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ISSN: 0976-3759

Volume X

Issue 07

ISSN: 0976-3759

Journal of SCHOOL SOCIAL WORK December 2013

Journal of SCHOOL SOCIAL WORK December 2013

ISSN: 0976-3759

Volume X Date: To Subscription Division, Journal of School Social Work, 8 (New 14), Sridevi Colony, 7th Avenue, Ashok Nagar, Chennai 600083 Past Subscription no:

Issue 07

ISSN: 0976-3759

From Principal/ Librarian,

Social Work Intervention for Academic Excellence


John Packiaraj M* * John Packiaraj M, MSW, MPhil, Project Manager, Thiruvallur Integrated Child Development Project, Help A Child of India.

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Sub: Renewal/ New Subscription reg. Please find enclosed a crossed DD drawn in favour of JOURNAL OF SCHOOL SOCIAL WORK for Rs 1200.00 (5 years subscription) Rs 2400 (10 years subscription) Rs 3600.00 (Patron subscription 15 years) payable at Chennai Service Branch. Details of DD: No: dated drawn on The Journal may please be sent to the following address:

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Journal of School Social Work has a current account (A/C no: 409201010035051) in Ashok Nagar, Chennai branch of Union Bank of India (IFSC Code: UBINO540927.) Subscription can be directly remitted from ANY BANK, anywhere in India.

Introduction: Parenting is all about nurturing children at home and making them respond appropriately to social situations they face elsewhere. While school offers opportunities to obtain information, master new skills and sharpen old ones; to participate in sports, arts and other activities to explore vocational choices and to socialize with friends, family gives all inputs to make things happen at school. School widens intellectual and social horizons. But, family prepares one for it and parenting has a vital role to play in motivating the child to consider experience-at-school as an opportunity. Need for taking board exam: The results of board examinations decide the career and educational ladder they wish to climb. Their entire life appears to hinge on this single factor. Academic marks thelps them to get admission in college. The right college is very important for future advancements and career options. Every adolescent follows his own pace of development. His growth is gradual. Parents tend to consider the

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problems of an adolescent from their point of view which is seldom right. Understanding the adolescents problem as he perceives it paves the way for quicker adjustment and social work principles of accepting the person as he is helps us find the right mix of understanding and direction or confrontation, if need be. Changes in adolescence: Adolescents are more conscious of their rights. Desire for being treated at par with an adult arises. They tend to participate in varied social activities more intensely and frequently. The changes in the body paves way for fear of criticism and censure, embarrassment due to uneven co-ordination of hands, feet and nose. For boys their voice becoming hoarse causes concern. Outbursts of temper occur due to waves of desperation and frustration. The twelfth standard period is naturally a stressful time for adolescents. Two faces of a coin: Schools and parents give equal pressure to the students in academic and social spheres. Schools expect improvement in grades and Journal of SCHOOL SOCIAL WORK December 2013 11

Volume X parents expect social nicities ignoring to board exam as perceived by the developmental struggle of growing parents and students. A group of up. Parents are the primary source of twenty five parents was selected and information as they observe the after a general discussion to focus adolescents who are living with them their attention on the subject matter, and notice first the behavioural they were split into five groups of five change in them even as it unfolds. each and the summary of their Hence the social work intervention discussions was taken into account. starts at home. A home visit will reveal Parents were encouraged to voice out a lot more than several sessions of the prevalent problems with respect interview. to board exams. School counsellors Parental acceptance: and Principals were also interviewed Thergoenkar and Wadda (2007) for complaints commonly seen by studied 207 eleventh standard them. students and their mothers and have The common factors: observed that parental warmth has The following were seen as the been found to reduce the threat stressors in the family due to the implied in evaluative experiences. critical condition of the students taking There is a strong emphasis on the board examinations: importance of acceptance of parents Irritability. by the child. According to Stagner Looking for things misplaced. (2007) acceptance leads to Priority in matters of abulution. identification, which in turn gives the Skipping breakfast. child relief from feelings of Long hours of sleep deprivation helplessness as well as a sense of at night leading to sleepiness in the strength. Rejection of parents may morning and after lunch. represent a situation of conflict and of Heavy schedule of tuitions. insecure detachment. It may make Frequent spot tests at school. the child come to a wrong conclusion Sibling rivalry when the younger that the situation is threatening and child demands equal attention. insecure even when it is warm and relaxation extending beyond limit comfortable. leading to argument over TV time. A discussion in groups of five: Skipping meals to watch There are several issues involved favourite programmes. in the generation of stress factor due Clash of siblings in sharing TV. 12 Journal of SCHOOL SOCIAL WORK December 2013
ISSN: 0976-3759

Issue 07 Views of adolescents parents: Everybody agreed that the parentchild relationship becomes very much strained and reaches a flash point almost everyday. Students complain that they work like bulls non-stop without any entertainment, relaxation of socializing. Middle class families find the expenditure more for the students education and tuition. Parents also feel strongly about the three different types of question papers set for the same examination. The cut-off range for college admission is unfair to the students, especially the rural ones. They felt that it was not fair to the slow learners or the average student. Some schools do not cover the eleventh standard portions at all. May be the most important lessons are taught. CCE pattern in the CBSE is still not assimilated completely. Counsellors point of view: School counsellors have received the following complaints from parents regarding childrens behaviour: Open rebellion and talking rudly. Wasting time Spending long hours at the computer/ TV. Not replying questions regarding their movements between school and home or tuition centre and home.

Such behaviour is common during adolescence stage. However, counsellors also received complaints from children: Parents repeatedly forced them to study without any rest. Prevent friends from coming home. Force career choice on them. Demanding high performance. Not addressing their emotional needs. These issues can be easily sorted out if there is a healthy non-arguing dialogue among the parents and students, felt the parents. Counsellors also opined that there is a strong need to create an awareness among parents as well as students as to how to deal with the above issues by establishing channels of communication and marking territories. Parenting skills: Sibling rivalry can be averted by discussions with the younger ones. Timely meals and healthy alternatives for regular meals such as nuts and fruits to take care of the health needs. Helping the student to concentrate by avoiding needless noise at home. Any incentive should be in commensurate with the task.

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ISSN: 0976-3759

Parents should take care of their own health concerns. Both parents should share the responsibility of providing facilities for the student. Remind students gently about the tasks ahead and time available rather than nagging and commanding. Students can try relaxation techniques to calm their body and mind. Encourage students to use positive self-affirmations. Help children to plan a study plan and follow it diligently. Bring students attention back to task at hand to make the best use of time available. Memory enhancing techniques can be taught.. Breathing exercise and short family games of scrabble can be played for relaxation. The students have to be

Volume X encouraged to keep the communication channel open. Seek professional help at the earliest. Conclusions: Examinations always cause anxiety. The amount of preparation, expectations, sleepless nights, long hours of continued strain cause a great amount of stress in children and also the entire family. If the younger siblings are encouraged to discuss the kind of problems they face because of the entire attention of the family being focussed on the exam-going child, their rivalry and jealous feelings can be adequately addressed and removed. Students can also be encouraged to relax at appropriate time so that their tension gets a diversion and they feel connected to the family. Parents who handle the situation deftly stand to benefit immensely when the child passes with flying colours!

Issue 07

ISSN: 0976-3759

References: Chaube (2003): Developmental Psychology .Hyderabad: Neelkamal Publications Jersild A T, Brook J S & Brook D W (1978): The Psychology of Adolescence. New York: Macmillan Papalia D E, Olds S W and Feldman. R. D (2004): Human Development (9thEd.) New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill Thergoenkar and Wadda (2007): Relationship between Test Anxiety and Parenting Style: JIACAM. (JAN2007)

The articles for January 2014 should reach us on or before 25th Dec 2013. Focus: BALANCED DIET. A soft copy by email, a CD containing article and declaration that it is original can be posted. 14 Journal of SCHOOL SOCIAL WORK December 2013

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