INNOVATOR

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MatheMatics and science for all

IN thIS ISSUE
Dean’s note 1

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On the cover: Elementary Master of Arts with Certification student Beth Person assists as Southfield sixth graders Christian Conner and Pharoh Johnson study the Allosaurus at the University of Michigan Exhibit Museum.

mathematics anD science for all? BuilDing novice teachers’ confiDence anD competence - Betsy Davis particular Decisions...in interactions with stuDents - pat herbst

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BoB moses’ algeBra project: mathematics anD civil rights

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a gooD iDea: everYone at the taBle You’ve got to Dig Deeper hyman Bass closing the gap Between school anD authentic scientific inquirY nancy songer

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alumni making a Difference richarD pappas (am’74, edD’84) alumni making a Difference karen shook (aB ’69, certt eDuc ’69)

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snapshots alumni in action tim Boerst (am ’99, phD ’03) awarDs

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Dean’s note
Deborah Loewenberg baLL
The United States is lagging in international comparisons. The numbers of students prepared to enter scientific and mathematical fields have been dropping; the basic overall scientific and mathematical literacy of the American population is low. Within the U.S. school-age population, dramatic gaps in educational opportunity and achievement exist between minority students and those living in poverty when compared with their white and middle-class counterparts. The United States has not built a strong system of pre-college education in what is frequently referred to as STEM—Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Significant federal and private dollars have been spent on initiatives in mathematics and science education, too often with disappointing results. Meanwhile, sustained efforts to improve STEM education have faltered. The reasons for this are many, but among them are simplistic ideas about instruction and its improvement, especially for underrepresented groups, naïvete about the particular requirements of instructional interventions, weak designs, and poor evaluations. Yet the need for improvement in mathematics and science education remains urgent. A trademark of the work done at the University of Michigan is our disciplined and interdisciplinary approach to pressing problems. Our School of Education, ranked consistently among the top ten education schools, is known for its strong emphasis on rigorous research on instructional treatments and practice, its tradition of interdisciplinary work and collaboration with the academic disciplines, and its investment in developing ground-breaking ways of training teachers. The School’s faculty is rare for its simultaneous expertise in practice and the first-rate rigor and quality of its social science research. The faculty members involved in STEM education are in enormous demand as they represent some of the nation’s leaders in these fields. U-M already has a strong track record of innovative research, development, and outreach in STEM fields. However, collectively as a university, we intend to extend our capacity for research on improving instruction at the secondary and college levels and to reduce the enormous inequities. We plan to strengthen engagement in schools and more effectively evaluate our outreach efforts. We intend to build our international efforts, including comparative study and global outreach and engagement in STEM education. This issue of Innovator, themed “Mathematics and Science for All,” conveys our deep commitment and current actions related to this challenging goal. As my colleague and friend, Bob Moses, the civil rights activist and founder of the Algebra Project, argues, “In today’s world, economic access and full citizenship depend crucially on math and science literacy.” The University of Michigan and its School of Education stand with Bob Moses in working toward this ambitious vision for education.

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Mathematics and science

Elementary Master of Arts with Certification students Chelsea Cubba and Colleen Thompson work with Karina Ramos, a Southfield sixth grader, to complete a scavenger hunt at the U-M Exhibit Museum.

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for All?

How would it affect American politics if every voter could correctly assess the accuracy of a poll, or knew the difference between a million and a billion? How would the economy look today if all homeowners understood how their mortgages work, or if America’s appetite for employees proficient in mathematics and science could be satisfied domestically? What would be the impact on economic and social justice if every child had equal access to effective educational opportunities? “‘Mathematics and science for all’ is a terrific slogan,” says Ed Silver, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, the William A. Brownell Collegiate Professor of Education, and professor of mathematics. “Who is in favor of mathematics and science for some?” For decades, unfortunately, some American youth have received less rigorous, less useful mathematics and science education than others. Changing the paradigm from some to all is exactly the challenge that the School of Education and the University of Michigan are taking up. The numbers could not speak louder. Consider these two: the 2006 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) test of 15-year-olds’ scientific literacy worldwide ranked the U.S. 29th of the 57 countries/ economies surveyed, and almost 90% of fourth grade African-Americans are not proficient in math, according to a recent report from the Education Trust.

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MatheMatiCS anD SCienCe aFFeCt our FutureS
“Those statistics are a crime,” says Nancy Songer, professor of science education and learning technologies. “There’s something seriously wrong with our educational system that we’re allowing this to happen.” Because, let’s face it, math and science aren’t add-ons or grace notes; they’re ubiquitous and pervasive, from Mom’s diagnosis to climate change to the stock market. Much of modern life is incomprehensible to anyone who lacks not only the factual knowledge these subjects provide but also the critical thinking skills needed to make sense of it. Sadly, that means far too many of us. “We as Americans are fairly ignorant about how profoundly science affects so many dimensions of our life and our well being and the future of our planet and the quality of our life,” Songer adds. “It’s not really a question of ‘science for all.’ Science is already everywhere.” “Everything is dumbed down to make it accessible, and that prevents us from getting into some of the nuances of complicated issues like health care,” says Ed Silver. “For the most part, such issues are only being dealt with by people in think tanks. They’re not being portrayed in the public discourse in a way that people can grapple with them because we’re not sure, I think, that the public can grapple with them. This kind of critical literacy and numeracy is what schools should be helping people acquire.”

Math SuperStar CallS For “DeepeSt revolution”
Hyman Bass is the Roger C. Lyndon Collegiate Professor of Mathematics in the College of Literature, Science and the Arts as well as Professor of Education in the School of Education. In 2007, he received the National Medal of Science, the nation’s highest honor for scientific achievement. If there’s such a thing as a math superstar, he is one. And he’s worried. All the initiatives, mandates and movements notwithstanding, “In terms of the requirements of the workplace, of the economy, of responsible citizenship in a modern democracy, by any of the rationales for this sort of education you can think of, the performance of the U.S. system is just dismal,” he says. This didn’t happen overnight, but perceiving it so bleakly almost did. When you mandate universal proficiency from a system designed to educate elites, what had looked like a shining success suddenly becomes a colossal failure.

lotS oF “FixeS,” But Failure to proDuCe
“We are not producing, in general, a scientifically literate population,” says Joe Krajcik, Associate Dean for Research and professor of education. “In order to make important decisions these days, you have to know more about science. Producing a population that is more scientifically and mathematically literate, if only so they can make sense of the claims made in a newspaper, is essential. We’re really losing that battle when it comes to a large population of our children in this country.” And then there’s the global marketplace. Educating students to perform jobs and solve problems that don’t even exist yet places an even higher premium on developing the kind of critical thinking that standards, and standardized tests, largely ignore, although the PISA test is an exception.

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Bass calls that shift in priorities “probably the deepest revolution in American education. People don’t appreciate the magnitude of that challenge.”

FroM Sputnik to a nation at riSk: Wake up CallS
Some historical context might help. The Soviet Union’s successful launch of Sputnik I in 1957 was a wake-up call, but the response was a push to produce more scientists rather than fundamentally change the game. “The aims were to build up a cadre of highly skilled scientific and technological professionals,” says Bass. “They didn’t need everybody

in the world to be this way but needed a certain population of people with those professional capacities. The incentive system they put into the educational process succeeded in producing the numbers and quality of people they needed. And for some people, it worked well. For lots of other people, it worked badly, turned them off and demoralized them. Math and science for all was definitely not the principle at the time.” The initially ballyhooed and quickly derided New Math, which emphasized learning abstract mathematical structure ahead of what had long been deemed the “basics,” came along shortly thereafter. The New Math’s devotees, says Bass, “made the mistake that every failed reform makes – and the word ‘failed’ is almost redundant – which is to assume you can write new curriculum and hand it to teachers and expect them to do it, that the teachers don’t need to be prepared.”

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building novice teachers’ Confidence and Competence - betsy Davis
Betsy Davis, associate professor of science education, sees her job as helping new elementary science teachers to hit the ground running and to avoid stumbling once they do. While their colleagues at the secondary level are sometimes confident in their expertise, one of the hurdles in early science education is that so many elementary teachers are, bluntly put, afraid of science. In her teaching, Davis seeks to build confidence as well as competence, and through the Curriculum Access System for Elementary Science (CASES), to support new teachers in their first years of practice. Two realities lend urgency to the task: almost half of all new teachers leave the profession within five years. In addition, the emphasis of No Child Left Behind on math and language arts discourages many school systems from putting many resources into early science. The CASES web site (http://cases.soe.umich.edu), loaded with links to resources and discussion groups, keeps that ball rolling into their careers. “For some folks, it’s really important because they aren’t provided with inquiry-oriented or reformoriented materials,” she says. “Some districts don’t provide curriculum materials at all. We also try to make curriculum materials educative for teachers, helping them learn while they practice.” “In the methods course, we focus on three big goals,” says Davis, a former engineer who shifted her focus to education. “One is an ability to engage in inquiry-oriented science instruction. Another is helping the pre-service teachers learn to anticipate and attend to children’s ideas in science, how to listen and pay attention to kids. The third is helping the teachers learn to be critical users of curriculum materials.”

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That same ghost haunted A Nation at Risk, the 1983 report by the National Commission on Excellence in Education that linked declining academic achievement with eroding economic competitiveness. All it really said about teachers was that they should demonstrate competence in an academic discipline and be paid competitively, worthy goals that missed the point, but at least “math and science for all” had a foot in the door. “This time it was not security, it was the economy,” Bass says. “The demands of the workplace for technical and quantitative skills, even for general reasonably well-paying jobs, were gradually escalating. Now the rules of the game were different than post-Sputnik. It was more analogous to what happened at the time of the Industrial Revolution with the literacy movement. Math and science for all becomes a mandate for the educational system just as basic literacy was early in the last century.”

error: leaving teaCherS out oF the equation
Six years later, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics published standards for K-12 mathematics. Absent a national educational policy (other than the de facto one that is, as Bass says, “driven by market forces from textbook publishing and commercial testing”), they were an attempt to give some direction to improvements on a national basis without the political baggage of “government control.” And they were so successful that other disciplines – English, history, dance, science – followed suit. The standards movement was born, but not without controversy. Standards in turn called for standardsbased curricula, and these were not universally well received. “A lot of parents saw these new materials and said ‘This doesn’t look like what I was taught in school and I don’t understand it and I can’t help you with your homework,’” says Bass. “Several mathematicians said, very publicly, ‘You see, these reform materials are a disaster.’

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Particular Decisions... in Interactions with students - Pat herbst
Another National Science Foundation-funded research and development project, Thought Experiments in Mathematics Teaching (ThEMaT), collects and analyzes the responses of groups of high school geometry teachers to animated representations of classroom activities. “What teachers say in those discussions – where they might have handled a situation differently, how they value particular behaviors – can inform reformers about the rationality behind teachers’ actions,” says Pat Herbst, associate professor of mathematics education, and the principal investigator who directs the program jointly with Dan Chazan at the University of Maryland. Herbst and his colleagues are now working to put the animations online. “We hope to create virtual study groups that are more heterogeneous, including international groups,” he says. “That may give us a chance to see a more diverse response to the decisions the animated teacher makes.” “The grain size of the things that interest me have to do with particular decisions that are made in interactions with students about content in high school geometry,” says Herbst. “What we want to do with ThEMaT is find out answers from the teachers themselves. This information could help create structures or supports for changes in practice that don’t ignore the problems that are being handled by practitioners as they teach.”

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In fact, they had only just appeared, had a minuscule part of the market, and even where they were adopted, teachers were still teaching in traditional ways because they didn’t know anything else. The unfortunate reaction was to declare the education establishment as incompetent and unreliable and try to take over the whole show with the premise that the basic issue is the integrity of the curricular treatment of the subject matter. If only it were that easy.” The reason it’s hard is that, at the end of the day, the basic issue is teachers, who are almost always left out of the equation. In Bass’s view, No Child Left Behind presents a vivid example. “It’s well intentioned, but the lever is to use punitive sanctions,” he says. “If you want to insist on somebody doing something they don’t know how to do, it’s like torturing someone to get information they don’t have. You’ll get the effects of the torture but not the answers to your questions. The answer to the problem is building capacity in the system.” That’s difficult, time-consuming and not often glamorous. But it’s also the only way forward.

BuilDing teaCher CapaCity neCeSSary to DeMoCraCy
“Teachers are what make education happen,” says Bass. “People are appreciating more and more now that they are the key factor. What does it take to produce standards, what does it take to produce curriculum and what does it take to produce skilled teachers? One takes a roomful of people for a year, one takes several rooms full of people over maybe a few years, and the third means transforming 3.7 million human beings to perform professionally in a way that they’ve never been trained to do before.” The School of Education has taken on that work. It is addressing teacher capacity in every sense of the word – teachers’ quantity, their quality and their tool kits – at the elementary, secondary, and university levels. It is nurturing collaborations within the school and across the university as well as with public schools and their communities, sharing its resources to produce pertinent research and reliable assessments, enlarging the pool of talented, wellprepared teachers, enriching the practices of in-service teachers, and equipping them with innovative yet proven curriculum materials to support the learning of students, from future knowledge workers to future citizens who can think critically in mathematical and scientific terms. It matters for equity. It matters for the economy. And it matters for democracy itself. Story by Jeff Mortimer Photos by Mike Gould

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bob Moses’ aLgebra ProjeCt
Mathematics and Civil rights

“Bob Moses is treating improvement in mathematics education as comparable to sharecroppers getting the right to vote in the civil rights movement,” says Hyman Bass, “both in the work that it takes to do that but also in the power that is gained by being mathematically skilled.”
Anyone concerned with the expansion of mathematical literacy in the United States has been touched by the Algebra Project. Founded in the 1980s by civil rights activist and math educator Robert Moses, its guiding principle is that such literacy is the key to 21st century citizenship. “Bob Moses is treating improvement in mathematics education as comparable to getting sharecroppers the vote in the civil rights movement,” says Hyman Bass, “both in the work that it takes to do that but also in the power that is gained by being mathematically skilled.”

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That power resides in technology-based jobs, informed citizenship and the inclusion of previously overlooked and underrepresented groups – children of poverty and/or color – in the pool of the mathematically adept. Beyond the familiar features of reform initiatives – development of curriculum materials, preparation of teachers and teacher-trainers, in-service teacher enrichment – the Algebra Project also enlists students themselves as Math Literacy Workers, who not only “do the math” but also work in the community and with their younger peers to sustain the demand for an education that will equip them for success in today’s economy. At the University of Michigan, both the School of Education and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts have built ties with Bob Moses’ work. Bass and Dean Deborah Ball have been collaborating with Bob Moses for several years under the aegis of the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute; more recently, however, they have decided to link their respective equity-focused efforts—the Algebra Project and the Elementary Mathematics Lab—so their voices could be raised in chorus in some policy

conversations, and so the Algebra Project could expand its work throughout the state of Michigan. In the meantime, the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts sponsored five undergraduates to be trained last summer by the Young People’s Project, the youth empowerment effort that has been developed to operate alongside the Algebra Project. This school year, “the Chicago Five” have been working in tutoring programs at schools in Detroit, Ypsilanti, and Ann Arbor, and recruiting other college and high school students to the cause. In January, the Algebra Project submitted a grant proposal to the National Science Foundation, partly to establish four demonstration sites, each with a cohort of 20 ninth graders who would be supported and tracked through their four years in the program. One of those sites would be in southeastern Michigan and affiliated with the School of Education. “We want to be an Algebra Project-affiliated group or consortium,” says Bass, “and we’re going to do that whether or not the Project gets the grant.” Story by Jeff Mortimer Photos by Mike Gould

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a good idea
eVerYone at the tabLe
If “mathematics and science for all” is to be achieved, then all who affect the success of the enterprise must be engaged. As vital as firstrate preparation and curricular materials are to the work of teachers, they won’t succeed – nor will students – without sustained support from the school systems and communities in which those people, materials, and plans are embedded. And their tools will be adequate to the task only if the research that spawns them is grounded in the real world, and the teachers who instruct them in both methods and their subjects are learning from each other. “When you have a pressing problem in the physical world, you bring together people in biology, physics and chemistry,” says Joe Krajcik, Associate Dean for Research and professor of education. “Breakthroughs are made by interdisciplinary teams. It’s the same thing here. We have this crisis, this problem, and it’s too complex just for one subject matter to solve it. Education problems are multifaceted, and we’re not going to come up with solutions unless we engage people from a variety of backgrounds, including – and this is important – the school systems and their people. They have to be at the table. It’s not going to be us at the university going to them. It has to be them working with us, and not just School of Education people, but LSA people.”

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iDea inStitute a CollaBoration BetWeen lSa anD eDuCation
In collaboration with chemistry professor and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor Brian Coppola, Krajcik directs the academic program of the Instructional Development and Educational Assessment (IDEA) Institute, a partnership between the School and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts that is focusing initially on science and mathematics education. Initial funding for IDEA was provided by alumni and donors Rob Horwitz (AB ’74) and Catherine Redlich (AB ’71, CERTT ’71). IDEA’s idea is itself multi-faceted: to design and evaluate creative

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“Education problems are multi-faceted, and we’re not going to come up with solutions unless we engage people from a variety of backgrounds, including – and this is important – the school systems. They have to be at the table.” – Joe Krajcik

pedagogical strategies, to improve the teaching of University faculty, and to provide promising undergraduates with teaching experiences in local classrooms that may open their eyes to the rewards of the profession. “The idea is to increase the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics [STEM] pipeline through improving teaching,” says Krajcik. “This provides a solid opportunity for us to actually make a difference, both in what happens in the classes here at U-M as well as in school systems. Often young people don’t see teaching as a viable career, probably because they just got out of high school. But teaching is one good way to use your subject matter knowledge, a creative and thoughtful activity that can actually do some good for the world. You can bring new science and new mathematical knowledge into schools to motivate kids, and it can be pretty challenging for you.” “I’m definitely excited about where we are right now,” he adds.

“I think if we can show people this is a way they can use their intellectual resources, we might be able to hit a tipping point. If we had 100 kids in the School’s undergraduate programs in physics, biology, math, and chemistry, instead of the piddling 10 or 15 we get every year, and they all stayed in the workforce for five years, we would make a tremendous difference.”

CollaBorating With CoMMunity CollegeS to inveStigate praCtiCe
Just as there is no other project anywhere else like the IDEA Institute, Vilma Mesa’s investigation of math teachers’ practices in six Michigan community colleges is unique. And just as the IDEA Institute is exploring unprecedented approaches, her work is shining light on problems that have received scant attention in academe before now. Given that 53% of all undergraduate students in the United States are enrolled in community colleges, such short shrift should be mystifying. It may have something to do with the fact that their mission isn’t a good fit with traditional methods of education

“Changing the patterns of questions and answers is an attempt to make the community college math classroom a truly student-centered environment.” – Vilma Mesa

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“There’s already a kind of distributed network of expertise and support for ongoing improvement of math and science education; the goal is to get that kind of capacity built in a sustainable way so we have continuous improvement.” – Ed Silver

research and faculty development. Almost all their students have jobs, most are between the ages of 25 and 35, and many have family responsibilities, so they’re both more mature and more distracted than “traditional” undergraduates. At the same time, only about a third of community college math teachers have full-time appointments; many of them have had little or no formal preparation to teach, and they can’t be obliged

to participate in improvement projects the way elementary and secondary school teachers can. Nonetheless, the level of commitment on both sides is extraordinary. “The teachers make sure that every class counts, that every class has something the students can take home,” says Mesa, assistant professor of educational studies. “They’ll go over a procedure four or five times until everyone gets it. I wouldn’t have the patience.”

For more information
aLgebra ProjeCt http://www.algebra.org bIoKIDs http://www.biokids.umich.edu MoD 4 CurrICuLuM aCCess sYsteM for eLeMentarY sCIenCe (Cases) http://cases.soe.umich.edu InstruCtIonaL DesIgn anD eDuCatIonaL assessMent InstItute (IDea) http://www.ideainstitute.umich.edu InVestIgatIng anD QuestIonIng our worLD through sCIenCe anD teChnoLogY (IQwst) http://www.hice.org/iqwst thought eXPerIMents In MatheMatICs teaChIng (theMat) http://www.grip.umich.edu PrograMMe for InternatIonaL stuDent assessMent (PIsa) http://www.pisa.oecd.org http://mod4.soe.umich.edu/mod4/home MIChIgan MatheMatICs anD sCIenCe teaCher LeaDershIP CoLLaboratIVe (MMstLC) http://www.mmstlc.net

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And while studies have documented an average student participation per lesson by U.S. undergraduates to be in the 1218 range, “in community colleges, I have about 200 in an hour,” she says. “These classes are highly participatory.” That dedication is a fine foundation, but it will bear more fruit if some of the blanks particular to community colleges are filled in. Mesa’s work in observing instructors, surveying students and recording and analyzing their interactions aims to achieve that.

“The grant will allow us to test how teachers can take advantage of student feedback, how they can change the students’ pattern of participation to discuss concepts rather than to repeat procedures, and how they can help students become more aware of the kinds of activities they have to do in order to make sure their answers are correct,” she says. “Changing the patterns of questions and answers is an attempt to make the community college math classroom a truly student-centered environment.”

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You’ve got to Dig Deeper - hyman bass
What do teachers need to know about mathematics in order to help learners with a wide variety of needs succeed? This question has been at the heart of a research effort between Hyman Bass, Heather Hill, now at Harvard, and Dean Deborah Ball. The team began by analyzing hours of elementary classroom instruction. “It’s like a job analysis,” says Bass. “If you need to know what math an architect or pharmacist or physicist needs, you look at their work and see what are the mathematical problems they have to solve to do that work. That was the point of view we took toward mathematical teaching. Clearly teachers need to know the content they expect their students to learn, but for teacher, they need to know much more, and we wanted to find out what ‘more’ was.” What they found was that such knowledge could, indeed, be identified, that it could be measured and tested. Most important, students whose teachers possessed and applied this knowledge showed dramatic improvement in their learning. “The size of the effect of teachers’ mathematical knowledge for teaching was comparable to that of SES [socioeconomic status] on student gain scores,” they wrote in a 2005 article for American Educator. “One important contribution we can make toward social justice is to ensure that every student has a teacher who comes to the classroom equipped with the mathematical knowledge needed for teaching.” Toward that end, the mod4 project, funded by the National Science Foundation, is producing practice-based materials for teacher education and professional development that help teachers learn mathematical knowledge and skills for the work of teaching. Bass says, “mod4 is one way we can get them outside the University of Michigan and available to other people.”

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partnering to Strengthen regional Math anD SCienCe partnerShipS
One of the principal goals of the Michigan Mathematics and Science Teacher Leadership Collaborative (MMSTLC) might be called “everyone-centered instruction.” Funded by a grant from the Michigan Department of Education, its aims include creating a matrix of stakeholders in high-needs schools and their communities that will support improved math and science learning.

“In American education, there are often these short bursts of energy about certain things and then it stops and you go on to the next thing,” says Ed Silver. “What we need is some kind of engagement that’s continuing, so the strategy in the project is to involve very heavily people who could be supporting agents for these schools in the long run.” For example, every school is in a district that’s connected to one of the state’s Mathematics and Science Centers, whose instructors include faculty from neighboring colleges and universities as well as business people. “There’s already a kind of distributed network

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Closing the gap between school and authentic scientific Inquiry - nancy songer
Closing the gap between authentic science inquiry and the school subject of science is the goal of Nancy Songer’s work. “In America, we seem to be emphasizing that essential knowledge in science is facts,” says Songer, professor of science education and learning technologies. “Our belief is that this is a wrongheaded approach. We aren’t going to develop problem-solvers and complex thinkers that way.” But one more effective way to develop children’s thinking would clearly be through programs such as BioKids, a project of the School of Education and the U-M Museum of Zoology in which fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders in the Detroit Public Schools used technology and hands-on learning methods to explore the world around them and learn to ask questions the way scientists do. It served 2,000 students a year for five years, and “served” is the operative word: a third more DPS students who used the BioKids curriculum, developed by Songer and her research team, passed their state standardized science tests than those who didn’t. “We want them to have complex opportunities to think like scientists,” Songer says, “but we have to build curricular programs that will that make that challenging task possible. Those two ideas have to go in concert if this is going to work.”

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“Our goal is to begin to rethink how universities who are engaged in research in education do research to inform and support high school reform. we’re really trying to focus on the critical issues in high schools and trying to bring research to the table to help high schools engage in this.” – Ed St. John
of expertise and support for ongoing improvement of math and science education,” he says. “The goal is to get that kind of capacity built in a sustainable way so we have continuous improvement. The state will modify its curriculum standards again, the assessment system will change, and new expectations will be piled on top of teachers and students, so what is the capacity of the collection of individuals who have a stake in this to address those changes and to keep the ship sailing in the right direction?” Thus, the MMSTLC is a partnership – of the University of MichiganAnn Arbor, the University of Michigan-Dearborn, Saginaw Valley State University, Grand Valley State University, and the math and science centers – whose job is creating partnerships that will survive beyond the grant. partnering to BuilD anD pilot neW CurriCular MaterialS Associate Dean Krajcik is also involved in a partnership called IQWEST (pronounced “i-quest”), the Investigating and Questioning our World through Science and Technology project, a collaborative initiative funded by the National Science Foundation and led by the School of Education’s Center for Highly Interactive Classrooms, Curricula and Computing in Education (hic3e) and Northwestern University, in partnership with Michigan State University, Columbia University, the University of Illinois, and Project 2061. This interdisciplinary team of science teachers, scientists, literacy experts, curriculum designers, and university researchers works with middle schools to develop inquiry-based curricular materials that enable teachers with diverse knowledge and experiences to teach science effectively to students from equally diverse backgrounds. In a word, or two, it’s working. “We’re getting calls from teachers asking how they can get their hands on these materials,” Krajcik 16 w w w. S O E . U M I C H . E D U SpRING/SUMMER 2008 says. “It’s really starting to make a difference in the world. Part of the solution is to have good materials in the hands of teachers, and schools are starting to recognize that. Unlike most textbooks, our instructional materials allow kids to have experiences in the classroom that build on each other over time.” The units developed in the first phase of the project comprise one semester of freshly envisioned science learning across two disciplines. The chemistry unit, “How do I make new stuff from old stuff?,” engages students in the study of substances and properties, the nature of chemical reactions, and the conservation of matter. The biology unit, “What will survive?” involves them in the study of species’ interactions in ecosystems, including structure and function, variation, competition, and natural selection. “We’re having some wonderful success with using this in a variety of school systems in Illinois, Michigan, Arizona, Texas, and Washington, D.C.,” says Krajcik. “It’s becoming a very powerful story.” CollaBorating With urBan DiStriCtS to Support inStitutional iMproveMent Ed St. John directs a national planning project that approaches shortcomings in high school math preparation with the intention of making schools part of a seamless loop of research, testing, development, and application back to the high school curriculum. “There hasn’t been very much collaboration between our great research universities and our urban school districts,” says St. John, the Algo D. Henderson Collegiate Professor of Education. “Our goal is to begin to rethink how universities who are engaged in research in education do research to inform and support high school reform. We’re really trying to focus on the critical issues in high schools and trying to bring research to the table to help high schools engage in this.”

The school districts cooperate in collecting data on students from eighth grade through college entry, which can be used to identify both barriers to success and programs and services that are achieving it. “We can use that information in collaboration with other groups to design interventions that are school district projects to improve high school preparation,” St. John says. “We’re trying to use existing data, in partnership with the schools, to find out what works and how to make it work better.” In his view, the ways in which testing and accountability are currently employed tend to penalize schools rather than help them. “We’re going back to the original idea behind testing,” he says, “which was to help with assessing students and enabling school systems to develop better instructional programs. We’re trying to come up with an action research model that uses data to inform and support organizational change and institutional improvement with respect to gains in high school education, college enrollment and college success. “I will go so far as to say researchers should have been doing this for a long time.”

to the field and preparing them better, by enriching the practice of in-service teachers, and by providing them with the tools they need to do their jobs – at the elementary, secondary, community college and university levels (each of which, needless to say, has its own unique set of tasks and challenges). It’s a large, complicated task, but “difficult” is not a synonym for “impossible,” especially when the efforts of so many talented people are in play. “We have to do some things with a short-term payoff because there are kids in the system right now who need help,” says Ed Silver, “but as a collective entity, we have to have a commitment to steady improvement over the long haul, recognizing that some of the things that are problematic might take a generation to repair. But that’s okay. That’s not failure. Many things have changed dramatically in our thinking across generations. They haven’t changed for everybody and it’s taken a long time, but there’s been short-term progress made, building the potential for a long-term progress. “You need both.” Story by Jeff Mortimer Photos by Mike Gould

The rubric that informs all these directions is building capacity – among teachers and within systems—by attracting more top students

Save the date

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Go Blue Tailgate

th

October 3-5, 2008

The 2008 Reunion Weekend will congratulate and celebrate the 50th anniversary of the class of 1958. Events include: Michigan vs. Illinois football game Campus-wide Reunion Gala dinner Emeritus pin presentation to the class of 1958 As members of the Emeritus Society, the classes of 1957 and prior also are encouraged to attend and join in the festivities of Reunion Weekend. We welcome all alumni whose class has previously celebrated its 50-year anniversary. Come back to enjoy campus and share your Michigan spirit. Registration begins June 2, 2008. To learn more, visit www.reunions.umich.edu, call 866.998.6150 or email umreunions@umich.edu.

REUNION

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Making a Difference
rICharD PaPPas (aM ’74, edD ’84)
U-M alumnus Richard Pappas once made a detour from his decision, at 23, to have a career in higher education. He flirted with the insurance industry for a couple of years. He was successful, a top salesman nationwide, but invisible forces seemed to propel him back into education. “I missed making a difference in students’ lives,” he explains. Today, Pappas is president of National-Louis University in Chicago, which has several campuses and is known for its strong tradition in teacher training. Two factors kindled Pappas’s early interest in a career in higher education. One was the example of his father, Charles, a former president of Mott Community College. The other was his experience at the University of Michigan, where he earned an M.A. (higher education and business management) and an Ed.D. (higher, adult and continuing education). He particularly remembers a course with noted community college pioneer Joe Cosand. “Joe Cosand was a down-to-earth, highly regarded, and warm person who told me that I had great potential. In my first course with Joe, he said, ‘You should consider a community college presidency as a career.’ It was a light bulb moment!” Pappas also was excited that various community college presidents visited Cosand’s class to discuss their careers. “I was very motivated to get started,” he emphasizes. Pappas’s first job in higher education was at Snead State Junior College in tiny Boaz, Alabama, where he taught business and marketing. “Culture shock,” he says, laughing, as he recalls how he practiced talking more slowly, in keeping with a slower-paced environment. From there, he progressed to increasingly responsible positions at various community colleges, and assumed his first presidency, at 37, at Harford Community College in Maryland. In 1994, he left to become president of Lake Michigan College, where he stayed eleven years. There, he transformed a single community campus college into a four-site multicampus institution, received an award for increasing the campus’s diversity, and grew the enrollment to its largest in history. In 2005, he made the unusual transition of moving from community college administration to National-Louis, a four-year institution. The biggest difference, he says, is the need to fundraise aggressively—National-Louis is a private institution. “Rick Pappas is a national leader in community-based higher education, workforce preparedness, educational partnerships, and innovative approaches to lifelong learning,” says Diana Mendley Rauner, Chairman of the National-Louis Board of Trustees. “He has the ideal combination of attributes for our

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“Michigan played a large role in really opening my eyes to a lot of these issues. Getting my degree at University of Michigan was a very good experience.”

university, which is committed to collaborating with public school systems in the preparation of excellent pre-K through 12 teachers, educational administrators, and to collaborating with communities in opening avenues of advancement for all citizens through quality higher education.”

Pappas’s Michigan ties are as thick as so many branches on a tree. His father received his master’s degree from the University of Michigan. His two brothers graduated from the university, as did two of his three children. He is galvanized by the importance of educating people somehow

Throughout his career, Pappas says he has emphasized “inclusiveness” in governing, “to really encourage and support people in the decision making process . . . so that faculty and staff can say ‘this is our plan.’” He has also made a point of getting to know students, for example, holding frequent open houses. He recalls that after a poor showing at one open house, someone suggested he offer free pizza at the next one. He did—and attendance improved greatly.

marginalized in society. He wrote his doctoral thesis on how women, minorities, people with disabilities and others struggled with access to Jackson Community College, where he was then serving as dean. “Michigan played a large role in really opening my eyes to a lot of these issues,” he says. “Getting my degree at University of Michigan was a very good experience.” Story by Eve Silberman

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Making a Difference
Karen shooK (ab ’69, Certt eDuC ’69)
A former Washington D.C. school board president and award-winning TV news reporter/producer, Karen Shook speaks matter-of-factly about her own successes. But modesty vanishes when she notes that both her children participated in Teach for America, the program that places college grads in schools in disadvantaged neighborhoods. And she is eager to reveal that younger daughter Allison, who just received her master’s degree in education and now is working as a literacy coach in Massachusetts, is committed to improving the country’s literacy rate. “She told me, ‘This is my passion, and this is what I will be doing for the rest of my life.’ I am so proud of her! ” Her older daughter, Kathryn, also a Michigan alumna, works for an education software company. Shook herself taught high school history for just one year, but commitment to improving public education in America has been a constant throughout her busy life. This commitment has taken different forms. She and her lawyer husband, Langley Shook, had their two daughters educated in the struggling D.C. public schools. Karen was a long-time PTA volunteer, and chair of an annual fundraising auction, before she successfully ran for school board in 1988. “Instead of complaining {about the school problems},” she says, “I thought, ‘Maybe I could make a difference.’” Sadly, during her eight-year tenure, Congress slashed the D.C. schools budgets, and schools had to be closed—a situation so emotional that angry parents picketed her home. But Shook, board president for a year, found satisfaction in efforts such as increasing the number of psychologists and social workers in schools, and building partnerships between schools, private businesses, and government. Former Attorney General Janet Reno and her staff “adopted” a school, she recalls. “On Saturday morning, Janet would be there in her blue jeans and sweatshirts—painting the school!” Educated in the Chicago suburbs, Shook recalls, “I idolized my teachers.” She met Langley when they were both undergrads at Michigan, and she married him in 1970, a year after she graduated; Langley was then enrolled at the U-M Law School. Eventually, the couple and their two young daughters settled in D.C. Shook then received an M.A. in American Studies from George Washington University. Always fascinated by current events, she decided to try to break into the highly competitive world of television news. After several rejections, she finally drove to Baltimore and, walking in unannounced, secured a brief interview with a news director. He gave her a writing test and, impressed with the results, hired her immediately. She worked first for the Baltimore station, then for a D.C. station where she was both a researcher and producer. She won two Emmy awards in 1986. Later, after her tenure on

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“I feel so strongly that public schools are the strength of our democracy,” she says. “That’s why schools like Michigan’s School of Education are so important.”

Karen Shook with Madeleine Albright, former US Secretary of State and Distinguished Scholar at U-M’s William Davidson Institute, 2001- 2004.

the Washington D.C. school board ended, she produced an awardwinning series on the changes in America between 1968 and 1988. She is currently president of the Women’s National Democratic Club in Washington—a position especially exciting during this election year. Shook retains strong ties to her alma mater. Currently the national fundraising co-chair for the School of Education, she has established the Lois Hansen Scholarship for Urban Education, named after her mother. She has also created an estate plan that will increase the scholarship after her death. “I feel so strongly that public schools are the strength of our democracy,” she says. “That’s why schools like Michigan are so important. We have to think of ways to get people interested in education!” Story by Eve Silberman
Karen Shook being interviewed by Tom Sherwood, politics reporter for NBC News 4 in Washington, D.C.

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Martin luther king jr. youth anD ChilDren’S prograM Well attenDeD
Over six hundred children and young people from the region attended the ninth annual Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. Youth and Children’s Program, sponsored by the School of Education and School of Social Work. The all-day program, which featured lessons prepared and given by undergraduates, work on projects, music, and a visit by Lou Gossett, was a highlight of the extensive yearly Martin Luther King. Jr. program, which involves the entire campus for several weeks each January. On the right: Reverend Robert Jones, who performed for the children.

inaugural Meeting oF the Dean’S aDviSory CounCil helD
The founding members of the Dean’s Advisory Council gathered at the School of Education for their inaugural meeting in November 2007. The Council is made up of experts in education, business, the media, and government, with strong interests in education improvement both in the U. S. and internationally. At their first meeting, the Council tackled questions about the redesign of teacher education at Michigan, and how this redesign is fundamental to ensuring quality and consistency in a global environment. From left: Lynn White, Todd Roberts, Donna Hartwig, Ed McElroy, Judy Frey.

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engliSh anD eDuCation DoCtoral StuDentS prepare poliCy BrieFS For teaCherS
In 2006, the National Council of Teachers of English established the James Squire Office for Policy Research, in conjunction with Professor Anne Ruggles Gere and the Joint Program in English Education. The team has prepared policy briefs on topics such as “Adolescent Literacy,” “21st Century Literacies,” and “English Language Learners” distributed to over 50,000 teachers. From left: Laura Aull, Ebony Thomas, Chris Gerben, Anne Gere, Stephanie Moody, Melinda McBee Orzulak, Hannah Dickinson.

Marvin peterSon retireS aFter 40 yearS in higher eDuCation
On March 14, students, former students, colleagues and family members from across the country gathered at the Michigan Union to celebrate Marvin Peterson’s contributions to the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education, to the field of organizational studies, and to his mentees’ lives as he retired after 40 years on the faculty of the University of Michigan’s School of Education.

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SChoolS arounD the WorlD exhiBit FeatureD
Including photographic contributions from faculty, staff and students, an exhibit featuring schools and schoolchildren around the globe is now on display in the South Hall of the School of Education. The photo on the left, featuring children from a Guatemalan school, was shared by Tasha Lebow, Programs for Educational Opportunity. The photo on the right was taken by recent Ph.D. Jennifer Lewis, on a trip to Japan during the summer of 2007.

SChool oF eDuCation CoMMenCeMent inSpireS
At the 2008 School of Education ceremony, held at Hill Auditorium, speaker Michelle Rhee, the 37-year-old Chancellor of the District of Columbia Schools and founder of the New Teachers Project, brought the crowd of graduates, parents and friends, faculty and staff to their feet with her rousing speech. Chancellor Rhee called for schools and colleges of education to prepare more “Mr. Wallaces”—teachers whom underserved students would recognize as knowledgeable, caring mentors who did whatever was needed for student success.

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aLuMnI

In Action

tIM boerst (aM ’99, PhD ’03)
Tim Boerst is talking to U-M education classes about the practice of pairing up kids so they can help each other solving math problems. Sixty students have come to his school’s media center to observe him teach his fifth grade students. They ask him about partnering “slow and advanced” students. It’s tricky, he warns them. Sometimes matching students with dramatically different skills doesn’t work—they just can’t connect, he says. He offers several ways to think about forming partnerships. Boerst himself can empathize with students of various abilities. He confesses that he was no whiz kid. But he was inspired by the satisfaction his parents, who were both teachers, derived from their work. Further, he happened to take a college math class (at the University of Wisconsin—Stevens Point) at the same time the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics released the first of their national standards documents. The document “captivated my mind about what math teaching could be,” he recalls. “It wasn’t just about procedures and facts about fractions and graphs and measurements. It put more of a priority on understanding.” Currently, Boerst teaches multiple subjects in a South Redford elementary school each morning, and math methods to U-M students in the afternoon. He enjoys the combination. “As I learn about teaching from my own experiences, I’m able to articulate it” while working with the U-M students, he says. What he especially appreciates about teaching at U-M is the university’s growing emphasis on preparing student teachers to do the work of teaching. He helps to steer the Teacher Education Initiative at the School of Education, designed to improve novice teachers’ experiences, through methods such as having them collect and learn from videos of their own teaching or having them rehearse and receive feedback on teaching techniques. “It’s an exciting time to be part of the School of Education,” he says. “There’s a real appreciation and attention to classroom teaching that I don’t think you would find in many other education schools.” Some of Boerst’s thinking about mathematics education can be found on a Carnegie Foundation website, where he describes his exploration of “The Rule of Three.” Essentially, this means teachers can support the use of multiple representations when teaching math: numbers, algebra, and graphic representations. Although Boerst is committed to helping students understand, not just memorize, concepts, he believes it is important to develop fluency with facts and procedures. “It isn’t an either-or” question, he says, acknowledging that math teachers have been divided over this issue. Boerst completed the demanding process to become certified by the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards, something relatively few teachers attempt. But he remains modest about the complexities of teaching a complex subject. It’s difficult, he tells his U-M students, “trying to figure out the dynamics to make sure that students have the opportunity to advance. I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t still searching for answers myself.” Story by Eve Silberman Photo by Mike Gould U N I V E R S I T Y O F M I C H I G A N S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N

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Faculty and Staff
Professor stePhen L. DesJarDins received the “Leadership Award” for service as the Association’s budget director from the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE). The award was presented at the Annual ASHE conference, November 2007. Professor JacqueLynne eccLes, William McKeachie Collegiate Professor of Psychology, Women’s Studies, and Education, was awarded the Lifetime Career Contribution Award by the Society for the Study of Human Development. Professor anne ruggLes gere, Gertrude Buck Collegiate Professor of English and Education, has agreed to serve as Director of Sweetland Writing Center beginning July l. One of her goals is to build more connections between the School of Education and Sweetland. Professor Gere also had a Global and Ethnic Literary Studies fellowship in Fall 2007 and a Michigan Humanities Award in Winter 2008. Professor MagDaLene LaMPert received $9055 from The Gilbert Whitaker Fund for the Improvement of Teaching for her project, “Producing and Using Records of Practice to Deliver Coherent Academic and Professional Content Across Courses.” She also received another award: a $4,000 “Investigating Student Learning Grant” from U-M’s Center for Research on Learning and Teaching (CRLT) for a project entitled “Novice Teacher Learning Through Content-Rich Rehearsals.” Professor viLMa Mesa received the Early Career Award from the National Science Foundation. The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious awards in support of the early career-development activities of those teacher-scholars who most effectively integrate research and education within the context of the mission of their organization. Such activities build a firm foundation for a lifetime of integrated contributions to research and education. An article co-written by Professor BarBara MireL and her graduate student, nichoLas Johnson, was awarded the 2007 Best Article on Qualitative or Quantitative Methods in Technical or Scientific Communication from the National Council of Teachers of English. The article is entitled “Social determinants of preparing a cyberinfrastructure innovation for diffusion.” Technical Communication Quarterly 15 (Summer) 329-354.

Professor BoB Bain was named “Educator of the Year” by the Michigan Council for the Social Studies; he received this award at the 2008 State Professional Development Conference at the Hyatt Regency in Dearborn. Dean DeBorah LoewenBerg BaLL delivered the 2008 Charles W. Hunt Invited Lecture at the 2008 AACTE (American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education) conference in New Orleans. In August 2008, Professor MichaeL BasteDo will be in residence at the Bellagio Center in Italy, sponsored by the Rockefeller Foundation. He will be revising a manuscript with Global Policy Fellows from the Institute of Higher Education Policy. The paper will address how institutional stratification suppresses college graduation rates in the U.S. and internationally. Professor connie cook, Director of the Center for Research on Teaching and Learning, has been promoted to clinical full professor of educational practice in the School of Education. Connie is a member of the faculty of the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education (CSHPE). Professor Betsy Davis was elected to a three-year term to the Board of Directors of the National Association of Research in Science Teaching (NARST), the leading international organization for research in science education.

Spotlight
Professor vaLerie Lee
has received a 2008 Rackham Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award. This highly competitive, prestigious award carries a stipend of $1,500 and will be publicly announced and conferred at a ceremony on October 8, 2008.

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ceciL MiskeL, Professor and Dean eMeritus, received the Roald Campbell Lifetime Career Achievement Award in November 2007 from the University Council for Educational Administration. In June 2008 he will be inducted into the College of Education Hall of Fame at his alma mater, Oklahoma State University. Professor eLizaBeth MoJe received the Edward B. Fry Book Award from the National Reading Conference for her book, Lewis, C. J., Enciso, P., & Moje, E. B. (Eds.) (2007). Reframing sociocultural research on literacy: Identity, agency, and power. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. The award is presented for the best book on literacy of that year. It includes a monetary award, which the co-authors each donated to a youth literacy program in their own communities. Professor carLa o’ connor received University of Michigan’s Harold R. Johnson Diversity Award for her dedication to creating a diverse and equitable society, as demonstrated through her scholarship on resilience and African American learners, through her contributions to undergraduate and graduate curriculum design and teaching practice, and through her many caring actions toward students, staff, and faculty. Professor kLotyLDa PhiLLiPPi received a CRLT Lecturer’s Professional Development Grant for $1,925.50. The project involves working collaboratively with cooperating teachers to improve instruction in two elementary education language arts courses and the field instruction for those courses. The project will also faciliate learning for prospective teachers and provide professional development for practicing teachers. Professor cathy reischL received the Master’s Mentoring Award from Rackham Graduate School, a prestigious university-wide award for work with graduate students. Professors cathy reischL, anneMarie PaLinscar, kLo PhiLLiPPi and karen wixson received a $6,000 Faculty Development Fund Grant from the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching, University of Michigan, to improve literacy methods instruction in undergraduate and masters programs. The project is titled “Using Digital Records of Practice to Learn to Lead Text-Based Discussions with Children in Grades 3 - 8.” Professor LesLey rex is the 2008 recipient of U-M’s D’Arms Faculty Award for Distinguished Graduate Mentoring in the Humanities. This award recognizes scholars and/or creative artists of extraordinary depth and breadth who have provided their students with the quality of intellectual support that only

remarkable learning, coupled with boundless generosity of spirit, can bestow. Nominees for this award must be tenured faculty members in the humanities and have directed a substantial number of dissertations over the past several years. The award includes a $5,000 stipend, and $5,000 to the program for student travel. Continued on page 30 // Faculty and Staff Awards

Spotlight
Professor hyMan Bass
has been awarded a Distinguished University Professorship, one of five granted this year. This award is the highest honor that the University bestows on senior faculty to “recognize exceptional scholarly and/or creative achievement, national and international reputation, and superior teaching skills.” Hyman’s outstanding contributions to the fields of mathematics and mathematics education are acknowledged with this prestigious appointment. Each Distinguished University Professorship bears a special name, determined by the professor in consultation with her or his dean. Each professorship also carries with it an annual salary supplement of $5,000, and an annual research supplement of $5,000. The number of Distinguished University Professorships is capped at 30 total across the entire university. In creating these special positions in 1947, the Board of Regents intended to create opportunities for exceptional faculty to pursue scholarly activities “in a manner calculated to ensure the greatest contribution to the University and the nation.” In addition, newly appointed Distinguished University Professors are expected to deliver an inaugural lecture during the first year of appointment. The award will be presented at a special ceremony on October 8, 2008.

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Academic program abbreviations:
CSHPE: CPEP: ES: JPEE: MAC: Educational Studies Master of Arts with Certification

Students and Alumni
Two students from the School of Education have been awarded Rackham Predoctoral fellowships for 2008-09: Jennifer BuehLer (JPEE) and cory forBes (ES). heather thoMson Bunn (JPEE) has been awarded the 2008 Rackham Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor award. During Academic Year 2007-08, the following students were awarded Rackham One-term Dissertation Fellowships: JaMes BeitLer, charaLaMBos charaLaMBous, sean DeLaney, Jenny DeMonte, Martina ePstein, aMy carPenter forD, heiDi Matiyow, Lauren Mcarthur harris, PhiLiP Piety, eBony thoMas and yinMei wan. charaLaMBos y. charaLaMBous, (ES) a doctoral candidate in mathematics education, received a Phi Kappa Phi Research Award at the induction ceremony April 1. At this same ceremony, Professor hyMan Bass delivered the keynote address and was named an honorary member of Phi Kappa Phi. The proposals of cesar DeLgaDo, cory forBes and anDrew BaBson (ES) to the Doctoral Consortium at the International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) were accepted. This conference will be held in Utrecht, Holland, at the end of June. The doctoral consortium comes with mentoring and networking opportunities, plus a $1,500 travel grant and

Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education Combined Program in Education and Psychology Joint Program in Education and English

In December, JaMes BarBer (CSHPE) was awarded a Doctoral Fellowship ($1,000) from the National Order of Omega. Order of Omega is an honor society which recognizes individuals for leadership and service to the fraternity/sorority system and to their college or university. JaMes BeitLer (JPEE) has been selected to be a part of the Sweetland Fellows Seminar, Fall 2008. The Sweetland Writing Center Fellows Seminar brings together committed faculty and graduate student instructors from across the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts for sustained, advanced study of writing and writing pedagogy. MichaeL Bunn was a Fellow in Fall 2007.

Spotlight
cesar DeLgaDo, eDucationaL stuDies

complimentary conference registration. The ICLS accepted only 44 proposals from advanced doctoral students representing the European Union, Switzerland, the United States, Canada, Israel, and Singapore. aMy carPenter forD (JPEE) received a grant for $500 from the Institute for Research on Women and Gender as well as a Rackham Graduate Student Research Grant. She was also elected graduate student representative for the Language and Social Processes SIG of the American Educational Research Association. gLoriana gonzaLez, (ES) doctoral candidate in mathematics education, received the Susan Lipschutz award from the Rackham Graduate School. The criteria for the award include “exceptional scholarly achievement, a sense of social responsibility and service, and a lively interest in promoting the success of women

won the National
Association of Research in Science Teaching (NARST) Ethics and Equity Award in February 2008. Cesar received this award because he demonstrated that his research has the potential to benefit underprivileged groups by improving the science education they receive. His work, in part, examines differences between groups with respect to the size and scale of scientific objects, particularly objects too small to see with the unaided eye.

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Spotlight
Beth kuBitskey has been selected as the winner of the 2008 Outstanding Dissertation of the Year from the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE) for her dissertation, “Extended Professional Development for Systemic Curriculum Reform.” Beth received the award at the annual meeting of AACTE in New Orleans. Beth’s dissertation director was Barry Fishman.

PeLeMa i. Morrice (CSHPE) was recently elected to serve a two-year term as a graduate student representative for Division J of the American Educational Research Association. MeLinDa McBee orzuLak and eBony thoMas (JPEE) have each received a Rackham Graduate Student Research Grant. Two students from the Secondary MAC Program, JorDan PasquaLin and keLsey Johnson, have been awarded teaching fellowships from the Janet H. and C. Harry Knowles Science Teaching Foundation (KSTF) for 2008-09. The Foundation was established in 1999 to strengthen the quality of science and mathematics teachers teaching in grades 9-12 in United States schools. The Knowles Science Teaching Foundation supports individuals and programs designed to encourage and sustain young scientists and mathematicians as they dedicate their lives to teaching other young people and to becoming leaders in the field of education. The Teaching Fellowships are awarded both to students who are entering a teacher education program and to those who are graduating from such a program and entering the teaching field.

in the academic community.” Gloriana will receive $5,000 as part of this honor. The Susan Lipschutz Fund for Women Graduate Students was established to honor the memory of Dr. Susan Lipschutz, former Senior Associate Dean of the Graduate School and Associate Provost for Academic Affairs, who was esteemed as a valued colleague, mentor and friend, and as an advocate committed to the support of women students as they pursued their doctoral degrees. anna kroth (CSHPE) has been awarded an Individual Fellowship from the International Institute. This will support her research in Europe this summer. Two students in CPEP received scholarships: xuezhao Lan received the Rackham Barbour Scholarship, and anneMarie hinDMan received both the Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship and a Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship. steven Lonn, (ES) doctoral candidate in learning technologies, has been awarded a $2,400 Rackham Graduate Student Research Grant to study how students collaborate and construct knowledge using CTools project sites. In 2007, Joi Merritt and nonye aLoize, (ES) both doctoral students in science education, won Ethics and Equity Awards from the National Association of Research in Science Teaching (NARST).

Continued on page 32 // Students and Alumni Awards

Spotlight
keLLy sassi, Joint PrograM in engLish eDucation has been awarded a CARAT Learning Sciences Grant of $2,000 for Winter 2008 to study how students use technology to collaborate. Collaboratory for Advanced Research and Academic Technologies (CARAT) is a synergetic organization in the Office of the Provost to enable diverse disciplines at U-M to join forces and participate in cutting-edge research and educational projects involving advanced networking and computing technologies.

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Events include:
Meet and Greet - Hook back up with old friends, or even find new ones, in this laid-back event at the Alumni Center. Go Blue Pep Rally – Join current Michigan students, the Marching Band and more on the Diag and show your Maize and Blue spirit. Wolverine Club – Sing and dance the night away with friends, win prizes and party!

The second annual Recent Grad Reunion will welcome back the undergraduate classes of 2003-2008 on September 26-28, 2008. Come celebrate with fellow U-M alumni! Registration begins June 2, 2008.
REUNION

Go Maize Tailgate – Experience “The Victors” in a brand-new way. Michigan vs. Wisconsin football game – Time to show the Badgers what the Wolverines can do!

Join the festivities, win prizes and have fun!

www.reunions.umich.edu

Continued from page 27 // Faculty and Staff Awards

Professor eDwarD siLver delivered the 2008 Judith E. Jacobs Lecture at the annual meeting of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Professor nancy songer received a 2008 Rackham Faculty Recognition Award. This competitive award is given to faculty who “demonstrate substantive contributions to the University through significant achievements in scholarly research and/or creative work, excellence as a teacher, advisor and mentor, and distinguished participation in service activities of the University” and will be conferred at a ceremony on October 8, 2008. In November our staff members were honored by the University for their many years with the U-M. tasha LeBow, Programs for Educational Opportunity (PEO), was honored for 20 years of service; sharon Laski and caroL BirMinghaM (Educational Studies) were each recognized for their 40 years of service.

The Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education (CSHPE) received a Certificate of Recognition by the University of Michigan’s History & Traditions Committee recognizing the 50th anniversary celebration of the founding of Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education. See http://www.umich.edu/ pres/history/certificates.html The Chronicle of Higher Education has released an analysis of faculty scholarly productivity across 375 institutions that offer doctoral degrees. The School of Education shows up very well on this analysis, ranking first in scholarly productivity in research in foundations, educational leadership, and mathematics education; third in research in teacher education in specific subject areas; and fifth in research in higher education. For more details, please explore the website: http://chronicle.com/stats/productivity/page. php?byinst=true&institution=15&year=2007

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the president’s donor challenge
Challenge
• To increase the amount of scholarship support available to graduate and professional students.

inCentive
• University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman will match all gifts for graduate and professional support ($1 for every $2 donated) – including scholarships, fellowships, internships, and student awards.

neeD
• Scholarship support is critical in recruiting the most talented students to attend the University of Michigan School of Education. Private support can significantly increase our ability to recruit the best and brightest students.

urgenCy
• The President’s Donor Challenge is available to ALL University of Michigan graduate programs, which means the matching dollars could go fast. Make your gift now to ensure additional matching support for a School of Education graduate student. The President’s Donor Challenge will end when $40 million in graduate support is committed through gifts and pledges (University-wide), therefore exhausting $20 million in matching dollars.

aMount
• Gifts will be matched $1 for every $2 donated • $20 million is available from the President’s Donor Challenge for all U-M graduate programs until $40 million is received

tiMe FraMe
• • • • September 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008 Five-year pledges signed before December 31, 2008 will be matched Previous pledges paid before December 31, 2008 will be matched Challenge ends after $40 million in graduate and professional student support is committed

guiDelineS
• Gifts or pledges for graduate and professional scholarships, fellowships, internships, or awards will be matched • All gifts up to $1 million will be matched • Challenge match funds will be deposited in an endowed fund for graduate and professional student support

uM SChool oF eDuCation giFt opportunitieS
• Gifts of any amount, to any scholarship, fellowship, internship, or student award will be matched • A minimum gift of $50,000 will create a named endowment • Corporate matching funds will also be eligible for the President’s Donor Challenge match

Your gift is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law. For additional information please call 734-763-4880, the Office of Development and Alumni Relations, or email mdubin@umich.edu

U N I V E R S I T Y O F M I C H I G A N S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N

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Continued from page 29 // Students and Alumni Awards ranDaLL PinDer (JPEE) received the Rackham International Student Fellowship which assists outstanding international students. Beth sanDers, (ES) doctoral student in educational administration, has been accepted as a fellow in the Chicago Public Schools Urban School Leadership Program this summer. JPEE students, keLLy sassi and staci shuLtz, have been awarded the 2008 David and Linda Moscow Prize for Excellence in Teaching Composition. sheLLey strickLanD (CSHPE), DanieLLe MoLina (CSHPE), and Britt-Marie Martinsson (ES) were named by the Center for the Education of Women 2008-2009 CEW Scholars. These scholarships were established in 1970 to recognize the outstanding academic and professional competence and potential of women who have had at least a four-year educational interruption. The CEW Scholarship Awards were presented on April 15. Laurie sLeeP, (ES) doctoral candidate in mathematics education, has been awarded a Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for Research Related to Education. This highly competitive and prestigious award provides support to 30 students across a range of fields related to education to complete their dissertation research. Laurie has been selected for the Spencer fellowship for the 2008-09 academic year to support her study, “What is My Goal in this Lesson? Knowing and Using Mathematics in Teaching.” Her research focuses on beginning elementary teachers’ comprehension of their instructional goals and their use of those goals to steer instruction in the course of mathematics lessons. kate thiroff (CSHPE) was recently awarded a Raoul Wallenberg International Summer Travel Fellowship from the Rackham Graduate School. In partnership with VietHope and the Can Tho Youth Empowerment Project, Kate will work with college students and orphanages in southern Vietnam and run a summer program that will focus on learning, leadership, and service. Kate will be in Vietnam during July and August, 2008. christoPher warD (CSHPE) has been awarded a $6,000

Staying in touch
we’d love to hear from you. Send us news about your achievements and experiences. Send us your comments and advice. Our address is: Office of Development & Alumni Relations U-M School of Education 1001 SEB, 610 E. University Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1259 e-mail: mdubin@umich.edu

AIR/NCES Fellowship for Graduate Study. The fellowship includes attendance at the AIR/NCES/NSF Summer Data Policy Institute in June 2009. AIR is the Association for Institutional Research and NCES is the National Center for Education Statistics. Alumna Dr. hsin-kai wu, now an associate professor at National Taiwan Normal University in Taipei, has received the Early Career Research Award from the National Association for Research in Science Teaching. The award is given annually to the early researcher who demonstrates the greatest potential to make outstanding and continuing contributions to research in science education. She is the first Asian to receive this award. The Educational Administration program made two awards at graduation to friends of the School. Both Dr. suzanne kLein, Superintendent, Grosse Pointe, and Dr. MichaeL yocuM, Learning Services Director, Oakland ISD, received the 2008 Excellence in Education Leadership Award for their work in supporting the School’s academic programs and efforts to develop future education leaders. Klein is a U-M Ph.D. alumna. Yocum is a MSU alumnus. The recipients are nominated by U-M to the University Council for Educational Administration, which approved both of our nominees.

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Innovator is published by the University of Michigan School of Education Office of Outreach and Communications leadership Team of The school of educaTion Deborah Loewenberg Ball, Dean Joseph Krajcik, Associate Dean, Research Edward Silver, Associate Dean, Academic Affairs Henry Meares, Assistant Dean

School of Education

communicaTions Team of The school of educaTion Jeff Mortimer, Eve Silberman, Writers Elena Godina, Yvonne Pappas, Designers Mike Gould, Photographer Eugenie Potter, Laura Roop, Editors

SUMMEr 2008
JUnE 10-13, 2008 JUnE 23 - 26, 2008

INstItutes • coNfereNces • workshops
tHoUGHt EXPErIMEntS In MatHEMatICS tEaCHInG SUMMEr WorKSHoP For tEaCHEr EDUCatorS Workshop for mathematics-focused teacher educators previewing representations of secondary algebra and geometry teaching, classroom narratives based on graphic novels and animation, and creating resources for use with various clients. Contact S08-themat@umich.edu

The regenTs of The universiTy of michigan Julia Donovan Darlow Laurence B. Deitch Olivia P. Maynard Rebecca McGowan Andrea Fischer Newman Andrew C. Richner S. Martin Taylor Katherine E. White Mary Sue Coleman, ex officio

CUrrEnt LEGaL anD PoLItICaL ISSUES For SCHooL LEaDErS Combined online and onsite course for administrators and leaders, taught by Anthony Derezinski, Director of Government Relations for the Michigan Association of School Boards. Offered by the Education Leadership Center. Contact Bonita Kothe at bkkothe@umich.edu

JULY 13-17, 2008
InvEStIGatInG anD QUEStIonInG oUr WorLD tHroUGH SCIEnCE anD tECHnoLoGY (IQWSt) ProFESSIonaL DEvELoPMEnt WorKSHoP Workshop for 70 middle school teachers across the country, utilizing new curricular materials which foster scientific inquiry and substantive disciplinary learning. Contact Mandy Chambers at mbenedi@umich.edu

JULY 21-24, 2008
The University of Michigan, as an equal opportunity/ affirmative action employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding nondiscrimination and affirmative action, including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The University of Michigan is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for all persons regardless of race, sex, color, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry, age, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, disability, or Vietnam-era veteran status in employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions. Inquiries or complaints may be addressed to the Senior Director for Institutional Equity and Title IX Section 504 Coordinator, Office of Institutional Equity, 2072 Administrative Services Building, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1432, 734-763-0235, TTY 734-647-1388. For other University of Michigan information call 734-764-1817.
*Includes discrimination based on gender identity and gender expression.

orGanIZInG SCHooLS to DEvELoP tEaCHInG EXPErtISE Combined online and onsite course for administrators and leaders, taught by Dr. Kristi Holmstrom. Offered by the Education Leadership Center. Contact Bonita Kothe at bkkothe@umich.edu

JULY 21-aUGUSt 1, 2008
ELEMEntarY MatHEMatICS LaBoratorY At its heart: a mathematics class for rising fifth graders, taught by Dean Deborah Loewenberg Ball, which is then studied by practitioners, researchers, prospective teachers, mathematicians, and teacher educators. Contact Laura Roop at laurroop@umich.edu

JULY 21-aUGUSt 1, 2008
SUMMEr nanoSCIEnCE aCaDEMY A collaboration focused on learning about the cutting edge “science of small,” involving Ypsilanti middle school students, practicing teachers, the research team of the Center for Highly Interactive Curriculum, Collaboration, and Computing Education (Hi-C3e), a nanoscience center, and the U-M Medical School’s Project Hope staff. Contact Yolanda Campbell at Yodav@med.umich.edu

JULY 21-aUGUSt 1, 2008
IDEa InStItUtE SCIEnCE SUMMEr CaMP at CaSS tECH IDEA’s first summer science program designed for Detroit’s Cass Tech High School students. Contact Mary Starr at mastarr@umich.edu

Innovator

University of Michigan School of Education 610 E. University Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1259

FALL GATHERING 2008
This Homecoming weekend, join School of Education alumni, faculty, and students at our annual Fall Gathering reunion brunch and football game.

Saturday, October 4, 12:30 p.m. School of Education

For more information or to register, call (734) 763-4880 or visit www.soe.umich.edu/fallgathering

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