NOVEMBER

25, 1937.

FLIGHT.

517

Some idea of the cabin-top shape of the new CW Cygnet may be gathered from these two sketches, which also show the way in which the special suitcases and other luggage may be accommodated.

DE HAViLLAND
T is a little difficult to realise t h a t I something like six hundred Tiger Moths are being used by clubs and Cygnet, has, during the last nine months or so, been put thoroughly through its paces and will shortly be reappearing in final form. I t , is, of course, a side-by-side twoseater low-wing monoplane, fitted with a Gipsy Major engine and, in its latest form, very special attention has been paid both to the cabin roof and screen shape and to the general accommodation. Built-in suitcases of a useful size will be provided with the machine, there is a recess for such things as golf clubs, and plenty of room behind the squab for the usual oddments. There will be two doors, central or full dual control (quickly interchangeable) and a standard dashboard arrangements leaving ample space for any additional instruments required. The latest performance figures for the Cygnet will be found in the table on page 522. C-W Aircraft, Oxford Avenue, Trading Estate, Slough. schools throughout the world, including, of course, the majority of the Reserve schools in this country. Naturally enough, such popularity is not the result of an accident, and the Tiger can be said to form an excellent compromise in the matter of flying and maintenance qualities. I t is fully and pleasantly aerobatic without being in the least tricky for ab initio work, and is entirely orthodox in construction. Hore, perhaps, than in the case of a training type, compromise is necessary in the design of a machine for the private owner—who may be a twentyhour pilot or one with a vast amount of general flying experience. Owing to the recent rise in material and production costs it has appeared during the last month or two t h a t the well-known Hornet Moth might be withdrawn from the market. We are glad to say that this excellent little two-seater cabin machine is now again in production, following an inevitably large number of pathetically worded enquiries, though the price will necessarily have to be

raised to some extent from the exceptionally low figure of £775. Special features of the Hornet include a remarkably low full-load take-off, a aseful range, and ample luggage accommodation with side-by-side seating. Originally produced for the luxury private owner and charter market, the popularity of the twin-engined Dragonfly for transport and blind-flying training has been adequately shown during the past year. The Danish, Swedish, Roumanian, Turkish, other Governments, and one or two clubs and schools in this country have shown considerable interest in its possibilities. Several of these training Dragonfiies have been fitted with full radio and D / F equipment and with duplicated blind-flying panels, and the need for a twin-engined trainer becomes more obvious year by year. As a private-owner type the Dragonfly is luxuriously equipped, and exhaust and airflow noises have been reduced by careful soundproofing to the large transport decibel level. De Havilland Aircraft Co., Ltd., Hatfield Aerodrome, Herts.

HESTON
MACHINE with an outstanding allround performance in its original form with a Series I Gipsy Six, the Heston Phoenix is now available, if desired, with the Series I I engine and v . p . airscrew. This installation, needless to say, puts up the normal-output cruising speed quite effectively and reduces the take-off run, and it is the Phoenix in this form for which the figures are given. The designer's idea in laying out this machine was to transport a pilot and four passengers in considerable luxury and a t a reasonably high cruising speed on comparatively low horse-power. A great deal of attention has been paid to the soundproofing, ventilation and upholstering, and the Phoenix is probably the quietest single-engined machine on the British market. Furthermore, the fact t h a t a disposable load of 1,2001b. or so is carried on 200 h.p. a t a cruising speed of 135 m . p . h . definitely gives the machine a place in the charter or small transport market. From the pilot's point of view the layout and handling qualities are excellent, and the occupants enjoy the comfort of armchair flying, with the excellent all-round view available with the high wing arrangement. There is ample luggage space and the machine can be purchased, if required, with full night-flying equipment, generator, and electric starter. Heston Aircraft Co., Ltd., Heston Aitport, Middlesex. Possessed of a remarkably good performance for a machine with only 32 h.p., the single-seater Chilton monoplane has now been flying quite successfully for several months.

A