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E- Learning (-) ................................................................................................................................... 3 Technology ................................................................................................................................................ 4 Audio ......................................................................................................................................................... 4 Video ......................................................................................................................................................... 5 Computers,tablets and mobile devices .................................................................................................... 5 Learning Management System (LMS) ....................................................................................................... 6 M Learning (Mobile Learning ) ................................................................................... 7 HTML or App format ................................................................................................................................. 8 Tablets and smartphones ......................................................................................................................... 9 References .................................................................................................................................................. 10

E- Learning (-)
E-learning refers to the use of electronic media and information and communication technologies (ICT) in education. E-learning is broadly inclusive of all forms of educational technology inlearning and teaching. E-learning is inclusive of, and is broadly synonymous with multimedia learning, technology-enhanced learning (TEL), computer-based instruction (CBI), computer-based training (CBT), computer-assisted instruction or computer-aided instruction (CAI), internet-based training (IBT), web-based training (WBT), online education, virtual education, virtual learning environments (VLE) (which are also called learning platforms), m-learning, and digital educational collaboration. These alternative names emphasize a particular aspect, component or delivery method. E-learning includes numerous types of media that deliver text, audio, images, animation, and streaming video, and includes technology applications and processes such as audio or video tape, satellite TV, CDROM, and computer-based learning, as well as local intranet/extranet and web-based learning. Information and communication systems, whether free-standing or based on either local networks or the Internet in networked learning, underly many e-learning processes. E-learning can occur in or out of the classroom. It can be self-paced, asynchronous learning or may be instructor-led, synchronous learning. E-learning is suited to distance learning and flexible learning, but it can also be used in conjunction with face-to-face teaching, in which case the term blended learning is commonly used. It is commonly thought that new technologies make a big difference in education. Many proponents of e-learning believe that everyone must be equipped with basic knowledge of technology, as well as use it as a vehicle for reaching educational goals.

E-learning refers to the use of technology in learning and education. There are several aspects to describing the intellectual and technical development of e-learning, which can be categorized into discrete areas. These are addressed in turn in the sections of this article: 1. e-learning as an educational approach or tool that supports traditional subjects; 2. e-learning as a technological medium that assists in the communication of knowledge, and its development and exchange; 3. e-learning itself as an educational subject; such courses may be called "Computer Studies" or "Information and Communication Technology (ICT)"; 4. e-learning administrative tools such as education management information systems (EMIS)

Technology
Various technologies are used to facilitate e-learning. Most e-learning uses combinations of these techniques, including blogs, collaborative software, ePortfolios, and virtual classrooms.

Audio
The radio has been around for a long time and has been used in educational classrooms. Recent technologies have allowed classroom teachers to stream audio over the internet. There are also webcasts and podcasts available over the internet for students and teachers to download. For example, iTunes has various podcasts available on a variety of subjects that can be downloaded for free.

Video
Videos allow teachers to reach students who are visual learners and tend to learn best by seeing the material rather than hearing or reading about it. Teachers can access video clips through the internet instead of relying on DVDs or VHS tapes. Websites like YouTube are used by many teachers. Teachers can use messaging programs such as Skype, Adobe Connect, or webcams, to interact with guest speakers and other experts. Interactive video games are being integrated in the curriculum at both K-12 and higher education institutions. Research on the use of video in lessons is preliminary, but early results show an increased retention and better results when video is used in a lesson. Creating a systematic video development method holds promise for creating video models that positively impact student learning.

Computers,tablets and mobile devices


Computers and tablets allow students and teachers access to websites and other programs, such as Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, PDF files, and images. Many mobile devices support m-learning.

Learning Management System (LMS)


A learning management system (LMS) is software used for delivering, tracking and managing training and education; for example, tracking attendance, time on task, and student progress. Educators can post announcements, grade assignments, check on course activity, and participate in class discussions. Students can submit their work, read and respond to discussion questions, and take quizzes. An LMS may allow teachers, administrators, students, and permitted additional parties (such as parents if appropriate) to track various metrics. LMSs range from systems for managing training/educational records to software for distributing courses over the Internet and offering features for online collaboration. The creation and maintenance of comprehensive learning content requires substantial initial and ongoing investments of human labor. Effective translation into other languages and cultural contexts requires even more investment by knowledgeable personnel. Two widely used internet-based learning management systems tools for e-learning are Blackboard Inc. and Moodle.

Blackboard Inc. has over 20 million users daily. Offering six different platforms: Blackboard Learn, Blackboard Collaborate, Blackboard Mobile, Blackboard Connect, Blackboard Transact, and Blackboard Analytics; Blackboard's tools allow educators to decide whether their program will be blended or fully online, asynchronous or synchronous. Blackboard can be used for K-12 education, Higher Education, Business, and Government collaboration.

Moodle is an Open Source Course Management System. It is free to download and provides blended learning opportunities as well as platforms for distance learning courses. The Moodle website has many tutorials for creating a program or becoming a Moodle student.

M Learning (Mobile Learning )


The term m-learning or "mobile learning", has different meanings for different communities, that refer to a subset of e-learning, educational technology and distance education, that focuses on learning across contexts and learning with mobile devices. One definition of mobile learning is, "any sort of learning that happens when the learner is not at a fixed, predetermined location, or learning that happens when the learner takes advantage of the learning opportunities offered by mobile technologies. In other words, with the use of mobile devices, learners can learn anywhere and at any time. M-learning technologies include handheld computers, MP3 players, notebooks, mobile phones and tablets. M-learning focuses on the mobility of the learner, interacting with portable technologies, and learning that reflects a focus on how society and its institutions can accommodate and support an increasingly mobile population. There is also a new direction in 7

m-learning that gives the instructor more mobility and includes creation of on the spot and in the field learning material that predominately uses smartphone with special software such as AHG Cloud Note. Using mobile tools for creating learning aides and materials becomes an important part of informal learning.

It feels as though, just-enough, just-in-time, anytime, anywhere learning is finally becoming a reality with the rapid take-up of smartphones and tablet PCs. Their convenient and intuitive interface is perfect for e-learning, allowing the learner to tap, swipe and pinch their way through e-learning content, whilst sitting comfortably on the couch. Tablets especially, we feel, could drive the drive the development of elearning content in their own right, having the larger screen size more suited to interactive activities.

HTML or App format


E-learning on mobile devices can be delivered as an 'App', or in web-page format.There are pros and cons to both approaches, but the difference is in the detail. Apps have the advantage that they can be downloaded and stored locally from the relevant app store (iTunes or Android market) for use offline. You can limit the distribution of the App to your own employees, by developing an enterprise app. These can be distributed from your own website or hosting, rather than the App stores. Apps are convenient for the user - once downloaded, just tap to start and you're away. They can be used offline and the interfaces are usually clean, intuitive and uncluttered by browser toolbars. They make use of more advanced coding languages, that enable more sophisticated interactions and animation, compared with the relatively limited HTML5 environment for browser based e-learning. They can also interface with smart-phone hardware like the accelerometer (for position recognition), GPS (for location) and on-board camera, to enable highly sophisticated learning applications, for example, involving augmented reality. At this stage, Apps tend to be relatively expensive to produce, but new authoring tools are beginning to appear, which could change this very quickly. 8

Tablets and smartphones


Tablet PCs are an ideal e-learning platform. Smartphones are also great for video content, but perhaps a bit small for a sustained, comfortable e-learning experience with interactive content. Not all would agree though. Your existing web-based content can be delivered perfectly well on tablet PCs or smartphones, with one notable exception: content in Flash format is not supported on iPhones and iPads. Unfortunately, this accounts for a very large proportion of existing e-content, as it's the chosen publishing format for most of the mainstream authoring tools. If you're considering mobile devices as the primary delivery platform for your e-learning programme, we can help you work through the options and arrive at the best solution for your organisation. We can develop your content, help you to deliver it to your learners mobile devices and help you to support your learners in a way that leads to a measurable improvement in performance.

References
1. "Guidelines for learning/teaching/tutoring in a mobile environment". MOBIlearn. October 2003. p. 6. Retrieved June 8, 2009. 2. Crescente, Mary Louise; Lee, Doris (March 2011). "Critical issues of m-learning: design models, adoption processes, and future trends". Journal of the Chinese Institute of Industrial Engineers28 (2): 111123. 3. Saylor, Michael (2012). The Mobile Wave: How Mobile Intelligence Will Change Everything. Perseus Books/Vanguard Press. p. 176. ISBN 978-1593157203. 4. "Mobile Learning Community". Mobile Learning History. 2010. 5. Rose, Frank. "PIED PIPER ON THE COMPUTER". The New York Times. Retrieved 8 November 1987. 6. Wireless Coyote Wayne C. Grant. (1993). Wireless Coyote: A Computer-Supported Field Trip, Communications of the ACM - Special issue on technology in K12 education, Volume 36 Issue 5, May 1993, 57-59 7. Mobile learning in practice:Piloting a mobile learning teachers toolkit in further education colleges.C.Savill etc.,p8 8. M Learning http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M-learning 9. E Learning http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-learning

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