PROGRAMMING SUSTAINABLE LOCAL DEVELOPMENT ANNEX 1 United Nations Bodies and

A HANDBOOK FOR EASTERN EUROPE AND CENTRAL ASIA

other OrganiZations Working on Sustainable Development

UNDP RBEC November 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. The United Nations and Sustainable Local Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2. The European Union and Sustainable Local Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3. International and regional NGOs working on sustainable development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 4. International donor organizations with programmes in the region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

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1. The United Nations and Sustainable Local Development
Since 1972, the United Nations (UN) General Assembly has adopted multiple resolutions on sustainable development (SD), creating a distinct policy framework and specialized bodies responsible for promoting sustainable development worldwide. In 2011, Sustainable Energy for All was added to this body of resolutions (full database can be found here: https://rio20.un.org/resolutions-more). The formulation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in 2001 combined all sectors and even mentions environmental sustainability explicitly as one of its goals. While the MDGs primarily target national governments, international organizations, civil society and the private sector, the importance of and chance to include local governments into the realization process was acknowledged. The following figure illustrates the most important milestones in the development of UN principles and strategies for sustainable development starting in 1972 to the most recent events at the Rio +20 conference in 2012. FiguRe 1: Milestones in tHe deVeloPment of sustAinABle deVeloPment PRinCiPles The General Assemply dedicates its 19th Special Session (UNGASS-19) to design a “Programme for the further Implemenation of Agenda 21”.

World Conservation Strategy asserted conservation cannot be without development.

UNCED launches Agenda 21.

At the Rio+20 Conference a high-level political forum for SD will replace the CSD.

1972

1980

1983

1992

1993

1997

2002

2012

UN Conference on the Human Environment recognized the need to revitalize humanity’s connection with nature.

World Commission on Environment and Development publishes Our Common Future weaving together social, economic, cultural and environmental issues.

The newly established Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD) will follow up on the implementation of Agenda 21.

The WSSD renews the global commitment to SD by adopting the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation (JPOI).

Sustainable development in general, or separate elements contributing to it, has played a significant part in the programming priorities of UN agencies. The non-exhaustive table below illustrates the programming priorities of various UN agencies in relation to sustainable development. The information herein is intended to help UNDP practitioners to delineate the boundaries of the cooperation with other UN agencies at regional and national levels.

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TABle 1: OVeRVieW of UN AgenCies And tHeiR FoCus AReAs RelAted to SustAinABle DeVeloPment

AGENCY
UN Development Programme UNDP www.undp.org http://europeandcis.undp.org

MISSION /MANDATE
The UNDP is one of the major UN agencies concentrating on sustainable development and specifically on the local aspect of sustainable development. UNDP is part of the UN’s global development network, advocating for change and connecting countries to knowledge, experience and resources to help people build a better life. UNDP is on the ground in 177 countries, working with the people on their own solutions to global and national development challenges. UNDP Regional Centre for Eastern Europe and the CIS http://europeandcis.undp.org/

FOCUS
Human development*; Democratic Governance*; Decentralization*; Local governance*; Community empowerment*; Anti-corruption*; Poverty reduction*; Green job creation*; SME development*; Sustainable agriculture*; Promotion of alternative energy*; Energy efficiency*; Crisis prevention and recovery*; Gender equality*; Capacity development*; Human rights*; Electoral support*; Inclusion of marginalized people*. Inclusive green economy*; Climate change, employment and local development; Climate change at local level; Environmental governance; Harmful substances and hazardous waste; Poverty and environment*; Biodiversity*; Sustainable farming*. Immunization*; Nutrition*; Justice for children*; Violence against children*; HIV/AIDS and children*; Water, sanitation and hygiene; Social and economic policy; migration; Evidence based policy making*; Access to education*.

UN Environment Programme UNEP http://unep.org/

UNEP’s mission is to provide leadership and encourage partnership in caring for the environment by inspiring, informing, and enabling nations and peoples to improve their quality of life without compromising that of future generations. UNEP Regional Office for Europe http://www.unep.org/roe/

UN Children’s Fund UNICEF www.unicef.org

UNICEF is mandated by the United Nations General Assembly to advocate for the protection of children’s rights, to help meet their basic needs and to expand their opportunities to reach their full potential. UNICEF is committed to ensuring special protection for the most disadvantaged children — victims of war, disasters, extreme poverty, all forms of violence and exploitation and those with disabilities. UNICEF Office for Central and Eastern Europe and the CIS (CEECIS) http://www.unicef.org/ceecis/

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AGENCY
UN Human Settlements Programme UN HABITAT www.unhabitat. org

MISSION /MANDATE
UN HABITAT is the UN agency for human settlements. It is mandated to promote socially and environmentally sustainable towns and cities with the goal of providing adequate shelter for all. UNHABITAT for Europe and the former Soviet Union States http://www.unhabitat.org/categories. asp?catid=173 UNFPA promotes the right of every woman, man and child to enjoy a healthy life and equal opportunities. UNFPA supports countries in using population data for policies and programmes to reduce poverty and to ensure that every pregnancy is wanted, every birth is safe, every young person is free of HIV/AIDS, and every girl and woman is treated with dignity and respect. UNFPA Regional Office for Eastern Europe and Central Asia http://eeca.unfpa.org/public/

FOCUS
Sustainable Cities; Local Agenda 21; Decentralization; Urban economy ; City development strategies*; Settlement and integration of refugees*.

UN Population Fund UNFPA www.unfpa.org

Gender equality; HIV/AIDS*; Cultural sensitivity; Human trafficking*; Gender-based violence*; Reproductive health*.

UN Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women UN WOMEN www.unwomen. org

UN WOMEN works for the elimination of discrimination against women and girls; the empowerment of women; and the achievement of equality between women and men as partners and beneficiaries of development, human rights, humanitarian action and peace and security. UN Women for Europe and the CIS http://www.unifem.org/worldwide/ europe_cis/ The United Nations Volunteers (UNV) programme supports sustainable human development globally through the promotion of volunteerism and the mobilization of volunteers. It serves causes of peace and development by enhancing opportunities for participation by all peoples. The UNV headquarters office is in Bonn, Germany.

Economic empowerment; Women’s land rights; Women’s participation in governance structures and decision-making processes*; Gender equality; Violence against women*; HIV/AIDS*; Women’s peace networks*.

UN Volunteers www.unv.org

Agriculture; Children; Civil society*; Environment*. Food; Gender*; Health/ HIV/AIDS*; Human rights*; Peace and conflict resolution*; Poverty*; Private sector*; Refugees and displaced people*; Youth*; Electoral support*.

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AGENCY
UN Economic Commission for Europe UNECE www.unece.org

MISSION /MANDATE
As a multilateral platform, UNECE facilitates greater economic integration and cooperation among its member countries and promotes sustainable development and economic prosperity through policy dialogue, negotiation of international legal instruments, development of regulations and norms, exchange and application of best practices as well as economic and technical expertise and technical cooperation for countries with economies in transition. The UNECE headquarters office is in Geneva, Switzerland.

FOCUS
Affordable and sustainable energy supply*; Link between environment, transport and health*; Cooperation with cities and local authorities on urban environmental performance and local transport policies*; Promotion of renewable energy technologies, energy efficiency, sustainable forest management;* Green economy*; Water management*; Public private partnerships*. Education for sustainable development and education for all*; Environmental protection*,cultural heritage and sustainable development; Research on and collaboration with indigenous people on climate change; Post conflict education*; Freedom of press and expression*. Public finance for local development (focus on women’s priorities, climate change planning, etc.); Financial services for the poor (micro loans, access to energy via financing schemes, bank services etc.). Private sector development; Persistant organic pollutants*; Cleaner production*; Industrial energy efficiency and renewable sources of energy*; Development of agro-businesses*; Trade capacity building*; Financial institutions and partnerships.

UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization UNESCO www.unesco.org

UNESCO’s mission is to contribute to the building of peace, the eradication of poverty, sustainable development and intercultural dialogue through education, the sciences, culture, communication and information. UNESCO runs cluster offices in Almaty (http://www.unesco.kz/new/), Tashkent (http://www.tashkent.unesco.org/en/, and Moscow (http://www.unesco.org/new/en/ moscow/). UNCDF assists developing countries in the development of their economies by supplementing existing sources of capital assistance by means of grants and loans. No regional office.

UN Capital Development Fund UNCDF www.uncdf.org

UN Industrial Development Organization UNIDO www.unido.org

UNIDO aspires to reduce poverty through sustainable industrial development. UNIDO wants every country to have the opportunity to grow a flourishing productive sector, to increase their participation in international trade and to safeguard their environment. UNIDO programme for Europe and Newly Independent States http://www.unido.org/index.php?id=74

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AGENCY
International Labour Organization ILO www.ilo.org

MISSION /MANDATE
ILO is devoted to promoting social justice and internationally recognized human and labour rights. ILO advances the creation of decent work and the economic and working conditions that give working people and business people a stake in lasting peace, prosperity and progress. ILO Regional Office for Europe and Central Asia http://www.ilo.org/public/english/region/ eurpro/geneva/index.htm

FOCUS
Conducive environments for sustainable enterprises*; Employment promotion*; Social security*; Green job promotion*.

World Health Organization WHO www.who.int

WHO is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system. It is responsible for providing leadership on global health matters, shaping the health research agenda, setting norms and standards, articulating evidence-based policy options, providing technical support to countries and monitoring and assessing health trends. WHO Regional Office for Europe http://www.euro.who.int/en/home

Immunization; Food safety; Water, sanitation and health; Development of health systems*; Advocating public health*; Provision of health data.

Food and Agriculture Organization www.fao.org

FAO’s mandate is to raise levels of nutrition, improve agricultural productivity, better the lives of rural populations and contribute to the growth of the world economy. FAO Regional Office for Europe and Central Asia http://www.fao.org/europe/en/

Agribusiness and enterprise development;* Agricultural economy, policy, research and biotechnology;* Animal health and production*; Plant production and protection*; Fishery*; Forestry*; Gender*; Information and knowledge management*; Investment*; Land tenure and rural development*; Prevention and disposal of obsolete pesticides*; Statistics*.

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AGENCY
International Fund for Agricultural Development www.ifad.org

MISSION /MANDATE
IFAC is dedicated to eradicate rural poverty in developing countries and is working with poor rural people, governments, donors, NGOs and other partners. IFAD focuses on country-specific solutions, which can involve increasing poor rural peoples’ access to financial services, markets, technology, land and other natural resources. No regional office.

FOCUS
Identification of investment opportunities*;* Agricultural services*; Livestock production*; Infrastructure*; Market development*; Pasture development*.

*These focus areas are part of programmes being implemented in Europe/CIS. Should UNDP undertake UN joint programming with other UN agencies, then the following management structures are recommended. A joint programme steering committee should be established to ensure full national ownership, and smooth and successful implementation of the joint programme. The steering committee, co-chaired by the UN resident coordinator and the national partner(s) should consist of senior representatives of all signatories of the joint programme. The frequency of the steering committee meetings should be established by the members at the first meeting and uphold to monitor the programme implementation on a regular basis and make strategic decisions. A joint programme coordination team could be established with the involvement of the designated programme officers of the participating agencies with a responsibility to coordinate the planning and implementation for the joint programme, ensuring the quality of implementation and reporting to the steering committee. The team should meet at least once a month to review the progress, work-plans and ensure coordinated implementation. A programme management unit should be set up for successful implementation of the programme outputs and activities towards achievement of the joint programme outcomes. It shall consist of the project staff of each participating agency. The team should be coordinated by a staff member representing the administrative agent and be responsible for regular coordination, coherence and communication. The team should set regular meetings, preferably at weekly intervals, to ensure continuous information sharing and coordination. The table below elaborates on some management issues that commonly arise in UN joint programming.

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TABle 2: MAnAgement Issues RelAted to UN Joint PRogRAmming And Hints foR tHeiR Resolution

Common Issues
Lengthy negotiations over the programme document

Hints for resolution
• Plan from the beginning for an extended period of time (sometimes over a year) for developing the fully agreed programme document; • Staff of the participating agencies meet with the aim of consolidating the programme document, including developing the common chapters of situation analysis, strategy, partnership, etc. jointly; • Alternatively, the agencies decide to delegate programme document development to an external consultant who, among, other things, will also enjoy the benefits of objectivity and impartiality. (Still, the consultant cannot substitute the efforts that each UN agency will still need to devote to guiding and coaching the consultant before the advance draft of the programme can be completed).

Allocating/dividing resources among and within various outputs

• Consider donor priorities in distributing resources among outputs; • Consider relative weight and importance of each output; • Involve the highest authorities of the agencies in resource distribution discussions; • Engage a UN resident coordinator in the decision-making process; • Reach an advanced agreement on tolerated thresholds for management costs within output, including possibly on the extent of the staffing, grades/levels of the staff, major procurements, such as vehicles, etc.

Different rules and procedures

• Allocate time for inter-agency discussions on topics of marginal significance, resulting from different rules, i.e. on thresholds for procurement announcements, contracting a common premises, etc.; • Establish a simple memorandum of understanding among the involved agencies, outlining the rules for sharing services, i.e. on the use of the common premise.

Visibility sharing

• Define and agree on visibility protocol at the beginning of the programme, including the use of visibility actions, the use of individual logos versus the common programme logo, standard texts of the press-releases, project banners, etc. • Design a scheme of coordination and cooperation for all stages of the implementation that goes much beyond the common workplan; • Ensure daily coordination between country offices’ and project implementation units (PIU) teams; • Place the PIUs in the common premise.

Coordination

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2. The European Union and Sustainable Local Development
The European Union (EU) acknowledged sustainable development as a fundamental objective of its policies already in 1997 when it was included in the Treaty of Amsterdam. In 2001, the EU launched the first EU Sustainable Development Strategy with the aim “to identify and develop actions to enable the EU to achieve continuous improvement of quality of life (…) through the creation of sustainable communities able to manage and use resources efficiently, and to tap the ecological and social innovation potential of the economy, ensuring prosperity, environmental protection and social cohesion.”1 The central instrument for this purpose was the obligation for the European Commission (EC) to submit each new major policy proposal to an impact assessment. Due to challenging developments, ranging from climate change to the ageing of societies, a widening gap between the rich and the poor and the enlargement of the EU, the EU adopted a renewed sustainable development strategy in 2006. This strategy calls for an integrated approach to policy making and using education, research and public finance to influence a gradual change in current unsustainable consumption and production patterns. Furthermore, it sets overall objectives and concrete actions for seven key priority challenges, which are: • climate change and clean energy; • sustainable transport; • sustainable consumption and production; • conservation and management of natural resources; • public health; • social inclusion, demography and migration; • global poverty and sustainable development challenges. The 2006 strategy highlights the role of governance, businesses and social partners, and citizen involvement. Policy coherence means that policies at the EU level should be coherent with local, regional, national and global actions. One step in this direction has been the development of national sustainable development strategies. The involvement of businesses is to promote social dialogue and corporate social responsibility, particularly in the areas of sustainable consumption and production. Citizens are to be involved in decisionmaking. They are also to be better informed so they can make more sustainable choices. In 2010, the EU formulated Europe 20202 setting specific targets at the EU level for the reduction of greenhouse gases (20% lower than 1990), a 20% increase of energy efficiency, and a 20% share of energy from renewables. There are also targets related to employment, R&D/innovation, education and reducing poverty and social exclusion. Europe 2020 is a growth strategy with seven flagship initiatives along three major themes: smart growth, sustainable growth and inclusive growth. Smart growth covers the digital agenda for Europe, innovation (refocusing R&D and innovation policy on major challenges like climate change, energy, health, demographic change etc.), and youth on the move. Sustainable growth covers resource efficient Europe and an industrialized policy for the globalization era. Inclusive growth covers an agenda for new skills and jobs and a European platform against poverty and social exclusion. A special handbook on Europe 2020 for local and regional authorities acknowledges their important role and gives a comprehensive overview on networking and funding options as well as best practices.3 Several EU initiatives and sources of funding are available to local and regional authorities, as well as the local private sector and CSOs. Some of these initiatives (Covenant of Mayors, LEADER, LIFE+) also work in acces-

1 Council of the European Union (2006), “Renewed EU Sustainable Development Strategy”. Available from: http://www.sd-network.eu/pdf/quarterly%20reports/EU_SDS_final_version_2006_June26_en.PDF 2 The European Union, “Europe 2020”. http://ec.europa.eu/europe2020/index_en.htm 3 The European Union (2012). Handbook for Local and Regional Authorities: Delivering on the Europe 2020 Strategy. Available online at http:// portal.cor.europa.eu/europe2020/news/Pages/Europe2020HandbookLRAs.aspx

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sion countries and neighbouring countries. • The Covenant of Mayors unites local and regional authorities in their commitment to increase energy efficiency and use renewable energy sources (www.eumayors.eu). • Focusing on new EU member states and accession countries, the LEADER approach is designed to assist rural actors to consider the long-term potential of their rural region and to encourage them to implement integrated, high-quality and original strategies for sustainable development. • The LIFE+ programme contributes finance and know-how for environmentally relevant science and technology research and international environmental and nature conservation projects. LIFE+ is mostly active in the EU, but also in some candidate, acceding and neighbouring countries. • For capacity building purposes, the INTERREG IVC provides funding for interregional cooperation to improve the effectiveness of regional policies and instruments and to exchange experiences among partners responsible for the development of their local and regional policies. • The ELENA fund supports the preparation of energy efficiency and renewable energy projects by funding market studies, business plans, energy audits.). • The EU Eco Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS) is a tool for companies and other organizations to evaluate, report and improve their environmental performance. Local authorities could provide subsidies and exemptions from legislative obligations for certified small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). • The Joint European Support for Sustainable Investment in City Areas (JESSICA) provides financial engineering mechanisms to sustainable urban development and regeneration projects. • The Social Business Initiative aims to improve the situation of social businesses by improving their access to funding (fostering the development of microcredit models, creating a European financial instrument, etc.), their visibility (e.g. through the creation of a public database of labels and certifications, creation of a single, multilingual information and exchange platform, etc.) and the legal environment (introduction of a European foundation statute, simplification of implementation rules etc.). In terms of its international assistance, the EU is setting out a more strategic approach to further reduce poverty and promote sustainable development by channeling resources to fewer sectors, but including democracy, human rights, good governance and creating inclusive and sustainable growth. At the time of writing the EC is in the process of preparing a communication on local authorities in development, which is to be approved by all major organs of the EU and will be relevant for further EC policy direction in support to local authorities. The paper emphasizes the importance of local authorities, outlines why they hold a special institutional responsibility in development and how and why they can act as catalysts in change while building trust among stakeholders and supporting national development and poverty reduction programmes. PARTNERSHIP OF THE EU AND THE UN4 The partnership on development and humanitarian cooperation between the EU and the UN is mainly based on the MDGs, representing the core values of both organizations. Additionally, the EU is at the forefront of the implementation of the Kyoto Protocol and strongly supports the UN Hyogo Declaration, which recognizes disaster risk management as an important element of sustainable development.

4 United Nations (2006). The partnership between the UN and the EU. The UN and the EC are working together in development and humanitarian cooperation. Available online at: http://www.unric.org/html/english/pdf/UN-EC%20Report.pdf

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In the past, the UN (not the UNDP exclusively) and the EU have already collaborated in diverse areas, including: • support to the development of democratic institutions and strengthening of democratic processes (Georgia, 2005; Kyrgyzstan, 2005); • electoral support; • decentralization and participation (the Balkans, Volunteer Exchange Programme); • protection of children’s rights (Turkey); • promotion of participation of sub-regions in international trade; • water and sanitation facilities (Tajikistan); • access to education; • disease prevention, especially maternal health and vaccinations; • development of joint tools for assessment, analysis and planning in post- crisis situations; • development of joint needs assessments and coordinated programmes of assistance for postconflict countries. For the EU, collaborating with the UN means to benefit from the UN’s mandate and the legitimacy it provides for critical issues in crisis situations, but also the UN’s consistent presence and network on the ground. The latter, particularly, defines the UN’s unique position within the development corporations and therefore should be mentioned in discussions for project planning.

3. International and regional NGOs working on sustainable development
The role of NGOs in the process of sustainable (local) development is highly diverse, ranging from offering capacity building activities to financial support, from community mobilization to claiming accountability and, finally, representing and supporting those who cannot represent themselves. Additionally, it should be mentioned that the development of NGOs themselves is already one of the signs that sustainable development is taking place.5 • The International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives (ICLEI) is an independent association of over 1,220 local government members, as well as national and regional local government organizations, from 70 different countries who made a commitment to sustainable development. ICLEI provides technical consulting, training and information services to build capacity, share knowledge and support local governments in implementing sustainable development at the local level. ICLEI runs several campaigns and programmes addressing local sustainability issues linking local action to internationally agreed goals and targets, assists local governments in generating political awareness and establishes plans of action. ICLEI also provides information, publishes reports, and facilitates networking and city-to-city exchanges. • Green Budget Europe (GBE) is a platform currently operating as a project within Green Budget Germany that aims to promote environmental fiscal reform. This encompasses green public procurement, green subsidies, feed-in-tariffs and all other aspects of green budgetary policy. The initiative is in regular contact with EU institutions and meets representatives of each upcoming EU presidency to present their ideas. GBE produces expert responses to EU consultations, detailed policy papers, media articles and publications.

5 Nikkhah, H.A. and Redzuan, M.B. (2010). “The Role of NGOs in Promoting Empowerment for Sustainable Community Develop-

ment”. Journal of Human Ecology, 30(2):85-92 Available online at: http://www.krepublishers.com/02-Journals/JHE/JHE-30-0-000-10-Web/JHE-30-2-000-2010-Abst-PDF/JHE30-2-085-10-2023-Nikkhah-H-A/JHE-30-2-085-10-2023-Nikkhah-H-A-Tt.pdf

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• The International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) is an international public policy research institute and provides a variety of informational resources on environment and sustainable development topics. Through policy research, information exchange, analysis and advocacy, the institute promotes sustainable development among governments, business and civil society on all levels. • The Regional Environmental Center for Central and Eastern Europe (REC) is an international organization assisting in addressing environmental issues. The REC fulfils this mission by promoting cooperation among governments, non-governmental organizations, businesses and other environmental stakeholders, and by supporting the free exchange of information and public participation in environmental decision-making. The REC has an office network in 17 countries: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia and Turkey. • The Northern Alliance for Sustainability (ANPED) is a non-governmental organization (NGO) representing a vast network of NGOs and is the organizing partner responsible for providing NGO Major Group input into the UN SD. Besides a newsletter on initiatives that are making a difference in sustainable consumption and production, ANPED participates in several European projects, efor example, bringing together a consortium of international actors to promote collaboration and mutual learning among stakeholders on sustainability sciences and ecological distribution (e.g. Environmental Justice Organizations, Liabilities and Trade (EJOLT)). ANPED is also involved in the capacity building of NGOs and provides a link between grassroots activities at regional and international level by channeling grassroots concerns at international meetings and then providing feedback on the outcomes. The organization is involved in the UN Commission on Sustainable Development (UNCSD), UNEP, the European Union, the OECD and others. • The European ECO Forum is a coalition of environmental citizens’ organizations (ECOs) and other NGOs acting in the UNECE region and focusing on the Environment for Europe ministerial process, and takes an active part in the “environment and health” process. The ECO Forum develops its contributions on the basis of broad and inclusive consultation process among all interested environmental citizen groups in the UNECE region. • The mission of the Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC) is to help communities around the world address environmental, economic and social challenges, and brings together best practices from the public and private sectors. The organization’s main areas of work are climate and environment, community building, civil society, education for sustainability as well as advocacy and leadership. In its work, ISC focuses on providing training, advice and technical assistance so the communities are enabled to find creative solutions and lasting change.

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4. International Donor Organizations with Programmes in the Region
Asian Development Bank (ADB) Poverty reduction, infrastructure, including transport and communications, energy, water supply and sanitation and urban development, environment, finance sector development, education. http://www.adb.org/ Austrian Development Agency (ADA) Poverty reduction, peace building, environment, gender, water management, rural development, (sustainable) energy, business development, education, good governance, health (not a priority). www.entwicklung.at Canadian International Development Organization (CIDA) Economic growth, good governance, food security. www.acdi-cida.gc.ca Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA) Democracy, (sustainable) energy, environment, water management, health, gender. www.um.dk/en/danida-en/ UK Department for International Development (DFID) Good governance, economic growth, business development, rural growth. www.dfid.gov.uk European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) Good governance, agriculture, climate change, information and communications technology, natural resources, legal reforms, financial institutions, infrastructure. www.ebrd.com European Community Humanitarian Office (ECHO) Provides humanitarian aid in emergency and immediate post-emergency situations (priority: food security). http://ec.europa.eu/echo/about/index_en.htm EuropeAid Poverty reduction, MDGs, education, (sustainable) energy, environment, migration, drugs, health, independent media. http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/index_en.htm Finnish Department for International Development Cooperation (FINIDA) Peace building, environment, climate change, business development. http://www.formin.finland.fi/Public/default.aspx?
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Global Environmental Facility (GEF) Biodiversity, climate change, chemicals, land degradation, sustainable forest management, capacity building, small grants. www.thegef.org German International Cooperation Agency (GIZ) Economic growth, water management, agriculture, rural development, environment, climate change, good governance, education, (sustainable) energy, health, democratization. www.giz.de International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Sustainable development of rural mountain areas, poverty reduction, agriculture, rural development, business. development www.ifad.org Irish Aid Poverty reduction, human rights, good governance, civil society, vulnerable groups, MDGs. http://www.dci.gov.ie/ Italian Development Cooperation (Cooperazione Italiana allo Sviluppo) Democratization, economic growth, privatization, labour market, education www.cooperazioneallosviluppo.esteri.it Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) Health, business development, waste management, capacity development. www.jica.go.jp KfW Entwicklungsbank (KfW) Peace building, (sustainable) energy, education, health, rural development, waste management, water management, good governance, decentralization. www.kfw-entwicklungsbank.de Luxembourg Agency for Development (LUX DEV) Water management, health, education. www.lux-development.lu Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD) Climate change, environment, (sustainable) energy, health, education, macroeconomics and public administration. www.norad.no
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OPEC Fund for International Development (OFID) Transportation, agriculture, health, education, water management. www.ofid.org Polish Aid Education, food, rural development, business development. http://www.polishaid.gov.pl/ Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) Security, environment, infrastructure, business development, social development. www.sdc.admin.ch Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) Food, water management, (sustainable) energy, sustainable urban development, climate change. www.sida.se Slovak Aid Business development, (sustainable) energy, capacity development. http://eng.slovakaid.sk/ US Agency for International Development (USAID) Democracy, good governance, empowerment of local governments, strengthening of the financial sector, poverty reduction, health, economic growth, peace building, business development. www.usaid.gov

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The World Bank – through the International Development Association (IDA) Albania: Armenia: Azerbaijan: Belarus: Bosnia: Bulgaria: Croatia: Georgia: Kazakhstan: Kosovo: Kyrgyzstan: Republic of Macedonia: Moldova: Public administration, agriculture, transportation, water, education, energy. Transportation, public administration, health, energy and mining, agriculture, finance, education. Transportation, water, public administration. Energy and mining, transportation, water, etc. Water, finance, public administration, energy and mining, health. Transportation, public administration, water, health. Transportation, water, public administration, industry and trade. Transportation, water, public administration. Transportation, energy and mining, public administration. Public administration, energy, finance. Energy and mining, agriculture, public administration, transportation, health. the former Yugoslav Public administration, transportation, health, energy and mining. Health, public administration, energy, finance.

Montenegro: Public administration, energy, education, water. Serbia: Transportation, energy, agriculture. Romania: Tajikistan: Health, public administration, water, agriculture. Energy, public administration, agriculture, education.

Turkmenistan: Public administration. Ukraine: Uzbekistan: Energy, transportation, finance, public administration. Agriculture, water, energy, health.

www.worldbank.org

ANNEX 1 - UnITeD NaTIOnS BODIeS anD OTHeR ORGanIZaTIOnS WORKInG On SuSTaInabLe DeVeLOPMenT

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TABle 3: SummARY of DonoR ORgAnizAtions suPPoRting SustAinABle LoCAl DeVeloPment

fYr Macedonia
             

Bosnia & Herzegovina

Kazakhstan

Kyrgyzstan

Azerbaijan

Lithuania

ADB ADA CIDA DANIDA DFID EBRD ECHO Europe Aid FINIDA GEF GIZ IFAD Irish Aid Coop. Italiana JICA KfW LUX DEV NORAD OFID Polish Aid SDC SIDA Slovak Aid USAID World Bank                

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

   

      

      

 

               

                                                   

 

 

      

  

Note: A check mark indicates that the donor organization supports programmes in the corresponding country.

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ANNEX 1 - UnITeD NaTIOnS BODIeS anD OTHeR ORGanIZaTIOnS WORKInG On SuSTaInabLe DeVeLOPMenT

Moldova
                

Bulgaria

Armenia

Belarus

Georgia

Albania

Kosovo

Croatia

Cyprus

Slovak Republic

Turkmenistan

Montenegro

  

                                                                                 

Uzbekistan

Tajikistan

Romania

Ukraine

Serbia

ANNEX 1 - UnITeD NaTIOnS BODIeS anD OTHeR ORGanIZaTIOnS WORKInG On SuSTaInabLe DeVeLOPMenT

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UNDP Bratislava Regional Centre Grosslingova 35, Bratislava 81109 Slovakia Tel: +421 2 59337 111 Fax: +421 2 59337 450 http://europeandcis.undp.org

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