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MOCK XAT - Paper -I Booklet with you. E BEST Instructions Before the test: 1. DO
MOCK XAT - Paper -I Booklet with you. E BEST
MOCK XAT - Paper -I
Booklet with you.
E BEST

Instructions Before the test:

  • 1. DO NOT START TH E TEST UNTILL THE INVIGILATO R GIVES THE INSTRUCTION TO ST ART THE TEST.

  • 2. DO NOT KEEP with yo u books, rulers, slide rulers, drawing instr uments, calculators (including watch calculato rs), pagers, cellular phones, stop watches or any other device or loose papers. You are allo wed to only keep pencil, pen, eraser and shar pener.

  • 3. Ensure that your personal data have been entered correctly on the Answ er Sheet.

At the start of the test:

  • 1. A soon as the signal to sta rt the test is given, open the test booklet.

  • 2. This test booklet contains 31 pages, including the blank ones. Immed iately after opening the Test Booklet, verify t hat all pages are printed properly and are in order. If there is a problem with your Test

Booklet, immediately inform the invigil ator. You will be

provided with a replaceme nt.

How to Answer:

  • 1. This test contain 90 ques tion in Three sections. There are 31 ques tions in Section A and 29 questions in Sect ion B and 30 questions in Section C. You have two and half

sections.

hours to complete the test . In demonstrate your competence in all three

  • 2. Questions in each section

have been jumbled , and sections are ind icated on the right

hand side of each questio n. You are required to answer questions fro m all sections and

expected to maximize sco res in each section.

  • 3. Directions for answering t he question are given before each group of q uestion. Read these directly carefully and an swer the question by darkening the approp riate circles on the Answer Sheet. Each quest ion has only one correct answer.

  • 4. All questions carry One one third of allotted mar k.

marks each. Each wrong answer will at tract a penalty of

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  • 6. Follow the instructions of the invigilator. Candidates found violating t he instructions will be disqualified.

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Answer Sheet from

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  • 2. You may retain this Test

Candidates giving assistance or seeking / receiving from any source in a nswering questions

or Copying in any manner admission. Such candidates

in the test will forfeit their chances of be ing considered for will forfeit the right to the scorecard. Th e testing authority

Booklet for Final

reserves the right to exclud e any question or question from this Test

examination. ALL TH

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1. There are many two digit prime numbers in Real Number set such that both digits
1.
There are many two digit prime numbers in Real Number set such that both digits of the
number are prime number s?
A] 3
B] 4
C] 5
D] 15
E] 8
Section (A)
2.
There are four face cards
Ace, Jack, Queen, and King one of each and places them face
down in any order. You p oint to each card in turn, and guess which fac e card is in the
bottom. You guess each o f Ace, Jack, Queen, and King exactly once an d you guessed
exactly n of the letters cor rectly. Which value of n is not a possible val ue of n?
[A] 0
[B] 1
[C]
2
[D] 3
[E] 4
Section (A)
3.
If sin
cos
then sin cos ?
[A]
[B]
[C]
[D]
[E]
Section (A)
4.
There are how many integ ral pairs of ( x, y) satisfy 16
[A] 0
[B] 1
[C]
2
[D] 3
[E] Mo re than 3
Section (A)
5.
sin sin sin
sin ?
[A] √
[B]
[C] 0
[D]
[E]
Section (A)
6.
There 11 toffees in the sto re: three cost `0.50 each, four cost ` 1.00
each and four cost
` 2.00 each. Find the tot al number of ways to purchase 3 toffees from the 11 toffees so
that the total cost is more than ` 4.00? (consider all toffees are differe nt)
[A] 8
[B] 20
[C]
46
[D] 60
[E] 66
Section (A)
7.
Sir MATHs is playing a g ame. in which Sir MATHs picks a natural nu mber between 1
and 100. One after the oth er, each of three players SINE, COSINE & T AN tries to guess
the number Sir MATHs pi cked. Each player writes his or her guess on a black-board
before the next player gue sses. The winner is the player who comes clo sest to Sir
MATHs' number without exceeding it. NOTE: Each guess has to be di fferent from the
previous guesses. & It is p ossible for none of the players to win.
Suppose that SINE guesse s 24, and that TAN will guess a number that gives him the best
chance of winning. What number should COSINE guess to maximize h is chances of
winning?
[A] 1
[B] 25
[C]
62
[D] 63
[E] 64
Section (B)

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8. A biased coin has a proba bility of coming heads and tails are (1/3) and
8.
A biased coin has a proba bility of coming heads and tails are (1/3) and (2/3) respectively.
On average, how many to ss of this coin are needed to guarantee both h eads and tails
appear at least once?
[A]
2.25
[B] 2.5
[C]
3
[D] 3.5
[E]
5
Section (A)
9.
If in ∆ ; ∗ ; W
here a, b & c are sides of triangle and A,B &
C are
corresponding angles then
lies in which interval
[A]
0, ∝
[B]
0, √
[C] √
,
[D]
√ , ∝
[E]
√ , ∝
Section (A)
10.
What is the probability of selecting two real number x and y from inter val [0,4] which
satisfy the relation .
[A]
[B]
[C]
[D]
[E] No
ne of These
Section (A)
11.
Let 2 1
for 1
3 and 3 for 3 10. Then qua dratic equation
whose roots are lim →
and lim →
[A]
10 459
0
[B]
10 459 0
[C]
10 459 0
[D]
3 0
[E] None of th ese
Section (A)
2
12.
√3
1 ); then
k=?
[A]
1
√3
[B] 1
√3
[C] √
[D] √
[E] √
Section (A)
13.
If ; where P(x) is a polynomial of degree greater than 2, the
2
?
[A]
-P(x)P'''(x)
[B]
P(x)P'''(x)
[C] -P(x)P''(x)
[D]
P(x)P''(x)
[E]
None of These
Section (A)
14.
Consider the following sta tements :
I.
If for some positiv e integers p, q , r (p<q<r) , 2 , 2 2 are in G.P.
then , will be in H.P.
II.
If x, y and z are
p ositive integers such that , ar
in H.P then for
any real number 0; , will also in H.P.
Which of the followin g statements is(are) correct?

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[A] I only [B] II o nly [C] I or II [D] I and II [E]
[A] I only
[B] II o nly
[C] I or II
[D] I and II
[E] Nei ther I nor II
Section (A)
15.
What is the range of sin
cos if domain is "R" [ R≡ Real & [ ] ≡ close interval]
[A]
1,2
[B]
,
1
[C]
, 1
[D][0, 1]
[E] No ne of these
Section (A)
16.
T is a function defined as: T (x, y, z) = (x – y, y – z, z – x)
Which of the following po int does not belong to image set T?
[A]
(2, 3, –5)
[B] (1,
1, –2)
[C] (3, 7, –10)
[D]
(1, –4, 3)
[E] No ne of these
Section (A)
DIRECTIONS for questions 17-21 : Refer to the data below and answer t he questions that
follow.
Six people Kiran, Kishan, Sa mir, Sagar, Tania and Tanya living at six diff rent places viz;
Ahmedabad, Patna, Kolkata,
Chennai, Delhi and Mumbai own six differen t cars, of brands
Bambassador, Galio, Korpio, Mascent, Suntro and Talto having six differe nt colours. Kiran
and Sagar stay in Chennai and
Delhi, respectively. Tania owns a Mascent. Samir and Tanya
have Grey and White coloure d cars, respectively. The person staying in M umbai owns a Blue
Galio. The person staying in C hennai does not own a Talto. The person ow ning Grey
coloured car does not stay in
Patna nor does he own a Talto. The car of ma ke Talto is Red
coloured. The person staying in Patna owns a Korpio. The person who ow ns a Mascent make
car does not stay in Ahmedab ad. The other two cars are Black and Silver i n colour.
17.
If Kiran owns a silver colo oured Suntro, what is the colour of the car tha t Tania owns?
A]
Blue
B]
Gre y
C] Black
D]
Red
E] Can not be determined
Section (B)
18.
What is the brand of the c ar that Samir owns?
A]
Suntro
B] Bam bassador
C] Korpio
D]
Talto
E] Can not be determined
Section (B)
19.
What is the colour of the
Korpio?
A]
Blue
B] White
C]
Silver
D] Grey
E] Cannot be d etermined
Section (B)
20.
Who stays in Kolkata?
A]
Tania
B] Samir
C]
Tanya
D] Sagar
E] Cannot be d etermined
Section (B)
21.
Who owns the Talto?
A]
Tania
B] Kishan
C]
Sagar
D] Samir
E] Cannot be d etermined
Section (B)

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DIRECTIONS for questions 22-24: The following set of questions is base d on a decision- game
DIRECTIONS for questions 22-24: The following set of questions is base d on a decision- game

DIRECTIONS for questions 22-24: The following set of questions is base d on a decision-

game ‘Shipping Tycoon’ showed.
game ‘Shipping Tycoon’ showed.

making situation that is descr ibed. Attempt the questions and select the cor rect option.

Toyz is an Indian company th at makes toys for children only in the age gro up of 1-8 years.

The company had, in a firstof -its-kind move for the Indian toy industry, sig ned a deal for a

promotional campaign with U TV films to market a soft toys range, ‘Cuddl es’, based on

characters in the children’s m ovie Antariksh and Pehelwan. ‘Kidz Quotien t’, a range of

educational toys for children i n the age group of 3-8 years met with the sa me brilliant success

as the ‘Cuddles’ range. Thus, the company’s pioneering efforts in the toy i ndustry had earned

it the top slot in the Indian toy field.

Over the last few months how ever, the company’s sales growth had slowe d, though cost

cutting measures were not req uired as yet, as the company had been makin g decent profits.

Toyz had to do a rethink on se veral of its latest policies as the company’s c ompetitors were

growing. Crabtree, a toy chain , was steadily growing in the educational ga mes format and

looked poised to take over the mantle of such games from Toyz. Furtherm ore, with the

growing power of the Internet , toys for children had changed by becoming more learning

based and more interactive. T inkle Bells, a major rival of Toyz, had collab orated with a

computer firm and had come up with a successful range of computer-based products, while

Toyz were still strategizing ab out the changing toy environment. Moreover , the management

felt that the company’s marke ting strategies needed to go through a change as the poor

marketing of their latest board

After much deliberation, the

management realized that apart from the grow ing competition,

the company’s dismal perform ance was also due to organizational issues. F or example, since

the company followed a centr alized system of management, the top manag ement was

burdened with a heavy worklo ad, leaving them with little time for focusing

on major issues.

Also, communication and dec ision making in the company was slow and c omplicated due to

the many layers of middle ma nagement - many of whom were being under utilized due to the

fewer number of subordinates working under them - as compared to fewer middle managers

in rival companies. Thus, the additional levels of management meant incre ased administrative

overhead.

Employees, the majority of w hom were under 35, on the other hand had st arted feeling that

the formal and strictly workre lated environment of the company was stiflin g growth.

Frustration, lack of motivatio n and a feeling of inequity was settling in as

many a times, the

management would not accep t their ideas. The employees also felt that inn ovation had come

to a standstill because ideas to ok a long time to filter through the many ma nagement layers.

Thus, employee morale had h it an all-time low, leading to insecurity about their jobs and

futures.

The management had schedul ed a high-powered meeting of the top brass t o decide on a

course of action to resolve the se issues. While there were many debates reg arding the ideal

course of action that the comp any should take, all were agreed on the point that Toyz had to

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take new steps, both within an d outside the company to regain the top slot as
take new steps, both within an d outside the company to regain the top slot as

take new steps, both within an d outside the company to regain the top slot as pioneers in the

toy industry. Arrange the following in desc ending order of importance. 1. Diversify into computer-ba sed
toy industry.
Arrange the following in desc ending order of importance.
1. Diversify into computer-ba sed games, educational CD’s and DVD’s
2. Restructure to expedite the decision-making processes
niche.
4. Revamp the marketing strat tegies of the company.
A]
2, 3, 1, 4
B] 1+2, 3, 4
C]
3+4, 2, 1
D] 2, 4, 1+3
E] 1+3, 4, 2
following in ascending order of importance.
help them in focusing on inno vation and strategies.
reduce the need for a number of managerial posts.
some others.
which only leads to stagnation
and monotony.
lifetime employment reduces.
A]
3+5, 4, 1+2
B] 5, 3, 2, 1+4
C] 1+3, 5, 2+4
D]
5, 2, 4, 1+3
E] 2+5, 3, 4, 1
ascending order of import ance.
1] Recognize and reward
vision and strategies.
2] Encourage employee p articipation in the decision-making process.
the company's return on in vestment (ROI).
encourage innovation.
travelling awards, etc., to boost employee morale.
A]
5, 1+2, 3+4
B]
4, 1+5, 2, 3
C] 3+5, 1+2, 4
D]
2, 4+5, 1, 3
E]
1+3, 2, 4+5

competition?

  • 22. What course of action should the management take to handle the growing

    • 3. Expand its product line by catering to a market of 8 years and above and as yet unexplored

Section (B)

  • 23. What should be the course of action of the management regarding restructu ring? Arrange the

    • 1. Adopt decentralization tech niques that will lighten the load of the top m anagement and

    • 2. Increase the span of control so that increasing the number of subordinate s per manager will

    • 3. Shift a number of middle m anagers to hands-on work and offer retireme nt with perks to

    • 4. Encourage the delegation o f responsibilities so that no level of employee s is over-worked,

    • 5. Hire 30% new workers as c ontract employees so that the company's com mitment to

Section (B)

24. How should the managem ent boost employee morale? Arrange the foll owing in

employees for exemplary actions in support o f the company's

3] Provide employees wit h extra payments into supplemental retiremen t plans based on

4] Expedite the decision-m aking process by restructuring the manageri al levels in order to

5] In addition to monetary benefits, offer non-monetary rewards like ho lding picnics,

Section (B)

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decision making
decision making

DIRECTIONS for questions 25-27: Each group of questions is based on a

views.
views.

situation that is described. Att empt the questions that follow and mark the correct answer.

Gallons, a Mexican restaurant , is one of the main attractions of the nightlif e of the city.

Situated in a posh neighbourh ood, it counts the who’s who of the city amo ng its clientele. It

boasts of being the first restau rant in the city to employ women waiters. In a recent business

move, the restaurant managem ent came up with theme-based events for ev ery alternate

nightof-the-week. The combi ned business strategy of the restaurant spelt g reat success.

Recently, some customers got drunk and started a brawl. But the security m anaged to control

the situation. Drug addicts an d petty thieves frequent the roads around the restaurant. After a

few stray incidents, the mana gement decided to take a call on the safety of its employees.

The management decided to d isallow its women staff from working in nig ht shifts, after 8

p.m.

Medha is a veteran with 10 ye ars experience and was selected the Best Wa itress, 2005 and

2006. She is currently employ ed in two places, one at the town library and the other at the

restaurant. Due to the new tim e restrictions imposed by the management, s he has been unable

to meet her financial expenses .

Medha discussed the issue wi th the management. The management offered to transfer her to

another branch of their restaur rant where the timings would be suitable. Me dha objected to the

idea since she would not be ab ble to continue both her jobs on account of th e longer travelling

hours to reach the restaurant b ranch. The management then felt that it coul d not change its

policies to accommodate her

Recently, a lawyer representin g Medha has informed the restaurant that M edha intends to file

a case against her employers o n grounds of discrimination. The manageme nt agrees that more

customers visit the restaurant in the night and tend to give larger tips. Med ha says that

because of the recent decision of the management, she is being deprived of these fringe

benefits.

The management does not eve en want to lose face. It has to now decide on

a course of action.

25. Choose the viable options tha t would be beneficial for the management in the given situation

and arrange them in the desce nding order of importance.

  • A] Go for an out-of-court sett lement.

  • B] Arrange for transport for it s staff who work the night shifts.

  • C] Fire Medha and hire some one new.

  • D] Compensate Medha, and s tep up the security measures.

  • E] Stick with their decision of banning women waiters from working night shifts.

  • F] Fight the court case as the management has access to better lawyers and winning is more

likely.

  • G] Come up with a clause in t he letter of offer that allows women to work only day shifts,

which will prevent any furthe r legal hassles.

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A] F, G, E, C B] A, C , E, F C] D, B, G, A
A] F, G, E, C B] A, C , E, F C] D, B, G, A
A]
F, G, E, C
B] A, C , E, F
C] D, B, G, A
D]
A, F, G, B
E] D, A , B, F
Section (B)
steps. Arrange the following i n the descending order of importance.
A.
Do not hire women as incr easing security measures will be additional e xpenditure that can
be avoided.
B.
Women should be hired on ly if they agree to certain conditions mention ed in the
appointment letter.
C.
Arrange for transport for e mployees who work in night shifts.
D.
Screen customers and imp ose heavy fines on those creating trouble on t he premises.
E.
State in the job advertisem ent itself that the working conditions are subj ect to change at the
discretion of the management .
A]
A, B, E, D, C
B]
D, C, E, B, A
C] A, E, B, C, D
D]
E, B, C, D, A
E]
D, E, B, C, A
Section (B)
27. Choose the course of actio n in the ascending order of importance that
would be best for
Medha?
A.
Approach the media an d garner the support of the public as the med ia has played an
important role in getting j ustice for people in recent times.
B.
Wait for the manageme nt to take a decision since her case is very st rong and the
management has to capitu late.
C.
Enlist the support of he r colleagues by starting a signature campaign to influence the
decision of the manageme nt.
D.
Agree to an out-of-cou rt settlement and accept a higher and more lu crative position in
the sister concern of the re staurant.
A]
D, A, C
B]
A, D, B
C] C, A, D
D]
C, D, A
E]
B, C, D
Section (B)
DIRECTIONS for questions 28-30: The following set of questions is base d on a decision-
making situation that is descr ibed. Attempt the questions and select the cor rect option.
Meera Guinness took over the reins of the family-run wine business, Grape vine Has It, from
her father. She had a Masters degree and a doctorate in business managem ent from Wharton,
University of Pennsylvania. S he had also trained under the tutelage of one of the most
respected names in the wine b usiness in France, where she had learnt all ab out wines from
scratch – from growing, harve sting and processing grapes to the fermentati on, cellaring and
storing of wines. The compan y was, at one time considered to be one of th e finest wine
makers of the country. But wi th wine drinking becoming popular, the busi ness of wine
making had become more com petitive. Grapevine Has It had lost its lead i n the wine race.
Meera wanted to restore her c ompany to its former glory. Her father had n ot concentrated on
the marketing front of the com pany, focusing on only improving the qualit y standards of the

26. If the management has to avoi id this incident from recurring, then it will ha ve to take certain

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products. Meera realized that they were losing important ground because t hey had stopped experimenting and
products. Meera realized that they were losing important ground because t hey had stopped
experimenting and were playi ng safe. The areas that needed immediate att ention were the
white wine segment and the c ellaring process. She felt that though the whit e wine segment
was doing good business, it la cked the ‘buttery’ flavour that could be obtai ned by a second
fermentation. Also, their proc ess of cellaring could be further refined, as th eir wines seemed
to develop a slightly bitter tas te after the cellaring process. Meera wanted t o expand their
business by starting a rose wi ne section.
Meanwhile, the latest news w as that a four-star hotel was going to come up
in the next six
months and they were looking
for wine suppliers in the area. Meera did no t want to lose out
to their competitors, Wine Ris e. She decided to take up the challenge. She felt that some
aggressive and innovative thin nking was required to retain the top slot in the
wine industry.
Meera believed in top-down m
management, contrary to the way her father ra n the business.
Meera felt that the business h ad suffered recent losses because the manage rs had made some
faulty decisions. On the other hand, resentment was building up among the managers, some
of whom had been working w ith the company since its inception twenty ye ars ago. They
felt that their experience and e xpertise would not be valued and had becom e unsure of their
place in the business. While t hey understood that Meera’s plans were for th e betterment of
the company, they also felt th at some of her ideas were not practical. The c ompany was
facing an impasse. Meanwhile e, time was running out.
28.
The main conclusion (s) a bout Meera that emerge (s) from this situatio n is / are:
A.
She had the potential to
expand her business and was doing the righ t thing by being
aggressive about innovati ons.
B.
She was new in the fiel d and had to first establish her hold over the existing business.
C.
She was unsuccessful i n winning over the support of her managers
without whom it
would be difficult to mana ge her business successfully.
D.
The situation called for some strong measures and she should not w aste her time and
energy in convincing the
managers.
A]
A and D
B]
A, B, and C
C] Only B
D]
A and C
E]
A, C and D
Section (B)
29.
What should be Meera’s c ourse of action, keeping in mind that the com pany has only six
months to bring positive c hanges? Arrange the following in the descen ding order of
importance.
A.
Work out a system to i mprove the quality of white wines
B.
Reorganize the Researc h Wing
C.
Appoint a team to corre ect the flaws in the cellaring of wines
D.
Come up with a strong strategy for developing the rose wine busine ss
E.
Hone the skills of the m arketing professionals of the company
A]
B+C, A, D+E
B]
E+A, C, D+B
C] C, E+A, B, D
D]
B, C+E, A+D
E]
C+A, B, D+E
Section (B)

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30. This decision-making situ ation best highlights: A. Meera’s inexperience i n handling her staff. B.
30. This decision-making situ ation best highlights:
A.
Meera’s inexperience i n handling her staff.
B.
Meera’s short-sightedn ess in making business related decisions.
C.
Meera’s underestimatio n of experience of the senior managers.
D.
Meera’s aggressive app roach to expand her business.
A]
A, B and C
B]
A and B
C] C and D
D]
Only B
E]
A, B, C and D
Section (B)
DIRECTIONS for questions 31-36: Go through the following passage and answer the
questions that follow each.
In the mid-1980s, India’s mid dle class comprised just 10 percent of the po pulation. Today,
it’s larger than the entire popu lation of the United States and is predicted to
grow to 445
million by the end of this dec ade. For 70 years, Mohandas Gandhi’s myopi c vision of
backward-looking socialism a s a template for national advancement was a ccepted as revealed
wisdom by a string of Indian prime ministers, starting with his acolyte, Ne hru. Despite a
plenitude of cotton, Gandhi di dn’t think India should create a cotton indust ry, believing
instead that every family shou ld own a spinning wheel and spin its own. H e didn’t believe
India should develop a manuf acturing base, which not only caused the dea d hand of ‘import
substitution’ to smother nativ e initiative, but the failure to develop factorie s meant there was
also a failure to develop infras structure like roads and ports to take goods to market.
Now at last, riding on a new s urge of confidence at home and overseas, Ind ians have ditched
austerity, the spinning wheel
and the Mahatma and are spending it up like maharajas. In a
recent survey, 90 percent of th em cheerfully admitted that they spend their disposable income
on non-essentials.
Twenty-five years ago, they h ad a choice of one car and one colour: the A mbassador (top
speed 35 mph); it was black a nd you had to order it years in advance. Toda y, the consumer
chooses from among 40 mode ls produced by 13 companies.
When Gandhi’s thinking still prevailed, Indians expected poor quality cons umer goods
(Gandhi’s beloved ‘import su bstitution’) and expected a dismissive attitud e to complaints.
Thus the more prudent held o ff buying. Today, reliability and competitive after-sales service
are taken for granted.
The world’s top designers hav e discovered that the appetite for designer pr oducts, especially
handbags and shoes, is as rave nous in India as it is in the West, and they’v e flooded in. An
Indian lady no longer has to g o overseas to buy a pair of Jimmy Choos. Vu itton, Chanel,
shopping malls
...
all with cus tomers with money and credit cards. Retail t herapy trumps yoga
for relaxing tired nerves.

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Forbes Magazine’s Rich List last year placed India eighth in terms of the n umber of

Forbes Magazine’s Rich List last year placed India eighth in terms of the n umber of

his logo could be seen overhead.
his logo could be seen overhead.

billionaires. The number of m illionaires trebles every three years. Today, s treet peddlers pack

cellphones.

The Times of India’s Washin gton-based foreign editor, Chitanand Rajghat ta, in a piece on the

Indian diaspora, notes that the re are around 20 to 30 million Indian nationa ls living in some

180 countries, ‘give or take a million or two who are in various transit loun ges’.

No-frills airlines are having th e same effect on travel as they have in Europ e and the US —

more discretionary flying. Th e four economy airlines had captured 30 perc ent of the domestic

market in February of this yea r, which represented a 3 percent growth over January. Among

the four big no-frills carriers i s Kingfisher, owned by flamboyant billionair e and MP Vijay

Mallya. Mallya also owns a p opular Indian beer — Kingfisher. Irked becau se India doesn’t

allow advertising of alcohol o n its territory, he decided to start Kingfisher Air at a cost of 1.5

billion rupees ($23 million) so

How does one account for thi s massive swell of confidence?

According to India’s Business Line, only 54 percent of Indians now think

a rupee saved is a

rupee earned. Part of the reaso n for the spendathon on mutual funds, consu mer goods,

property, clothes and foreign t ravel, thinks Business Line’s Amit Mitra, is, Indian consumers

are also the most optimistic in the world in terms of their expectations for e mployment

opportunities and the health o f their personal finances. They top AC Nielse n’s Global

Consumer Confidence index

with a score of 127. The global average was 9 2. India has an

estimated growth rate of 8 per cent.

Surprisingly, losing out on all this trade is Britain, the former colonial adm inistrator and

major commercial partner for almost 300 years. It is that other developing giant, China, that

does the lion’s share of trade

with India, accounting for 6 percent of the wh ole. Next up,

America and tiny Switzerland , with 5 percent each. Even Belgium and Ger many, with 4

percent each beat out Britain’ s Lilliputian 3 percent. As for imports, again, Britain has been

inexplicably slow off the mar k, taking just four percent of India’s exports, whereas the United

States imports a whacking 18 percent. (China buys 6 percent, which is exa ctly what it

exports.)

Commenting on this rush to t he head, Sarang Panchal, AC Nielsen executi ve director for

South Asia said, ‘Socially and

economically, India is developing at a gallo ping pace when

compared to the rest of the wo rld.

‘In India, the assessment of ec onomic performance over the last 6 months

has moved up

smartly when compared to the previous six months. Seventy-nine percent o f Indians felt that

the economy had improved. T he follow-through of this positive evaluation has obviously

carried forward aggressively.’

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He predicts: ‘For the coming 12 month period, India is clearly the most op timistic country
He predicts: ‘For the coming 12 month period, India is clearly the most op timistic country

He predicts: ‘For the coming 12 month period, India is clearly the most op timistic country in

not fully inferable from the passage C] II and IV D] I, II and V
not fully inferable from the passage
C] II and IV
D] I, II and V

the world. With 88 percent of Indians bullish about the country’s economic

performance

going forward, we are even m ore positive than China. In the context of the global economy,

international

this forms an important inflec tion point in our perception even amongst the

investment community.’

  • 31. The author believes that I ndians are justified in being highly optimistic about their economic future.

    • A] Definitely true as infer red from the passage

    • B] Partially true as inferre d from the passage

    • C] Cannot be determined, as she only quotes others who say so

    • D] Probably not, though s he is aware that Indians are very confident

    • E] Not necessarily, as she adopts a cautionary tone later in the passage

Section (C)

  • 32. What does the author mea n by the statement 'Retail therapy trumps yog a for relaxing tired nerves'?

    • A] Indians no longer cons ider traditions like yoga relaxing.

    • B] Indians now go in for c osmopolitan hobbies instead of their traditio nal ones.

    • C] Indians are spurning th eir spiritual heritage and becoming more mat erialistic.

    • D] Indian preferences are changing drastically because of the new econ omic climate.

    • E] Indians now spend so

yoga.

much time shopping that they have no time fo r traditions like

Section (C)

  • 33. Mahatma Gandhi supporte ed an economic policy that encouraged India ns not to rely on imports, and instead devel op consumer goods indigenously.

    • A] True only in certain cir cumstances and false in others

    • B] Partially true as the go ods thus produced were of poor quality

    • C] Could be true, though

    • D] Completely false as M ahatma Gandhi encouraged imports

    • E] Completely false as M ahatma Gandhi did not encourage industry at all

Section (C)

  • 34. The following can be infe rred from the passage: I. The majority of Indians no longer think that saving is necessary. II. The current population of the United States is less than 445 million. III. The growing number o of Indian nationals living abroad is a cause fo r some concern in India. IV. According to Chitanan d Rajghatta, more than a million Indians are travelling abroad at present. V. Britain does not trade a s much with India as it should because it doe s not realize that

E] III, IV and V

its former colony has prog ressed so much.

A] I and III

B] I an d IV

Section (C)

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35. From which of the followi ng countries does India import the most? A] China B]
35.
From which of the followi ng countries does India import the most?
A]
China
B] Switzerland
C] The United States
D]
Both [1] and [2]
E] Both [2] and [3]
Section (C)
36.
Starting an airline in order to advertise his brand of beer would have de finitely proved
counterproductive for Vij ay Mallya if :
A]
setting up the airline h ad been a very costly venture.
B]
the income generated b y the airline had not been enough to cover its
costs.
C]
the profits generated b y this form of advertising had not been enoug h to offset the cost
of setting up an airline.
D]
the unprofitable airline had not generated enough publicity for the b eer to offset the
cost of setting it up in the first place.
E]
the publicity generated
by this venture resulted in the brand name K ingfisher being
linked more to the airline industry than to the beer industry.
Section (C)
DIRECTIONS for questions 37-40: Go through the following passage and answer the
questions that follow each.
Bayes’ Theorem is a mathem atical engine for combining many estimated l ikelihoods and
coming up with a final verdict , which bears its own quantitative estimate o f likelihood. But of
course that final estimate can only be as good as the original numbers fed i n. These are
usually subjectively judged, w ith all the doubts that inevitably flow from t hat. The GIGO
principle (Garbage In, Garbag e Out) is applicable here — and, in the case
of Unwin’s God
example, applicable is too mil d a word. Unwin is a risk management consu ltant who carries a
torch for Bayesian inference, as against rival statistical methods. He illustr ates Bayes’
Theorem by taking on the big gest test case of all, the existence of God. Th e plan is to start
with complete uncertainty, wh ich he chooses to quantify by assigning the e xistence and non-
existence of God a 50 per cen t starting likelihood each. Then he lists six fa cts that might bear
on the matter, puts a numerica l weighting on each, feeds the six numbers i nto the engine of
Bayes’ Theorem and sees wh at number pops out. The trouble is that the six
weightings are
not measured quantities but si mply Stephen Unwin’s own personal judgem ents, turned into
numbers for the sake of the ex ercise. For what it is worth (nothing, in my o pinion), at the end
of a ding-dong Bayesian race in which God surges ahead in the betting, the n drops way back,
then claws his way up to the 5 0 per cent mark from which he started, he fi
ally ends up
enjoying, in Unwin’s estimati on, a 67 per cent likelihood of existing. Unw in then decides that
his Bayesian verdict of 67 per cent isn’t high enough, so he takes the bizar re step of boosting
it to 95 per cent by an emerge ncy injection of ‘faith’. It sounds like a joke, but that really is
how he proceeds. I wish I cou ld say how he justifies it, but there really is n othing to say.
37.
From the given passage, w e can say that the author’s attitude towards B ayes’ Theorem is:
A]
neutral — he has no op inion for or against it.
B]
mildly positive — he t hinks that it is a useful mathematical engine.
C]
highly positive — he c onsiders it an indispensable mathematical too l.

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D] mildly negative — he t hinks it is only as good as the subjective esti
D] mildly negative — he t hinks it is only as good as the subjective esti
  • D] mildly negative — he t hinks it is only as good as the subjective esti mates fed into it.

D] mildly negative — he t hinks it is only as good as the subjective esti
  • E] highly negative — he t hinks that it is far too subjective in nature to

practical use.

ever be of any

Section (C)

  • 38. Which of the following is most likely to be a summary of the GIGO pr inciple, based on the passage?

    • A] If the basic premises u sed to arrive at a conclusion are not explicitly stated, then the

conclusion will be worthle ss.

  • B] If the basic premises u sed to arrive at a conclusion are themselves fl awed, then the

conclusion will be worthle ss.

  • C] If the basic premises u sed to arrive at a conclusion are not the only r elevant premises,

then the conclusion will b e worthless.

  • D] If the likelihood of the basic premises used to arrive at a conclusion is unknown, then

Section (C)

a conclusion cannot be de rived from them.

  • E] None of these.

  • 39. Which of the following lin es of thinking shows the same logical flaws as Unwin's God example?

    • A] XYZ calculates the am ount of damage done to the environment bas ed on reports by

environmental scientists a nd the oil industry, and then dismisses the fo rmer findings.

  • B] XYZ calculates the pos sibility that ghosts exist based on anecdotes by people who

claim to have seen them, a nd concludes that they do not because he him self does not

believe in ghosts.

  • C] XYZ calculates the pos sibility that extraterrestrial life exists based o n the subjective

likelihood of the argumen ts for and against it, and then concludes that i t must exist, based

on a gut feeling.

  • D] XYZ calculates the po ssibility that the Earth will be hit by a large m eteorite in the near

future based on statistics o f past such occurrences and scientific predic tions, and then

concludes that it is highly unlikely.

  • E] None of these.

Section (C)

would have made

  • 40. Which of the following st eps, had it been adopted by Stephen Unwin, his God example more acc ceptable to the author?

    • A] If Unwin's subjective w eighting of the facts bearing on God's existe nce had been more

than six in number.

  • B] If Unwin's subjective w eighting of the facts bearing on God's existe nce had been more

objective.

  • C] If Unwin had not assig ned numerical weightings on the facts bearin g on God's

existence.

  • D] If Unwin had not taken the additional step of injecting 'faith' into hi s equations.

  • E] None of these.

Section (C)

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DIRECTIONS for questions 41-45: Go through the following passage an d answer the questions that follow
DIRECTIONS for questions 41-45: Go through the following passage an d answer the questions that follow

DIRECTIONS for questions 41-45: Go through the following passage an d answer the

questions that follow each.

In order to achieve their ends, the socialist economic planners must create power—power

over men wielded by other m en— of a magnitude never before known. Th eir success will

depend on the extent to which they achieve such power. Democracy is an o bstacle to this

suppression of freedom, whic h the centralized direction of economic activi ty requires. Hence

arises the clash between plann ing and democracy.

Many socialists have the tragi c illusion that by depriving private individua ls of the power

they possess in an individuali st system, and transferring this power to socie ty, they thereby

extinguish power. By uniting in the hands of some single body power form erly exercised

independently by many, an am ount of power is created infinitely greater th an any that existed

before, so much more far-reac hing as almost to be different in kind. It is en tirely fallacious to

argue that the great power exe rcised by a central planning board would be “no greater than

the power collectively exercis ed by private

boards of directors”. There is, in a competitive society, nobody who can ex ercise even a

fraction of the power, which a socialist planning board would possess. To

decentralize power

is to reduce the absolute amou nt of power, and the competitive system is th e only system

designed to minimize the pow er exercised by man over man. Who can seri ously doubt that

the power, which a millionair e, who may be my employer, has over me, is very much less

than that which the smallest b ureaucrat possesses who wields the coercive power of the state

and on whose discretion it dep ends how I am allowed to live and work?

In every real sense a badly pa id unskilled workman in this country has mor e freedom to shape

his life than many an employe r in Germany or a much better paid engineer or manager in

Russia. If he wants to change his job or the place where he lives, if he wan ts to profess

certain views or spend his leis ure in a particular way, he faces no absolute impediments.

There are no dangers to bodil y security and freedom that confine him by b rute force to the

task and environment to whic h a superior has assigned him. Our generatio n has forgotten that

the system of private property is the most important guarantee of freedom. When all the

means of production are veste d in a single hand, whether it be nominally th at of “society” as

a whole or that of a dictator, w hoever exercises this control has complete p ower over us. In

the hands of private individua ls, what is called economic power can be an instrument of

coercion, but it is never contr ol over the whole life of a person. But when e conomic power is

centralized as an instrument o f political power it creates a degree of depen dence scarcely

distinguishable from slavery. It has been well said that, in a country where the sole employer

is the state, opposition means death by slow starvation.

Individualism, in contrast to s ocialism and all other forms of totalitarianism , is based on the

respect of Christianity for the individual man and the belief that it is desira ble that men

should be free to develop thei r own individual gifts and bents. This philoso phy, first fully

developed during the Renaiss ance, grew and spread into what we know as Western

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civilization. The general direc tion of social development was one of freein g the individual from
civilization. The general direc tion of social development was one of freein g the individual
from the ties which bound him
in feudal society.
Perhaps the greatest result of t this unchaining of individual energies was th e marvellous
growth of science. Only since industrial freedom opened the path to the fre e use of new
knowledge, only since everyt hing could be tried — if somebody could be f ound to back it at
his own risk — has science m ade the great strides which in the last 150 ye ars have changed
the face of the world. The res ult of this growth surpassed all expectations. Wherever the
barriers to the free exercise of human ingenuity were removed, man becam e rapidly able to
satisfy ever-widening ranges
of desire. By the beginning of the 20th centur y the working man
in the Western World had rea ched a degree of material comfort, security a nd personal
independence which 100 year s before had hardly seemed possible.
41.
Amongst the given option s, the one most opposite to the ideology bein g advocated by the
author is:
A]
Collectivism.
B]
Capitalism.
C] Socialism.
D]
Marxism.
E]
Fascism.
Section (C)
42.
Among the options given below, the one that best captures the ideolog y advocated by the
author is:
A]
Collectivism.
B]
Capitalism.
C] Socialism.
D]
Marxism.
E]
Fascism.
Section (C)
43.
When the author says that 'the system of private property is the most im portant guarantee
of freedom', he probably i mplies that:
A]
because the control of the means of production is divided among m any people acting
independently, we as indi viduals can decide what to do with ourselves.
B]
in the hands of private individuals the control of the means of produ ction can be an
instrument of manipulatio n of resources that results in uneven distribut ion of wealth.
C]
because there are too m any people who wield control over the mean s of production, it
becomes very difficult to
determine the contribution of each and divide the produce
evenly.
D]
because the control of the means of production is not centralized an d the private
players are independent o f state control, they are free to amass as much wealth as
possible.
E]
with the control of the means of production centralized in a few han ds, it becomes
imperative that the state s hould interfere in order to uphold the freedom
of the
individuals.
Section (C)
44. According to the author, in a
socialist set-up why would the smallest burea ucrat wield more
power over an individual than a millionaire who employs many people in h is organization?

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A] Because in a socialist set-u p, individuals relinquish their power so that i t can
A]
Because in a socialist set-u p, individuals relinquish their power so that i t can be used in
the interest of the entire natio n.
B]
Because in a socialist set-u p, power is centralized for use in the service of a single plan
which infinitely increases the power of the state.
C]
Because a socialist set-up
condemns concentration of wealth in few han ds and favours
decentralization of power.
D]
Because in a socialist set-u p government officials wield enormous pow er over individuals.
E]
Because a millionaire, if al lowed to function independently, would try t o seize
bureaucratic power and use it for his own selfish interests.
Section (C)
45. On the basis of your reading o f the passage, which of the following do you think is NOT a
measure representing the soci alist ideology?
A]
Introduction of a political party that embraces all activities of the indivi dual from the
cradle to the grave
B]
Using economic power as a tool for gaining compliance of people towa rds a particular
type of economic structure
C]
Devising ways for perman ent supervision of private lives
D]
Paying people on the basis of the degree of skills they possess
E]
None of the above
Section (C)
46.
Choose the option that co rrectly unscrambles the paragraph below.
1.
This takes energy and c ommitment, as few people will immediately buy into a radical
vision, and some will join the show much more slowly than others.
2.
The important factor is the leader buys into it, hook, line and sinker.
3.
This vision may be dev eloped by the leader, by the senior team or m ay emerge from a
broad series of discussion s.
4.
Transformational Leade rship starts with the development of a vision , a view of the
future that will excite and convert potential followers.
5.
The next step, which in fact never stops, is to constantly sell the visi on.
6.
The Transformational L eader thus takes every opportunity and will u se whatever works
to convince others to clim b on board the bandwagon.
A]
4-5-1-3-2-6
B] 4-2-3-1-5-6
C] 4-3-2-5-1-6
D]
4-1-3-2-5-6
E] 4-3-6-2-1-5
Section (C)
47.
Thompson's biographical method is not organization but evocation; rat her than order the
material into a chronologi cal narrative, she wants us to know what the subject feels and
offers novelistic insights i nto her state of mind.
Which of the following ch oices most accurately captures the meaning o f 'evocation' as
used in the above sentenc e?

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A] unique philosophy B] abstract discussion C] hap hazard narration D] imaginative recreation E] long-winded anecdote
A]
unique philosophy
B]
abstract discussion
C] hap hazard narration
D]
imaginative recreation
E]
long-winded anecdote
Section (C)
48.
⋯ … … … . ?
!
!
!
[A]
e
[B] 2e
[C] 3e
[D] 5e
[E] 4.5 e
Section (A)
49.
3 1 4 1 5 1 6√ 1 ⋯ . ?
[A] 14
[B]15
[C] 3√30
[D]20
[E] None of These
Section (A)
Directions for question 50-51
: The following questions consist of a capita lized word that is
followed by four words or phr ases. Choose the lettered word or phrase wh ose meaning is
most nearly opposite to the m eaning of the capitalized word. Because som e questions require
you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, it is advisable to consider all th e choices before
deciding on the best choice.
50.
MODISH:
[A]
eliciting admiration an nd joy
[B] avoiding harm and
danger
[C]
lacking style and fashi onableness
[D] providing vitality and fortitude
[E]
None of these
Section (C)
51.
SPINY:
[A]
heavy
[B] pla cid
[C] smooth
[D] ter se
[E] soft
Section (C)
Directions for questions 52-5 4 : Four alternative summaries are given bel ow each piece of
text. Choose the option that b est captures the essence of the text. If none o f them are best
summarization of given text
choose option [E]
52.
In practice the governmen t will have the last word on what an individu al’s rights are,
because its police will do what its officials and courts say. But that do es not mean that
the government’s view is necessarily the correct view; anyone who thi nks it is must
believe that persons have only such moral rights as the government cho oses to grant,
which means that they hav e no moral rights at all.
[A]
Individuals have no ri ghts at all unless the government says that th ey do.
[B]
What government offi cials and courts say an individual’s rights are may not be
correct.

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[C] Individuals have right s unless the government says that they do not . [D]The police
  • [C] Individuals have right s unless the government says that they do not .

[C] Individuals have right s unless the government says that they do not . [D]The police

[D]The police always agre e with government officials and the courts a bout what an

individual’s rights are.

Section (C)

  • 53. The obsession of economi sts with consumption as a measure of econo mic well-being has prevented us from underst anding the true nature of economic well-bein g. We get very little satisfaction out of th e fact that our clothing wears out, our automo biles depreciate, and the gasoline in our tha nks burns up and must be replaced.

    • [A] economic well-being cannot be defined solely in terms of consump tion

    • [B] satisfaction is possible without consumption

    • [C] valid measures of con sumption cannot be devised

    • [D] satisfaction can provi de an adequate quantitative measure of econo mic well-being

Section (C)

  • 54. The current theory about e arthquake holds that they are caused by adjo ining plates of rock sliding past each other; th e plates are pressed together until powerful fo rces overcome the

mysterious on this

resistance. As plausible a s this may sound, at least one thing remains

theory. The overcoming o f such resistance should create enormous am ounts of heat. But

so far no increases in temp erature unrelated to weather have been detec ted following

earthquakes.

  • [A] No increases in tempe rature have been detected following earthqua kes.

  • [B] The current theory do es not fully explain earthquake data.

[C]No one will ever be su re that the true cause of earthquakes is.

  • [D] Contrary to the curren t theory, earthquakes are not caused b adjoin ing plates of rock

Section (C)

a 3 dimensional

sliding past one another.

Directions for next three questions: A 3 dimensional grid a placed in

co-ordinate system as sho wn:

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Each cell (small cube let) is identified by its co-ordinates (x, y, z) wher e x,
Each cell (small cube let) is identified by its co-ordinates (x, y, z) wher e x, y, z is the cell
number along the X, Y an d Z axis respectively. E.g. the lightly shaded cube let is
identified as (6, 2, 1) beca use it is the 6 th cube along the X-axis, 2 nd alo ng the X-axis and
1 st along the Z-axis
The right-most, back-mos t and top-most cube let (as shown in the figur e by the black cell)
has its co-ordinates (A, B, C)
55.
An even number is placed in a cell that has all of x, y and z odd. An od d number is
placed in a cell that has al l of x, y and z even. All other cells are vacan t. Which of the
following are true?
I.
If A is odd, B is even an d C is odd, even numbers in the grid are mor e than odd
numbers.
II. If A, B and C are even, even numbers in the grid are more than odd numbers.
III. If A, B and C are odd, odd numbers in the grid are more than even numbers.
[A]
I only
[B]
II only
[C] III only
[D]
I and II only
[E]
All
Section (A)
56.
If (A, B, C) is (4, 4, 4) and
in each cell denoted by (x, y, z), a number e qual to x + y + z is
placed, what is the sum of the numbers placed in all the cells?
[A]
480
[B] 640
[C]
720
[D] 780
[E] None of these
Section (A)
57.
Which of the relation is tr ue about m and n?
I.
All cells where no two o f x, y, z are same are filled with 1 and all oth er cells are filled
with 0.
If A = B = c = 5,
m refers to the number of 1’s that are placed?
II. If A = 8, B = 9 and C =
10 and every cell (x, y, z) that satisfies the c ondition that 2 < x
< 7, 3 < y < 8 and 4 < z < 9 is filled with a 1.
Rest all the cells are fille d with a 0. n
refers to the sum of the nu mbers placed in all the cells.
[A]
m > n
[B]
n > m
[C] m = n
[D]
Cannot be determined
[E]
None of these
Section (A)
Directions for questions5 8-60:
A 20 over match was pla yed between Magical MP and Awesome AP.
The line graphs
below refer to the current run rate for the team that batted first and the required run rate
for the team that batted se cond. However it is not known which is line is the current run-
rate and which is the requi ired run rate. But it is known that the top line
refers to that of
team Magical MP and the lower line refers to awesome AP. Hence we do not know who
batted first and who batted
second.
The current run rate and r equired run rate is defined as:

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Current Run Rate = . Required Run Rate = . Score required to win is at
Current Run Rate = . Required Run Rate = . Score required to win is at
Current Run Rate =
.
Required Run Rate =
.
Score required to win is at least 1 more than the score that the team batt ed first made.
Y-axis represents the run
rate at the end of every 2 over’s e.g. run rate for Magical MP at
the end of 2 over’s was 10 , at the end of 4 over’s was 8.5 and so on.
Since the required run-rat e is not defined at the end of the 20 th over, he nce neither is the
required run-rate nor the c urrent rate given in the two line graphs at the end of 20 th over.
Instead it is know that the team that batted first made 7 runs in the last two over and the
team that batted second m ade 12 runs in the last two over’s. Also sinc e the current run-
rate at start of the game is not significant, hence the first value of the re quired run-rate is
also only after two over’s and not at start of the innings.
[B] Only II [C] Neither I nor II [E] Can't be determined [C] 319 [D] 317
[B]
Only II
[C] Neither I nor II
[E]
Can't be determined
[C] 319
[D] 317
[C] 11-12
[D] 17-18

Section (A)

  • 58. Which of the following qu estions can be answered using the above dat a?

I. Which team batted f irst?

II. Which team won th e match?

[A]

Only I

[D]

Both I and II

teams?

[A]

161

[A]

3-4

  • 60. In which two overs did A wesome AP make minimum runs?

[B] 7-8

Directions for questions6 1-63:

  • 59. What were the total runs s cored in the match i.e. total of the runs score d by both the

[B] 321

  • [E] None of These

Section (A)

  • [E] None of These

Section (A)

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A law firm has 5 lawyers, A, B, C, D and E working for it. Each
A law firm has 5 lawyers, A, B, C, D and E working for it. Each

A law firm has 5 lawyers, A, B, C, D and E working for it. Each case

A law firm has 5 lawyers, A, B, C, D and E working for it. Each
all the 3 courts? [C] 12 [D] 13 all the 3 courts? [C] 2 [D] 3
all the 3 courts?
[C]
12
[D] 13
all the 3 courts?
[C]
2
[D] 3
exactly 1 court?
[C]
32
[D] 42

[E] No ne of these

A law firm has 5 lawyers, A, B, C, D and E working for it. Each

handled by the firm

is represented by only 1 la wyer. However, each case may have to be re presented in any

of the three courts – Assau lt, Cheating or Product Liability. Each case is represented in

atleast one of these three c ourts. Representing a case in a particular co urt is called as

court representation. Thu s each case can have any of 1 or 2 or 3 court representation.

The bar graph below give s the total number of cases that a lawyer is re presenting and the

line graph gives the total n umber of court representations made by a la wyer. The bar

graph is read on the left Y -axis whereas the lien graph is read on the rig ht Y-axis.

  • 61. Of the cases being handle d by the firm, what can be the maximum num ber of cases that have to be represented in [A] 10

[B] 11

Section (A)

  • 62. Of the cases being handle d by the firm, what can be the minimum num ber of cases that have to be represented in [A] 0

[B] 1

[E] No ne of these

Section (A)

  • 63. Of the cases being handle d by the firm, what can be the maximum num ber of cases that have to be represented in [A] 25

[B] 27

[E] No ne of these

Directions for questions 64-6 8:

Section (A)

Ram took four tests, A, B, C, and D, each having different maximum mark s. And the scores,

that Ram scored in the four te sts, in no particular order, are 36, 48, 60 and 72. The maximum

marks of the tests, again in no particular order, are 80, 100, 120 and 150.

In each of the question below, two statements labeled I and II are given. C hoose your answer

as:

  • [A] If statement I is necessaril ly true and statement II is necessarily false

  • [B] If statement II is necessari ly true and statement I is necessarily false

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[C] If both statements, I and I I are necessarily true [D] If both statements, I
[C]
If both statements, I and I I are necessarily true
[D]
If both statements, I and I I, are necessarily false.
[E]
Can't say
64.
I.
The total percentage sco red by Ram in all the 4 tests in 48%
II. If the pass percentage i n each of the test is 40%, then the maximum tests that Ram can
fail is just 1 test.
Section (A)
65.
I.
If Ram scored 60% in t wo subjects considered together, then the mar ks in the two
subjects have to be 36 and 72
II. If Ram scored 60% in t wo subjects considered together, then the ma rks in the two
subjects have to be 48 and 60
Section (A)
66.
I.
There is exactly 1 test in
which it is not possible for Ram to score 60 %
II. If Ram has scored 60% in three tests, then percent scored in the four th test is 24%
Section (A)
67.
The two tests of 80 marks and 120 marks is considered as Group A and the two tests of
marks 100 marks and 150 marks is considered as group B
I.
Ram could have scored equal percentages in the two groups A and B .
II. If percentage scored in Group B is greater than that scored in Group A, then percent
scored in Group A is 42% .
Section (A)
68.
Triangle ABC is isosceles with the unequal side being AC. Point P an d Q are
respectively in CB and AB
such that AC = AP = PQ = QB. Measure o f angel B in
degrees is
[A] 25
[B 26
[C] 30
[D] 40
[E] No ne of these
Section (A)
Directions for questions 69-7 1: Each question has a set of four sequentiall y ordered
statements. Each statement c an be classified as one of the following:
-Facts, which deal with pi eces of information that one has heard, seen or read, and which
are open to discovery or v erification (the answer option indicates such a statement with
an” F’).
-Inferences, which are co nclusions drawn about the unknown, on the b asis of the known
(the answer option indicat es such a statement with an” I’).

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-Judgments , which are op inions that imply approval or disapproval of persons, objects, [C] JIFI
-Judgments , which are op inions that imply approval or disapproval of persons, objects, [C] JIFI

-Judgments, which are op inions that imply approval or disapproval of persons, objects,

[C] JIFI [D] FFFI like the theater and films – is an unholy mix [C] JJJJ
[C]
JIFI
[D] FFFI
like the theater and films – is an unholy mix
[C]
JJJJ
[D] JJIF
[C]
JFFJ
[D] JFFI
[E] IIII

[E] FF FF

situations and occurrences in the past, the present or the future (the ans wer option

indicates such a statement with a” J’).

  • 1. Something must be don e to stop spam.

  • 2. In early days, people se ldom received unsolicited email advertiseme nt; but now

numerous bulk email soft ware and email address finders are developed to collect email

address all around the wor ld.

  • 3. Advertisers use email a ddresses to market their products and even se ll such email lists

to other advertisers.

  • 4. As a result, almost ever yone gets junk email, and sometimes several and even tens of

annoying emails a day. S o, relevant anti-spam regulations should be fr amed to stop

unsolicited advertising.

  • [A] IFFI

[B] JFF I

Section (C)

  • 1. Editors need encourage ment, freedom.

  • 2. They must be allowed t o make mistakes.

  • 3. The business of books –

commerce.

  • 4. Like oil and water they don’t naturally go together.

    • [A] FFFF

[B] IIII

of art and

[E] FFJJ

Section (C)

  • 1. Neville Chamberlai n was nothing if not a diligent correspondent

  • 2. Every week he wr ote to his sisters Ida and Hilda letters that wer e in effect a diary of all that he was d oing politically.

  • 3. They have long be en invaluable for historians in achieve form, but now they have finally been publis hed in extensor, along with a scholarly fifty- page introduction and helpful footno tes by their very diligent editor, Robert Self.

  • 4. Unfortunately the huge price of this book will mean that few wi ll be able to buy a copy.

Section (C)

  • [A] FFFF

[B] FFI I

69.

70.

71.

Directions for questions 72-7 3: The following questions are based on the reasoning

contained in the following bri ef passages. Choose the best answer that mo st accurately and

completely answers the questi on.

Rahul: Some scientists ex plain the dance of honeybees as the means by which honeybees

communicate the location of whatever food source they have just visite d to other

members of the hive. But honeybees do not need so complicated a me chanism to

communicate that informa tion. Forager honeybees returning to their hi ve simply leave a

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scent trail from the food s ource they have just visited. There must ther efore be

scent trail from the food s ource they have just visited. There must ther efore be some

scent trail from the food s ource they have just visited. There must ther efore be

other explanation for the h oneybees’ dance.

Simran: Not necessarily.

Most animals have several ways of accompl ishing critical

tasks. Bees of some speci es can navigate using either the position of th e Sun or the

memory of landmarks. Si milarly, for honeybees, scent trails are a supp lementary not an

exclusive means of comm unicating.

  • 72. The point at issue Rahul a nd Simran is whether

  • [A] theories of animal beh avior can be established on the basis of evide nce about only

one species of animal

  • [B] there is more than one valid explanation for the dance of honeybee s

  • [C] honeybees communic ate the location of food sources through their dance

  • [D] the honeybees is the o nly species of that is capable of communicati ng navigational

information to other hi ive members

  • [E] None of these

Section (C)

  • 73. In Simran’s response to R ahul, the statement about how bees of some s pecies navigate plays which one of the fol lowing roles?

    • [A] It addresses an ambig uity in Rahul’s use of the expression “commu nicate the

location.”

  • [B] It provides evidence i n support of a general claim.

  • [C] It calls into question t he accuracy of key evidence cited by Rahul.

  • [D] It points out that Rahu l’s conclusion directly contradicts one of his premises.

  • [E] None of these

Direction for question 74-75 : Read the paragraph and solve stated questi ons

Section (C)

One way or another, the h istoriography of science has been greatly bro adened, not to say

transformed, in recent dec ades. And the impulse for this came, in part a t least, from the

n at the same

coordinate transformation in the philosophy of science that was going

time. One consequence of this shift, of course, has been that philosoph ers who are

concerned with the theorie s and theorists of the past in terms of the trad itional concerns

with evidence, explanatio n and justification, find rather less of interest in many, but I

should emphasize, not all, of the history-of-science journals today than they would

have done of yore. On the other hand, philosophers who aim to explore the implications

of the new socialization h ave no trouble in finding grist for their mill in

recent work in the

history of science. From t he side of the working historian of science, h owever, it would

seem hazardous to claim t hat philosophic issues or explicit references t o work in the

philosophy of science play y a larger role today in their work than they d id forty years ago.

  • 74. Which of the following be st summarizes the above paragraph?

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A] Recent work in the hist tory of science has been influenced by philos ophy from
  • A] Recent work in the hist tory of science has been influenced by philos ophy from that

A] Recent work in the hist tory of science has been influenced by philos ophy from

point in time.

  • B] Historical accounts of science in today's journals are better than tho se in the past.

  • C] Even though philosoph ers who want to research new socialization f ind sufficient

matter in the recently publ ished work on the history of science, it doesn 't carry much

about the traditional conce rns that others might be interested in.

  • D] The historian currently seeking theories of science finds it difficult t o locate

the publications of the phi losophy of science from forty years ago.

  • E] All of the above.

philosophical issues and w ell-defined references to works in the philos ophy of science in

Section (C)

  • 75. Which of the following st atements is the author most likely to agree wi th?

    • A] The philosopher of yes teryears was more dedicated to bringing the t rue story of

science to the reader.

  • B] The historiography of s cience has altered with time, as with most th ings, and has

explored newer horizons.

  • C] History of science play s a key role in contributing to newer philoso

hies emerging

from old ones.

  • D] Not many of the histor y-of-science journals of recent times truly ex plore the theories

and theorists of the past.

  • E] A chronology of scient ific achievements is the only thing that can b e found in current

historiography.

Section (C)

  • 76. Ecologists apply the term “biome” to the major divisions of ecosystem types, largely based on the structure of t heir most prevalent vegetation. The tundra b iome, for example, found in the Arctic and hi gh in the mountains of all latitudes, is charact erized by low – growing perennial plants t hat can survive in soil that remains frozen fo r most of the year. The temperate grassland b iome, on the other hand, is found in those are as of the world that remain relatively dry throughout the year and is distinguished by s tructurally simple grasses and scrub brush d ominating the landscape. In the last sentence of the passage, the author implies that grasses and scrub brush

    • [A] only live in the tempe rate grassland biome

[B]can only thrive in dry c limates

  • [C] require relatively little water to survive

  • [D] are, by definition, stru cturally simple

  • [E] None of these

Section (C)

Directions for questions

spaced apart in a circular

77-78: Six objects, each of a different color a re placed equally

arrangement. Three friends, Aakash, Mohan and Gautam see

the arrangement and make the following observation:

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Aakash: The ball is oppos ite the vase and to the immediate right of the cup
Aakash: The ball is oppos ite the vase and to the immediate right of the cup
Mohan: The green object is opposite the blue object and has the black
object to its
immediate right.
Gautam: Two objects are an orange cap and a red bell. And neither of them are adjacent
nor opposite.
77.
If the sixth color is white, which object is white in color?
[A]
Cup
[B]
Vase
[C] Ball
[D]
The sixth unnamed ob ject
[E] None of these
Section (B)
78.
If the sixth object is a pen , it is of which color?
[A]
Blue
[B] Bla ck
[C] White
[D]
Red
[E] can not be determined
Section (B)
Directions for questions79-8 2: In a game of Musical Chair, the number of chairs is always
atleast 1 less than the number of players in that round. All those who get a chair to sit in,
once the music stops, succeed to the next round and those who do not get a ny chair to sit in
are eliminated. Thus atleast o ne player is eliminated in each round. Furth er, the chairs are
reduced in each successive ro und till at last there is just one winner and all the other
participants are eliminated. A bout a particular game, we have the followin g data:
A.
The number of cha irs removed in each round is a different num ber. The number
of chairs in the fift h round was two less than the number of cha irs in the fourth
round.
B.
The winner was de cided in 5 rounds
C.
To start with, i.e. i n round 1, there were 11 chairs
D.
The ratio of the nu mber of participants in round 3 and round 4 i s 2 : 1.
79.
The number of chairs in ro ound 3 were how many less than the number of chairs in round
2?
[A]
1
[B] 2
[C]
3
[D] 4
[E] Ca
't be determined
Section (B)
80.
How many participants w ere eliminated in the last round?
[A]
1
[B] 2
[C]
3
[D] 4
[E] No ne of these
Section (B)
81.
Find the number of partici pants in round 4.
[A]
1
[C] 2
[C]
3
[D] 4
[E] No ne of these
Section (B)

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82. Which of the following re presents the number of chairs removed betwe en the rounds
82.
Which of the following re presents the number of chairs removed betwe en the rounds in
the correct order?
[A]
3, 4, 1, 2
[B]
1, 4, 3, 2
[C] 3, 1, 4, 2
[D]
3, 2, 4, 1
[E]
None of these
Section (B)
Directions for questions 83-8 5: At a fabrication shop, three products A, B and C have to be
produced and there are three
machines , and . Further to produce A, three processes
have to be completed , , , strictly in the same order. Similarly t o produce B, four
processes, . , h have to be completely, strictly in the same or der. However to
produce C, only two processe s, have to be completed, again in the same order.
Any of the successive process cannot be started until the previous process is complete for the
particular product. Also not a ll the processes can be done on any of the m achines. The table
below gives the time taken by each of the machines to complete any of the processes. A ‘—
‘in a cell implies that the spec ific process cannot be done on that machine.
6
6
--
A
--
5
--
4
5
5
--
6
--
B
--
5
7
7
9
--
5
3
3
C
4
-- --
83.
What is the minimum tim e in which all the three products, A, B and C can be produced?
[A]
21 mins
[B]
23 mins
[C] 24 mins
[D]
25 mins
[E]
None of these
Section (B)
84.
On which machine is the p rocess done?
[A]
[B]
[C]
[D]
On or , does n ot make a difference to total time.
[E] No ne of these
Section (B)

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85. Reducing which of the fol lowing process times would decrease the min imum time taken
85.
Reducing which of the fol lowing process times would decrease the min imum time taken
to produce all of A, B and C
I.
by 1 minute
II. By 3 minute
III.
by 1 minut e
[A]
I only
[B]
I and II
[C] III only
[D]
II and III
[E]
Can't be determined.
Section (B)
Directions for questions 86-8 88: Each of the questions is followed by two
statements, A and
B.
Answer each quest ion using the following instructions.
Choose [A] if question can be
answered by using either statement A or B
alone but cannot be
answered by using the other statement alone
Choose [B] if the question ca n be answered by using A alone and can al so be answered by
using B alone, indepen dently
Choose [C] if the question ca n be answered by using both the statements together but not by
either statement alone
Choose [D] if the question ca nnot be answered on the basis of the two state ments
Choose [E] if the question is
wrongly stated.
86.
In a race between Amol,
Bhagat, Chetan and Dhruv, there were no tie s in any spot. Who
finished last?
A.
No
two of them,
having their first letters
of
their
name
a s
neighbors in the
alphabetical listing, w ere neighbors in the ranking.
B.
A did not finish fir st, B did not finish second, C did not finish third and D did not
finish last.
Section (B)
87.
Three people predicted th e outcome of a race among A, B and C as:
ABC (i.e. A is first,
B is second and C is third) , BAC and CBA.
What was the actual outc ome of the race?
A.
Exactly two of th e predictions were entirely wrong i.e. they did not get even a
single position correct in their predictions.
B.
Two predictions c orrectly predicted exactly one position and
one prediction was
wrong in predicting al l positions.
Section (B)
88.
There are five friends, A, B, C, D and E, standing in a row. B is to the immediate right of
A.
Who is standing in the middle?

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A: C is somewhere be tween D and E B: E is somewhere bet ween B
A: C is somewhere be tween D and E
B: E is somewhere bet ween B and C
Section (B)
Directions for questions 89-9 0:
Each of Akash, Sid, Raj and S ameer played against exactly one of Priety,
Yasmeen, Christine
and Shilpa and each pair com peted in one sport out of Chess, Badminton, Carrom are indoor
games and Badminton and Te nnis are outdoor games.
None of the pairs, Akash & Si id, Sameer & Raj, Priety & Shilpa, Christine & Yasmeen played
the same kind of game i.e. bot h players in a pair did not play indoor games or both did not
play outdoor games.
Akash did not against Priety,
Sid did not play against Yasmeen, Raj did no t play against
Christine and Sameer did not play against Shilpa.
Akash did not play Chess, Sid did not play Badminton, Priety did not play Carrom and
Yasmeen did not play Tennis.
In each of the questions that f ollow, you are given additional data. The dat a given for a
question can be used only for that question. You have to find who played against whom and
which game. And your answe er would be according to the rules:
Choose [A] if the question ca n be answered by using statement A alone bu t cannot be
answered by using B alone
Choose [B] if the question ca n be answered by using statement B alone bu t cannot be
answered by using A alone
Choose [C] if the question ca n be answered by using both the statements to gether but not by
either statement alone
Choose [D] if the question ca nnot be answered on the basis of the two stat ements
Choose [E] if all are wrong.
89.
A. Akash played Carr om
B. Yasmeen played Badminto n
Section (B)
90.
A. Raj played Carrom
B. Shilpa played Badminton.
Section (B)

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ROUGH-WORK
ROUGH-WORK

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