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XAT 2014: 30 minutes on error corrections in conditionals XAT 2014 verbal ability, XAT 2014 preparation material, XAT 2014 preparation strategy, XAT 2014 Verbal error correction, XAT 2014 result XAT has more number of questions on error corrections than CAT. The questions are based on core grammar, tenses, modifiers, conditionals, punctuation etc. This article gives you tips and tricks to crack the questions on conditional usage. XAT has more number of questions on error corrections than CAT. The questions are based on core grammar, syntax, tenses, modifiers, conditionals, punctuation etc. Learn quick tips and tricks from Prof. S.K. Agarwal, Verbal Ability expert how to crack the questions on conditional usage. Key points to prepare: Correcting the Error in the usage of conditional clauses is definitely tricky. The reason is that we try to apply only the rules of tenses missing their special formation and thus get half baked knowledge on the concept. Any of the following four types of conditionals may be there in error correction. Know the key points and specific formation to crack them. The question may be in the form of - fill in the blanks, rewriting (picking out the correct) sentence from the given options. Type-1: Situations that are always true if something happens: This use is similar to, and can usually be replaced by, a time clause using 'when'; For example: When I am late, my father takes me to school; or If I am late, my father takes me to school; She doesn't worry if Jack stays out after school. Formation: Use of the present simple in if clause followed by a comma. E.g. If I am late, When I am late; Use present simple in the result (main) clause. E.g. …….. My father takes me to school. You can also put the result clause first without using a comma between the clauses e.g. My father takes me to school if I am late/when I am late. Type-2: Real Conditional: These situations take place if a certain condition is met. In this type of conditional we often use ‘unless’ which means 'if ... not'. In other words, '...unless he hurries up.' could also be written, '...if he doesn't hurry up.' Formation: Use of the present simple in the if clause followed by a comma, future simple i.e. will+verb (base form) in the result clause. (Sub+will/shall+I form of verb+object). You can also put the result clause first without using a comma between the clauses. Examples - If he finishes in an hour, we will go to the movies. OR We will go to the movies if he finishes in an hour.

If it rains, we will stay at home. He will arrive late unless he hurries up. Peter will buy a new car, if he gets his raise. XAT 2014: Top expert articles for XAT 2014 preparation; XLRI registration till December 30 Type-3: Called Unreal Conditional because it is used for unreal - or improbable - situations. This conditional provides an imaginary result for a given situation. It is the peculiar example of using past for imaginary future. Formation: Use of ‘Be’ form verb (is, am, are, was, were etc.) is always conjugated as ‘were’, even with singular forms. Such ‘Be’ form verbs can be placed in statements before the subject in place of ‘If’ We can write – If I were the Prime Minister of India…………. Or Were I the Prime Minister of India……….. Both the sentences will have same meaning. Formation: Use of the past simple in the if clause followed by a comma. Could/should/could/might+ verb (base form) is placed in the result clause. You can also put the result clause first without using a comma between the clauses. Examples- If they had more money, they would buy a new house. OR They would buy a new house if they had more money. Type-: Often referred to as the "past" conditional because it concerns only past situations with hypothetical results. Used to express a hypothetical result to a past given situation. It is known as Past Unreal conditional. Formation: Formed by the use of the past perfect in the if clause followed by a comma. Verbs- would have/should have/could have/might have + past participle in the result (Main) clause. You can also put the result clause first without using a comma between the clauses. Example - If Alice had won the competition, life would have changed OR Life would have changed if Alice had won the competition. Click here to score high marks in GD PI WAT at Top B school for Admission 2014: http://www.mbauniverse.com/gd_pi_preparation/gd_preparation.php Stay tuned to MBAuniverse.com for more news and Expert articles on XAT 2014 Preparations