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ISSN 0975 5942

Vol.I (2), June-December 2009, pp.154-173


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Human Resource Management Practices in Cement
Industries in India: A Case of India Cements Limited
K. Krishna Kumar
Assistant Professor, Departtment of Commerce, Periyar University
Salem - 636 011, Tamilnadu.
Email: krishna30971@yahoo.co.in
Abstract
Human resource is considered as the backbone of any
economic enterprise. In recent years the economist has added
Human resource besides land, capital and technology as the key
factor for building and developing the nation. The human resource
management is a proactive central strategic management activity
which is different from conventional personnel management. Human
resource management is a sun rise concept and traditional personnel
management is a sun set concepts. The HRM has tremendous
relevance to productivity industry. Human input is the single largest
that goes in the cement industry. The level of efficiency of production
of this input reflected in the quality of product provided by industry
to its customer. In Industrial sector to see the problem in its totality
and a planned approach is needed for maximizing the human
resources. The India Cements Limited is one of the large scale
organizations in the cement industry employing human resources
with entire satisfaction of employees. It was decided that to know
their human resource policies of employees and level of satisfaction
is carried out by the researcher in this study. Hence the India
Cements Ltd, Sankari, Salem District is taken up for the study.
Keywords: HRM, Human Resources, India Cements, Personnel
Management, Productivity Industry
K. Krishna Kumar
Asia-Pacific Journal of Social Sciences, Vol.1(2), July-Dec 2009, pp.154-173
155
Introduction
Human resource is considered as the backbone of any
economic enterprise. In recent years the economist has added
Human resource besides land, capital and technology as the key
factor for building and developing the nation. The optimal utilization
of natural resources and the factor inputs of capital technology
depend on the extent of use of human resources. The human resource
management is a proactive central strategic management activity
which is different from conventional personnel management. Human
resource management is a sun rise concept and traditional personnel
management is a sun set concepts. The HRM is a growing concept. It
has tremendous relevance to productivity industry. Human input is
the single largest that goes in the cement industry. The level of
efficiency of production of this input reflected in the quality of
product provided by industry to its customer. The most of the
employees on regular and contract status show excellent performance
but just after being regularized their performance decreases, and it
has become a different circle. In Industrial sector to see the problem
in its totality and a planned approach is needed for maximizing the
human resources. In two approaches will not be helpful quantitative
aspects need more emphasis organization having excess and poorly
utilized manpower cannot think of growth in the future. The India
Cements Limited is one of the large scale organizations in the cement
industry employing human resources with entire satisfaction of
employees. It was decided that to know their human resource policies
of employees and level of satisfaction is carried out by the researcher
in this study. Hence the India Cements Ltd, Sankari, Salem District
is taken up for the study.
Statement of the Problem
Indian economic scenario is undergoing a basic structural
change affecting all walks of life. Physical, behavioral and
psychological differences among individuals have increased with
rapid changes taking place in the management process of
organizations. These have implications in the design of recruitment,
selection, training and development, compensation programme,
performance appraisal, employee discipline, promotion and transfers
etc., are becoming difficult for implementation due to poor
understanding of personnel management by the employees.
Therefore, it is necessary to know the meaning of the term human
resource management is not simply a new form of jargon to describe
K. Krishna Kumar
Asia-Pacific Journal of Social Sciences, Vol.1(2), July-Dec 2009, pp.154-173
156
personnel management, it represent a new model of management
with different value system, for others it remains an exclusive
concept, elastic an ambiguous. However, there is a pressing need for
empirical research that addresses the contributions that HRM makes
to a firm's ability to accept risk, be innovative and be proactive.
Objectives of the Study
To study the Awareness Level of the employees about
Human Resource Policies and Practices in India Cements
Limited, Sankari.
To know the satisfaction level of Human Resource Policies
and Practices in India Cements Limited, Sankari.
To study the satisfaction level of Allowances provided in
India Cement Limited, Sankari.
To find out the Labour Welfare Measures to improve Human
Resource Management Functions of India Cements Limited,
Sankari.
To find out the Employer and Employee Relationship in
Human Resource Management functions of India Cements
Limited, Sankari.
Methodology
This study covers both primary and secondary data. Primary
data is collected by distributing questionnaire to the employees of the
India cements limited Sankari and secondary data collected from
various journals, articles, websites, dissertation and thesis pertaining
to the relevant matter of the subject under study.
The main focus of study is human resource policies and
practices in India Cements Limited Sankari. Random sampling
method is adopted to carry out study. In this connection out of 250
employees 125 are selected covering almost all the departments. In
this study the questionnaire consisting mostly close ended questions
with Likerts 5 point scale. The statistical tools applied for the
analysis purpose are descriptive statistics and Friedmans test.
Analysis and Interpretation
The study on HRM has been focused on the HR policies and
practices followed in company related to HRP Recruitment,
Performance Appraisal, HRA, DA, Labour Welfare Measures. The
success of the company is purely based on the Human Resource
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157
Policies and Practices followed. The Employer Employee
Relationship is identified through employee participation in
management, Social Security Measures, Collective Bargaining,
Employee Grievance Handling and Industrial Relations Practices.
Human Resource Policies Wise Classification of the Respondents
The following table classified the respondents on the basis of
level of satisfaction regarding human resource policies and practices.
Table 1
Human Resource Policies Wise Classification of the Respondents
Human
Resource
Policies
Highly
Dissatisfied
Dissatisfied
Moderately
Satisfied
Satisfied
Highly
Satisfied
Total
7 19 53 46 125 Human
Resource
Planning
5.6% 15.2% 42.4% 36.8% 100.0%
6 27 65 27 125
Recruitment
and Selection 4.8% 21.6% 52.0% 21.6% 100.0%
2 4 34 54 31 125 Training and
Development 1.6% 3.2% 27.2% 43.2% 24.8% 100.0%
13 20 56 36 125 Performance
Appraisal 10.4% 16.0% 44.8% 28.8% 100.0%
5 7 25 57 31 125 Career
Advancement
Avenues
4.0% 5.6% 20.0% 45.6% 24.8% 100.0%
4 12 25 49 35 125 Wages and
Salary
Structure
3.2% 9.6% 20.0% 39.2% 28.0% 100.0%
5 7 38 44 31 125 Promotion
and Transfer 4.0% 5.6% 30.4% 35.2% 24.8% 100.0%
2 15 39 43 26 125 Motivational
Measures 1.6% 12.0% 31.2% 34.4% 20.8% 100.0%
4 12 29 52 28 125 Safety
Measures 3.2% 9.6% 23.2% 41.6% 22.4% 100.0%
Source: primary data
The above table shows that satisfaction level of the
respondents regarding human resource policies and practice of the
company.
Human Resource Planning: It denotes that a maximum of 42.4% of
the respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 5.6% of the
respondents are dissatisfied with the human resource planning
process of the company.
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158
Recruitment and Selection: It denotes that a maximum of 52% of
the respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 4.8% of the
respondents are dissatisfied with the recruitment and selection
policies of the company.
Training and Development: It denotes that a maximum of 43.2% of
the respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 1.6% of the
respondents are highly dissatisfied with training and development
programme of the company.
Performance Appraisal: It denotes that a maximum of 44.8% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 10.4% of the respondents
are dissatisfied with the performance appraisal of the company.
Career Advancement Avenues: It denotes that a maximum of 45.6%
of the respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 4% of the
respondents are highly dissatisfied with the career advancement
avenue of the company.
Wages and Salary Structure: It denotes that a maximum of 39.2% of
the respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 3.2% of the
respondents are highly dissatisfied with the wages and salary
structure of the company.
Promotion and Transfer: It denotes that a maximum of 35.2% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 4% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the safety measures of the company.
Motivational Measures: It denotes that a maximum of 34.4% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 1.6% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the motivational measures of the
company.
Safety Measures: It denotes that a maximum of 41.6% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 3.2% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the promotion and transfer process of the
company.
Allowances Wise Classification of the Respondents
The following table classified the respondents based on the
level of satisfaction about the allowances provided by the company.
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159
Table 2
Allowances Wise Classification of the Respondents
Allowances
Highly
Dissatisfied
Dissatisfied
Moderately
Satisfied
Satisfied
Highly
Satisfied
Total
8 21 62 34 125 Dearness
Allowance 6.4% 16.8% 49.6% 27.2% 100.0%
4 28 69 24 125 House Rent
Allowance 3.2% 22.4% 55.2% 19.2% 100.0%
1 6 33 51 34 125 Conveyance
Allowance
0.8% 4.8% 26.4% 40.8% 27.2% 100.0%
2 12 37 48 26 125 Washing
Allowance 1.6% 9.6% 29.6% 38.4% 20.8% 100.0%
6 14 38 45 22 125 Heat
Allowance
4.8% 11.2% 30.4% 36.0% 17.6% 100.0%
1 13 37 53 21 125 Dust
Allowance 0.8% 10.4% 29.6% 42.4% 16.8% 100.0%
2 18 36 48 21 125 Night Shift
Allowance 1.6% 14.4% 28.8% 38.4% 16.8% 100.0%
7 16 34 42 26 125 Special Pay
Allowance 5.6% 12.8% 27.2% 33.6% 20.8% 100.0%
Source: primary data
The above table shows that satisfaction level of the
respondents regarding allowances provide by the company.
Dearness Allowance It denotes that maximum 49.6% of the
respondents satisfied and a minimum of 6.4% of the respondents are
dissatisfied with dearness allowance provided by the company.
House Rent Allowance - It denotes that maximum 55.2% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 3.2% of the respondents
are dissatisfied with house rent allowance provided by the company.
Conveyance Allowance - It denotes that maximum 40.8% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 0.8% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with conveyance allowance provided by the
company.
Washing Allowance - It denotes that maximum 40.8% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 1.6% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with washing allowance provided by the
company.
Heat Allowance - It shows that maximum 36% of the respondents
are satisfied and a minimum of 4.8% of the respondents are highly
dissatisfied with heat allowance provided by the company.
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160
Dust Allowance - It reveals that maximum 42.4% of the respondents
are satisfied and a minimum of 0.8% of the respondents are highly
dissatisfied with the dust allowance provided by the company.
Night Shift Allowance - It reveals that maximum 42.4% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 0.8% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the night shift allowance provided by the
company.
Special Pay Allowance - It reveals that maximum 33.6% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 5.6% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the special pay allowance provided by the
company.
Employer and Employee Relationship Wise Classification of the
Respondents
The following table classified the respondents based on the
level of satisfaction about the employer and employee relationship of
the company.
Table 3
Employer and Employee Relationship Wise Classification of the Respondents
Employer and
Employee
Relationship
Highly
Dissatisfied
Dissatisfied
Moderately
Satisfied
Satisfied
Highly
Satisfied
Total
12 24 55 34 125 Employee
participation in
Management
9.6% 19.2% 44.0% 27.2% 100.0%
4 10 23 62 26 125 Social Security
Measures
3.2% 8.0% 18.4% 49.6% 20.8% 100.0%
2 5 36 59 23 125 Collective
Bargaining 1.6% 4.0% 28.8% 47.2% 18.4% 100.0%
2 10 32 54 27 125 Employee
Discipline 1.6% 8.0% 25.6% 43.2% 21.6% 100.0%
4 9 32 56 24 125 Employee
Grievance
Handling
3.2% 7.2% 25.6% 44.8% 19.2% 100.0%
8 11 43 40 23 125 Industrial
Relations
Practices
6.4% 8.8% 34.4% 32.0% 18.4% 100.0%
Source: primary data
The above table it reveals that satisfaction level of the
respondents regarding Employer and employee relationship provide
by the company.
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161
Employee Participation in Management - It reveals that maximum
44% of the respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 9.6% of the
respondents are dissatisfied with Employee participation in
Management provided by the company.
Social Security Measures - It reveals that maximum 49.6% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 3.2% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the social security measures provided by
the company.
Collective Bargaining - It reveals that maximum 47.2% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 1.6% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the collective bargaining provided by the
company.
Employee Discipline - It reveals that maximum 43.2% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 1.6% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the employee discipline provided by the
company.
Employee Grievance Handling It reveals that maximum 44.8% of
the respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 3.2% of the
respondents are highly dissatisfied with the employee grievance
handling process provided by the company.
Industrial Relations Practices - It reveals that maximum 34.4% of
the respondents are moderately satisfied and a minimum of 6.4% of
the respondents are highly dissatisfied with the industrial relations
provided by the company.
Labour Welfare Measures Wise Classification of the
Respondents
The following table classified the respondents based on the
level of satisfaction about the welfare measures provided by the
company.
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162
Table 4
Labour Welfare Measures Wise Classification of the Respondents
Welfare
Measures
Highly
Dissatisfied
Dissatisfied
Moderately
Satisfied
Satisfied
Highly
Satisfied
Total
2 23 50 50 125 Leave
Facilities 1.6% 18.4% 40.0% 40.0% 100.0%
1 7 27 58 32 125 Medical
Facilities 0.8% 5.6% 21.6% 46.4% 25.6% 100.0%
1 7 26 57 34 125 Drinking
Water 0.8% 5.6% 20.8% 45.6% 27.2% 100.0%
2 10 25 58 30 125
Canteen 1.6% 8.0% 20.0% 46.4% 24.0% 100.0%
6 10 30 56 23 125 Free Coffee
and Tea 4.8% 8.0% 24.0% 44.8% 18.4% 100.0%
12 31 49 33 125 Rest and
Lunch
Room
9.6% 24.8% 39.2% 26.4% 100.0%
4 7 30 59 25 125 Sports and
Recreational
Facilities
3.2% 5.6% 24.0% 47.2% 20.0% 100.0%
1 6 36 47 35 125 Facilities
for Children
Education
0.8% 4.8% 28.8% 37.6% 28.0% 100.0%
1 14 34 55 21 125 Loans and
Advances 0.8% 11.2% 27.2% 44.0% 16.8% 100.0%
10 10 34 48 23 125 Retirement
Benefits 8.0% 8.0% 27.2% 38.4% 18.4% 100.0%
6 35 60 24 125 Supply of
Uniform
and Shoes
4.8% 28.0% 48.0% 19.2% 100.0%
3 9 27 54 32 125 Housing
Facilities 2.4% 7.2% 21.6% 43.2% 25.6% 100.0%
2 3 53 41 26 125 Special
Medical Aid 1.6% 2.4% 42.4% 32.8% 20.8% 100.0%
7 8 34 47 29 125 Leave
Travel
Concession
5.6% 6.4% 27.2% 37.6% 23.2% 100.0%
Source: primary data
The above table shows that satisfaction level of the
respondents regarding Labour welfare measures provide by the
company.
Leave Facilities - It reveals that maximum 40% of the respondents
are moderately satisfied and a minimum of 1.6% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the leave facilities provided by the
company.
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163
Medical Facilities - It reveals that maximum 46.4% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 0.8% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the medical facilities provided by the
company.
Drinking Water - It reveals that maximum 45.6% of the respondents
are satisfied and a minimum of 0.8% of the respondents are highly
dissatisfied with the drinking water facilities provided by the
company.
Canteen - It reveals that maximum 44.8% of the respondents are
satisfied and a minimum of 1.6% of the respondents are highly
dissatisfied with the canteen facilities provided by the company.
Free Coffee and Tea - It reveals that maximum 44.8% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 4.8% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the free coffee and tea provided by the
company.
Rest and Lunch Room - It reveals that maximum 39.2% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 9.6% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the rest and lunch room provided by the
company.
Sports and Recreational Facilities - It reveals that maximum 34.4%
of the respondents are moderately satisfied and a minimum of 6.4%
of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with the industrial relations
provided by the company
Facilities for Children Education - It reveals that maximum 37.6%
of the respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 0.8% of the
respondents are highly dissatisfied with the facilities for children
education provided by the company.
Loans and Advances - It reveals that maximum 44% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 0.8% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the loans and advance provided by the
company.
Retirement Benefits- It reveals that maximum 38.4% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 8% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the retirement benefits provided by the
company.
Supply of Uniform and Shoes- It reveals that maximum 48% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 4.8% of the respondents
are dissatisfied with the supply of uniform and shoes provided by the
company.
Housing Facilities- It denotes that maximum 43.2% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 2.4% of the respondents
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164
are highly dissatisfied with the housing facilities provided by the
company.
Special Medical Aid - It reveals that maximum 32.8% of the
respondents are moderately satisfied and a minimum of 1.6% of the
respondents are highly dissatisfied with the special medical aid
provided by the company.
Leave Travel Concession- It reveals that maximum 37.6% of the
respondents are satisfied and a minimum of 5.6% of the respondents
are highly dissatisfied with the leave travel concession provided by
the company.
Influencing Factors towards the Attitude
The Friedman test is a nonparametric alternative to the
repeated measures analysis of variance. The Friedman test is the
nonparametric equivalent of a one-sample repeated measures design
or a two-way analysis of variance with one observation per cell.
Friedman tests the null hypothesis that k related variables come from
the same population. For each case, the k variables are ranked from 1
to k. The test statistic is based on these ranks. The Friedman test
ranks the scores in each row of the data file independently of every
other row. The factors that will influence the respondents towards the
attitude were classified in seven factors. They are External
Environment, Internal Environment, Educational Environment,
Evaluation methods, Psychological factors and Social Environment.
In this study, Friedman non parametric test is used to identify the
factor which is more influencing the respondent towards attitude.
Influencing Factors towards Human Resource Policies and
Practices
To identify the factor which is more influencing the
respondents towards the satisfaction level the Friedmans test
analysis is used and results is given in the following table.
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165
Table 5
Influencing Factors towards Human Resource Policies and Practices
Human
Resource
Policies
N Mean
Std.
Deviation
Mean
Rank
Chi
square
value
df P value
Human
Resource
Planning
125 4.10 .860 5.70
Recruitmen
t and
Selection
125 3.90 .787 5.12
Training
and
Developme
nt
125 3.86 .883 5.05
Performanc
e Appraisal
125 3.92 .930 5.21
Career
Advanceme
nt Avenues
125 3.82 1.003 5.04
Wages and
Salary
Structure
125 3.79 1.057 4.99
Promotion
and
Transfer
125 3.71 1.030 4.70
Motivation
al Measures
125 3.61 .999 4.44
Safety
Measures
125 3.70 1.024 4.75
28.455 8 0.000
Source: primary data
The Friedmans Chi-square test results are indicated that there
is difference of opinion found among the respondents towards human
resource policies and practices (P<0.05). It could be noted from the
above table that among all the factors that human resource planning
is ranked first and motivational measures ranked last.
Influencing Factors towards Allowances
To identify the factor which is more influencing the
respondents towards the satisfaction level the Friedmans test
analysis is used and results is given in the following table.
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166
Table 6
Influencing Factors towards Allowances
Allowance N Mean
Standard
Deviation
Mean
Rank
Chi
square
value
df
P
value
Dearness Allowance 125 3.98 .837 5.00
House Rent Allowance 125 3.90 .734 4.81
Conveyance Allowance 125 3.89 .891 4.90
Washing Allowance 125 3.67 .965 4.47
Heat Allowance 125 3.50 1.060 4.01
Dust Allowance 125 3.64 .911 4.33
Night Shift Allowance 125 3.54 .988 4.32
Special Pay Allowance 125 3.51 1.126 4.16
28.587 7 0.000
Source: primary data
The Friedmans Chi-square test results are indicated that there
is difference of opinion found among the respondents towards the
allowances (P<0.05). It could be noted from the above table that
among all the factors that dearness allowance is ranked first and heat
allowance ranked last.
Influencing Factors towards Labour Welfare Measures
To identify the factor which is more influencing the
respondents towards the satisfaction level the Friedmans test
analysis is used and results is given in the following table.
Table 7
Influencing Factors towards Labour Welfare Measures
Labour
Welfare
Measures
N Mean
Standard
Deviation
Mean
Rank
Chi
square
value
df
P
value
Leave
Facilities
125 4.18 .787 9.00
Medical
Facilities
125 3.90 .875 7.83
Drinking
Water
125 3.93 .881 8.07
Canteen 125 3.83 .940 7.70
Free Coffee
and Tea
125 3.64 1.027 7.03
Rest and
Lunch Room
125 3.82 .934 7.56
56.293 13 0.000
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167
Sports and
Recreational
Facilities
125 3.75 .947 7.31
Facilities for
Children
Education
125 3.87 .907 7.90
Loans and
Advances
125 3.65 .918 6.96
Retirement
Benefits
125 3.51 1.126 6.64
Supply of
Uniform and
Shoes
125 3.82 .797 7.44
Housing
Facilities
125 3.82 .976 7.76
Special
Medical Aid
125 3.69 .884 6.84
Leave Travel
Concession
125 3.66 1.077 6.96
Source: primary data
The Friedmans Chi-square test results are indicated that there
is difference of opinion found among the respondents towards the
labour welfare measures (P<0.05). It could be noted from the above
table that among all the factors that leave facilities is ranked first and
retirement benefits ranked last.
Influencing Factors towards Employer and Employee
Relationship
To identify the factor which is more influencing the
respondents towards the satisfaction level the Friedmans test
analysis is used and results is given in the following table.
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168
Table - 8
Influencing Factors towards Employer and Employee Relationship
Employer and
Employee
Relationship
N Mean
Std.
Deviation
Mean
Rank
Chi square
value
df P value
Employee
participation in
Management
125 3.89 .918 3.78
Social Security
Measures
125 3.77 .977 3.52
Collective
Bargaining
125 3.77 .853 3.58
Employee
Discipline
125 3.75 .939 3.57
Employee
Grievance
Handling
125 3.70 .969 3.46
Industrial
Relations
Practices
125 3.47 1.089 3.09
14.600 5 0.012
Source: primary data
The Friedmans Chi-square test results are indicated that there
is difference of opinion found among the respondents towards the
employer and employee relationship (P<0.05). It could be noted from
the above table that among all the factors that employee participation
in management is ranked first and industrial relations practice ranked
last.
Findings
Human Resource Policies
Maximum of 42.4%, 52%, 43.2%, 44.8%, 45.6%, 39.2%,
35.2%, 34.4%, 41.6% of the respondents are satisfied and a
minimum of 5.6% of the respondents are dissatisfied with the
human resource planning process, recruitment and selection
policies, training and development programme, performance
appraisal, career advancement avenue, wages and salary
structure, safety measures, motivational measures, promotion
and transfer process of the company.
Minimum of 5.6%, 4.8%, 10.4% of the respondents are
dissatisfied with the human resource planning process,
recruitment and selection policies, performance appraisal of
the company. Minimum of 1.6%, 4%, 3.2%, 4%, 1.6%, 3.2%
of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with training and
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169
development programme, career advancement avenue, wages
and salary structure, safety measures, motivational measures,
promotion and transfer process of the company
Allowances
Maximum 49.6%, 55.2%, 40.8%, 36%, 42.4%, 33.6% of the
respondents are satisfied with dearness allowance, house rent
allowance, conveyance allowance & washing allowance, heat
allowance, dust allowance & night shift allowance, Special
pay allowance provided by the company.
Minimum of 6.4%, 3.2% of the respondents are dissatisfied
with dearness allowance, house rent allowance provided by
the company. Minimum of 0.8%, 1.6%, 4.8%, 0.8%, 5.6%of
the respondents are highly dissatisfied with conveyance
allowance, washing allowance, heat allowance, dust
allowance & night shift allowance, special pay allowance
provided by the company.
Employer Employee Relationship
Maximum 44%, 49.6%, 47.2%, 43.2%, 44.8% of the
respondents are satisfied with Employee participation in
management, social security measures, collective bargaining,
employee discipline, employee grievance handing process
provided by the company and 34.4% of the respondents are
moderately satisfied with the industrial relations provided by
the company,
Minimum of 9.6% of the respondents are dissatisfied with
Employee participation in Management provided by the
company and a minimum of 3.2%, 1.6%, 3.2%, 6.4% of the
respondents are highly dissatisfied with the social security
measures, collective bargaining, employee discipline &
employee grievance handling process, industrial relations
provided by the company.
Labour Welfare Measures
Maximum 40%, 34.4% & 32.8% of the respondents are
moderately satisfied with the leave facilities, sports and
recreational facilities and special medical aid provided by the
company. Maximum 46.4%, 45.6%, 44.8%, 39.2%, 37.6%,
44%, 38.4%, 48%, 43.2%, 37.6% of the respondents are
satisfied with Medical facilities, drinking water facilities,
canteen facilities & free coffee and tea, rest and lunch room,
facilities for children education, loans and advances,
K. Krishna Kumar
Asia-Pacific Journal of Social Sciences, Vol.1(2), July-Dec 2009, pp.154-173
170
retirement benefits, supply of uniform and shoes, housing
facilities, leave travel concession provided by the company.
Minimum of 1.6%, 0.8%, 1.6%, 4.8%, 9.6%, 6.4%, 0.8%,
8%, 2.4%, 1.6%, 5.6% of the respondents are highly
dissatisfied with the leave facilities, medical facilities &
drinking water facilities, canteen facilities, free coffee and
tea, rest and lunch room, sports and recreational facilities,
facilities for children education, loans and advance,
retirement benefits, housing facilities, special medical aid,
leave travel concession and a minimum of 4.8% of the
respondents are dissatisfied with the supply of uniform and
shoes provided by the company.
Influencing Factors towards the Attitude
Human resource planning is ranked first, performance
appraisal is ranked second and recruitment and selection is
ranked third.
Dearness allowance is ranked first, conveyance allowance is
ranked second, and house rent allowance is ranked third.
Leave facilities are ranked first, drinking water is ranked
second, facilities for children education is ranked third.
Employee participation in management is ranked first,
collective bargaining is ranked second, and employee is
ranked third.
Suggestions
The company should conduct many awareness programmes
related to Human Resource Policies and Practices, it will
improve the knowledge of employees about Human Resource
Policies and Practices.
The company should provide the maximum level of
allowance as much as possible. Because the workers in the
cement industry are supposed to work with so many hurdles
like heat, pollution etc.
Adequate training and development programmes should be
provided to employees. It will develop there knowledge and
skill which leads to better productivity.
It is suggested that many further welfare measures can be
implemented. Because the employees expectation on welfare
measures is more.
It is essential for conducting special programmes on Human
Resource Policies and Practices.
K. Krishna Kumar
Asia-Pacific Journal of Social Sciences, Vol.1(2), July-Dec 2009, pp.154-173
171
It is suggested that, a separate department for HRD activities
may be established in ICL.
If the employees grievance is reasonable, the workload of the
employees can be reduced by the consultation with trade
union and management.
Conclusion
The study reveals that more than 80% of the employees are
satisfied with Human Resource Policies and Practices followed in the
company. In allowances also more than 80% of the employees are
satisfied. In Employer and employee relationship around 85% of the
employees are satisfied. More than 85% of the employees are
satisfied with Labour welfare measures. The overall conclusion about
the Human Resource Policies and Practices followed in India
Cements limited Sankari is excellent. It shows that the reason for the
vast development of India Cements Limited groups. If the company
continues the same stream of Human Resource Policies and Practices
in future it may achieved many glorious things.
K. Krishna Kumar
Asia-Pacific Journal of Social Sciences, Vol.1(2), July-Dec 2009, pp.154-173
172
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