS IN THE WEST FLORIDA PANHANDLE University of Central Florida November 30, 2010 IMPLEMENTATION OF AN ECONOMIC ADD-ON SURVEY TO ESTABLISHED MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES STATISTICS SURVEY IN FLORIDA Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration January 1, 2011 #SWG - CORAL REEF RESTORATION AND CONSERVATION: ENHANCING HERBIVORY TO RESTORE THE HEALTH AND RESILIENCY OF FLORIDAS CORAL REEF ECOSYSTEM U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service January 1, 2011 SOUTHEAST AREA MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM 2011-2016 U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration February 1, 2011 USE OF OTOLITH MICROCHEMISTRY TO IMPROVE FISHERIESINDEPENDENT INDICES OF RECRUITMENT FOR GAG (MYCTEROPERCA MICROLEPIS): LINKING ESTUARINE NURSERIES TO NEARSHORE REEFS IN THE EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO University of South Florida, College of Marine Science March 1, 2011 COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: THE ROLE OF SPONGES IN THE COASTAL NITROGEN CIRCLE University of North Carolina September 1, 2011

$39,400 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $39,400 Total $19,170 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $19,170 Total

$34,870 Grantor $32,241 State/In-Kind $67,111 Total $22,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $22,000 Total

$48,888 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $48,888 Total

$76,107 Grantor $40,981 State/In-Kind $117,088 Total

$1,591,356 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $1,591,356 Total $19,525 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $19,525 Total

$45,827 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $45,827 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

99

EXPLORING THE UTILITY OF SIDE-SCAN SONAR AND EXPERIMENTAL Z-TRAPS U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration September 1, 2011 FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION, FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE/GULF STATES MARINE FISHERIES COMMISSION MARINE RECREATIONAL INFORMATION PROGRAM STRATIFICATION PROJECT Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration September 1, 2011 CHARLOTTE HARBOR MONITORING NETWORK STRATA PROJECT Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program October 1, 2011 OYSTER MONITORING IN THE NORTHERN ESTUARIES ON THE SOUTHEAST COAST OF FLORIDA South Florida Water Management District December 1, 2011 FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION, FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE/GULF STATES MARINE FISHERIES COMMISSION BIOLOGICAL SAMPLING PROGRAM Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration January 1, 2012 #SWG - ALTERNATIVE FUTURES UNDER CLIMATE CHANGE FOR THE FLORIDA KEYS BENTHIC AND CORAL SYSTEMS U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service April 1, 2012 FLORIDA/NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE REGIONAL COOPERATIVE STATISTICS PROGRAM U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration April 1, 2012 LOWER ST. JOHNS RIVER FISHERIES-INDEPENDENT MONITORING PROGRAM St. Johns River Water Management District June 20, 2012 FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION, FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE/GULF STATES MARINE FISHERIES COMMISSION FLORIDA EAST AND WEST COAST HEAD-BOAT DATA COLLECTION Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration July 1, 2012

$329,987 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $329,987 Total

$402,102 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $402,102 Total

$53,550 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $53,550 Total $408,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $408,000 Total

$489,860 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $489,860 Total

$77,858 Grantor $41,924 State/In-Kind $119,782 Total

$600,101 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $600,101 Total

$169,936 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $169,936 Total

$756,608 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $756,608 Total

100

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE INTERACTION BETWEEN TERRAPINS AND CRAB TRAPS Wildlife Foundation of Florida July 1, 2012

$75,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $75,000 Total

MULTI-SPECIES APPROACH TO ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF ESTUARINE AND COASTAL SPORT FISH STOCKS, FLORIDA - SEGMENT 7 U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service August 15, 2012 FLORIDA ATLANTIC COAST STOCK ASSESSMENTS U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration September 1, 2012 RED DRUM SPAWNING STOCK SIZE AND STRUCTURE IN THE EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration September 1, 2012 SURVEY-CHARACTERIZE HARVEST AND REGULATORY DISCARDS IN OFFSHORE RECREATIONAL CHARTER FISHERY, ATLANTIC COAST FLORIDA U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration September 1, 2012 MAPPING OF HARD-BOTTOM HABITATS AT REEF MORPHOLOGY SCALES TO IMPROVE SAMPLING DESIGNS AND ANALYSES OF SPATIAL DYNAMICS FOR REEF FISHES IN THE GULF OF MEXICO University of Florida September 1, 2012 COMBINING FISHERY-INDEPENDENT AND FISHERY-DEPENDENT METHODS: A PILOT STUDY ON A HYBRID APPROACH TO SAMPLING REEF FISHES University of South Florida, College of Marine Science September 1, 2012 BIOLOGICAL SAMPLING AND CATCH/EFFORT ESTIMATION DURING EMERGENCY SOUTH ATLANTIC RED SNAPPER RE-OPENING U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration September 13, 2012 FISH HABITAT ASSESSMENT IN TIDAL RIVER ESTUARIES Southwest Florida Water Management District September 20, 2012

$515,763 Grantor $171,921 State/In-Kind $687,684 Total

$393,998 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $393,998 Total $215,394 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $215,394 Total

$458,646 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $458,646 Total

$27,870 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $27,870 Total

$50,400 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $50,400 Total

$28,152 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $28,152 Total

$43,860 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $43,860 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

101

MCKAY BAY SEDIMENT CONTAIMINENT BIOTIC EFFECTS STUDY Tampa Bay Estuary Program October 1, 2012 HYDRO-BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR TAMPA BYPASS CANAL/ALAFIA RIVER WATER SUPPLY PROJECTS University of South Florida, College of Marine Science October 1, 2012 ASSESS THE EFFECTS OF MOSQUITO CONTROL PESTICIDES ON NON-TARGETED ORGANISMS IN THE FLORIDA KEYS NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY Mote Marine Laboratory October 1, 2012 FISCAL YEAR 13 COASTAL CHARLOTTE HARBOR MONITORING NETWORK WATER-QUALITY MONITORING IN SIX UPPER CHARLOTTE HARBOR STRATA PROJECT Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program October 1, 2012 WATER QUALITY MONITORING IN LOWER CHARLOTTE HARBOR Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program October 1, 2012 FWC-FWRIS PARTICIPATION IN THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND CONSUMER SERVICES SEAFOOD SAFETY SCOPE OF WORK PLAN Florida Department of Agriculture October 15, 2012 EVALUATION OF HOW DEEPENING JACKSONVILLE HARBOR MAY AFFECT FISHERIES Army Corps Of Engineers January 25, 2013 FLORIDA MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERY STASTICAL DATA COLLECTION - SEGMENT 29 U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service April 1, 2013 POPULATION GENETICS OF MARINE SPORTFISH SPECIES FOR FISHERIES MANAGEMENT AND STOCK ENHANCEMENT - SEGMENT 21 U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service April 1, 2013 ASSESSMENT OF FLORIDAS MARINE AND FRESHWATER HATCHERY PROGRAMS - SEGMENT 4 U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service April 1, 2013 102 PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

$61,700 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $61,700 Total $282,295 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $282,295 Total

$35,120 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $35,120 Total

$110,160 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $110,160 Total

$18,207 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $18,207 Total $221,109 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $221,109 Total

$12,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $12,000 Total

$1,127,414 Grantor $375,805 State/In-Kind $1,503,219 Total

$302,593 Grantor $100,864 State/In-Kind $403,457 Total

$898,603 Grantor $299,534 State/In-Kind $1,198,137 Total

INVESTIGATIONS INTO ESTUARINE AND REEF FISH ABUNDANCE, ECOLOGY, AND LIFE HISTORY IN FLORIDA - SEGMENT 26 U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service April 1, 2013 INDIAN RIVER LAGOON ENHANCED FISHERIES MONITORING AND PHYTOPLANKTON BLOOM IMPACT St. Johns River Water Management District April 16, 2013 DETERMINING WHICH TIDAL TRIBUTARIES ARE THE BEST SNOOK NURSERIES (FLORIDA) National Fish and Wildlife Foundation June 1, 2013 FISHERY-DEPENDENT SPORT-FISH DATA COLLECTION - SEGMENT 4 U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service June 1, 2013 MONITORING OF A CONSTRUCTED OYSTER REEF IN THE ST. LUCIE ESTUARY Martin County June 17, 2013 PROMOTING RECOVERY AND ADDRESSING NEW SMALLTOOTH SAWFISH MANAGEMENT NEEDS U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration July 1, 2013 EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF LIONFISH ON SELECT HABITATS IN THE FLORIDA KEYS Wildlife Foundation of Florida July 1, 2013 ANGLER LOG DATA COLLECTION PROGRAM Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration August 1, 2013 ASSESSING THE LOCATIONS AND STATUS OF REEF FISH SPAWNING AGGREGATIONS IN THE FLORIDA KEYS U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration August 1, 2013 CONVERSION OF RESEARCH TO ECOSYSTEM PROTECTION: MARINE DEBRIS IN SOUTH FLORIDA U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration August 1, 2013

$1,057,791 Grantor $352,597 State/In-Kind $1,410,388 Total

$272,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $272,000 Total

$100,000 Grantor $151,696 State/In-Kind $251,696 Total

$261,406 Grantor $87,135 State/In-Kind $348,541 Total $62,470 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $62,470 Total

$201,594 Grantor $67,861 State/In-Kind $269,455 Total

$43,600 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $43,600 Total

$188,496 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $188,496 Total

$57,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $57,000 Total

$49,443 Grantor $49,887 State/In-Kind $99,330 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

103

A MULTI-SPECIES APPROACH FOR IMPROVING ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF ESTUARINE AND COASTAL SPORTFISH STOCKS U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service August 15, 2013 RESTORING THREATENED CORALS AS FISHERIES HABITAT The Nature Conservancy U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration August 27, 2013 RED DRUM SPAWNING STOCK SIZE AND STRUCTURE IN THE EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration September 1, 2013 IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF REEF FISH SPAWNING AGGREGATIONS ALONG FLORIDAS ATLANTIC COAST U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration September 1, 2013 EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF RECREATIONAL CATCHAND-RELEASE ANGLING ON THE SURVIVAL OF GAG GROUPER (MYCTEROPERCA MICROLEPIS), ADDITIONAL INVESTIGATION INTO GEAR/STRATEGIES TO REDUCE FISHING TRAUMA U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration September 1, 2013 POPULATION SURVEYS OF SPAWNING BLUE CRABS RESULTING IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF LARVAL DISPERSAL MODELS FOR FLORIDA COASTAL WATERS U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration September 1, 2013 FLORIIDA WORK EXPERIENCE PROGRAM, 2013-14 Florida Keys Community College September 23, 2013 TESTING AN ALTERNATIVE METHOD FOR THE SAFE RELEASE OF REEF FISHES CAUGHT ON HOOK-AND-LINE GEAR IN THE RECREATIONAL FISHERY IN THE GULF OF MEXICO U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration October 1, 2013

$515,763 Grantor $171,921 State/In-Kind $687,684 Total

$48,000 Grantor $28,000 State/In-Kind $76,000 Total

$175,862 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $175,862 Total

$299,293 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $299,293 Total

$113,749 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $113,749 Total

$99,927 Grantor $33,309 State/In-Kind $133,236 Total

$2,100 Grantor $900 State/In-Kind $3,000 Total $185,843 Grantor $23,799 State/In-Kind $209,642 Total

104

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

FRESHWATER FISHERIES RESEARCH


STATEWIDE LONG-TERM MERCURY MONITORING IN LARGEMOUTH BASS AND OTHER BIOINDICATORS Florida Department of Environmental Protection January 26, 2007 FISH COLLECTION FOR MERCURY IN BROWARD, MARTIN, MIAMIDADE, OKEECHOBEE, PALM BEACH, ST. LUCIE COUNTIES South Florida Water Management District October 1, 2007 REPORT ON BLACK CRAPPIE FISHERY IN NEWNANS LAKE St. Johns River Water Management District October 1, 2009 GUM SPRINGS FISH COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT AND HABITAT SUITABILITY CURVE DEVELOPMENT - YEAR 2 Southwest Florida Water Management District May 18, 2010 BLACK CREEK CRAYFISH BASELINE SURVEY Florida Department of Military Affairs September 29, 2010 FISH COLLECTION WITHIN THE SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT South Florida Water Management District October 1, 2012 MACROINVERTEBRATE TAXONOMIC SUPPORT SERVICES South Florida Water Management District April 9, 2013 FLORIDA FRESHWATER FISHERIES RESEARCH - SEGMENT 3 U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service July 1, 2013 LAKE EUSTIS PUPFISH EVALUATION Wildlife Foundation of Florida July 1, 2013 LAKE GEORGE CREEL SURVEY St. Johns River Water Management District June 4, 2013 $472,741 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $472,741 Total

$336,945 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $336,945 Total

$11,950 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $11,950 Total $15,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $15,000 Total

$26,500 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $26,500 Total $285,300 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $285,300 Total

$11,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $11,000 Total $1,992,074 Grantor $664,025 State/In-Kind $2,656,099 Total $20,843 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $20,843 Total $25,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $25,000 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

105

WILDLIFE RESEARCH
MANATEE BEHAVIORAL RESPONSE TO APPROACHING AND PASSING WATERCRAFT IN THE COASTAL WATERS OF FLORIDA Wildlife Foundation of Florida July 1, 2007 LONG-TERM STUDY OF SEA TURTLES IN FLORIDA BAY U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service May 1, 2009 CONTINUATION OF LONG-TERM STUDY OF SEA TURTLES IN FLORIDA BAY U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration June 1, 2009 #SWG - EFFECTS OF HUMAN-INDUCED HABITAT MODIFICATION ON MULTIPLE SHOREBIRDS AND SEABIRDS IN FLORIDA U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service July 1, 2009 OCALA BALD EAGLE MONITORING U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service September 1, 2009 #SWG - SURVEY OF WINTER-BREEDING AMPHIBIAN SPECIES IN THE PENINSULA U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service January 1, 2010 MANATEE CARCASS RECOVERY AND INVESTIGATION U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service January 1, 2010 TELEMETRY - CAPE CANAVERAL ENERGY CENTER CONVERSION PROJECT Florida Power and Light March 3, 2010 FLORIDA MARINE TURTLE RESEARCH AND CONSERVATION U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration June 1, 2010 GENETIC IDENTIFICATION OF MANATEES IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service June 1, 2010 $19,400 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $19,400 Total

$88,100 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $88,100 Total $107,875 Grantor $37,743 State/In-Kind $145,618 Total

$153,232 Grantor $153,232 State/In-Kind $306,464 Total

$12,500 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $12,500 Total $28,378 Grantor $28,400 State/In-Kind $56,778 Total

$90,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $90,000 Total $250,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $250,000 Total

$684,663 Grantor $210,465 State/In-Kind $895,128 Total $40,080 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $40,080 Total

106

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

BLACK BEAR HABITAT USE STUDY - CAMP BLANDING Florida Department of Military Affairs September 29, 2010 RIGHT WHALE AERIAL SURVEY EARLY WARNING SYSTEM U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration October 1, 2010 2010-11 BALD EAGLE NESTING SURVEY AND CONSERVATION U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service January 26, 2011 DOCUMENTATION OF MANATEES AT TECO POWER PLANTS - 2011 Tampa Electric Company February 22, 2011 DEPRADATION/PREDATION RATES BY FLORIDA PANTHERS ON LIVESTOCK AND WILD PREY U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service July 31, 2011 RIGHT WHALE RECOVERY PLAN IMPLEMENTATION ACTIVITIES U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration October 1, 2011 DOCUMENTATION OF MANATEES AT TECO POWER PLANTS - 2012 Tampa Electric Company February 7, 2012 BALD EAGLE POPULATION MONITORING Wildlife Foundation of Florida May 23, 2012 DOCUMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF SEA TURTLE MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY IN FLORIDA U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration July 1, 2012 LEVEL 1 AND 2 NECROPSY TRAINING FOR INCREASED QUALITY OF LEVELS A, B, C DATA COLLECTION BY SOUTHEAST CETACEAN STRANDING NETWORK U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration August 1, 2012 ENHANCED SEA TURTLE CONSERVATION PROGRAM, FLORIDA INDEX NESTING SURVEYS, INDEX NESTING BEACH SURVEY PROGRAM U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service October 1, 2012

$112,100 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $112,100 Total $1,043,803 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $1,043,803 Total $81,967 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $81,967 Total $5,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $5,000 Total $95,159 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $95,159 Total

$1,287,014 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $1,287,014 Total $5,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $5,000 Total $162,993 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $162,993 Total $45,769 Grantor $17,179 State/In-Kind $62,948 Total

$99,999 Grantor $44,799 State/In-Kind $144,798 Total

$19,116 Grantor $6,372 State/In-Kind $25,488 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

107

MANATEE WARM-WATER REFUGIA AND MORTALITY Wildlife Foundation of Florida October 1, 2012 MANATEE UNUSUAL MORTALITY EVENT Marine Mammal Center January 1, 2013 DOCUMENTATION OF MANATEES AT TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY POWER PLANTS - 2013 Tampa Electric Company March 14, 2013 FLORIDA MARINE TURTLE RESEARCH AND CONSERVATION U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration June 1, 2013 IMPACT OF HYDRILLA ON USE OF THE LITTORAL ZONE BY FORAGING LIMPKINS AND WADING BIRDS IN CENTRAL FLORIDA Wildlife Foundation of Florida July 1, 2013 BEAR ABUNDANCE IN OCALA NATIONAL FOREST Wildlife Foundation of Florida July 1, 2013 PANTHER RESEARCH Raymond James Trust August 15, 2013 RIGHT WHALE AERIAL SURVEYS, RIGHT WHALE COORDINATOR/ ACTIVITIES, GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM/AUTOMATIC IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM SUPPORT: RIGHT WHALE RECOVERY PLAN IMPLEMENTATION ACTIVITIES U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration October 1, 2013 ENHANCED SEA TURTLE CONSERVATION PROGRAM, FLORIDA NESTING BEACH SURVEYS PROGRAM U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service October 1, 2013

$25,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $25,000 Total $35,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $35,000 Total $5,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $5,000 Total

$248,855 Grantor $88,201 State/In-Kind $337,056 Total $28,026 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $28,026 Total

$32,350 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $32,350 Total $5,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $5,000 Total $650,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $650,000 Total

$19,116 Grantor $6,372 State/In-Kind $25,488 Total

108

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION


SEAGRASS AND WATER QUALITY MONITORING IN BIG BEND REGION Suwannee River Water Management District March 25, 2003 RELATED RESEARCH TO THE OCEANS AND HUMAN HEALTH INITIATIVE/BREVETOXIN ACCUMULATION IN FISH AND POTENTIAL IMPACTS University of North Carolina Wilmington U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration October 1, 2005 JOHNSONS SEAGRASS FIELD SURVEY ANALYSIS AND DOCK IMPACT STUDY U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration July 15, 2007 JOHNSONS SEAGRASS DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE SURVEY, MONITORING OF POPULATIONS IN THE SOUTHERN RANGE AND INVESTIGATION OF THE SOUTHERN LIMIT U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration February 29, 2008 INVESTIGATION THE EFFICACY OF CHOLESTYRAMINE AS A TREATMENT FOR BREVETOXICOSIS IN STRANDED LOGGERHEADS AND DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS Mote Marine Laboratory September 1, 2008 DRY TORTUGAS NATIONAL PARK CORAL REEF MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROJECT U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service September 25, 2008 SOUTHEAST FLORIDA CORAL REEF EVALUATION AND MONITORING PROJECT Florida Department of Environmental Protection February 23, 2009 SOUTH FLORIDA FISHERIES HABITAT ASSESSMENT PROGRAM South Florida Water Management District March 25, 2009 JOHNSONS SEAGRASS DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE SURVEY, MONITORING THE POPULATIONS IN THE SOUTHERN RANGE AND INVESTIGATION INTO THE BIOLOGICAL THREAT OF SALINITY THROUGHOUT THE SPECIES RANGE U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration April 13, 2009 $390,445 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $390,445 Total $14,220 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $14,220 Total $32,298 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $32,298 Total $189,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $189,000 Total $222,706 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $222,706 Total

$50,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $50,000 Total

$650,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $650,000 Total

$756,500 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $756,500 Total $355,767 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $355,767 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

109

SEAGRASS INTEGRATED MAPPING AND MONITORING PROGRAM - YEAR 3 Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Coastal Management Program July 1, 2009 REMOTE SENSING DECISION SUPPORT FOR WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT AND SEAGRASS PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT IN FLORIDAS BIG BEND REGION National Aeronautics and Space Administration August 7, 2009 CORAL REEF/HARDBOTTOM MONITORING FLORIDA KEYS NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY U.S. Environmental Protection Agency October 1, 2009 U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY COASTAL WATERS SURVEY Florida Department of Environmental Protection May 1, 2010 MONITORING AND MAPPING OF THREATENED CORALS IN THE U.S. JURISDICTION: DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-STATE CONSERVATION PROGRAM U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration June 1, 2010 #SWG - DISEASE SURVEILLANCE IN SELECTED SPECIES OF GREATEST CONSERVATION NEED - BATS AND AMPHIBIANS U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service July 1, 2010 SEAGRASS INTEGRATED MAPPING AND MONITORING PROGRAM - YEAR 4 Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Coastal Management Program July 1, 2010 AVIAN INFLUENZA SURVEILLANCE U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service July 20, 2010 DEVELOPMENT OF A JOHNSONS SEAGRASS RESTORATION PLAN U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration July 22, 2010 MONITORING OF TOXIC ALGAE IN THE INDIAN RIVER LAGOON St. Johns River Water Management District September 27, 2010

$178,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $178,000 Total $399,260 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $399,260 Total

$1,510,000 Grantor $191,783 State/In-Kind $1,701,783 Total

$528,152 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $528,152 Total

$2,753,418 Grantor $245,292 State/In-Kind $2,998,710 Total

$142,587 Grantor $142,587 State/In-Kind $285,174 Total

$150,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $150,000 Total $50,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $50,000 Total $20,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $20,000 Total $76,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $76,000 Total

110

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

RAPID DETECTION AND RESPONSE TO CETACEAN MORTALITIES IN WEST CENTRAL FLORIDA AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING Mote Marine Laboratory August 4, 2011 BREVETOXIN METABOLISM AND PHYSIOLOGY - A FRESHWATER MODEL OF MORBIDITY IN ENDANGERED SEA TURTLES U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration September 1, 2011 HIGH RESOLUTION ASSESSMENT OF CARBON DYNAMICS IN SEAGRASS AND CORAL REEF BIOMES UAV Collaborative October 11, 2011 SOUTH FLORIDA FISH HABITAT ASSESSMENT MONITORING NETWORK South Florida Water Management District December 1, 2011 NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION ATLANTIC OCEAN ACIDIFICATION TEST-BED CARBONATE CHEMISTRY VALIDATION SAMPLING U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration March 6, 2012 SURVEILLANCE FOR NEUROTROPIC VELOGENIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS IN DOUBLE CRESTED CORMORANTS IN FLORIDA Wildlife Management Institute May 23, 2012 PREVALENCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF BAYLISASCARIS PROCYONIS IN FLORIDA Wildlife Foundation of Florida July 1, 2012 #SWG - DEVELOPMENT OF A SEAGRASS MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE SPRINGS COAST U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service July 1, 2012 AUTONOMOUS WATER QUALITY AND HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOM MONITORING PROJECT National Fish and Wildlife Foundation May 1, 2013 HEALTH MONITORING OF FLORIDAS SPORTFISH - SEGMENT 18 U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service June 1, 2013

$5,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $5,000 Total

$123,987 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $123,987 Total

$130,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $130,000 Total

$705,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $705,000 Total $14,985 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $14,985 Total

$50,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $50,000 Total

$29,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $29,000 Total

$105,000 Grantor $105,000 State/In-Kind $210,000 Total

$50,000 Grantor $76,118 State/In-Kind $126,118 Total

$477,288 Grantor $159,096 State/In-Kind $636,384 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

111

AVIAN AND TERRESTRIAL WILDLIFE DISEASE SURVEILLANCE AND RESPONSE PROGRAM Wildlife Foundation of Florida July 1, 2013 MARINE TOXINS IN SEAFOOD ITEMS USED TO FEED AQUARIUM ANIMALS Georgia Aquarium August 26, 2013 CORAL REEF ECOSYSTEM STUDIES: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF REEF SYSTEMS U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Geological Survey August 19, 2013 LONG-TERM MONITORING OF SELECT CORAL REEFS AT DRY TORTUGAS U.S. Environmental Protection Agency October 1, 2013 SOUTHEAST FLORIDA CORAL REEF EVALUATION AND MONITORING PROJECT Florida Department of Environmental Protection October 13, 2013

$50,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $50,000 Total

$18,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $18,000 Total $8,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $8,000 Total

$40,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $40,000 Total

$85,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $85,000 Total

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT


MAINTENANCE OF METADATA OF ONGOING RESEARCH AND MONITORING PROJECTS IN THE BIG CYPRESS BASIN South Florida Water Management District December 1, 2006 FLORIDA OCEANS AND COASTAL COUNCIL RESEARCH ASSESSMENT AND REVIEW Florida Department of Environmental Protection January 15, 2008 NATIONAL PARK SERVICE: LIDAR SURVEYS FOR OFFSHORE PORTIONS OF BISCAYNE BAY U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service September 4, 2008 DIGITIZE AREA CONTIGENCY PLAN FOR SAN JUAN AND US VIRGIN ISLANDS U.S. Coast Guard September 16, 2008 $93,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $93,000 Total

$262,567 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $262,567 Total

$15,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $15,000 Total

$65,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $65,000 Total

112

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

GEODATABASE DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE FOR ACROPORA SPAWNING U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration March 23, 2009 SATELLITE EARTH IMAGES FOR THE REGULATORY DEVELOPMENT OF WATER QUALITY STANDARDS National Aeronautics and Space Administration January 8, 2010 GAME - GEOSPATIAL ASSESSMENT OF MARINE ECOSYSTEMS U.S. Environmental Protection Agency April 1, 2010 MONITORING AND MAPPING OF THREATENED CORALS IN THE U.S. JURISDICTION: DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-STATE CONSERVATION PROGRAM U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration June 1, 2010 #SWG - FLORIDA LAND COVER MAP U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service July 1, 2010 #SWG - MAXIMIZING THE VALUE OF FLORIDAS PRIORITY SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION THROUGH DATA COORDINATION & QUALITY ASSURANCE U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service July 1, 2010 #SWG - HISTORICAL AND MODERN PATTERNS OF BIODIVERSITY IN CORAL REEFS WITH EMPHASIS ON SPECIES OF GREATEST CONSERVATION NEED U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service July 1, 2010 FLORIDA KEYS NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY WATER QUALITY PROTECTION PROGRAM U.S. Environmental Protection Agency October 1, 2010 SPRINGS COAST SEAGRASS REMOTE SENSING PILOT PROJECT, PHASE II Southwest Florida Water Management District February 2, 2011

$70,600 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $70,600 Total

$150,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $150,000 Total

$241,911 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $241,911 Total $2,753,418 Grantor $245,292 State/In-Kind $2,998,710 Total

$247,356 Grantor $247,356 State/In-Kind $494,712 Total $151,763 Grantor $151,763 State/In-Kind $303,526 Total

$63,498 Grantor $63,498 State/In-Kind $126,996 Total

$195,000 Grantor $17,037 State/In-Kind $212,037 Total

$25,000 Grantor $25,000 State/In-Kind $50,000 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

113

LIFE HISTORY SUMMARIES AND CREATION OF THE ECOSPECIES DATABASE TO PROVIDE WEB-ENABLED INFORMATION TO SUPPORT SOUTH ATLANTIC FISHERIES MANAGEMENT COUNCIL HABITAT MANAGEMENT AND SOUTHEAST DATA, ASSESSMENT, AND REVIEW South Atlantic Marine Fisheries Commission July 1, 2011 REVISION OF AREA CONTINGENCY PLAN FOR SECTORS KEY WEST, MIAMI AND ST. PETERSBURG U.S. Coast Guard August 17, 2011 REVISION OF AREA CONTINGENCY PLAN FOR SECTOR JACKSONVILLE U.S. Coast Guard September 1, 2011 REVISION OF AREA CONTINGENCY PLAN FOR SECTOR MOBILE U.S. Coast Guard September 30, 2011 WEB APPLICATION AND DEVELOPMENT TO SUPPORT ECOSYSTEM BASED MANAGEMENT IN THE SOUTH ATLANTIC REGION South Atlantic Marine Fisheries Commission U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration January 1, 2012 SCIENTIFIC GIS SUPPORT FOR FLORIDA KEYS NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration June 28, 2012 #SWG - MAXIMIZING THE VALUE OF FLORIDAS PRIORITY SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION THROUGH DATA COORDINATION AND QUALITY ASSURANCE U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service July 1, 2012

$75,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $75,000 Total

$85,510 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $85,510 Total

$45,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $45,000 Total $95,203 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $95,203 Total $38,250 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $38,250 Total

$80,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $80,000 Total

$91,966 Grantor $91,966 State/In-Kind $183,932 Total

COORDINATED CORAL/HARD BOTTOM ECO-MAPPING AND MONITORING Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Coastal Management Program August 21, 2012

$85,810 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $85,810 Total

WEB APPLICATION AND DEVELOPMENT TO SUPPORT ECOSYSTEM BASED MANAGEMENT IN THE SOUTH ATLANTIC REGION South Atlantic Marine Fisheries Commission U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration January 1, 2013

$38,250 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $38,250 Total

114

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20132014

LIFE HISTORY SUMMARIES AND REFINEMENT OF THE ECO-SPECIES DATABASE TO PROVIDE WEB-ENABLED INFORMATION TO SUPPORT SOUTH ATLANTIC FISHERIES MANAGEMENT COUNCIL HABITAT MANAGEMENT AND SOUTHEAST DATA, ASSESSMENT, AND REVIEW South Atlantic Marine Fisheries Commission U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration January 1, 2013 ENHANCEMENT OF A RECREATIONAL FISHERIES COMPONENT OF THE MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERIES GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM - SEGMENT 24 U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service May 1, 2013 MAPPING FLORIDAS EAST COAST CURRENTS AND OUTFLOWS Florida Department of Environmental Protection May 13, 2013 COORDINATED CORAL/HARD BOTTOM ECO-MAPPING, MONITORING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM, YEAR 3 Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Coastal Management Program July 1, 2013 ENHANCEMENT FOR COORDINATED CORAL AND HARDBOTTOM ECOSYSTEM MAPPPING, MONITORING, AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Coastal Management Program October 1, 2013

$38,250 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $38,250 Total

$318,668 Grantor $106,224 State/In-Kind $424,892 Total

$22,000 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $22,000 Total $168,091 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $168,091 Total

$126,357 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $126,357 Total

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR


COORDINATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF FLORIDAS MARINE SPORT FISH RESTORATION GRANTS - SEGMENT 3 U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service March 1, 2013 FLORIDA COYOTES: REFINING A COMPREHENSIVE MODEL OF MANAGEMENT Wildlife Foundation of Florida July 1, 2013 $29,886 Grantor $9,962 State/In-Kind $39,848 Total

$35,447 Grantor $0 State/In-Kind $35,447 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

115

OUR MISSION Through effective research and technical knowledge, we provide timely information and guidance to protect, conserve, and manage Floridas fish and wildlife resources.

FWC FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 100 Eighth Avenue Southeast St. Petersburg, Florida 33701 (727) 896-8626 MyFWC.com/Research Find us on Facebook: Facebook.com/FWCResearch Follow us on Twitter: Twitter.com/MyFWC View our pictures on Flickr: Flickr.com/MyFWC Watch our videos on YouTube: YouTube.com/MyFWCvideos Read our documents on Scribd: Scribd.com/MyFWC