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2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

THE ROCKEFELLER

FOUNDATION

Trustees, Officers, and Staff

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

The

Rockefeller

Foundation

T R U S T E E S , OFFICERS, AND COMMITTEES April 1 9 55-April ig$6

TRUSTEES CHESTER BOWLES DETLEV W. BRONK RALPH J. BUNCHE WILLIAM H. CLAFLIN JOHN S . DICKEY LEWIS W, DOUGLAS WALLACE K. HARRISON JOHN R. KIMBERLY ROBERT F. LOEB ROBERT A. LOVETT JOHN J.MCCLOY HENRY ALLEN MOE WILLIAM I. MYERS THOMAS PARRAN JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER, 3RD DEAN RUSK GEOFFREY S. SMITH1 ROBERT G. SPROUL ARTHUR HAYS SULZBERGER HENRY P. VAN DUSEN W. BARRY WOOD, JR.

E X E C U T I V E COMMITTEE THE PRESIDENT, Chairman CHESTER BOWLES DETLEV W. BRONK ROBERT A. LOVETT HENRY ALLEN MOE JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER, 3RD W. BARRY WOOD, JR. RALPH J. BUNCHE, alternate member ROBERT F. LOEB, alternate member

F I N A N C E COMMITTEE ROBERT A. LOVETT, Chairman WILLIAM H. CLAFLIN JOHN J. MCCLOY LEWIS w. DOUGLAS, alternate member GEOFFREY S. SMITH,1 alternate member THE PRESIDENT THE CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 1 Resigned October 21, 1955.
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© 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation

OFFICERS Chairman of the Board of Trustees President Pice-President Executive Pice-President Pice-President for the Natural and Medical Sciences Secretary Treasurer Comptroller Director for Agriculture Director for Biological and Medical Research Director for the Humanities JOHN D, ROCKEFELLER, SRD DEAN RUSK ALAN GREGG LINDSLEY p. KIM BALL

WARREN WEAVER FLORA M. RHIND EDWARD ROBINSON H. MALCOLM GILLETTE j . GEORGE HARRAR

ROBERT s. MORISON CHARLES B. FAHS

Director for Medico! Education and Public Health JOHN c. BUGHER Director for the Social Sciences dcttna Director for the Social Sciences NORMAN s. BUCHANAN1

LELAND c. DBViNNEY2

COUNSEL CHAUNCEY BBLKNAP VANDERBILT WEBB

BOARD OF CONSULTANTS JOHN NORMAN EPPERSON P. C. MANGELSDORF WILL MARTIN MYERS 1 Beginning July i, 1955. *To Juno 30, 1935.

FOR AGRICULTURE

HERMAN ALONZO RODENHISER ERNEST C. YOUNG

V

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

The

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T R U S T E E S ,O F F I C E R S , AND C O M M I T T E E S April 1956-April 1 9$ y

TRUSTEES CHESTER BOWLES DETLEV W, BRONK RALPH J. BUNCHE WILLIAM H. CLAFL1N JOHN 8 . DICKEY LEWIS W. DOUGLAS LEE A. DUBR1DGB WALLACE K. HARRISON JOHN R, KIMBERLY ROBERT F. LOBE ROBERT A. LOVETT JOHN J. MCCLOY HENRY ALLEN MOB WILLIAM I. MYERS THOMAS PARRAN JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER, 3RD DEAN RUSK ROBERT G. SPROUL1 ARTHUR HAYS SULZBBRGBR HENRY P. VAN DUSEN W. BARRY WOOD, JR.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE THE PRESIDENT, Chairman CHESTER BOWLES DETLBV W. BRONK RALPH J. BUNCHE ROBERT A. LOVETT HENRY ALLEN MOE JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER, 3RD LEE A. DUBRiDGE, alternate member ROBERT F. LOEB, alternate member

F I N A N C E COMMITTEE ROBERT A. LOVETT, Chairman WILLIAM H, CLAFLIN JOHN J. MCCLOY LEWIS W. DOUGLAS, alternate member JOHN R. KIMBERLEY, alternate member

THE PRESIDENT THE CHAIRMAN OP THE BOARD OP TRUSTEES 1 Retired June 30, 1956.
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2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

OFFICERS Chairman of the Board of Trustees President Vice-President Executive Vice-President VIce-President for the Natural and Medical Sciences Secretary Treasurer Comptroller Director for Agriculture Director for Biological and Medical Research Director for the Humanities Director for Medical Education and Public Health Director for the Social Sciences JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER, 3RD DEAN RUSK ALAN GREGG1 LINDSLEY F. KIM BALI,

WARR EN WEAVER FLORA M. RHIND EDWARD ROBINSON H. MALCOLM GILLETTE J. GEORGE HARRAR

ROBERT s. MORISON CHARLES B. FAHS

JOHN c. BUGHER NORMAN s. BUCHANAN

COUNSEL CHAUNCEY BELKNAP VANDERBILT WEBB2

B O A R D OF C O N S U L T A N T S FOR A G R I C U L T U R E JOHN NORMAN EPPERSON P. C. MANGELSDORF WILL MARTIN MYERS 1 Retired June 30, 1956. fl Deceased June 17, 1956.
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HERMAN ALONZO RODENHISBR ERNEST C. YOUNG

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

The

Rockefeller

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OFFICERS AND

STAFF

* 9 5 5

JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER, 3RD DEAN RUSK ALAN GREGG LINDSLEY F. KIMBALL WARREN WEAVER FLORA M. RHIND JANET M. PAINE EDWARD ROBINSON ROBERT LETORT H. MALCOLM GILLETTE GEORGE E. VAN DYKE

Chairman of the Board of Trustees President Vice-President Executive Vice-President Vice-President for the Natural and Medical Sciences Secretary Assistant Secretary Treasurer Assistant Treasurer Comptroller Assistant Comptroller

MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH

JOHN c. BUGHER, M . D . JOHN B. GRANT, M . D . WADE W. OLIVER, M . D . ROBERT B. WATSON, M . D . JOHN M. WEIR, M.D., PH.D. MARSHALL c. BALFOUR, M . D . ROLLA B. HILL, M . D . MARY ELIZABETH TENNANT,1 R.N.

Director Associate Director Associate Director Associate Director Associate Director Assistant Director Assistant Director Assistant Director

Staff RICHMOND K. ANDERSON, M . D . , P H . D . GUY S. HAYES, M . D . ESTHER M. HIRST, R . N . JOHN H. JANNEY, M . D .

i Retired June 30, 19SS.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

M .D. MILLER. Brazil OTTIS R. Johannesburg. ix 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . M . M . D . D .1 R. GERARD R. DELPHINE H. R . OSLER L.N. KOKERNOT. i Temporary ataff member. SMITHOURN. P H . India J. Director JORDI CASALS-ARIET. PAUL F. JR. Belem. Director Associate Director Associate Director Assistant Director Stag New Yor6 Virus Laboratories MAX THEILER. Union of South Africa ROBERT H. M.D. KNIFE ESTUS H. THOMAS. LEO A. C . D . HARRY M. M . M . M . WORK.LILLIAN A. KENNETH C. D . D . MAGOON OLIVER R. POMERAT. FRED W. D .. MORISON. AUSTIN KERR. P H .1 P H . M . JOHNSON. D . California HARALD N. MC COY. D . D . S . JOHN MAIER. D . M . TELFORD H. PETERSON. BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH ROBERT s. M . M . D .SC. JOSEPH L. CAUSEY. D .L . . . Berkeley. D . D.1 PH. C . D . CLARKE. JOHNSON. M . D . Poona. P . M . RUSSELL. M . MELN1CK. LORING WHITMAN. R .

BORLAUG. P H . P H . YERKES. D . STAKMAN. ROBERT F. D . PH. D . JR. Staff Special Consultant Mexican Agricultural Program EDWIN J. P H . Trinidad THOMAS H. P H . DOROTHY PARKER. D . AGRICULTURE J. ROBERT p. c .. BULLER.Part of Spain. P H . s c . KENNETH WERNIMONT.. Associate Soil Scientist Staff Photographer Assistant Extension Editor Plant Pathologist Associate Geneticist Bibliographer and Librarian Associate. Associate Geneticist WILLIAM D. D . MC KELVEY. NEIL B. YOUNG. D . JR. Assistant Plant Physiologist REGGIE J. M . P H . RODERIC E.B. F . JOHN J. Experiment Station Operations JOHN A. P H . WELLHAUSEN. Assistant Plant Pathologist WILLIAM R. JR. D . M . P H . P H . D . PERRY. P H . PINO. D . CHANDLER.. ANDERSON. P H . . D . SMITH.. D . BURDEN. LAIRD. P H . Plant Pathologist Assistant Animal Husbandman LOWELL s. GLEASON. P H . P H . D . D . D . M . D . D . RALPH w. Assistant Plant Geneticist Associate Geneticist DONALD L. WILBUR G. D . RACHIE. D . MACLELLAN DELBERT T . OSLER. D . P H . RICHARDSON. Regional Director in the Far East E. GEORGE HARRAR. MYREN. JR. ROBERT D. JR. Director DOUGLAS BARNES. CHARLES R. NIEDERHAUSER.. D . Director Assistant Director Assistant Director Assistant Director Assistant Director RICHARD BRADFJELD. P H . Assistant Entomologist © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . P H . A . Entomologist NORMAN E. Animal Scientist KENNETH o. D .D. D . P H . D . G. D . P H . JESSE P. P H . P H . DOWNS. JOHN S. LL. AITKEN. M .

ROBERT L. FRANSEN. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . P H . GIBLER. M . Experiment Station Operations Assistant Horticulturist Associate Entomologist Assistant Plant Pathologist Specialist in Farm Management Assistant Geneticist. EDWARD F. EVANS KENNETH w.8 P H . D . RUPERT. LOY V. Director Assistant Agronomist THE S O C I A L S C I E N C E S NORMAN S. in Training Chilean Agricultural Program JOSEPH A. JULY. JAMES M. HARWOOD LEE E. D . GUY B. P H . D . P H . P H . D . Director Associate Soil Scientist Associate Agronomist Associate Animal Husbandman Associate Plant Pathologist Associate Geneticist Assistant. HALPIN. GRANT. Director Associate Director Assistant Director Assistant Director Consultant THE HUMANITIES CHARLES B. D . CROWDER. SKILES. D . D . FAHS. P H . JAMES T. DEViNNEY. P H . 1955. ULYSSES J. JOHN w . BUCHANAN. LELAND c. D . D . D'ARMS. P H . D . P H . H. M . s . P H . D . M . 19SS. P H . P H .Colombian Agricultural Program LEWIS M.4 P H . si S Acting Director to June 30. P H . 19S5. ROBERT F. SOULES. D . STEWART. D . ROGER F.5 P H .1 P H . S . RUPPEL. JOHN B. THOMPSON. ROBERTS.2 P H . JAMES E. Director Associate Director Associate Director Assistant Director Assistant Director 1 Temporarily assigned to the Colombian Agricultural Program. HEIDR1CK. D . D . 0 To August 31. JOHN MARSHALL CHADBOURNE GiLPATRic ROBERT w . S . BAIRD. ROLAND E. D . 195 S. 4 Beginning April 6. 2 Beginning July 1. D . DAVID THURSTON.

1956-1957 OFFICERS AND STAFF MEMBERS. AND COMMITTEES.CONTENTS TRUSTEES. OFFICERS. 1955-1956 TRUSTEES. Brazil Catholic University of Chile: Medical Education Cornell University: Electron Microscopy University of San Marcos: High Altitude Physiology Santa Casa de Misericordia: Intern and Residency Program University of Chicago: Study of the Integration of Negroes in Medicine State Medical College Hospital: Model Teaching Wards University of the Republic: Faculty of Medicine Other Grants xii 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 25 27 27 28 28 29 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . AND COMMITTEES. 1955 iv vi viii xix LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL Introduction Summary of Appropriations in 1955 Information on The Rockefeller Foundation Supplement to the Fellowship Directory Organizational Information ILLUSTRATIONS following 8 g 10 13 16 Medical Education and Public Health INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION MEDICAL University of Chile: Faculty of Medicine University of Minas Gerais: Faculty oi Medicine University of SSo Paulo: Ribeirao Preto and Sao Paulo Faculties of Medicine University of Oxford: School of Medicine Campaign for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel. OFFICERS.

35 Biological and Medical Research INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT THE BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF BEHAVIOR Verkes Laboratories of Primate Biology Dartmouth College: Research in Cellular Biology Karolinska Institute: Research in Neurophysiology University of Brussels: Research in Neurophysiology University of Munich: Studies in Animal Behnvior Other Grants GENERAL BIOLOGY University of Naples: Genetics of Microcythemta University of London: Gal ton Laboratory University of Sao Paulo: Population Genetics University of Sao Paulo: Laboratory of Cell Physiology Other Grants BIOCHEMISTRY Karolinska Institute: Research in Biochemistry University of London: Structure of Nucleic Acids Haskins Laboratories: Research in Biochemistry University of Uppsala: Research in Biochemistry University of Cambridge and the University of Birmingham: Research in Biochemistry 57 58 59 60 61 53 54 54 55 5& 46 48 48 49 50 5 ° 44 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .NURSING University of Edinburgh: Nursing Teaching Unit University of Valle: Nursing Education Other Grants PUBLIC HEALTH University College of the West Indies: Faculty of Medicine University of London: Occupational Health Christian Medical College: Preventive and Social Medicine Other Grants MEDICAL CARE University of North Carolina: Survey of Medical Practice Other Grants FIELD SERVICE GENERAL Indian Council of Medical Research: New Office Building Other Grants 42 43 41 41 42 36 37 38 38 34 3 4 .

Peru: Postgraduate Training and Research University of Wisconsin: Research in Plant Pathology 88 89 go go 91 91 92 93 93 94 95 96 86 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .National University of Mexico: Institute of Chemistry Columbia University: Enzyme Research Philip University: Institute of Physiological Chemistry Other Grants BIOPHYSICS Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn: Research on Protein Structure University of Cambridge and the Royal Institution of Great Britain: Research in Biophysics . University of Uppsala: Research in Biophysics University of Cambridge: Physiological Laboratory Other Grants VIROLOGY Johns Hopkins University: School of Hygiene and Public Health Queen's University of Belfast: Virus Research The Virus Research Program Other Grants SPECIAL PROJECTS Smaller Grants 62 63 63 64 66 67 68 69 69 71 73 73 84 85 Agriculture INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT AID TO RESEARCH AND TEACHING Louisiana State University: Rice Research Center University of the Philippines: College of Agriculture University of the Philippines: Agricultural Scholarships University of Sao Paulo: School of Agriculture Gammon Institute. India: Horticultural Research Station South Pacific Commission: Control of the Rhinoceros Beetle National School of Agriculture. Brazil: College of Agriculture Agronomy Institute of the South: Research in Cereal Improvement National Institute of Agricultural Sciences. Japan Rural University of the State of Minas Gerais: School of Veterinary Medicine Government of Uttar Pradesh.

Brazil: Plant Virus Research Kasetsart University : Department of Home Economics Ohio State University: Plant Science Purdue University: Genetics Research University of Uppsala: Royal Agricultural College of Sweden Other Grants OPERATING PROGRAMS Introduction Mexican Agricultural Program Colombian Agricultural Program Chilean Agricultural Program Com Improvement Project: Central America Other Grants GRANTS WITH LONG-RANGE RELATION TO WORLD'S FOOD SUPPLY University of Wisconsin and the Stanford Research Institute: Solar Energy University of California: Algal Studies University of Maryland: Algal Studies University of Texas: Laboratory of Algal Physiology Other Grants SPECIAL PROJECTS Boy Scouts of America: Conservation of Natural Resources Other Grants 9 6 97 97 98 99 99 100 1 0 0 1 0 4 106 m 1 16 116 n? 120 120 121 122 123 The Social Sciences INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT 124 THE SOCIAL SCIENCES AS SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINES University of Michigan: Survey Research Center Princeton University: Office of Population Research Harvard University: Economic Research Social Science Research Council: Fellowships Other Grants THE QUEST FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Columbia University: East Asian Institute University of the Philippines: Institute of Public Administration New York University: Study of Foreign Student Orientation Program xv 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 *33 © 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation .University of Lund: Institute of Genetics University of the Republic: College of Veterinary Medicine Institute of Agronomy.

Inc. Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes: Area Studies Harvard University: Russian Language Research University of Rochester: Canadian Studies German Association of American Studies Egyptian Society for Historical Studies Other Grants HUMANISTIC RESEARCH University of Geneva: Psychology.: Research on Internationa] Relations Hague Academy of International Law: Center for Study and Research in International Law and International Relations University of Notre Dame: Committee on International Relations London School of Economics and Political Science: Fellowships in International Relations Columbia University: International Law University of Heidelberg: Political Science University of Wisconsin: Study of Tax Administration Other Grants 138 139 140 142 142 143 144 145 136 137 The Humanities INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT INTERCULTURAL STUDIES McGill University: Institute of Islamic Studies University of Washington: Research on Northeast Asia Kyoto University. and Logic University of Chicago: Study of Kansas City Italian Institute of Historical Studies Other Grants xvi J49 156 157 158 159 160 161 161 162 163 163 164 164 168 169 170 171 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics 134 Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Center for International Studies 135 University of Chicago: Philippine Studies Program Other Grants SOCIAL SCIENCE PROBLEMS OF CONTEMPORARY WESTERN SOCIETY Council on Foreign Relations. Inc. Philosophy. Doshisha University. and the University of Michigan: American Studies Program Salzburg Seminar in American Studies. International Press Institute Columbia University: American Press Institute Sixth Section.

: Advanced Training for Conductors Little Symphony Society of Berkeley Connecticut College: Summer School and Festival of the Dance Other Grants SPECIAL PROJECTS Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Dual Major Program Humanities Research Council of Canada Other Grants 183 184 185 173 175 175 176 177 178 178 179 180 180 Other Appropriations Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization: Construction of a Radio Telescope 187 The Conservation Foundation 188 Mexican-American Cultural Institute 189 National Academy of Sciences: Atomic Radiation Grants 190 FELLOWSHIPS AND OTHER STUDY AWARDS REPORT OF THE TREASURER GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF GRANTS. I n c . Inc.THE ARTS Kenyon College and the University of the South: Creative Writing Fellowships Virginia Museum of Fine Arts: Community Drama Program Union Theological Seminary: Program in Religious Drama Boston Symphony Orchestra: Tanglewood Revolving Scholarship Fund Louisville Philharmonic Society. : New Music by Living Composers Young Audiences. Inc. 1955 INDEX 192 an 300 327 zvii © 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . American Symphony Orchestra League.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

together with detailed reports of the Treasurer of the Foundation and of the Directors for Medical Education and Public Health.To the Trustees of The Rockefeller Foundation Gentlemen: I have the honor to transmit herewith a general review of the work of The Rocke- feller Foundation for the year 1955. 1955. Respectfully yours. Agriculture. Dean Rusk President 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 1955 to December 31. and the Humanities for the period January I. the Social Sciences. Biological and Medical Research.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Annual Report for 1955 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

that the scale of his philanthropy had grown beyond the range of personal giving and had decided to enlist the help of boards of trustees composed of men of wide and varying experience. The instruction in the charter to ''promote the well- being of mankind" confers upon the Trustees a wide freedom of action." The action of its founder in setting aside substan- tial private resources for public purposes. A charter which would tie the hands of those upon whose discernment and judgment he wished to rely would have frustrated his decision. together with the act of the legislature. the third of the large philanthropies endowed by Mr. feller. and had confirmed his view that future decisions should not be unduly restricted by the past nor by man's inability to see very far into the fog o£ the future. Rockefeller had apparently concluded. Mr.INTRODUCTION Rockefeller Foundation. Rocke- created in 1913 by a special act of the York as a corporate body throughout the legislature of the State of New "to promote the well-being of mankind world. both income and capital. Mr. within the permissive terms of a liberal charter. clothed The with a public trust and Rockefeller Foundation empowered its Trustees to use its funds. was John D . Rockefeller's own experience had undoubt- edly impressed him with the fact that conditions change. prior to the turn of the century. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

with the alternative uses which are rejected. Many possibilities are "good" but. rather than to profit making for private gain. more compelling is the wish of Trustees to use them as effectively as possible for the purposes for which they were intended. although it retains the right of petition about legislation which directly affects itself. which are "best"? Each grant or expenditure competes. the more exacting is the task of deciding what to do. no substantial part of its activities may consist of propaganda. If such guides as these are negative. educational. Taken for granted is the prudent care of such funds. Where are the large returns to mankind from the modest investments of an endowed philanthropy? What will prove of enduring rather than of transitory value. It must refrain from participation in partisan political campaigns. like any other individual or corporate citizen. both at home and in the foreign countries where it is active. or other efforts. More positive guides are implicit in the sense of stewardship which governs the use of funds committed to public purposes through a charitable corporation. expects to obey all relevant laws and to act within the general framework of public policy. Officers and Trustees must somehow come to terms with the haunting and elusive question as to whether such funds might better be used in some other way. A foundation's business is philanthropy. If it wishes to qualify for exemption from federal income taxes. boundaries and guide posts do exist. m a sense. to influence legislation. of fundamental rather than superficial importance? Which types of expenditures are © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The wider the possible choices under a charter. The concern to make the "best" use of charitable funds generates an endless stream of questions. A foundation. they are nevertheless important and give clear answers to certain types of proposals which reach the Foundation each year. since limited funds can not provide for them all. it devotes itself to scientific. religious or other charitable purposes.4 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION If discretion is wide.

There is respect for knowledge. The promotion of well-being necessarily involves no- tions. or where the neglected but crucial tasks? help to explain the now These and similar questions familiar phrases which have become standard in the foundation field: "the extension of knowledge. They also explain the emphasis which is placed upon individual capacity and the encouragement of men with creative ideas. which seem to bar general progress. Where does one find the philosophical roots of the work of The three years? Rockefeller Foundation over the past fortyIn Jeremy Bentham's felicific calculus." "root causes. Optimism was written into the Foundation's charter." Such Mr. in one or another religious approach? The men who have been responsible for the Foundation have been. of course." "the training of leadership. reliance upon individual capacity and individual responsibility. much of it of religious inspiration.INTRODUCTION 5 likely to benefit more rather than less of mankind in the long run? Where are the roadblocks. the techniques. familiar phrases reflect the sifting process by which are discovered the ideas. as it was into the Preamble of the American Constitution. But the Foundation also reflects the proposition that men with different notions about ultimate issues can agree upon a wide range of practical action. Attempts © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Fortunately. in an Idea of Progress. expressed or implied." and Rockefeller's "passion for excellence. One finds the broad humanitari- anism. in some systematic political or social theory. about the anatomy of wellbeing. faith in education. perhaps of igno- rance. and their judgments differ." "building on strength. the men and the institutions which seem to offer the most promising opportunities for foundation assistance. strongly influenced by the society and times in which they have lived and by the prevailing Ideas of nineteenth and twentieth century America. there are many foundations. which seeks to remove such scars upon human dignity as sickness and extreme poverty." "germinal ideas." "pioneering.

they have been able to identify a number of great preferences so deeply and widely held as to approximate a consensus among mankind. seem to prefer knowledge to ignorance. say. Men. Some powerful preferences divide rather than unite. on the other hand. in material prosperity. especially where the means for pursuing them are in short supply. point. reasonable and predictable laws to tyranny. a reasonable livelihood to poverty. Admit- tedly. As have many others.6 THB ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION to articulate a philosophy of pragmatism out of the American experience have sometimes discounted the role of the strongly held beliefs about the meaning of life and nature of reality. they have encountered most of the great religious and philo- sophical traditions which have something to say about the nature of human well being. beauty to drabness. That there is a broad and growing consensus about ends is illustrated by the manifold activities of the United Nations and its Specialized Agencies. such as our preference of ourselves over others. Elementary aspirations can get into each other's way. health to sickness. atoms for peace to hydrogen war. If the Foundation is American in background. to the agreed rules of the democratic process which are designed to permit men to pursue theoretically diverse aims in reasonable harmony. by and large. order to anarchy. its national commitments have been enlarged by its charter instruction to consider "mankind throughout the world. to the consensus about daily life are deeply committed to which can be reached by men who a variety of beliefs and. The several charters of this international system record purposes to which the 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . significance to dreary routine." In the more than 90 countries and territories in which the officers and staff have worked at one time or another. even such a partial list is full of complication. And relative success at a particular point. brings new and subtle problems of its own. on the one A more sensitive interpretation might hand.

that the primary asset of an endowed foundation is money. some of it is the inevitable accompaniment of most worthwhile efforts.INTRODUCTION 7 Members have given formal adherence. If controversy occasionally arises. The how Report will show each of these is utilized in the course of a given year. From what men do in such cooperative action can be inferred substantial agreement about the ends they share. not without reason. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . To feller Foundation has worked say that The Rocke- toward aims which are widely shared throughout the world does not mean that it turns only to those which can be expressed as a least common denominator. some is a sign that a problem which needs attention is getting it. as it does. Flexibility to concentrate resources at points of unusual need or opportunity and the capacity to persist in a particular effort for long periods of time are useful attributes of endowed philanthropy. nor only to those safely anchored in the promotion of well-being calls for change in status quo. The thoughtful examination of ends. Equally important is its freedom—the freedom to use money in ways which multiply its value by creating other assets which reinforce financial support. More tangible and persuasive are the thousands of specific tasks to which men of different nationalities and cultural traditions have given their time. arises because all undertakings do not come up to the hopes which launched them. a vigorous search for new and more effective means. The the direction of preferred ends. be it said. The later sections of this Annual Report describe the grants made in 1955 and the work of the Foundation's own staff in agriculture and in virus research. and a sober and respon- sible discussion of differences offer tempting and rewarding opportunities to a foundation. some. It is commonly supposed. thought and material resources.

5 8 8 $ 1 9 . 2 2 3 . classification becomes. As of the same date. somewhat arbitrary. The amount shown for Administration covers con- siderably more than what is commonly understood as overhead. for example. Included. 1955 Foundation December amounted to $ 5 4 7 . 9 5 O 2 . international organizations and institutions of higher learning as well as a wide range of services provided for fellows and to other recipients of Foundation grants. In fact. 6 0 1 .332. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The appropriations for 1955 included $ 9 3 1 . 8 6 0 3 } 5 5 O .155 435»OOO 2 . The uncommitted capital funds of The at market value on Rockefeller 31. therefore.- 353 during 1955. 1 5 2 . an increasing number of grants are recommended jointly by two or more Directors and combine more than one field of interest or academic discipline. 3 1 . 4 5 0 . 4 *i . 3 1 3 . are the costs of personnel on loan to governments. 3 3 O 3»597>470 3. 3 5 3 The above categories reflect the primary program distribution of the total among major categories responsibilities of the five Directors of the Foundation. The shows: Agriculture Biological and Medical Research Humanities Medical Education and Public Health Social Sciences General (Unclassified) Administration and Services $ 3 . the outstanding commitments of the Foundation totalled $3M45>744-79Appropriations in 1955 bring the total of all appro- priations since 1913 to $535»5u»3i5'37. 0 8 0 for 176 fellowship awards in 44 foreign countries.8 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Summary o f Appropriations i n1 9 5 5 The Rockefeller Foundation appropriated $195152.

Because the public is the intended beneficiary. and will give or withhold confidence accordingly. Information about the activities of The Rockefeller Foundation may be found in the following: The Annual Report. and public health. Technical papers appearing in scientific journals. issued separately from time to time and included in the appropriate Annual Report. a full account of its grants and activities is published each year for public scrutiny. vims research. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . the next Review will appear in the first quarter of 1957 and will cover the years 1955- 1956. In the long run the public itself. in addition. important practical advantages for the Foundation itself. the work of the Foundation's own scientific and technical staff. which describes in some detail the grants made during the year. those working in fields of special interest to the Foundation are encouraged to make applications which it is glad to receive. those whose proposals lie clearly outside such fields may learn in advance what the Foundation's answer will probably be. and the management and status of the Foundation's investments. The President's Review. especially the informed portions of it. The Treasurer's Report. the status of all outstanding appropriations. this attempts to provide a brief but general review and calls attention to fields of special interest in the Foundation's program. which gives a brief and prompt sum- mary of grants made during the preceding three months. The Quarterly Report.INTRODUCTION 9 Information on The Rockefeller Foundation Rocke- The use of the funds and other assets of The feller Foundation turns upon the judgment of its Trustees. The policy of full publication has. advised and assisted by its officers. arising from the investigations of the Foundation's scientific staff in such fields as agriculture. will decide whether the trust is being administered in the public interest. which appears as a part of the Annual Report. is separately printed for those specially interested in the Foundation's investment portfolio.

great tasks are waiting for the men who can do them. Yellow Fever. edited by Dr. Publications arising out of research and scholarship in colleges.IO THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION The Fellowship Directory. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . advances depend upon individuals of unusual capacity. Despite changes in the scope and emphasis of program over the years. such as The Story of The Rockefeller Foundation by Raymond B . John F.firstpublished in 1951. Mans Mastery of Malaria by Dr. A complete bibliography will be furnished upon request. Fosdick. Logan. a five-year supplement is being issued in 1 9 5 6 . The reply of The Rockefeller Foundation ( a n d of the General Education Board) to the inquiries of the Special Committee to Investigate Tax Exempt Foundations of the House of Representatives of the 83rd Congress. the Foundation has always been preoccupied with the encouragement of talent and the development of leadership. Special volumes written by present or former officers and staff of the Foundation. will bring this information up to date by adding the 899 fellowships awarded during the five years 1951-1955. universities and independent research institutions. The "There is plenty of room at the top." takes on new meaning. Paul F. Supplement to the F e l l o w s h i p D i r e c t o r y In 1951 The Rockefeller Foundation published a Directory of Fellowship Awards which covered the years 1917-1950. this. Russell. whatever the field of human endeavor. and The Sardinian Project by Dr. Whether in the endless search for more knowledge or in the application of what is already known to practical problems. together with supplementary statements on special issues. A forthcoming Supplement. While such books and articles are not a direct responsibility of the Foundation. even more true today. If this has been true in the past. Strode. was published and distributed widely. to which the Foundation has provided assistance. now in production. they are of value to those who might wish to understand more fully the Foundation's interests in particular fields. it is old maxim of a free society. George F.

Travel grants. some of whom held more than one During its early years. Geographically. the great majority of fellowships awarded directly by the Foundation have gone to foreign countries.INTRODUCTION The II Foundation's fellowship program is only a part of its total investment in people. the American Council of Learned Societies. agriculture. and as scholarships the awards to people who have not taken their degrees but are seriously working toward them. 9 5 6 individuals from 98 countries and territories. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . such as the Social Science Research Council. the Foundation con- appointment* centrated its fellowships largely in medical education. The Foundation has awarded 7 . the social sciences and the humanities. public health. Though the differences among the various kinds of assistance are more technical than real. the later expansion of program into other fields provided increasing numbers of awards for the natural sciences. These have been held by 6 . it is Foundation practice to designate as fellowships. the medical sciences. Substantial funds have gone to support training awards by other American institutions. rang- ing in annual numbers from 97 in 1943 to 221 in 1951. Table I shows the distribution by areas and fields of interest of the awards made directly by The Rockefeller Foundation during the past five years and in the 1917-1950 period. 3 2 4 fellowships. the National Research Council. although the United States has received more than any other single country. awards for advanced training to men and women who have their doctorates or professional degrees and who are well launched on professional careers. scholarships. funds for training awards by other institutions and a high proportion of its larger grants are aimed at individual development. and nursing. grants-maid.

TABLE I.852 531 6 .316 1. 0 8 9 840 1. BY GEOGRAPHIC AREA AND FIELD OF INTEREST.116 904 104 22 135 106 33 60 4 103 26 18 49 1 72 45 3 4 125 19 36 31 27 1 7 6 14 77 46 353 214 95 191 B " w 53 "3 0 a o > | 356 200 114 586 104 208 899 4.029 7. Geographic Area 1917-1950 Africa & Near East Europe Asia & Pacific North America & Caribbean South America TOTALS 1951-1955 Africa & Near East Europe Asia & Pacific North America & Caribbean South America TOTALS GRAND TOTALS Medicine and Public Health Natural Sciences Social Sciences Humanities Agriculture Totals " 104 1.333 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .240 413 3. 4 3 4 E w fa 0 o w 1.475 606 5 799 77 187 48 11 714 108 69 2 2 52 40 344 34 472 49 9 12 34 122 3 . FELLOWSHIPS.838 1.194 1.

the Board of Trustees approved certain organizational changes. Vice-President since 1951. 1955. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Smith. Dr. Dr. 1955. the Secretary (Miss Flora M. continues on special assignments both within the Foundation and in public service until his retirement on June 30. 1956. also a member of the Board October 21.INTRODUCTION 13 Organizational Information MEETINGS During 1955 regular meetings of the full Board of Trustees were held on April 6 and on December 6 and 7. On April 4. resigned on Lee A. and continue with the duties implied by their titles substantially unchanged. Under Secretary General of the United Nations. Geoffrey S . Dodds. Rhind). was elected to succeed Dr. Malcolm Gillette) Robinson). Six meetings of the Executive Committee of the Trustees were held to take actions within the general policies approved by the Board. PRINCIPAL OFFICERS At their meeting on April 6. BOARD OF TRUSTEES The Board of Trustees of The Rockefeller Founda- tion elected one new member at their meeting on April 6. Alan Gregg. the Treasurer (Edward the Comptroller ( H . who retired from the Board on June 30. Dr. Bunche. Among the principal officers. 1954. the President (Dean Rusk). 1956 the Board of Trustees elected Dr. Harold W . President of Princeton University. Mr. of Trustees. DuBridge is President of the California Institute of Technology. DuBridge to membership. 1955. Ralph J.

Warren. Warren's contributions to the fight against yellow fever and to the development of improved public health services in many countries were outstanding. Thompson. Kimball. J. Miss Mary Elizabeth Tennant re- as Assistant Director of the program in Medical Education and Public Health. Director for Medical Education and Public Health. Director for the Social Sciences. Associate Director for Medical Education and Public Health. Dr. Miss Tennant had been a © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Kenneth W . Dr. Associate Director for Medical Education and Public Health. Lindsley F . Robert S . Director for Biological and Medical Research. 1955. Dr. Dr. Robert B. retired on March 31. Weir. Andrew J. Fahs. Assistant Director for Agriculture. Watson. At the same meeting several new appointments of officers were made for the various programs. Burden. Assistant Director for the Social Sciences. Richard Bradfield. Bugher. former Director of the Division of Natural Sciences and Agriculture. On tired June 30. John Maier. Kenneth Wernimont. Director for Agriculture. Director for the Humanities. Dr. John M. All of these persons had previously been members of the Foundation's staS or associated with it as consultants. Vice-President since 1 9 4 9 . Dr.1 4 THB ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Dr. and Dr. Dr. Dr. Warren Weaver. Regional Director for Agriculture in the Far East. Because of the growing interrelationships among the Foundation's many activities. former Director of the Division of Medicine and Public Health. Robert P. John C . Morison. Charles B. George Harrar. Dr. Assistant Director for Biological and Medical Research. Norman S. Assistant Director for Agriculture. Buchanan. the former Divisions were eliminated as formal units and specific program responsibilities were assigned to five Directors: Dr. was named Executive Vice-President and made responsible for the administration of the Foundation's activities. Dr. was elected Vice- President for the Natural and Medical Sciences. The new appoint- ments were: Dr. 1955. Dr.

Fransen were assigned to the Colombian Agricultural Program as Associate Agronomist and spectively. Myren as Assistant Extension Editor. Kenneth O . Crowder and Dr. 1955. 1955. Leo A. JLoy V. Halpin joined the Agricultural Program as Assistant Agronomist with initial assignment to Colombia. Kokernot. was appointed a tempo- rary staff member to assist in the work of the Virus Research Centre in Poona. Associate Animal Husbandman. 1938. Joseph L . Robert W . 1955. Melnick. formerly an Assistant Director of the General Education Board. India. re- Dr. who in 1954 was a temporary staff member of the Division of Medicine and Public Health. Dr. Delbert T . Robert H . July. Dr. Dr. OTHER OFFICERS AND STAFF Dr. Rachie as Assistant Plant Geneticist. on October i. and Dr. a regular staff member of the Biological and Medical Research Program. of the Department of Microbiology at Yale University. Young as Assistant Entomologist. John A. was appointed. and Dr. Pino as Associate Animal Scientist. To the Foundation's Mexican Agricultural Program were added Dr. was named Assistant Director for the Humanities. Several new staff members joined the program in Agriculture in 1955. In October. Thomas was named a temporary staff member of that program for one year beginning October. Dr. James E.INTRODUCTION 15 valued member of the staff of the former International Health Division since 1931 and had directed the Foundation's work in nursing education since October i. Dr. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . William R. James M.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Illustrations 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

© 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .!. retire. Photograph Excised Here DR.FO/. A L A \ (5KKGG Vk-e-Pri'siileiit of The Kockctclln Fmiiulatinn.

<r% Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

two ICA trainees. is illustrated here. At the left. drying and storage. Its program includes many phases of rice research. Below. && Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .it Crowley is one of the leading rice stations in the world. only one of which. from Brazil and Thailand respectively. make moisture determinations on rough rice \vith the Stcinlitc Klcctric Moisture Tester.Louisiana State University's experimental iarra . air velocities in the duct of a bin-type rice drier are being measured with a pitot tube and a micromanometer.

«fc^rS%S ^ * $& Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .Among the specialized research equipment purchased by the Institute of Chemistry of the National University of MCMCO with funds from the Foundation is a Perkin-Elmer double benni infrared spectropliotometer.

Photograph Excised Here A view of one of tlip Institute ot Chemistry's I:i!)(ir. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .itorii-s ^hci'c rcseardi is conchu'tod mi the dicniistij i*f n.uuinl prothut'i nf MCNKMII plniits anil t'niit-.

Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

The laboratory's first isolation oi a viral agent was made from a "sentinel" monkey in the Uriboca Forest.s H The lielcni Virus Laboratory is studying arthrypoilhorne neurotropic virus diseases in man and animals in Brazil. The monkeys are fed and watered each day ant! twice a week are bled and their tr^tod by mouse inoculation. in a dealing so as to prevent attacks from animals of prey. These monkeys are placed in cages and then raised by steel wires and pulleys to a. height of 15 to 20 feet from the ground. ^^ Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Wtf###BOT_TEXT###amp; © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .^(ati'm^ l < n culIct-rini: samples is slio^n !il«>vc.Mit:itJiin. tin.m o t h e r u .itoiv :in:uicr<! to t n k c pirimlir Wnchl >.Photograph Excised Here it U U S found tllut people a^n'iati'd \itll ot \vcro likclv to l i a \ c j i u ' t c c t i v c antihoilii"-. i i l \ visits to homes in tin iiTt'. One n t llu.\ \ l i " wt? i 1 I« i :in'iiL' virgin t<)iTit tui . At llir time nf tlio visit tn tin. i x izrindinjr the \.iincil t i o n i tln'M.i n i M v i pl.ih«n.ikcn of ain • uiic ulio couipliiincd i)1 lifiiiliulif and blimd ^.f i t m i l y at tin.i.it'll.w l i i > -linucd ir\ci'. On t l .w a > t. the U'lnpcMUin.\**• I'nftcc -np|ih :tnd \w li:i<l hci'ii in the t'ori'it izaitu'i-iim wiM f r u i t . the ].tinplrs \IMT (ilu.iniplrs h u m u n r k r r .

Photograph Excised Here * &* Q^ TffvTrN ^ © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Iii the Central and Southern Pacific Islands thi? beetle is nn economically serious pest nf coconut find nthcr palms.IIIM. The South Pacific Commission is presently conducting n survey of the p.nnsiU's and diseusi's nf the beetle. Its threat to tlie coconut palm is especially j.Lu^eh (. tissue i>.' coconuts are the iii. nnd pineapple.erion* IICC.iinr Mib^t-ionce ciop nnd also the source of copra.Photograph Excised Here 'I* H E R H I N O C K R O S H K K T I. The coconut palm shown at the left hits such frequent and extensive attacks bj adult Rhinoceros beetles that it> embiyonic. sugar cane. the area's most important cvpoit t. which it is hoped will lead In .niisutni'd and it ^ill die-.. Oiyttt rhinnfrrn* F.in effective program of bin- © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . K .

ivc a 'Vrml" fnr tliptli'rtvtion "i Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . tn Si'p whether hers li.Photograph Excised Here As part of their continuing rcscm'hes on the behavior of bees.m<l hi* folleaiiiu's nt the University of Munich me rNpL-riiiieritiiip. Professor Karl vim Frix'li .

Its position is signalled by a team memlu-r on an adjoining peak.tahle is raised by pulli-js to the sunimit of the ditt. As the table ascend*. a c a r e f u l watch is kept to sec whether the hers can explain the taMe's locution tn the rest of the hive.Photograph Excised Here Abuvi 1 left is a }ceding tjblo "ii-pt'u«'eil f n i n i the top of . © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .\t to the hive at the cliff's base. tlu.1 60-im'ter-high cliff so :is tn hang ne. When some of the hers (nil of which me mmibrml) have been nttrncrcil to it and have groivn accustomed to the location.

was established in 1952 for the purpose oi encouraging cultural and intellectual exchange between Japan and other countries. a library.n! The International House of Japan.000 toward the center's building program and activities. which were designed hy Japanese architects. include residential facilities. meeting rooms. Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The buildings. At that time the Foundation contributed $676. and office*. in Tokyo. In August of 1955 International House was formally opened.

socioeconomic situation of the villaprv.Photograph ExcisedHere The Philippine Studies Program of the University of Chicago is undertaking fit-Id research in npricuhiirnl anil fishing communities in the Tagalog rofiion of central Luzon.i prnccssins center*.nl kind and also of Mudying ttiu . vilr* :irc r a f t i n g coconuts to the copi. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . In this picture. with the pujposc of gathering ihita oi n cnlnirnlanthropologic.

+ (& Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .9^0 f if Jk Z*fJ.

i di.. S. ot-ntntl LUKOII.'»'*• P.i. nml in'i^hliorin^ ttmn-.u-ii. Mi)ier Thi-.iii P:ihlo City.inil.liny. ^!io\> tlie Mi u>n:iK \lm-li tin.ipun. At iln.villiiuprs iiM1 M t'sit^'li silver sinmt^ .left :ir<' ria> fit-Ids."£SV • .il \ii-\v ni the \i->t slum' oi L. G.itul ontJisli for M. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

As part of a larger program... the survey committee has presented a plan for converting the Ruiz-Soler Sanitarium (designed by Isadore Rosenfield. Architect and Hospital Consultant) at Rio Piedras to a district hospital which can he expanded into a hase medical center. is to study ways in which existing health services can be improved through regionalization.„ IH jll One ol the purposes oi the health survey of Puerto Rico being made bj* the Island's Department of Health and the medical school of the University oi Puerto Rico. i Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

It is now planned to expand the program to include field training at an out-patient clinic and also to extend medical services to the other islnnds in the British West I miles.irticul. LL_ © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .000 in 3955.iph above nr<working Jti the pathology laboratory in the Medical Faculty at the University College of tlic West Indies. Jamaica.ni!y t a u a r d the Health needs oi the area. To help make this possible?) the Koimdation contributed $314. The program developed by the Faculty combine?both mcilic.Photograph Excised Here The students in tliu photojjr. and at present is directed p.il education nnd research.

in in © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The Founiintioirs vurreiit ynint "I $4^.-iiiiport x\]t!ch In'U.000 to Piotessor Thenu'llV rt-MMrdu-s in eivynic . n'^ipit-nt ul the Notn-I pri/i' in medicine in 395\ CMimining apparatus tor int-iisiiritig mngiu'tic si^n-ptihility at t!ic Mi'ilk'al Nohcl l n > t i tutc in Stuckliolm.Photograph Excised Here Professor H»un Tlienn-II.

PIT! The Institute of Andean Biology lias been one of the most substantial contributors to modern knowledge of the physiology of living organisms under low OMygen conditions.900 feet above sea level. during a study on high altitude physiology. 14. This photograph \vas taken at the branch laboratory at Morococha. v% Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

c^ Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Nicaragua. JL © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . At the left. Guatemala. and Panama are cooperating in a program for improving corn production in the Central American region by strengthening the existing corn programs. Honduras. and creating a system for the exchange of information and planting materials. coordinating research.Photograph Excised Here The luundatiun . agronomists inspect seed of the single crosses for the hybrid Mexico H-50I sent to Guatemala for yield trials. Costa JRica. being tested in Nicaragua. The corn shown above is the hybrid Cuba M .mJ the guveiiminitii of HI Salvador.l l .

ii|:i)it:!hilitv ui' M'lmcil spcciw gumn niuloi irri{..riiuli on fnr. unii nUo fzivins iniTiMM'tl ctnpliasis to sccil proiluctidii. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .1i.i^c yni^i-s ami l^ginm-s.u-. the . Tin' piVture s grass SIM-I! lirin.ini iV invcMipJitinp.ifnl :tnii rjiinfiill amilitiuns.it (.Mcvii'iin Auiii'ithnnil I'niyi'. the .^ tlirfslu'd .i]i!n»n.I TtUffTjl* <^ »l I ' Photograph Excised Here hi it.

where the men can learn about the program's current studies and also discuss problems they encounter in the field.In addition to field days for farmers. The meeting shown below was liehl nt Ln Picdad. Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation 3& * •&« . the Mexican program holds meetings of regional extension workers at each of its research centers.

1 Experiment Station near Medel]in. Colombia. Bean plants have a very low tolerance of excess moisture. J. and ridging provides for a rapid run-off of surface water and drainage of the soil around the roofs. land to be used in the bean breeding program is prepared by ridging.d Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .At the Tuh'u Ospin. Several of the lines developed in the program give excellent promise of beinc placed irt commercial production in the near future. 4.

:ts shown nbovc.^ *£v Photograph Excised Here Until .witli acci'ptnblt' commercial characteristics. potato iields must be spraj-L-d \vtth fungicide^.( blight resistant jiotiitu c\m be ih-vi-lojit-J tor MexK-d. The potato improvement program i^ fontinufng its b. These selections are being increased :is rapiiMy :i* possible for more extensive ^ «• G-V* fe r ^ © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .isif iTspati'h snitlics on this prohU-iii anil hits obtained some outstanding selections which combine a higli Jc^ri'L1 of resist ana.

Tests arc mmlc licrc1 of hybrids for irrijiatctl planting in .itiun si stem hfini. inipro\fil Jubriil for liigh-nltitiulo vosiotisi i-^ cnmcd un nt (lie stiitinii.Innd fni \icld tri.• Photograph Excised Here In McviV" the \uik ni (IfVt'liipiiiq.Miiirh and April. u«!d to jH'cpiiu. AluHd a portable ivric. and iilso of hybrids :iml Miithctk's t<t be ^ro«n with MMMUKil riiintnll alono.ik © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

pic-eniei'getKt: tu-ntmc-ius oi DN-PK ami 2. Of the matciials. &?* Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The cost of these materials is hifih. tested. anj practical recommendations for farmers onnnot hr maclc as ret. however.The Colombinn program is continuing its experiments with chemicnl weed-killers in corn.4-D amine hove given the best results. in comparison with that of mechanical cultivation.

000 samples of native grass seed in nurseries. where the material will serve as a basis for selection and seed improvement. Photograph Excised Here © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .As a preliminary stage in the improvement of native grasses. A taxonomic study will be made and also a classification of the different types of natural grasslands according to botanical formation*. the Mexican program has established nearly 1.

as p a r t 11^ the Central American corn projPIT.i.IT Photograph Excised Here f. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .. The yield trials of corn planted at Las Delicfns (above) tind f o u r other locations in Costa Ric. showed t h a t thr In livid Mexico H-5Q1 \-as \vcll-adapted to the coastal regions of that couiitrj' nml j i r l t l r d consMi*raMv morr t h n n nutivo vnrictirs.

M-.m> Photograph Excised Here The lieu \in^ U'O-ntl\ :ulilnl to the

ir^ini. given in December.111 .i Museum (if l-'ine Arts in Riclinunnl includes .Hinm. in \liiell the Museum trustees with Rockefeller Knunilatiun a^istancr a t e ileveloping a community drama program having professional guidance but lelying ihiclly on vohmtaiy parlicipatimi.iliny iiliout ''^O pel • sons. i t t r a t t i \ e theatie. Abo\e is a scene trom J. 1 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

an internal review has been under way which has resulted in a number of specific concepts of future significance. As a result. Infectious disease as a cause of death and disability has been undergoing a marked decline in the more advanced countries of the world. Concurrently with these changes. While continuity with past programs has been maintained through project support to various institutions a t home and abroad. the composition of the populations concerned is being modified markedly.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 1955 has been a transitional one in medical education as well as public health. HE YEAR T © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Both our philosophy of medical care and our objectives in public health must be reoriented to meet the new factors that have entered upon the world scene. entirely apart from the military problems involved. which has already had a profound effect upon national and international thought. there has been introduced into our industrial and social complex the completely new factor of nuclear energy. The base of development in this field in the foreseeable future will be of such a magnitude as to tax both our scientific knowledge and our technical ingenuity in insuring public safety. These studies have been needed especially because of the rapid change in the character of our public health problems during this decade.

Not only must the medical student enter his professional training with adequate scientific preparation. the Foundation has recognized the inseparability of teaching and research and has encouraged the evolution of departments where the close interplay of these most fundamental aspects of academic life would have the greatest prospect of full development. which are inevitable and reasonable. Programs have meaning only in terms of people. but the objective character of scientific observation and the experimental approach to biomedical problems must color his entire professional life. all sound medical curricula are in harmony with the general thesis that medical diagnosis and therapy must rest upon modern scientific development.I8 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION T h e programs that the Foundation is supporting in medical education in various parts of the world are predicated on the concept that the academic structure for medical education will differ appreciably among the various cultures and national patterns that exist today. In the general support of medical schools in various countries. to extend the scientific method into the clinical training of the student. Notwithstanding these differences. T h e numerous fellowships and travel grants provided contribute to the development of the professional personnel upon whom the entire expectation of a steadily improving medical care and pub- © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . One of the most essential activities of the Foundation is its provision for the advanced training of outstanding persons who may be expected t o exhibit leadership in the educational systems of their respective countries. In extending its assistance to the improvement of the quality of instruction in medicine and public health. with emphasis upon the integration of clinical disciplines and the development of a sympathetic understanding of the patient and his problems. the objectives of T h e Rockefeller Foundation have been: to encourage the development of faculties with strong scientific orientation and a devotion to the responsibilities of teaching.

Since I942 T h e Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated $145. was started late in 1954. but the medical school faculty. is still working under exceptionally difficult conditions. planned after a study of representative medical schools in the Western world. Special studies in the United States have been supplemented on occasion by visits of the Fellow to other countries in order that he may apply to his own problems the most relevant methods and concepts.400 hospital beds. A fire destroyed the physical plant of the school in 1948. 1.600 to the University of Chile for the Faculty of Medicine. Continuing this support through the current © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Facilities for clinical teaching include about 3. especially in the preclinical sciences. about 150 years after the university itself was founded. and has remained in these quarters since that time pending construction of a new building. Construction of the building. Professional Education MEDICAL UNIVERSITY OF CHILE FACULTY OF MEDICINE T h e University of Chile's medical school in Santiago was originally established in 1738.400 under immediate university control. 90 per cent Chilean and ten per cent from other Spanish-speaking countries.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 1 9 lic health practice must depend. I n 1949 it was reestablished in temporary quarters in various Santiago hospitals. and it trains most of the physicians who enter the National Health Service in Chile. It is currently responsible for seven classes of approximately I 60 persons each.

A 150-bed teaching hospital and a new building to house most of the preclinical science departments were added to its facilities in the last three years. is centrally located in the capital of one of the largest arid potentially one of the richest of the Brazilian States.000 cruzeiros and $155. it is the fourth oldest faculty of medicine in the country. and as a first step is now making all personnel full-time in the Departments of Anatomy.222. Pathology.ooo (approximately $339. During the next two years the older buildings of the school will be remodeled for the remaining departments. increased salaries.20 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION transition period. Belo Horizonte. and Biochemistry.000 for additions to the staff. and for the travel expenses of professors visiting from abroad for three months or more while the medical school is in session.000) to the University of Minas Gerais for use through December 3 I . © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . doubling its available space. teaching and research equipment. has also been planned. The school expects to establish positions in all preclinical science departments on a full-time basis as soon as possible. The Department of Biochemistry is a national training center for teachers and research workers in biochemistry. The Belo Horizonte medical school has. been carrying through major organizational changes. Founded in I 9 I I . UNIVERSITY OF MINAS GERAIS FACULTY OF MEDICINE The Faculty of Medicine of the University of Minas Gerais. Minas Gerais. for the past several years. the Foundation has appropriated 9. the Foundation in 1955 made a five-year grant of $379. 1959. Minas Gerais depends on it for its principal supply of physicians. and an addition to the library. T o help the school bridge the period of financial stringency attached to these projects.

the Ribeir i o Preto school is situated in one of the State of Siio Paulo's richer agricultural districts. Student admissions are limited to eighty a year.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 21 UNIVERSITY OF SAO PAULO RIBEI~O PRETO AND S ~ PAULO O FACULTIES OF MEDICINE The Foundation gave assistance in 1955 to both the Siio Paulo and the Ribeirio Preto Faculties of Medicine of the University of Siio Paulo. Minas Gerais. Drawn from the States of Siio Paulo. the school includes courses in this field throughout the curriculum after the first year.000 from the Foundation in 1955 for equipment and supplies for all departments. and to a lesser extent Matto Grosso to the west. The Ribeirio Preto school received a three-year grant of $278. With the aim of teaching preventive medicine as a dominant point of view. with a single head of each department over the representatives of specialties in each field. the medical school in SCo Paulo city was constructed in 1928-29 and equipped through financial assistance amounting to approximately $~. A state-sup- © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . near the border of the State of Minas Gerais. As in other countries. Brazil. students are accepted on the basis of merit alone but preference is given to applicants from adjacent rural areas.ooo. Also unusual is the emphasis placed upon clinical psychiatry in clinical teaching. The RibeirCo Preto school departs from general practice in Brazil in having only one department of medicine and one department of surgery. An older branch of the University of Sio Paulo.ooo from the Foundation. medical care in Brazil is more readily available in the industrial and urban population centers than in the agricultural areas. The Ribeiriio Preto school was organized as a step toward meeting the special needs of Brazilian rural areas. About 200 miles northwest of Sio Paulo.

In 1955 a further one-year grant of $35. who endowed professorial chairs in medicine. formerly of St. Pickering and his research associates at St. surgery. and Physiology. some of whom will come with him to Oxford. has been appointed Regius Professor of Medicine. They will continue these studies at Oxford and at the same time develop © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . W. Professor G. and Sir Charles Sherrington. S.500 was made for the Departments of Histology. The SIo Paulo Faculty of Medicine has received approximately $55.22 T H E ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ported institution. J. During the next thirty years departments in the basic sciences were built and raised to world eminence by such outstanding scientists as Burdon Sanderson. Mary's. subsidized in recent years by the federal government. UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD SCHOOL O F MEDICINE The beginning of medical teaching a t the University of Oxford dates from 1883 when the Waynflete Professorship of Physiology was established. The university is now broadening its facilities for clinical research and teaching by building new laboratories in Radcliffe and by the purchase of new laboratory equipment. that a full clinical school was developed in Oxford at Radcliffe Infirmary. and orthopedic surgery. Haldane. it attracts students from all over Brazil. Dr. Pickering. when the clinical facilities of London were disrupted. have been conducting research on hypertension in man. Although the groundwork for clinical departments at Oxford was laid in 1936 by Lord Nuffield. Mary's Hospital. Anatomy. anesthetics. obstetrics and gynecology. London. Its entire faculty for the preclinical years is full-time and until recently was unique in Brazil in this respect. it was not until World W a r 11.000 from the Foundation since 1950 for the Department of Histology and for the development of a laboratory for work with radioactive isotopes.

and plans have been laid for at least another two by 1960.ooo (approximately $156. CAPES has developed advanced training centers in a wide variety of fields. it also awards fellowships for study in these centers. BRAZIL Ten new medical schools have been established in Brazil since 1950 in an effort to satisfy a demand for medical education which could not be met with existing training facilities.000).2 I 1.000) for the use of the Regius Professor of Medicine toward the cost of research laboratory facilities and equipment. CAMPAIGN FOR THE IMPROVEMENT O F HIGHER EDUCATION PERSONNEL. These new schools have created an unprecedented demand for teachers. In I 955. was established by the Brazilian Government in 1953.500 cruzeiros (approximately $I 24. who will © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and the University of Rio Grande do Sul were among the groups participating in this effort.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC H E A L T H 23 the new clinical school as an important training center in academic medicine. the Campaign for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES). Sgo Paulo State. In part to deal with this problem. The Rockefeller Foundation awarded the university a further grant of oE52. two more will be opened in 1956. In addition to the ten new schools already operating. Since it was founded. Candidates. In support of its medical fellowships program. to help develop the research and teaching program in the clinical sciences. About 50 one-year fellowships for study in Brazil will be awarded from the grant to teachers in medical schools assured of positions after training or to persons being prepared for specific guaranteed posts. including medicine. Rio de Janeiro. The Roman Catholic Church. the Foundation in 1955 made a two-year grant to CAPES of 6.

I 95 8. Histology. the Departments of Anatomy. Approximately $qo. 35 students were admitted. formerly organized into seven courses. Toward the expenses of preclinical teaching and research in the Faculty of Medicine. in Santiago. CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY O F CHILE MEDICAL EDUCATION Organized in 1930. and pharmacology have been closely integrated. Clinical teaching in medicine and surgery. will be interviewed personally before awards. as opposed to two in 1940. Of 25 professorships at the school.600 to the Catholic University of Chile for use through June. is the youngest of the country's three medical schools. This is only one of many changes planned and effected since the school was founded. physiology (including neurophysiology. are made. the Medical School of the Catholic University of Chile. were full-time chairs. The Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated $123. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . biochemistry.ooo was given by the Foundation for similar uses in earlier years. In 1954. no further increase is now contemplated. but since larger classes would mean curtailment of the tutorial teaching emphasized at the school.24 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION be sought in part through visits to medical schools by representatives of CAPES. Under the leadership of Director Luis Vargas. a separate chair). and Embryology have all been combined in a single Department of Morphology in the past several years. is now combined in a single general subject. Teaching and research in the functional sciences. It occupies two of the university's eight faculty buildings and an adjacent teaching hospital of 190 beds. 13 in 1955. based on merit. and until recently admitted an average of 27 Chilean students a year.

were at first lacking. promised to overcome one of the prime difficulties in the way of general pathologists. Peru. John G . o o o to Cornell University under whose auspices a program for the application of electron microscopy to the teaching of pathology and to the study of cytological changes in disease has been undertaken. has received part of its support from The Rockefeller Foun- © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . with powers of resolution and definition far greater than those of conventional microscopes. The introduction of the electron microscope. Dr. T o a degree pathologists were diverted into a fruitful investigation of the physiological alterations associated with cellular change. Lima. but this extension of their interest in many instances only increased the need for the direct visualization of cells.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 25 CORNELL UNIVERSITY ELECTRON MICROSCOPY Research in general pathology has lost some of its momentum in recent years because the lack of effective techniques blocked visual study of the cellular changes. so that they could be examined effectively under the electron microscope. UNIVERSITY OF SAN MARCOS HIGH ALTITUDE PHYSIOLOGY Research on various aspects of human physiology at high altitudes at the University of San Marcos. New York City. These methods have now been developed. secondary to disease processes. Kidd will direct the program in the Department of Pathology a t Cornell Medical College. and the time seems ripe for use of the electron microscope in cellular pathology. The Foundation has made a five-year grant of $ g ~ . occurring in morbid tissues. cytologists are making detailed studies of normal cellular structure. but methods for embedding and sectioning tissues of extreme thinness.

© 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . This group of high altitude physiologists is experienced in the physiology of respiration and circulation in their broadest aspects.900 feet above the sea.26 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION dation since 1934. Among other interesting features. and in further support of the institute's research program. The University of San Marcos now plans to integrate further the teaching and research activities of the department with the program of undergraduate instruction in normal physiology. The institute has in the past provided training a t the graduate level.889. one at Huancayo. but its unique feature is the possession of two branch laboratories at 10. has its principal laboratories in the university Medical School in Lima. Thus their work has direct application to such different clinical states as anoxia arising from heart failure and the curious multiplication of the red blood cells known as polycythemia Vera. The Rockefeller Foundation has made a two-year grant of $go. 90 miles from Lima in the high Andes. The Institute of Andean Biology is a section of the Department of Pathological Physiology. the research being conducted at the institute on such subjects as respiration and circulation under low oxygen conditions has importance for the operation of aircraft at high altitudes. But its presence in the Medical School offers an opportunity for enriching the program of undergraduate instruction there which has not yet been fully explored.ooo. Toward the costs of this reorganization. the staff of the institute includes four associate and seven assistant professors and two instructors.700 feet and 14. including such matters as the formation of the blood cells and the biochemistry of the energy systems in tissue cells. in the physiology of respiration and circulation. Under the direction of Dr. the other at Morococha. where this research is carried on. Alberto Hurtado. The Institute of Andean Biology. both for young Peruvians and for visitors from other countries. Previous Foundation support to the university for related purposes totaled $124.

The Rocke- feller Foundation has made a grant of 2 . the largest of which is the Central Hospital. maintains six hospitals in Brazil. a charitable society founded in 1580. and even more important in relation to how gation are solved. Inc.] MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 27 • SANTA CASA DE MISERICORDIA INTERN AND RESIDENCY PROGRAM The Santa Casa de Misericordia of Rio de Janeiro. its rate. the position of Negroes in allfieldsof medicine apunder- pears to have improved to a marked degree. 0 0 0 cruzeiros (about $ 5 7 . To aid the society in developing a graduate training program for interns and residents at Central Hospital. National Medical Fellowships. and its further potentialities is important in planning the future development of medical training facilities. and particularly since the end of World War II. The grant will provide partial support for the remodel- ing of the necessary living quarters for the resident staff and for the administrative expenses of the new program. The information contained in the report led this group and the Department of Sociology of the University of Chicago to plan a study which would permit an analysis of the forces and processes leadproblems of segre- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 8 5 6 . An standing of how and why this improvement has occurred. published Negroes in Medicine in 1952 as a six-year report of the progress of Negro integration in medicine. UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO STUDY OF THE INTEGRATION OF NEGROES IN MEDICINE In recent years. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility and educational value of general rotating internships and resi- dency training in medical and surgical specialties under circumstances of such facilities in Brazil.. 0 0 0 ) for a three-year period.

The hospital serves as the main clinical teaching field for the Medical College and Nursing School in Trivandrum. Reitzes. The Indian Government is providing the additional staff and the structural alterations required for the wards. The first. the Department of Physiology. Uruguay. Kesavan Nair. a general medical and surgical hospital in Trivandrum. 5 0 0 was awarded to the University of the Republic. neurophysiology.28 THB ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ing to the growing role of Negroes in medical care and science. the Foundation in 1955 made a one-year grant of $ 3 8 . The project will be developed under the direction of Dr. R. Dietrich C . to equip and supply two model teaching wards. Founded in 1951. Montevideo. where the importance of modern clinical care will be demonstrated for students in the college and the nursing school. UNIVERSITY OF THE REPUBLIC FACULTY OF MEDICINE A one-year grant of $ 3 2 . Toward the costs of the study. India. Travancore. STATE MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL MODEL TEACHING WARDS The Foundation has appropriated $ 3 5 . in 1955 for teaching and research facilities in three departments of the Faculty of Medicine. the college is one of India's newer medical schools. is divided into research sections devoted to endocrinology and enzymatology. which will be directed by Dr. vegetative functions. hospital superintendent. 1 0 0 to the University of Chicago. 0 0 0 for one year to the State Medical College Hospital. These units all maintain research laboratories and are also concerned with teaching undergradu- 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . and physiological obstetrics.

Medical School. Medellin. professor of microbiology. Colombia: Equipment for the Department of Physiology. the De- partment of Biophysics. 0 0 0 . OTHER GRANTS University of Bahia. Histology and Embryology. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 6 0 0 . $9. $ 8 . and pattern of organization. University of Michigan. $ 2 . The second department receiving assistance. Medellin. to observe its educational policies. University of Antioquia. Bernardo Jimenez. The third department. methods. to observe recent developments in the teaching of microbiology in the United States. $ 4 . Dr. 0 0 0 . Travel by four members of the staff and Governing Body to the American University of Beirut. Ann Arbor: for the ex- change of two basic science teachers and one clinical teacher between the Medical School and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Antioquia. Faculty of Medicine. Lebanon. India: Purchase and installation of equipment for use in the Department of Thoracic Surgery. The physiological obstetrics section is internationally known for research contributions in its field. Christian Medical College. $ 8 . Vellore. 6 7 5 . Colombia. 5 0 0 .130. and in the past two years has published twenty-four papers on scientific subjects. Brazil: equipment and supplies for the Department of Pathology.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 29 ate and graduate students. also divides its time between teaching and research. $ 8 . Faculty of Medicine. is collaborating with the neurophysiology section of the Department of Physiology in a program of research involving radioactive isotopes and microdissection techniques.

Dr. Colombia: Purchase of basic reference and teaching texts for the medical library of the Faculty of Medicine. additional training in the United States in the field of virus research work and the collection of vertebrates and other animals for laboratory use. $ 5 . head. director. $ 4 . Boston: toward a program of continuing education for the practicing physician. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . to observe the teaching of biochemistry in the United States. . Surgical Clinic. under the direction of Professor Hans Schaefer. University of Michigan. to study organization and teaching methods: $ 2 . Trivandrum. Frank M. 5 0 0 . 2 0 0 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 0 . postgraduate education. University of Heidelberg. Gajra Raja Medical College. Ponnamma. India: equipment for the Anatomy Department. to visit the Department of Surgery. $ 7 . Carlos Lehmann V . chief professor. Department of Pathology. $ 2 . New York: purchase of two-way radio transmission facilities for postgraduate education programs under the direction of Dr. and in medical and nursing education. Alfredo Correa-Henao. Madhya Bharat. Department of Biochemistry. Alberto Gomez Arango. $ 7 . GwaKor. India: to observe recent developments in obstetrics and gynecology. K. Medical College. Jesus Pelaez Botero. University of Valle. Professor F . $775. Medical School. Dr. Albany Medical College of Union University. Postgraduate Medical Institute of the Massachusetts Medical Society. 3 0 0 . $ 2 . 1 0 0 . Faculty of Medicine.30 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Dr. head. Germany: toward support of the teaching program of the Physiological Institute. 5 5 0 . in the United Kingdom and the United States. additional travel in the United States. 6 o o . Dr. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Call. $ 4 . 0 0 0 . Woolsey. $ 5 .

Ministry of Health. Japan: to visit medical schools in the United States to observe recent developments in the teaching of pathology. Dr. University of Ceylon. 8 5 0 . 4 . $ 3 . Teisho Aoki. Potter (Meyer). Norio Shimazono. Professor C. 4 7 5 . de Silva. School of Medicine and Dentistry. the Middle East. associate professor. Pharmacological Institute. 0 0 0 . $ 2 . Colombo: to observe methods of teaching pediatrics in the United States and the Caribbean region with special reference to current developments in preventive medicine. head. India: preparatory expenses in condevelopments in medical educa- nection with the general conference of Indian medical educators. $ 2 . C . Dr. $ 3 . professor of pathology. Hermann Rahn. Department of Physiology. Japan: to visit medical schools in the United States to observe recent developments in the teaching of biochemistry. professor of pediatrics. England: to visit medical schools in the United States. $ 3 . 0 0 . Ankara. 7 5 0 . Dr. University of Chicago. Edith L . $ 2 . Medical School. Professor Ihsan Dogramaci. professor of biochemistry. School of Medicine. Percival C. I z z e t Kantemir. Dr. Department of Child Health and Pediatrics. Dr. Faculty of Medicine. Turkey: to visit the United States to observe new techniques in pharmacology and new tion. head. 8 0 0 . Tokyo University. $ 2 . 7 5 0 . Peru. Department of Medicine. $ 3 . 2 3 0 . 5 0 0 . and Europe. University of Bristol. New Delhi.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 31 Dr. Turkey: to visit departments of pediatrics and institutes of maternal and child health in the United States and Mexico. Illinois: to observe and lecture at centers of obstetrics and gynecology in the Far East. Bruce Perry. New York: to study high altitude physiology at Morococha and Lima. Tokyo. University of Rochester. $ 2 . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . University of Ankara. Keio University. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Department of Medicine. Australia: to observe modern trends in undergraduate medical education and family care programs in the United States and Canada. associate professor of pediatrics. 3 2 5 . Department of Physiology. Tokyo University. executive. Dr. Stanford University. Juan Arturo Guedea Larios. 3 5 0 . University of Guanajuato. $ 2 . $ 1 . University of Brazil. senior lecturer. senior general physician and dean. Bishmipada Mukopadhaya. 5 0 0 . Melbourne. Japan. $ 1 . associate professor of tropical medicine. Leon. Medical Faculty. Michael Heidelberger. Rytand. Faculty of Medicine. New York: to give a series of lectures at the Faculty of Medicine. 8 0 0 . 9 0 0 . Julio Ornelas K . 0 0 0 .32 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Dr« David A. Dr. $ 1 . $ 2 . $ 1 . to visit the United States to observe modern trends in the teaching of tropical medicine and clinical medicine. Columbia University. University of Chihuahua. $ 1 . Rio de Janeiro: Dr. director. Mexico: to observe the organization and operation of medical schools in South America. University College of the West Indies. Dr. $ 1 . assistant director. India: to visit orthopedic surgery centers in the United States. 0 0 0 . Dr. 9 0 0 . Patna University. 4 0 0 . Dr. California: to visit recognized centers of medical teaching and research in Europe. professor of immunochemistry. Lebanon: to observe recent developments in the fields of pediatrics and medical education in the United States. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Prince of Wales Medical College. Ewen Thomas Taylor Downie. . American University of Beirut. Dr. Jamaica: to study liver metabolism research techniques and to observe teaching programs in the United States. Alfred Hospital Medical School. Jose Rodrigues da Silva. lecturer in orthopedic surgery. Sydney John Patrick. Hassan Misbah Idriss. Mexico: to observe the organization and operation of medical schools in South America. College of Physicians and Surgeons. Faculty of Medicine. $ 1 .

Japan: to visit medical schools in the United States. India: additional expenses of visits to medical cation and medical school and hospital administration. medical assistant. University of Rajputana. Shanfcar Karunakar Menon. to study in the United States. Thure von Uexkiill. Sawai Man centers in the United States to observe new Singh Medical College. $427. professor and chairman. Dr. Dr. methods of medical eduJaipur. $825. School of Medicine. Australia: to visit recognized centers of gynecological pathology and obstetrical teaching and services in the United States. assistant professor of pharmacology. and principal. $525.. University of Adelaide. Jr. Rajasthan. Stephen Wilhelm Thesleff. New York: to observe teaching techniques in undergraduate education in the United States. Rio de Janeiro. dean. Kyushu University. Leslie O . Dimas Prajeres de Campos. Santa Casa de Misericordia Hospital. Dr. $ 9 2 0 . assistant professor of clinical medicine. $ 1 . Hiroshi Mi'yake. Department of Pathology. Fukuoka. Dr. Albert Einstein College of Medicine. $525. Poidevin. $600. professor of biochemistry. University of the Philippines. Dr. Dr. 0 0 0 . Orthopedic Service. director of obstetrics. Faculty of Medicine. University of Munich. University of Lund. Dr. Dr. $ 6 0 0 .MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 33 Dr. Sweden: to visit recognized centers of research in neuropharmacology in the United States. chief assistant in internal medicine. Brazil: to accept a residency in orthopedic surgery at the University of Wisconsin Hospitals. Juan Sanchez Salcedo. Julio Studart de Moraes. $17. professor of surgery. Alfred Alvin Angrist. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Yeshiva University. Quezon City: to observe new developments in biochemistry and nutrition in the United States.S . Germany: additional expenses of attendance at the European Symposium on Medical Education held in Nice in 1953.

From the beginning the university has been concerned with preparing nurses for broad community responsibilities beyond the duties of service within hospital wards.34 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION NURSING UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH NURSING TEACHING UNIT A new postgraduate program for the training of teachers and administrators in nursing is currently being developed by the University of Edinburgh in cooperation with the Scottish branch of the Royal College of Nursing. and courses in the Nursing School are now being broadened to 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Colombia. Candidates for the Nurse-Tutor Certificate offered under the program will be full students of the university and will enjoy the advantages of close contact with general university life throughout the course. Toward support of the new unit The Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated £ 3 0 . and as part of this activity developed a nursing school in 1952. still largely rural. ultimately to be housed wholly on University of Edinburgh premises. will be the first of its kind within the framework of a university in Great Britain. Its head and most of its teachers will be regular members of the university staff. was created about ten years ago as a regional institution of higher learning for the Cauca Valley. 1 9 6 0 . Cali. ooo) to the University of Edinburgh for use during the fiveyear period ending June 30. UNIVERSITY OF VALLE NURSING EDUCATION The University of Valle. Its medical center is training personnel for a health program especially adapted to the area. responsible to the Faculty of Medicine. 0 0 0 (approximately $ 9 0 . The new Nursing Teaching Unit.

Equipment and supplies for the use of Miss Lillian A. College of Nursing. The Rockefeller Foundation previously appropriated a total of $ 5 1 3 . supervisor. 0 0 0 . $2. $ 5 . and in support of the expanded Nursing School program made an additional five-year grant in 1955 of 1 1 0 . $ 1 0 . $ 5 . Korea: equipment and support of teaching activities. public health nursing. 0 0 0 . Miss Alma F . Ministry of Health. Japan: to study trends in public health nursing and comprehensive medical care programs in the United States. Mrs. $ 1 0 . Trivandrum. Lima. Special Health Service. 2 0 0 ) .MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 35 include training in community health through coordination with the curriculum of the Medical Faculty related to public health. National Postgraduate School of Nursing. Rio de Janeiro: An appraisal of nursing resources and needs in Brazil. instructor in pediatric nursing. 0 0 0 . Miss Haydee G . to study techniques for appraisal of nursing care in the United States. $3. India. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Dourado. 0 0 0 to the University of Valle. 1 0 0 . University of the Philippines. Lara.525. Masae Hirai.675. in connection with her assignment to the School of Nursing. National Institute of Nursing. The recently established Department of Preven- tive Medicine and Public Health in the Medical Faculty will furnish the technical structure for this training. 0 0 0 . OTHER GRANTS The Brazilian Nursing Association. Peru: teaching equipment. temporary Rockefeller Foundation staff member. 0 0 0 Colombian pesos (about $ 4 6 . Tokyo Central Health Center. For the Faculty of Medicine. $ 1 0 . Seoul. Johnson. Quezon City: to visit schools of nursing in the United States and Canada to observe research work and graduate programs in nursing. Travancore.

Jamaica. Denmark: to observe developments in psychiatric nursing programs in Canada and the United States. the Leeward Islands. British Guiana. matron. In addition. Trinidad. the faculty's Department of Obstetrics plans to initiate a home delivery service and facilities for training midwives in conjunction with medical students to create a team relationship.36 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Miss Ingrid Nielsen. Oringe Mental Hospital. Vordingborg. and social conditions. 0 5 0 . PUBLIC HEALTH UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES FACULTY OF MEDICINE The Faculty of Medicine of the University College of the West Indies in Jamaica has. Jamaica. $ 3 . during the past seven years. however. the faculty has wished to expand its studies to include a larger part of the population. For some time. and now plans to establish an outpatient clinic at a govern- ment-owned health center built recently in the area of Mavis Bank. Representing a cooperative effort of the United Kingdom and the several governments concerned. and the Windward 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . These conveniently located facilities serve a selected population of about 5 . the West In- dian college was founded in 1 9 4 6 to provide higher education for Barbados. developed a highly coordinated program of research and teaching focused on the diseases and health problems peculiar to that colonial area. British Honduras. customs. The University College is also eager to extend medical services to the other islands of the archipelago and to provide for an exchange of personnel between the University College and individuals in the outlying areas who might wish to do postgraduate work in their special fields. 2 0 0 persons whose health problems will be studied in connection with direct observations of their diet.

including the use of atomic energy. But neither at this school nor elsewhere in the United Kingdom has a center been developed where the methods of physics. and other arts hazards is and sciences are brought together on a major scale for training and research in this field. the United Kingdom is also one of the areas most harried by public health problems in connection with its industry. the of the clinic. Although affiliated with the University College of London. The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine of the University of London for the past several years has offered to a limited number of students an elective in occupational health.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 37 Islands. and the effects of air pollution in the general population are occasionally very serious. it is controlled by an autonomous board composed of representatives of the British West Indies and selected personnel from the United Kingdom. Such a center is now to be established at the London School in a new Department of Occupational Health. medicine. To aid in the teaching and research program. and the extension of medical establishment services to the other islands of the British West Indies. and in some parts of the country the need for an immediate attack on industrial health urgent. The rates of lost time and disability among indus- trial workers are high. The department will be associated closely with such and existing Departments of the school as Epidemiology 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . engineering. The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 made afive-yeargrant of $ 3 1 4 . UNIVERSITY OF LONDON OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH One of the most highly industrialized areas in the world. 0 0 0 to the University College. the situation is steadily becoming worse. With the increasing complexity of industrial processes.

health education. 1959. and research on significant problems of preventive medicine and public health will be carried on. 0 0 0 ) to the University of London for use during the next five years. The center will give medical and nursing students at the college the opportunity to participate in a comprehensive rural medical program. CHRISTIAN MEDICAL COLLEGE PREVENTIVE AND SOCIAL MEDICINE Among the present objectives of the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine at the Christian Medical College. Quezon City: Exchange of faculty with the School of Hygiene and Public Health 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . environmental sanitation. For salaries and for additional research and teaching equipment. The Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated £ 1 5 . and related aspects of social medicine. Institute of Hygiene. 9 0 0 rupees (approximately $ 3 4 . India. 1 0 0 ) . and with the Medical Research Council Unit on Environmental Hygiene housed at the school. the combined sums to be available through July 31. public health nursing. Plans for the project have been approved by local and state officials and will be put into execution during the next several years. 8 0 0 . OTHER GRANTS University of the Philippines. revolving around maternal and child health. is the establishment of a health center to serve the college field area—about 1 1 square miles with a total population of 3 0 . Limited medical care for the inhabitants of the field area will be offered.38 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Vital Statistics. in addition to an earlier grant of $ 4 . 0 0 0 . Toward the general expenses of the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine during this period of expansion. Applied Physiology. Vellore. 0 0 0 (about $ 4 5 . the Foundation in 1955 appropriated 1 5 4 . and Public Health.

City of New York. LeRoy Allen. Johns Hopkins University. $ 6 . Division of Applied Science. $ 1 2 . to promote teaching and research in preventive medicine and to develop village medical service. Medical College. Poona. 0 0 0 . Japan: studies of the health hazards of radioactive dusts and vapors. India: Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. $ 1 2 . and Puerto Rico. Christian Medical College. $ 5 . $ 3 . 5 0 0 . B. J. $ 1 0 . professor and dean. Dr. Baltimore. Quezon City. the United States. Thomas. 0 0 0 . 5 0 0 . The Public Health Research Institute of The tibility to tuberculosis. under the direction of Dr. $ 8 . India: promotion of preventive medicine teaching and Medicine. Jr. Baltimore. research in the Department of Preventive Inc. Vellore. Harold A. $ 5 . Maryland. Jehangir Kaikhashru Adranvala. 8 0 0 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 0 for a three-year period. to observe new develop- ments at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health and other schools of public health in the United States. Faculty of Medicine. $ 4 .: investigation of the effects of certain types of stress on suscep- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Dr. Department of Preventive and Social Medicine. The American-Korean Foundation. 5 0 0 . Maryland: exchange of faculty with the Institute of Hygiene of the University of the Philippines. Cambridge. Hilario Lara. Massachusetts: to observe recent developments in sanitary and hydraulic engineering in Europe and Latin America. New York: salary of a Health Consultant to represent that foundation in the Republic of Korea. School of Hygiene and Public Health. Tokyo University.. 2 0 0 for a three-year period.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 39 of Johns Hopkins University. Christian Medical College. Dr. Ludhiana. $ 4 . 2 2 5 . associate professor of sanitary engineering. Harvard University. India: to observe methods of teaching preventive and social medicine in the United Kingdom.

principal medical officer. Institute of Public Health. $ 4 0 6 . Minister of Health. Medical School.4O THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Dr. $1. Juan Antonio Montoya O . head. health education officer. Dr. $ 1 . $ 2 . Port-of-Spain. George Graham Don. Cali. Trinidad: to visit centers of health education and disease prevention at federal and state levels in the United States. . Dr. Department of National Health and Welfare. director-general of public health. 0 0 0 . Charles Augustus Roberts. 6 2 5 . England: to observe the organization and practice of environmental sanitation in the United States. Canada. Department of York: to public health in the Medical Services.500. head. 7 5 0 . Tokyo. Colombia: to visit medical schools and medical care centers in South America and the United States. Professor Pieter Muntendam. Vouk. New Delhi: The Hon. Canada: to observe medical care programs in the United States. the Netherlands: to visit medical schools and schools of public health in Great Britain and the United States. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 6 2 5 . $ 6 0 0 . University of London. Department of Maternal and Child Health. New visit centers of administrative medicine and United States. Japan: to visit schools of public health in the United States. Kiyoshi* Saito. and vice-director. Rajkumari Amrit Kaur. Institute of Industrial Hygiene. School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. School of Public Health and Administrative Medicine. $ 2 . $ 2 . Dr. $ 2 . Ottawa. Dr. Pilot Health Center. 5 7 5 . Mental Health and Health Insurance Studies. Columbia University. lecturer in public health. Yugoslav Academy of Sciences and Arts. University of Valle. Ray Elbert Trussell. Zagreb: to observe in the United States methods of research and training in industrial medicine and industrial hygiene. Government of India. Stephen Moosai-Maharaj. executive officer. additional expenses of visits to medical centers and public health agencies in the United States. acting director. $925. and Puerto Rico. Velimir B .

6 0 0 in 1955 to enable the Division of Health Affairs to study further this finding and its significance for medical educa- tion. towns. an effort was made to identify some of the strengths and weaknesses of the system of medical education under which they were trained. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . D . One of the most important conclusions was that training in internal medicine for periods longer than three months. Institute of Sanitary Engineering. Berkeley: to continue the development of a certificate course in medical care administration. during either the internship or hospital residency of a young M . Italy: additional expenses of visits to sanitary engineering centers in the United States. Medical Care a UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA SURVEY OF MEDICAL PRACTICE The Division of Health Affairs at the University of North Carolina in 1955 completed afieldstudy of the family doctor as he practices in the villages.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 4 ! Professor Franco Cambi. and to complete three related projects during the next two years. and cities of the State. 0 0 0 . $ 6 . leads to better performance in his later years as a general practitioner. $ 3 1 8 . director. Extension Division. The Rockefeller Foundation made a grant of $ 8 0 . No other factor was found to be more consistently correlated with good performance. Milan. Institute of Technology. OTHER GRANTS University of California. Through this study of a representative sample of general practitioners. The project was undertaken with a view to guiding the future development of the university's medical school. .

The field offices are located in Mexico City. conducted by a professional staff with headquarters in New York City and with fivefieldoffices in foreign countries around the world.250. signed to these field offices vary somewhat depending upon the character of specific projects. Santiago. New and Tokyo. the Indian Council of Medical 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Rio de Janeiro. The field offices are maintained to provide close association with developing medical and public health problems in the areas of special interest. An area representative is able to give pergovernmental sonal attention to major institutional and projects with which The Rockefeller Foundation is associ- ated. Mexico. but all have certain functions in common. Chile. Japan. will be supported in 1956 by an appropriation of $321. General INDIAN COUNCIL OF MEDICAL RESEARCH NEW OFFICE BUILDING Working closely with various government departments and with the Indian States. The functions of the staff asDelhi.42 Field THB ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Service The field services in medical education and public health of The Rockefeller Foundation. India. Brazil. This exceed somewhat intangible activity in some instances may in ultimate value the grant program itself. The area repre- sentative also assists in the selection of qualified individuals for postgraduate study abroad under the well-defined terms of the Foundation's fellowship program. and he is in a position to serve as an informal adviser to the national authorities in many problems within the area of his personal competence if requested to do so.

The Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated 2 2 5 . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 rupees (about $ 4 9 . to whose scientific. and other facilities the council will have ready access in its new location. publication of scientific reports. Matching sums available from Indian sources. It also awards research grants and fellowships. and performs a number of special services including support of scientific journals.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH Research in New 43 Delhi exercises an advisory role in deter- mining broad public health and scientific policies and in setting standards for medical research and education. A building site has been donated by the All India Institute of Medical Sciences. 0 0 0 . and sponsorship of scientific meetings. provision of reference and information services. R. Corey. $ 2 . gives financial support to certain research laboratories. $ 5 . library. OTHER GRANTS Fund for grants of amounts not exceeding $ 5 0 0 for allocation under the supervision of the Director. Dr. Pasadena: to visit chemical laboratories in Europe and to attend conferences in Italy and Australia. 5 0 0 ) for a two-year period toward construction of an office building for the council. Department of Structural Chemistry. B. California Institute of Technology. 5 0 0 .

Its general scope has been presented previously and recent progress is sumwork marized in the following pages of this report.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH s HAS BEEN NOTED ELSEWHERE in this report. but there is some satisfaction in calling attention to the fact that the Foundation's long-standing interest in genetics is no longer split arbitrarily between the genetics of man and the genetics of lower animals. One result was the consolidation of research activities in the fields of medicine. biology. As a concrete example. The in the Foundation's own laboratories raises many questions which can only be solved by the application of specialized techniques beyond the scope of any single laboratory. For 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . public health and medicine. and their related biological sciences. the grants made last year to the Galton Laboratory in London and to the University of Naples for work in human genetics are listed side by side in this report with aid for population studies on fruit flies in Brazil. Of more far-reaching significance perhaps is the fact that the Foundation's operating program for the investigation of virus diseases has now been brought into close asso- ciation with grant-making activity in microbiology and the biochemistry of macromolecules. The operating program is currently devoted almost exclusively to a study of insectborne virus diseases affecting man. No organizational scheme can be completely logical. and biochemistry. the past year saw a regrouping of the Foundation's interest in agriculture.

the irritating personal inconvenience. the former Natural a large Sciences Division of the Foundation contributed share of its funds to laboratories engaged in such studies. The general effects of these agents.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 45 example. are all well known to everyone. but accurate knowledge of their characteristics as biological organisms has been curiously hard to come by. but the recent rapid development of tissue culture methods offers a convenient alternative. Grants to outside laboratories also serve to extend the Foundation's interest in virus into other fields which cannot conveniently be pursued by its own Thus substantial help was given laboratory staff. The re- cently reported fractionation and recombination of Tobacco Mosaic virus carried out independently during the past year in two laboratories receiving aid from the Foundation help to confirm the long-held hope that the biological and medical aspects of virus infections will ultimately find precise explanation in physico-chemical terms. Part of the difficulty stems from the fact that only a few of them will grow satisfactorily in lower animals. For years the small number of competent virologists who possessed the courage to work on the problem at all were concerned with isolating the causative agents of the diseases they already knew about. In previous years. the not infrequent severe illness and occasional deaths. there is increasing reason to believe that our understanding of the biology of viruses will be greatly enriched by advances in the knowledge of protein and nucleic acid structure. to the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene for investigation of respiratory viruses. the in effect searching viruses tables have been turned and they are now for the diseases which may be caused by the new which turn up in their tissue cultures. the lost time. Another group of grants represents the continuing interest of the Foundation in what is termed the biological 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Almost overnight. Several current additions to this series of grants are briefly described in the following sections of this report.

chologists are employing improved mathematical and Psyphy- sical techniques for the measurement of stimulus and response. between the investigation of processes that are largely inside the cells of the body and those larger adjustments which the whole organism makes to the environment around it. Neurophysiologists are finding it helpful. Broadly speaking. and the early development of biology proceeded hand in hand with the development of the physical sciences of mechanics and thermo-dynamics. The biological study of behavior as the term is used here is concerned primarily with the patterning of the flow of information from the environment to the organism. it has begun to look as though electro-physiological signs can be found to correlate with the establishment of the psychologists' "conditioned reflex. Florida. to familiarize themselves with the functioning of computer mechanisms. at least m degree. all the physical chemical events in the body contribute in some way to an organism's behavior. Robert M." There seems every reason to pursue on this level a Foundation interest in behavior which in the past was expressed in a long program of grants for the development of psychiatry and its related basic sciences. its processing within the organism and the control of the responses ultimately elaborated as a result. The Biological Basis of Behavior YERKES LABORATORIES OF PRIMATE BIOLOGY The Yerkes Laboratories of Primate Biology in Or- ange Park. The analysis of the internal biological organisms economy is concerned in large part with how produce or convert energy.46 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION and basis of behavior. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . but there is an important difference. for example. were established in 1925 as a division of Yale University under the direction of Dr. and in part underlies its continuing activity in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Quite recently.

anatomy. by the associate director. and adult behavior. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The chimpanzee program was continued. Dr. Lashley as director in 1956. and accumulated much valuable information on their growth. and discrimination. motivation. perception. Foundation aid to the laboratories has totaled $1. During the first seventeen years. Henry W . Karl S . and psychopathology. The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 appropriated $ 5 0 .232. who will succeed Dr.ooo since 1925. Nissen. Previous observation of infants and children suggests that early environmental influences are critically important for the development not only of normal behavior. development. Dr. and learning ability. utilizing the peculiar advantages of the chimpanzee for controlled studies of inferences derived from clinical observations of human beings. Dr. next five years Dr. 0 0 0 to the Yerkes Laboratories of Primate Biology. was introduced in 1942 as the result of the interest of the new director. Yerkes and his associates solved the many problems involved in breeding and rearing a captive colony of chimpanzees. Nissen and his associates will test the behavior and psychological functions of several groups of chimpanzees reared in a series of differing but carefully controlled environments. but a new whereby neighboring Southern universities would assume responsibility is presently under consideration.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH Yerkes. however. Nissen. and his co-workers will concentrate during the next few years on an experimental analysis of socio-emotional behavior. 47 Since 1942 Harvard University has shared replan sponsibility for the laboratories with Yale. utilizing refined techniques of neurosurgery. and his group. in the cerebral physiology underlying the psychological functions of sensation. intelligence. Experimental work on monkeys. To help meet budgetary requirements during the next five years. Lashley. and experimental psychology. Dr. but of such fundamental psychological functions as During the perception.

select and then excrete certain substances from the blood. Forster's direction. is not only a top-ranking research laboratory. In 1952 The Rockefeller Foundation made a grant in aid of $ 1 0 .48 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION DARTMOUTH COLLEGE RESEARCH IN CELLULAR BIOLOGY For several years Professor Roy P. Forster. and another grant in aid of $ 1 0 . 0 0 0 to continue this w o r k . like urea. across cell boun- daries are still undetermined. has been conducting research directed toward determining how secretory cells. directed by Professor Ragnar Granit. but the details of the mechanisms by which individual cells utilize oxidative energy to move metallic ions and organic substances. 0 0 0 in 1954 toward an interrelated program of research in cellular physiology under Dr. KAROLINSKA INSTITUTE RESEARCH IN NEUROPHYSIOLOGY The Nobel Institute for Neurophysiology of the Ka- rolinska Institute. but enjoys. world eminence as a training center for senior research students. and his long experience in 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Professor Granit and his associates have been responsible for many contributions to present-day knowledge of the function of nervous receptors. Forster and in microbiology under the direction of Dr. Raymond W . director of the Department of Zoology at Dartmouth College. Barratt. In 1955 the Foundation gave Dartmouth College a four-year grant of $ 5 0 . The Foundation has supported Professor Granit's work since 1931. as well. 0 0 0 to Dartmouth College toward a program of research in cellular physiology under Dr. especially those of the kidney. The over-all results of this process have been studied and are reasonably well understood.

emphasizing the transmission of impulses along neural pathways and the effects of their experimental disconnection. Bremer. is aided by about ten visiting scientists and graduate students as well as by a permanent group of six investigators. 0 0 0 to the University of Brussels to be used toward the expenses of the laboratory over the next five years. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .650 since 1939. 4 0 0 ) 1 2 0 . He now plans to enlarge his research program and to participate more actively in a nation-wide expansion of basic brain research in relation to mental illness being developed by the Swedish National Research Council. In 1955 The appropriated Rockefeller Foundation (about $ 2 3 . For these pur- poses the laboratory requires the use of electroencephalographic equipment. In 1955 the Foundation awarded a further grant of $ 3 0 . 0 0 0 Swedish crowns to the Karolinska Institute to provide Professor Granit with the equipment he needs. His research program deals with almost every phase of the physiology of the nervous system. Grants made by The Rockefeller Foundation in sup- port of Dr. UNIVERSITY OF BRUSSELS RESEARCH IN NEUROPHYSIOLOGY One of the outstanding laboratories in Europe for neurophysiological research is located at the University of Brussels under the direction of Professor Frederic Bremen The laboratory is not only internationally renowned for its research.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 49 this general field has demonstrated the importance of combining investigations of peripheral sense organs with concomitant electrophysiological studies of the brain. but is a training center for young neurophysiologists from all over the world. Dr. Bremer's laboratory have totaled $66. who for many years has occupied the chair of general pathology at the university.

0 0 0 for a three-year period. 0 0 0 was made for his work. 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . Sweden: research in endocrinology. In 1955 a new award of $ 2 0 . University of Lund. sound. 2 6 0 ) for a two-year period. and the first for his particular use was made in 1 9 4 8 . 6 8 . The Foundation'sfirstgrant to the Institute of Zoolo- gy was made in 1930 when Professor von Frisch was a member of the institute. Professor von Frisch directs at Munich a large group of younger workers who him in these studies and who assist are extending the range of the investigations. the methods they utilize to communicate this information to the hive ( t h e "language" of the bees). the psychological behavior of swarm fish. 0 0 0 Swedish crowns (about $ 1 3 . Berkeley: support of the White Mountain Research Station. to be available over a three-year period. $ 1 5 . the response sounds. grasshoppers. has made spectacular contributions to scientific knowledge of the behavior of bees: the means they use to find food. the physiological chemistry of insect blood and insect foods. director of the Institute of Zoology of the University of Munich. under the direction of Professor Georg Kahlson. Department of Physiology.50 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION UNIVERSITY OF MUNICH STUDIES IN ANIMAL BEHAVIOR In a long and distinguished career Professor Karl von Frisch. the orientation beof bats to high-frequency havior of ants. and their responses to sight. the sense of smell in fish. and smell. Among the newer projects are subjects such as the response of various arthropods to polarized light. OTHER GRANTS University of California. As a teacher and guide. and the zoo-psychological questions involved in the behavior of voice-gifted crickets. and other insects.

Dr. $ 7 . 6 0 0 . 5 0 0 .BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH University of Edinburgh. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and Mrs. England: equipment for biological research in the Department of Zoology. 1956. Ann Arbor: Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology. 0 0 0 for a two-year period. Julian Huxley. C . 1956. 0 0 0 . Maine: expenses of foreign scientists invited to participate in the Decennial Tissue Culture Conference. Department of Pharmacology. $ 6 . Paris. to visit recognized centers of teaching and research in pharmacology in the United States. Dr. $ 9 0 0 . Lawrence B. to be held during October. 0 0 0 . London. Bar Harbor. $ 6 . France: equipment for neurophysiological research. 5 0 0 . National Academy of Sciences. Jackson Memorial Laboratory. $ 8 . Curitiba. $ 5 . Japan: tissue culture studies in the Department of Anatomy. University of Michigan. Washington. $ 1 2 . 0 0 0 . University of Parana. $ 7 . $ 9 . 2 5 0 . under the direction of Agrege Professor Yves Laporte. Slobodkin. Scotland: 51 Biochemical equipment for research in experimental biology in the Department of Zoology. University of Toulouse. under the general direction of Professor Jesus Moure. Tokyo University. $ 4 . National Center for Scientific Research. University of London. Faculty of Medicine. Brazil: research on the bionomics of neotropical bees. Henry Matthew Adam. pro- gram of research in population studies. France: Department of Physiology. under the direction of Dr. 5 0 0 . Roscoe B. $ 3 . research in neurophysiology. held during the summer. England: to visit the United States in connection with a proposed book on evolutionary biology. D . : expenses of foreign delegates invited to participate in a Symposium on Cytodifferentiation. University College. 0 0 0 .

William Albert Hugh Rushton. 2 5 0 . Institute of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. Psychological Laboratory. $ 2 . $ 3 . 0 0 0 . 2 5 0 . 4 . Faculty of Medicine. reader in physiology. equipment and supplies for research in embryology and histology. 0 0 . psychological research in the 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . $ 2 . under the direction of Professor Bruno Schreiber. Faculty of Medicine. professor of anatomy. University of the Republic. 0 0 0 . head. under the direction of Professors Pasquale Pasquini and Silvano Leghissa. Department of Histology and Embryology. Roberto Caldeyro-Barcia. $1. University of Oslo. to in the investigation of retinal and visual study methods used physiology in the United States and Canada. Italy: equipment for physiological research. Zangwill. to study advances in the field of obstetrical physiology in the United States and Canada. Washington Buno. Institute of Pathological Anatomy. Dr. England: Dr. Norway: to visit centers of neuroanatomical and neurophysiological research in the United States and Canada. to visit centers of neurological and United States. $ 2 . 6 7 5> Professor Oliver L . University of Cambridge. director. $ 3 . to visit research centers in the United States. University of Parma.52 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION University of Bologna. New York. Uruguay: Dr. $ 2 .125. Professor Pedro Ferreira Berrutti. Faculty of Medicine. 5 0 0 . to study at Columbia University. Dr. Montevideo. $ 3 . Italy: Institute of Comparative Anatomy. Alf Brodal.

and the fact that carriers of the gene are easily identifiable. and his co-workers will extend and Professor Montalenti intensify surveys in order to obtain the data necessary for investigation of this and other questions. Extension of the surveys would allow case registers to be established in the villages. the fatal form of the disease. and provision is now being made to furnish genetic counseling to people in the affected areas. Professor Giuseppi Montalenti of the University of Naples has conducted research on the genetics of micro- cythemia for many years. one in four of whose children will die of Cooley's anemia. One marriage in every 25 will bring together two carriers of the gene. Twenty per cent of the inhabitants of certain villages in the Po Valley carry the gene causing microcythemia. and provides unusual opportunities for studies of importance to the development of human genetic theory. The Rocke- feller Foundation has made a supplementary grant of 23. 5 0 0 ) .BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 53 General Biology UNIVERSITY OP NAPLES GENETICS OF MICROCYTHEMIA The high incidence of microcythemia. in certain areas of Italy constitutes a serious public health problem. 0 0 0 lire year period. (about $ 4 2 . make it a particularly favorable subject for theoretical studies. an inherited blood disease. Certain important problems remain unsolved. available during a three- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . In continued support of the studies on microcythemia being carried on at the University of Naples.5 0 0 . one being the reasons for the peculiar geographical distribution of the gene. The wide prevalence of microcythemia.

biochemical genetics. the research at the Galton Laboratory now follows three main lines. psychoses. and © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . L . The Rocke- feller Foundation has supported this program since 1942. Sir Francis Galton. and malignant disease in which environmental effects play an important etiological part. and includes investigations in statistics. Rio de Janeiro. Its present program involves research on all aspects of human genetics.54 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION UNIVERSITY OP LONDON GALTON LABORATORY Under the leadership of Dr. On two past occasions the department has sponsored collaborative research projects in which scientists and trainees from other Brazilian universities and from a number of other countries have participated. A major part of the program is in the rapidly developing field of biochemical genetics. Scientists at Sao Paulo. the Galton Laboratory of the University of London has continued in the brilliant tradition established by its founder. blood group serology. and of such conditions as mongolisrn. and chromosomal cytology. Porto Alegre. Penrose. Also in progress are studies of human gene linkage. 1955.S . 0 0 0 to the University of London to be used toward research expenses during the next five years. In 1955 The Rockefeller Foundation renewed its longstanding support of research at the Galton Laboratory with a grant of $ 3 0 . UNIVERSITY OF SAO PAULO POPULATION GENETICS Since 1 9 4 0 the Department of General Biology of the University of Sao Paulo has increasingly intensified and expanded its researches on population genetics. Directed toward increasing understanding of the mechanism of human heredity. Another such cooperative effort on a broader scale was begun in June.

As a contribution toward the expenses of the research program in the Laboratory of Cell Physiology during the nextfiveyears. UNIVERSITY OF SAO PAULO LABORATORY OF CELL PHYSIOLOGY The Laboratory of Cell Physiology at the University of Sao Paulo. and tissue culture. 0 0 0 at the beginning of 1955. under the direction of Professor Luis Carlos Junqueira.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 55 Curitiba in Brazil are carrying out coordinated investigations with the participation of investigators from at least five other countries. Chile. Toward the travel expenses of the scientists from Australia. The Foundation contributed $ 1 7 . Junqueira and the his associates are cell secretion of the pancreas and submaxillary gland. A Spinco preparative ultracentrifuge has been made available through a recent Foundation grant. diversified regions of Brazil. into one of the outstanding Latin American centers for research in histology and embryology. radioautography. chromatography. microspectrometry. The chief research interests of Dr. The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 appropriated $ 4 0 . Italy. and the physiology of the mast-cell. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Denmark. 0 0 0 to the university. a leucocyte especially numerous in leukemic blood and in foci of chronic inflammation. 6 0 0 since 1948. the research program is being conducted with methods which include tracer techniques. nucleic acid chemistry. Brazil. and has been officially selected as the Brazilian training center for teachers in this field. The several groups are holding periodic meetings and conducting ecological surveys in a number of distant. Foundation aid to Professor Junqueira's research has totaled $ 4 8 . In the excellently equipped laboratory. a former Foundation fellow. and the United States Rockefeller invited to participate in the program. freezing-drying methods. has developed.

0 0 0 . Italy: research in human genetics. $ 1 0 . 5 0 0 . 4 5 0 ) . $ 2 . Cavalli-Sforza. San Salvador. under the direction of Dr. 0 0 0 . New Haven. $ 5 . 5 0 0 . Yugoslavia: Institute of Plant Breeding and Genetics. University of Oslo. Institute of Genetics. Massachusetts: research in genetics at the Genetics Experiment Station. Long Island Biological Association. $ 3 . Montevideo. under the direction of Professor Alois Tavcar. University of Utrecht. Cold Spring Harbor. Norway: establishment of a register of hereditary diseases. Connecticut: toward the development of research in pollen analysis. $ 3 . El Salvador: Department of Cardiology. University of Zagreb. 1955. 5 0 0 . Medical School. $ 2 .L . Research Institute of Biological Sciences. Hospital Resales. 0 0 0 . under the direction of Acting Professor L . Jan Mohr. 6 3 . equipment for use in genetics research. Uruguay: research in genetics. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . New York: to enable five European and two Japanese geneticists to travel further in the United States during a visit to attend a Symposium on Quantitative Biology held at Cold Spring Harbor in June. Smith College. Union of South Africa: to visit research centers in the United States. $ 3 . Tobias. Bombay: operation and expansion of its laboratory for studies on human variation. 2 0 0 . Yale University. University of Parma. equipment for the use of Dr. University of Witwatersrand. Philip V. Francisco Saez. Dr. $ 3 . 5 0 0 for a f°uryear period. 0 0 0 Norwegian crowns (about $ 9 . $ 4 . Northampton. Netherlands: equipment for research in genetics. under the direction of Dr. Maria Isabel Rodriguez. $ 1 4 . 2 0 0 . Johannesburg. 5 0 0 . Department of Anatomy.56 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION OTHER GRANTS Indian Cancer Research Centre.

These continue a series of grants for the researches of these two men which began in 1933. Stockholm.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 57 University of Pavla. Netherlands: travel and living expenses of two American members of the Editorial Committee invited to attend meetings of the association during November. University of Colorado. under the direction of Assistant Professor R. Dr. Pennak. Professor Newton Freire-Maia. Milani. and utilizes the nucleic acids so intimately associated with its metabolic and reproductive activity. 0 0 0 lire (about $ 1 . 3 0 0 . 1955. Italy: toward the expenses of maintaining a collection of Musca domestica in connection with the development in the Institute of Zoology of a new program for the genetical study of fly resistance to insecticides. during the summer. University of Parana. 3 0 0 ). 7 2 0 . for the support of research programs in biochemistry directed by Professor Einar Hammarsten and by Professor Hugo Theorell. Biochemistry KAROLINSKA INSTITUTE RESEARCH IN BIOCHEMISTRY In 1955 the Foundation made two grants to the Karolinska Institute. Utrecht. Curitiba. $ 1 . An expert in the uses 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . with increasing emphasis in recent years on the way the living cell builds up. Brazil: to visit centers of genetics research in the United States. Finland. Department of Biology. $ 7 0 0 . Faculty of Philosophy. International Association for Plant Taxonomy. Boulder: to attend a meeting of the International Association of Theoretical and Applied Limnology. held in Helsinki. accumulates. 1956. $ 5 0 0 . Robert W . For nearly two decades Professor Hammarsten has devoted a major portion of his research effort to the study of nucleotide synthesis.

58 THJ3 ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION of isotope tracer techniques. and was able to venture into new areas of research which have earned him an international reputation for his contributions on the chemistry and metabolism of cytochrome C and on the nature of various enzyme-coenzyme systems. A grant of $ 2 9 . T . An appropriation of $ 4 5 . Trained by Hammarsten and for many years his close research associate. he has made many distinguished contributions to his chosen field and to the broader area of protein synthesis. In this excellent new laboratory he continued his studies of porphyrins and of haem-containing compounds. In the autumn of 1955 he was awarded the Nobel prize in medicine. 0 0 0 was also made to the institute in further support over five years for the research in enzyme chemistry directed by Professor Theorell. UNIVERSITY OF LONDON STRUCTURE OF NUCLEIC ACIDS Since 1947 the Foundation has been giving financial support for the program of research in biophysics and biomolecular structure which is being carried on at King's College of the University of London under the direction of Professor J. Aimed at the application of the most exacting techniques of physics to such biological problems as cell division. and the response of the living organism to its physical environment. the submicroscopic anatomy of the cell. Theorell was appointed head of the newly created Department of Biochemistry of the Medical Nobel Institute in 1938. this program has included in recent years a special emphasis on the structure and The distribution of nucleic acids within the cell. 0 0 0 in 1955 provides continuing support of his work for three years. the nature of plant and animal fibers. research begun by Wilkins and his collaborators Stokes and Wilson at King's College several years ago on the X-ray crystal analysis of deoxypentose nucleic acid led 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Randall.

F . HASKINS LABORATORIES RESEARCH IN BIOCHEMISTRY At the Haskins Laboratories. biochemists. to the biologists who see it as the principal who organic moiety within the cell nucleus. These latter investigators. and to provide financial aid for the laborious task of confirming by every conceivable means the facts and theories which have already been accumulated. Randall and the immediate direction of Dr. Seymour Hutner directs biochemical researches in which 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . To enable Dr. separation. a finding which was almost immediately confirmed by Watson and Crick at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge. in turn. then suggested that the structure of the salt of deoxyribose nucleic acid would follow the pattern of two helices coiled around the same axis. The tributions—to the chemist who importance of these con- is concerned with the struc- ture of this basic molecule and the problems of protein synthesis in general.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 59 them to propose in early 1953 the probable helical nature of the nucleic acid molecule. these discoveries are of outstanding significance. Dr.000 over three years to the University of London for research on the structure of nucleic acids under the general supervision of Professor J. Wilkins and his group to devote most of their research activities to the further study of nucleic acid structure. H. T . to the geneticist looks upon it as possibly the chief "stuff" of inheritance— has stimulated scientists all over the world. The Rocke- feller Foundation has made an additional grant of $35. Wilkins in the Department of Physics at King's College. in New York City. M. and physicians who the group are search- ing the kingdom of chemical compounds for suitable agents In cancer chemotherapy. To of biologists. to make possible the continuing improvement of methods for the isolation. and purification of these acids.

60 THB ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION special emphasis is placed on protozoa. Hutner and his associates is con- cerned with the nutritional requirements of protozoa and other microorganisms. In 1955 the Foundation appropriated $ 6 0 . Due it now to their researches. Hutner and his group. One topic under particularly active study involves an investigation of the common pathways in the biosynthesis of vitamin Bia and the chemical substances known as the purines. appears safe to say that in wide areas. These findings have led to a great increase in related activities in laboratories. to be available over a three-year period. Another recent development in the group's work which has attracted wide attention is a gratifying confirmation of the faith that microbiological scientists can eventually contribute to the food supply problem. 0 0 0 for the work of Dr. especially in the United biology. and that therefore protozoa may furnish a more dependable guide to mam- malian biochemistry. The work of Dr. and over wide intervals. concerned with marine Rockefeller Foundation both because of its basic relationship to the program in experimental biology and because of its potential long-range relation to the problems of the world's food supply. Microbiology is presently of especial interest to The States and in England. UNIVERSITY OF UPPSALA RESEARCH IN BIOCHEMISTRY The development of more exact methods and equip- ment for the fractionating of organic substances is the central aim of the research program conducted at the Bio- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . most of the phytoplankton organisms at the base of the food pyramid in fresh water bodies and in the ocean require vitamins. in the belief that the protoplasm of certain protozoa is more like that of higher animals than the protoplasm of bacteria.

0 0 0 to the institute toward the purchase of certain major items of equipment. diffusion. 0 0 0 . W . and the combined sums have been made available through September. In 1955 The Rockefeller Foundation made a grant of $ 6 0 . the chemistry of bacteria and viruses. This grant supplements a 1952 appropriation of $ 5 0 .BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 61 physical Institute of the University of Uppsala. J. protein fragments. Other aspects of the work being done by Professor Tiselius and his associates include the study of biologically active peptides. UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE AND THE UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM RESEARCH IN BIOCHEMISTRY Two British universities engaged in research on the chemistry and metabolism of proteins will each be furnished with an analytical ultracentrifuge through Foundation aid. polypeptides. the biophysics of various fractions of common grass pollens capable of inducing allergic reactions. Professor John Squire and his staff 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Roughton. with emphasis on the structure of gamma globulin antibody. the use of zone electrophoresis and chromatographic methods for the isolation and characterization of peptides. and light scattering. 1960. electrophoresis. the Department of Colloid Sciences at the University of Cambridge is studying proteins by the techniques of ultracentrifugation. Under the leadership of Professor F . and the behavior of bovine serum albumin and other proteins in solution. The significant re- sults produced by this program have made the institute one of the outstanding study centers of Europe in the field of biochemical research and have brought increasing numbers of foreign investigators there for study. and proteins. under the direction of Professor Arne Tiselius. osmotic pressure. At the University of Birmingham's Department of Experimental Pathology. Sweden.

To provide this equipment The Rockefeller Foundation. Early in 1954 the institute moved into excellent laboratories in the new University City where with quadrupled space this program and all the activities of the institute could be given increased impetus. and by the invitation of professors from foreign countries to work in the laboratories. however. Detroit. where the spectrometric analyses are made. Under the leadership of Dr. 0 0 0 each to the University of Cambridge and the University of Birmingham. 0 0 0 was appropriated for use during the year for the purchase of specialized research equipment. awarded grants of $ 2 5 . an analytical ultracentrifuge has now become essential to the scientific faculties of both universities. To facilitate thefinerseparation of pure proteins from mixtures. In 1955 $ 3 0 . and their chemistry and metabolism as related to human physiology and to various disease processes. in consideration of provision by the university © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . their synthesis by plants. particularly proteins. the work of the institute has been extended by the addition of several specialized branches. Alberto Sandoval.62 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION are engaged in an extensive research program for the study of macromolecules. The permanent staff has been augmented and provided with increased support. Part of this program is conducted in cooperation with the Department of Chemistry of Wayne University. NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MEXICO INSTITUTE OF CHEMISTRY An important research program of the Institute of Chemistry of the National University of Mexico concerns the chemistry of the natural products of Mexican plants and fruits and of several genera of cacti from Mexico and other countries which have been found to be good sources of pharmacologically active compounds. in 1955. The Rockefeller Foundation made itsfirstgrant to the institute in 1941. the director.

0 0 0 was made in 1955 to Columbia University for the use of Dr. emphasizing such points as a 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . They have done numerous in vitro experiments with kidney slices and whole organs to elucidate the transport mechanisms responsible for tubular excretion of various organic acids. Taggart and his colleagues in the Department of Medicine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University have in the past eight years made important contributions to knowledge of the biochemistry of kidney function. is studying the comparative morphology of enzymes from a physicalchemical point of view. One group. directed by Professor Bucher. John V. PHILIP UNIVERSITY INSTITUTE OF PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY Under the leadership of the director. and to study the transport of sodium and potassium ions against concentration gradients in kidney tissue. Taggart and his associates. led by Professor Bucher's assistant. is investigating free nucleotides with energy-rich phosphate bonds. a five-year grant of $ 3 5 . COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY ENZYME RESEARCH Dr. Professor Theodor Bucher. to examine the role played by coenzyme A in this process. A second group. To help with this program of applying the techniques of enzymology to the problems of renal physiology. has embarked on two biochemical research programs centering on enzyme systems. and function. the Institute of Physiological Chemistry of Philip University.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 63 of $ 2 0 . Germany. 0 0 0 for the same purposes and an increase m the operating budget of the institute. Marburg. their origin. duplication.

Australia: equipment for research in biochemistry. $12. 0 0 0 for a two-year period. $13. University of London. Department of Chemical Pathology. Switzerland: research on the chemistry of physiologically important compounds. under the direction of Dr.500 for a two-year period. research in enzyme chemistry in the Department of Physiological Chemistry. Brazil. $ 1 0 . OTHER GRANTS Queen's University of Belfast. Federal Technical Institute. University of Stockholm. $15. to be used in biochemical research under the direction of Professor Giovanni Moruzzi. and a set of automatic counting equipment for isotope work. Gosta Ehrensvard. Zurich. a recording spectrophotometer. under the direction of Dr. The Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated $ 2 2 . $ 1 2 . Isaias Raw. $ 1 5 . University of Sao Paulo. Faculty of Medicine. Institute of Biochemistry. available during a two-year period. England: equipment for research on protein metabolism and enzymology. under the direction of Professor Vlado Prelog. Mary's Hospital Medical School. $16.000 for a two-year period. 0 0 0 for a three-year period. University of Adelaide. To enable Professor Bucher to purchase such items of apparatus as fraction collectors. under the direction of Dr. University of Bologna. Badger.64 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION comparison of the nucleotide pattern of tissues. 0 0 0 to Philip University.500. and the in vfoo synthesis of nucleotides. Northern Ireland: equipment for use in the Department of Chemistry. under the direction of Professor Albert Neuberger. Italy: equipment and installation of facilities for microbial assay work. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Sweden: research in biochemistry at the Wenner-Gren Institute. Geoffrey M. 0 0 0 .000. St.

Johns Hopkins University. $ 1 0 . University of Minnesota. 0 0 0 . Faculty of Sciences. 5 0 0 . Marrian.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH Columbia University. 0 0 0 . 6 0 0 . $ 2 . Baltimore. 1956. Institute of Medical Chemistry. H. V. G. $ 3 . $ 2 . O . $ 7 . 5 0 0 . F . University of Munich. University of Pretoria. Norway: research on the chemistry of nucleic acids. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 . Department of Physiology. Wheeler to spend a second year in research on the physical-organic chemistry of natural products. Professor Nathan Lifson. held in Europe during the summer. England. under the direction of Professor Einar Stenhagen. University of Edinburgh. Institute of Chemistry. Union of South Africa: research in plant biochemistry. 5 0 0 . Minneapolis: to spend a sabbatical year at the University of Oxford. Krebs. France: equipment for research in biochemistry in the Laboratory of Biological Chemistry of the Faculty of Sciences. $ 6 . $ 6 . Mes. Norwegian Radium Hospital. under the direction of Professor Margaretha G. equipment for use under the direction of Professor G. $ 5 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . $ 5 . $ 7 . 5 0 0 for a two-year period. University of Paris. University of Uppsala. Oslo: equipment for biochemical research in the Norsk Hydro's Institute for Cancer Research. Sb'ren Lai and. under the direction of Dr. Professor Rolf Hui'sgen. Scotland: Department of Biochemistry. Maryland: research in the field of protein biochemistry. 0 0 0 . Germany: to observe research in organic chemistry in the United States. by Professor Emeritus E . $ 7 . with Professor H. A. McColIum. University of Oslo. Sweden: equipment for research on the chemistry of biologically active molecules. 6$ New York: expenses of a group of American scientists invited to attend the Second International Neurochemical Symposium. College of Physicians and Surgeons. Mexico City: to enable Dr. Plant Physiological Research Institute. National University of Mexico.

The work of the Protein Structure Project falls into four categories: the design. E . an enzyme involved in the formation of the essential cellular constituents known as nucleotides which form an important part of the mechanism for transmitting genetic information during the process of cell division. and use of apparatus for collecting X-ray diffraction data from crystalline proteins. In their research Dr. lecturer in biochemistry. Jamaica: Professor C . $ 3 0 0 . began a long-range study of pro- tein structure utilizing X-ray diffraction methods. Department of Biochemistry. Biophysics POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE OF BROOKLYN RESEARCH ON PROTEIN STRUCTURE In 1950 Dr. and laboratories in the United States and Canada.66 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION University College of the West Indies. Sir William Dunn School of Pathology. New York. David Harker of the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. van Heyningen. $ i . and the interpretation of the X-ray diffraction data obtained from protein crystals. England: to visit biochemical research centers in the United States. 9 5 ° . Department of Chemistry. 2 5 0 . H. University of Glasgow. Department of Physiology. Dr. construction. the preparation and acquisition of protein crystals. Eccleston Alphonso Kean. ribonuclease. W . A Geiger counter spec- © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . to observe research techniques on protein metabolism in the United States. Hassall. Scotland: further contribution toward purchase of a time-lapse cinemicrograph apparatus for the use of John Paul. $ 1 . $ 6 5 0 . to visit the Institute of Chemistry of the National University of Mexico. Harker and his group have concentrated on a single protein. University of Oxford. the study of the chemical and physical properties of protein crystals. Dr.

1958. 0 0 0 different X-ray reflections to be recorded in each case. B . 1958. and counting devices for determining the intensity of the refracted X-ray beams. A more fully automatic device is under construction and should be completed late in 1956. In 1955 The Rockefeller Foundation made a further grant of $ 6 5 . hemoglobin. M . card. is of central interest in two collaborative research programs in England aided by The Rockefeller Foundation during 1955One program is carried on at the Davy Faraday Research Laboratory of the Royal Institution of Great Britain. are already in use. This instrument should be able to set the crystal to each required orientation in relation to the X-ray beam. and then move on to the next orientation to repeat the process. with about 2 0 . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . punch this information on an I .115 through the period ending June. Automation is of particular advantage because the preparation of three-dimensional maps of ribonuclease will requre observation of approximately ten crystals. Foundation support for the Protein Structure Project since 1950 has totaled $266.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 67 trometer for use with single crystals of proteins. UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE AND THE ROYAL INSTITUTION OF GREAT BRITAIN RESEARCH IN BIOPHYSICS The oxygen-carrying protein molecule. measure the diffracted intensity. 0 0 0 to the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn for support of the project during the two-year period beginning July. The excellent progress in the techniques for crystalliz- ing ribonuclease and the advances expected in automation give promise that the group will be able to elucidate the structure of the protein within the next few years and eventually identify the position of all the atoms except those of hydrogen.

in associa- tion with Dr. 0 0 0 in 1954 to the Royal Institution. UNIVERSITY OF UPPSALA RESEARCH IN BIOPHYSICS Professor Torsten Teorell. and $ 4 0 . to support research on the structure of protein molecules.68 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION in London. all related to permeability. 0 0 0 and £ 7 . Sweden. 3 0 0 . Foundation aid to the two laboratories has amounted to $ 3 2 . on which the two laboratories are engaged. Max F . Perutz. 4 7 0 since 1939 toward support of research in X-ray crystallography at the Cavendish Laboratory. transfer of electrolytes and transfer of © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . J. and $ 1 5 . leads the second at the Cavendish Laboratory of the University of Cambridge. C . Studies of the complex structure of hemoglobin by means of X-ray techniques. He and his colleagues are now conducting a series of studies involving a wide variety of physiological problems. Dr. totaling $ 7 0 . Nobel laureate in physics. In 1955 The Rockefeller Foundation made two further grants. biophysicist at the Institute of Physiology. 0 0 0 for use over a four-year period will go to the Cavendish Laboratory at the University of Cambridge. particularly from the standpoint of the chemical and electrical permeability forces involved in many kinds of cellular activity. has worked for many years on the behavior of membranes. using a number of different techniques in addition to X-ray crystallography. The Davy Faraday Research Laboratory of the Royal Institution of Great Britain will receive $ 9 . under the direction of Sir Lawrence Bragg. Kendrew. University of Uppsala. Associated with the hemoglobin investiof gation are others on the structure of myoglobin and nucleic acids. were begun at the Cavendish Laboratory more than 16 years ago. such as the mechanism of gastric juice secretion. 1 0 0 (about $ 3 0 * 3 0 0 ) for expenses during the next three years.

Brazil: Faculty of Medicine. and ion distribution across the envelope of the red blood cell. OTHER GRANTS University of Sao Paulo. UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE PHYSIOLOGICAL LABORATORY A distinguished research program. Neurophysiological research at the University of Cambridge has received support from The Rockefeller Foundation since 1934. Directed by Professor Alan Hodgkin.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 69 water. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 for a two-year period. 0 0 0 (about $18. 0 0 0 to the University of Uppsala for use during a two-year period. A further grant of £ 6 . the mechanism of muscular contraction and the relation between electrical and mechanical changes in muscle. is that conducted by the Biophysics search Group in the Department of Physiology headed by Sir Bryan H . secretion and absorption in the renal tubule. will be used toward the purchase of equipment and other expenses of the Biophysics Research Group during the nextfiveyears. The Rockefeller Foundation has made an additional grant of $ 2 2 . the research group study problems of nervous conduction.C . made in 1955.- ooo). Thefirstgrant assisting Professor TeorelPs research was made in 1936. Matthews at the University of Cambridge. and the active transport of cations across membranes in nerve and muscle fibers and in red cells. For the purchase of equipment made necessary by recent advances in the application of radioactive isotopes to studies of the kind on which Professor Teorell is engaged. long of interest to Re- the Foundation. $ 1 3 . research expenses in the Isotope Laboratory. In their research the group employ all the techniques of electron microscopy and radioactive tracer measurement necessary for precise and exacting study.

$ 1 0 . Faculty of Medicine. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin. under the direction of Professor Carlos Chngas. and Letters. Norway: research in X-ray crystallography. $ 1 2 . New Hampshire: Dartmouth Summer Research Project on Artificial Intelligence. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 5 0 0 . 0 0 0 for a two-year period. Edwards. Uruguay: Dr. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Hanover. $ 8 . George A. 0 0 0 ) . Isotope Laboratory. to visit Europe and the United States. Research Institute of Biological Sciences. Italy: research in the X-ray crystallographic study of biologically significant molecules. Tede Eston. Cambridge: a program of research in X-ray crystallography. Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Toxicology. Dr. 0 0 0 (about $ 9 . 5 0 0 . under the direction of Dr. director. $1. University of Brazil. 7 5 0 . Dr. under the direction of Mrs. Dartmouth College. equipment and supplies for use in the Electron Microscopy Laboratory. 0 0 0 ) for a three-year period. Montevideo. Department of General Physiology. $ 7 . University of Oslo.THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Polytechnic Institute. 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 5 . Helena Souza Santos. under the direction of Professor Odd period . to attend a Conference on Tissue Fine Structure and to visit research centers in the United States. 0 0 0 lire (about $ 1 0 . $ 6 . Laboratory of Chemical Crystallography. Faculty of Philosophy. Rio de Janeiro: research expenses of the Institute of Biophysics. Sciences. under the direction of Professor Martin Buerger. England: research in crystallography. $ 4 .750. University of Oxford. under the direction of Professor Giordano Giacomello. University of Texas. £ 3 . Dallas: reHassel. $ 3 . Southwestern Medical School. 0 0 0 for a three-year search with and development of a monochromatic ultraviolet flying spot television microscope in the Department of Pathology. 0 0 0 . University of Rome.

Keith Porter. Winston Price. Further knowledge of the natural history of respiratory diseases will not only throw light on the hitherto unclassified viruses which cause such infections. University of Durham. for instance. $ 1 . among others. Virology JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND PUBLIC HEALTH The causes and the sometimes unpredictable behavior of such respiratory diseases as influenza. to study developments in the field of electron microscopy in the United States. 9 6 0 . Professor Arthur Wormall. King's College. Dr. Frey-Wyssling. virus pneumonia.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH * ] ! Eduardo De Robertis. held at Rio de Janeiro in mid-1955. Dr. Professor Albert F . Botany Department. England: to visit laboratories of radiation chemistry in Europe. and bronchitis. 7 0 0 . head. Swiss Federal Technical Institute." although there is probably no such single entity and this term merely refers to milder forms of more serious respiratory infections. Bartholomew's Hospital Medical College. London. Zurich: to visit important centers of microscopy in the United States. Why. New York: to direct a course on electron microscopy sponsored by UNESCO and the University of Brazil. $ 1 . 4 0 0 . Joseph Weiss. $ 7 0 0 . will be the subject of a fiveyear study at The Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health under the direction of Dr. This study will include what appears to be a promising attack on the "common cold. England: to visit biophysical research centers in the United States. Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. are some epi- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . St. $ 6 3 0 . $ 1 . but should contribute toward understanding of the behavior of viruses in general during epidemics.

the School of Hygiene and Public Health has recently established a Division of Interepidemic Ecology under the leadership of Dr. even though there are no signs of illness.72 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION demies. so much more severe than others ? What causes the increase or decrease of virulence when a virus is passed through a series of animals or tissue culture? Why should a given virus lie low for months or years and then burst forth in a flaming epidemic? To answer such questions. The best known are the influenza viruses. The School of Hygiene and Public Health has received since 1916 substantial support from The Rockefeller Foun- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . At regular intervals. The details of all the illnesses suffered by these individuals over a period of several years will be recorded. Price and his team have high hopes of filling in important parts of the picture. the sufferers still fail to yield a virus which falls into either of these classifications. Price. if not most epi- demics. and a series of patients confined permanently to a hospital for chronic diseases. In many. but with recent advances in methods for handling viruses in the laboratory. however. who also holds appointments in the Departments of Biochemistry and Epidemiology. conjunctival group. A great deal of work lies ahead before there can be anything like a complete picture of the causes of respiratory infections. a small group of families in the outpatient department of the Hopkins hospital. Dr. Several different viruses have already been isolated from patients with respiratory diseases and are being classified on the bases of their serological reactions and their behavior in living animals or in tissue culture. another larger group of fishing families on an isolated island in Chesapeake Bay. Dr. Price and his team have made arrangements for studying four reasonably well-controlled populations: medical students and nurses. their nasopharyngeal washings and blood serum will be studied for the presence of viruses and changes in antibodies. More recently described is the adenoidalpharyngeal. apparently of the same disease.

a former Foundation fellow. calls for the cooperation of a number of scientific disciplines such as virology. who has done much work on the biology and natural history of viruses. as such.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH dation for general development and specific projects. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Professor Dick. he also intends to establish a virus reference laboratory in order to study the epidemiology and Northern Ireland. life cycle. the Foundation has given the school a five-year grant of $ 1 5 0 . The Rockefeller Foundation has made a two-year grant of $21. A.W . and the relation between viral and tumor activity. is leading a research group in the investigation of such important but poorly understood aspects of viral biology as latency.000 to the Queen's University of Belfast for use in the Department of Microbiology. The of the work followed by The and his domestic animals program is a direct extension Rockefeller Foundation in the study of yellow fever and. With the aid of the Regional Hospital Board. and infectivity. entomology. and epidemiology. QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY OF BELFAST VIRUS RESEARCH In 1955 a Department of Microbiology was created at the Queen's University of Belfast. Northern Ireland. THE VIRUS RESEARCH PROGRAM The virus research program of The Rockefeller Foundation is concerned with the study of the insect or arthropod-borne virus infections of man throughout the world. Dick. To enable Professor Dick to purchase such necessary ecology of virus diseases in equipment as a Spmco preparative ultracentrifuge and a refrigerated centrifuge. 73 To help in this new study of respiratory diseases. 0 0 0 . under the direction of Professor G .

and Russian encephalitis. and Venezuelan equine encephalitis. and more particularly white mice. the existence of groups of closely allied viruses rather than a large number of completely distinct agents. This observation was one of the determining factors which led The Rockefeller Foundation to undertake the present virus program. Many of these belong to the group of arthropod-borne virus diseases and include such well-known pathogenic agents as the causes of St. was the third virus disease of man sect vector was incriminated. like yellow fever. in all probability. In quick succession. A second widespread human virus disease transmitted by an arthropod is dengue fever which. transmitted by small. It was also thefirstvirus disease shown to be transmitted by an arthropod. Japanese B encephalitis.74 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Yellow fever was thefirsthuman infection shown to be caused by a virus. In addition. is mosquito-borne. viruses were shown to be the causes of numerous infections of man and domestic animals. Intensive study of these new agents revealed that they shared certain characteristics with some of the betterknown viruses. are susceptible to the virus of yellow fever may be taken as the begin- ning of the modern era of research on animal virus diseases. The discovery in which an in- that monkeys. All the arthropod- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Phlebotomus fever. biting flies commonly called sandflies. in the absence of susceptible experimental animals. Louis encephalitis. Western. It was soon realized that infection of man mestic animals was and his do- purely accidental. The similarity of many of these agents indicates. Eastern. numerous virus strains were isolated from wild-caught mosquitoes. The pioneer work on these three infections was limited as. chiefly in tropical Africa and South America. all work had to be done on human volunteers. Immunity surveys for antibodies in the blood of humans indicated that infection with some of the newly isolated agents was prevalent in the regions where the viruses were discovered.

8 0 0 in 1955. In the Union of South Africa. Of cardinal importance to the virus program is the 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Thus. The program calls for the study of the distribution. As man and his domestic animals are not essential for the maintenance of the viruses. reservoir hosts. their infection can occur only in regions where they can be bitten by arthropods. and Sindbis infections. which have become infected in nature. usually mosquitoes. Brazil. To The achieve the objective of the program. West Nile. incidence. operated in conjunction with the Servic. the work of New Rockefeller Foundation Virus Laboratories in York is coordinated with that of field stations established in various parts of the world. a sta- tion. a unit is working in cooperation with the State Department of Health. infection of man and his domestic animals is clearly virus related to the presence of virus cycles in nature. Various species of birds have been incriminated in a number of infections such as Eastern and Western equine encephalitis. it has been clearly established that monkeys are of importance in the epidemiology of yellow fever. India. For the virus research program the Foundation made appropriations totaling $ 7 8 6 . is maintained in cooperation with the South African Institute for Medical Research.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 75 borne viruses probably exist in nature as agents of infection in wild animals. Two units are located in the South American region: one at Port-of-Spain. The primary virus cycles involve wild animals and birds. is operated jointly with the Indian Medical Research Council. California. Thus. and vectors of these infections of man in various parts of the world. Japanese B encephalitis. In the Far East a station at Poona. at Johannesburg. It is basically a study of the infections of man and his domestic animals when exposed to various ecological environments.o Especiales de Saude Publica. In Berkeley. At presentfivefieldlaboratories are in operation. Trinidad. collaborative with the Government of Trinidad and the Colonial Medical Service. the other at Belem.

The close immunological re- lationship between this virus and the newly discovered May- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Previous studies in the Amazon Valley had shown that protective antibodies to the Semliki Forest virus were prevalent in the blood of humans. many of these viruses can be made to clump or agglutinate chick red blood cells. in all prob- ability. During the epidemic of yellow fever in Trinidad in 1954 two viruses which were definitely not yellow fever virus were isolated from febrile humans. The infections were. The greatest aid has come from the recently developed haemagglutination techniques. short duration. The last two are recently dis- covered agents of unusual interest. near Belem. These were identified as strains of Mayaro. and Mayaro viruses. an extensive epi- demic among quarry workers occurred in Guama. By this means two major groups of allied agents can be separated. and Venezuelan equine encephalitis. Sindbis. Semliki Forest. the fever lasting from two There were no deaths.76 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION classification of the agents. During this epidemic six strains of virus were isolated from the blood of patients. acquired by close contact with the Amazonian rain forest. or to a lesser extent when an immunologically related agent is used. An immune serum has the property of inhibiting agglutination ( H I ) of chick cells to a marked degree when an homologous virus is used. This virus was given the name Mayaro after the region in Trinidad where it was discovered. Western. It has been found that by the use of appropriate methods. The illness of the six patients was of to five days. To group A belong Eastern. and inhibition tests clearly revealed that the two agents were probably identical and belonged to group A. Shortly after the immunological characteristics of the Mayaro virus had been established. Chikungunya. Haemagglutinating antigens could be readily prepared. The Mayaro virus is clearly a new agent and is closely related to the Semliki Forest virus and the Chikungunya virus.

Haddow. The the Chikungunya virus was was available evidence suggests that the cause of this epidemic as it isolated from the blood of patients. These findings are of unusual interest. in fact. That this hypothesis is. Chikungunya virus is another new group A virus. correct. due not to infection with this agent but to infection with the closely related Mayaro virus. justified in interpreting the results of the protection test survey with the Semliki virus as giving us an indication of the extent of Mayaro infection in the Amazon Valley. One of these strains was sent to New York for study by Dr. Uganda. An haemagglutinating antigen was readily prepared. in all probability. This survey has been made at the beginning of the studies in the Amazon Valley in order to obtain information as to the prevalence of human infections with arthropod-borne virus diseases. Dur- ing 1952 an extensive epidemic occurred in the Makonde region of Southern Tanganyika. director of the Entebbe laboratories. During the epidemic several strains of virus were isolated from the blood of patients. was shown by the fact that the individuals from whom Mayaro virus was isolated developed neutralizing antibodies to the Semliki Forest virus. The results of this survey showed that antibodies to the Semliki virus were very prevalent and widespread throughout the entire Amazon Valley. Clinically. the disease resembled dengue with the typical fever and skin 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The clinical aspects of the disease were very similar to those of dengue.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 77 aro agent suggested that the results obtained with the Semliki virus were. J. with These findings thus clearly suggest that infection Mayaro virus is very widespread in tropical the America. This epidemic was studied and described by workers from the Virus Research Institute in Entebbe. therefore. Its closest relations are the Semliki Forest virus and the recently discovered Mayaro virus. We are. Haemagglutination-inhibition tests showed that this agent — the Chikungunya virus—was a member of group A and clearly a new virus. A.

Culex mosquitoes. and four from mosquitoes. this agent was found in South Africa. The presence of Eastern equine enceph- alitis virus infection in the Amazon Valley was suspected from the results of previous protection test surveys with human sera. with many of the clinical features of dengue.• 7 8 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION rash. five from sentinel monkeys. In India five strains of virus isolated from such diverse sources as bird spleens. It has been shown that birds of several species are involved in the maintenance of Western equine encephalitis in nature. Three of these were isolated from man. These findings also cast serious doubt upon past diagnoses of dengue. The fact that this virus is active in the Amazon Valley confirms the results of the protection tests of survey sera previously obtained. It will be recalled that a recent epidemic in Israel. A certain amount of information was obtained during the year concerning the other group A viruses. It evidently has a very wide distribution. This virus was discovered in Egypt where it has been repeatedly iso- lated from Culex mosquitoes. Subsequently. Twelve strains have been identified as Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. was shown to be caused by the West Nile virus. and bird mites have been identified as strains of Sindbis virus. This infection is very common in the western parts of the United States. Two viruses which were isolated from the blood of sentinel monkeys were identified as strains of Eastern equine encephalitis. It has been definitely established that both the Venezuelan and Eastern equine encephalitis viruses are present in the Amazon Valley. great caution will have to be used until the etiological agent has been established. It is apparent that in making future diagnoses of dengue. and the disease is highly seasonal in prevalence due to the great variation in numbers of the 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . not only in East Africa but in other parts of the world as well. but its importance as a cause of human infection is not known.

St. Preliminary surveys of immunity to this agent among humans and animals in Tongaland indicate that infection with H 177 is very prevalent. especially cattle. circumluteolus. it may also be that birds migrating from the south introduce the virus each year. isolated in Tongaland in northern Zululand: one. goats. Japanese B encephalitis. The second group of viruses which has been separated by means of the haemagglutination techniques is group B. This possibility is being studied in California with particular reference to swallows. four agents. which are at present unnamed. What is apparently the same agent as H 177 was also isolated from Aedes circumluteolus mosquitoes. It is clear that this virus very frequently attacks domestic animals. the other. H 177. Uganda S. TAR from a pool of Taeniorhynkhus uniformis mosquitoes.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 79 mosquito vector. The isolation of Western equine encephalitis from barn swallows collected as nestlings shows that these birds are infected in nature and that they are one of the natural hosts. Louis encephalitis. and Russian encephalitis. Culex tarsalis. However. Laboratory studies have shown that H 177 can be readily transmitted by the bite of the A. were discovered in Africa. In Africa. many of the more recently isolated agents belong in this group. and Ntaya were isolated and shown subsequently to belong to this group. but it is possible that infected hibernating mosquitoes are involved. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . During 1955 two new group B viruses. Here belong such important viruses as those that cause yellow fever. Zika. West Nile. It is not known by what means this virus overwinters. The Western equine encephalitis virus was isolated in August during the second not found in the first batch of breeding cycle but was nestlings after the birds arrived from the south. dengue. from the blood of a mosquito catcher who was suffering from a febrile disease at the time. Both were 94. during the Rockefeller Foundation studies on the epidemiology of yellow fever. In addition.

no Ilheus vims has been isolated from the blood of humans suffering from febrile diseases even though they live in the forested regions where the immunity surveys show infection to be very prevalent. In spite of intensive work. Analysis of immunity surveys indicates that the infection is acquired by intimate contact with the forest. Louis encephalitis were thought to be predominantly confined to the North American continent. West Nile. It is apparent that infection with this newly discovered agent is very widespread in the Union of South Africa and that it is of economic importance. in all probability. and donkeys. but the results of immu- nity surveys indicate that infection with this virus is obviously far less prevalent in Tongaland than infection with the H 177 virus. it has been shown that this agent is probably also present in Trinidad.8O THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION dogs. There are indications that a subgroup of very closely related agents can be separated in the B group of viruses. In portions of Trinidad human infection with the Ilheus virus is very prevalent. Results of studies by scientists at the Onderstepoort Veterinary Research Institute indicate that the H 177 virus is. the viruses of St. Although infections with the virus of St. This conclusion is based on the results of antibody surveys in humans. identical with an agent which had recently been isolated from sheep in the Orange Free State during an epidemic of a disease causing abortion. however. Japanese B encephalitis. That an infection with this virus can cause severe illness was demonstrated by the isolation of this agent from the blood of a patient in Port-of-Spain suffering from a severe encephalitis. and Ilheus are very close rela- tives. and infections with these occur over a large portion of the world. For example. It is believed that this 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Louis encephalitis. Louis virus. Very little is known concerning the role TAR ease in man 94 plays as a cause of dis- or domestic animals. as well as on the isolation from mosquitoes of a virus which appears to be a strain of St.

as a short while previous to her illness she had visited the forested region of the island. the cause of this severe disease was the virus of Japanese B encephalitis. Laboratory studies with the blood from convalescent cases showed that. Japanese B encephalitis. Thisfindingextends the known distribution of Japanese B to the Indian sub-continent It is thought that the epidemic may have been related to an unusual prevalence of mosquitoes due to exceptionally heavy rainfall. lead to the conclusion that the arthropod-borne viruses are all More primarily the agents of infection in wild animals. During the past year the attention of the workers in the Virus Research Centre in Poona was drawn to an epidemic in which there were severe cases of encephalitis in children. predominantly rural. with some deaths. This mosquito is closely related to Culex tritaenlorhynchus. However. evidence was obtained that possibly Japanese B virus was present there. On purely epidemiological grounds. Evidence has been obtained that this virus occurs in Korea. In the preliminary blood surveys for immunity to arthropod-borne viruses in India. Investigation proved that the cases. in all probability. was discovered in Japan. Malaya. though a resident of the city. China. it is suspected that humans acquired their infection by the bite of Culex vishnui. extending over many years. the possible role of other animals is continuously being 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . All these studies. and to Culex gelidus which has been incriminated in Malaya.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 81 patient. and Borneo. In recent years a virus very closely related to Japanese B has been shown to be the cause of infection in Australia. as its name indicates. and more evidence is accumulating that birds play an important part in the maintenance of infection in nature. Subsequent work showed that infection with this agent is very widespread in the East. did not acquire her infection there. the vector of Japanese B in Japan. in the North Arcot region of Madras State. were occurring over a very wide area.

No evidence has been obtained concerning the distribution or incidence of this unusually interesting virus. The Belem Virus Laboratory was fortunate in finding a source of nonimmune and susceptible monkeys on an island off the coast of Brazil. The study of these is not com- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . In planning work in a region. nor is it known whether it can cause human infections. In addition to these well-known agents. demonstrating their presence in a region is the examination at frequent and regular intervals of blood samples from susceptible animals recently introduced into the region. In California bats of various species are being studied. It was suspected atfirstthat these viruses were strains of rabies. as this agent has been previously found in the salivary glands of insectivorous bats in the United States. This survey shows the presence or absence of past infection with known viruses or others having certain antigenic relationships with the test viruses. Louis encephalitis virus and is the second group B virus to be discovered in North America. The search for the viral agents themselves is underOne of the quickest methods of taken in several ways. numerous other viral strains have been isolated. During these investigations three strains of virus were isolated from the salivary glands of Tadaria mexicanaf the Mexican freetail bat. A number of these animals have been stationed at selected spots in the forest and bled for virus isolation at regular intervals. By this means the presence of both Venezuelan and Eastern equine encephalomyelitis viruses was first demonstrated in the Amazon forest. the demonstration of the presence of arthropod-borne viral agents is approached first by the indirect method of an antibody survey on the human population. The presence of viruses distinct from the known agents remains undiscovered by this method.82 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION investigated. Conclusive evidence was obtained that at least one of these bat viruses was a new member of group B . This strain is apparently a new agent with some affinity to the St.

bear no relationship to either the A or B group of arthropod-borne viruses. Bwamba. As mentioned above. indubitable evidence that this virus can infect man has been obtained by the isolation of this agent from a human suffering from a febrile illness. and Rift Valley Fever. In Trinidad 31 virus strains were isolated from mosquitoes during the past year. The remaining three are apparently new. These agents can often be isolated from Culex tarsalts mosquitoes even in the absence of manifest cases of infection in man. No immunity surveys have yet been undertaken with the Marituba virus and. Louis and Western equine encephalitis viruses. 16 strains of virus were isolated. South Africa. This is routinely used in California during the mosquito season to determine the presence or absence of both the St. One of the most productive methods for determining the presence of a virus in a region is the systematic collection of mosquitoes and the isolation of virus by the inoculation of mice. protection tests in mice have shown that human immunity to the Oriboca agent is fairly prevalent in the Amazon region. That human infections with the Oriboca virus occur has been demonstrated conclusively by the isolation of this agent from man. In a similar manner. Moreover. for example. but it is already obvious that at least two new closely related viral agents have been discovered. its importance as a cause of human infections is unknown. hence. Thirteen of these are either identical with or very closely related to the previously described viruses. None of these agents has yet been identified. By means of the haemagglutination techniques it has been shown that these two. the Oriboca and Marituba viruses.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 83 plete. The productivity of this method is shown by the large number of virus strains isolated in various parts of the world. However. two of these are new group B members. Bunyamwera. During one month'sfieldstudy in Tongaland. the workers in Belem 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

Williams. Japan*. 3 5 0 . Australia: to visit centers of encephalitis research in the United States. $ 1 . M. $ 4 . Frits Dekking. Medical Faculty. $ 4 . Madison: Symposium on Latency and Masking in Viral and Rickefctsial Infections. 5 0 0 . $ 1 . OTHER GRANTS Long Island Biological Association. Institute of Public Health. Oscar Avendano. Queensland Institute of Medical Research. New York: development of a summer program for research on viruses. 3 5 0 . University of Malaya. and to visit laboratories in Europe. Robley C . Bacteriological Institute. Egypt. Singapore: to visit virus research centers m the United States. Dr. England. University of Amsterdam. $ 4 . 3 0 0 . Raja Varma. Bombay. Dr. 1956. Chile: to visit virus research centers in the United States. James Henry Hale. 4 0 0 . 3 0 0 . Virus Laboratory. University of Wisconsin. G . York State Depart- © 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . Netherlands: to visit virus research centers in the United States and Canada. 5 0 0 . Cambridge. professor of bacteriology. Berkeley: to study at the Virus Research Unit. 4 0 0 . University of California. India: to visit virus research centers in the United States and Cairo. $5>ooo. viral studies in the Department of Microbiology. Medical School. Miss Patricia Elsie Lee. held during August. The nature of the remainder has not yet been determined. 5 0 0 . India: to continue for three months her study of basic virus techniques at the New ment of Health. $ 2 . Dr. Mavelikara. Santiago. $ 3 . Dr. Cold Spring Harbor. Brisbane. Khorshed Pavri. conservator in bacteriology and public health. Albany. four of these were found to be yellow fever and four Venezuelan equine encephalitis. Dr. Dr. $ 1 . Tokyo.84 THE ROCKBFBLLBR FOUNDATION have isolated 1 4 strains of virus. $ 3 .

Fund for grants of amounts not exceeding $ 5 0 0 for allocation under the supervision of the Director. 0 0 0 . England: to confer with editors and United States. Research Center of Brazilian Geography. Japan: support of the basic research program of the Research Institute for Fundamental Physics. University of Brazil. New Haven. 0 0 0 for a two-year period. Nature. Beach. Connecticut: to visit European research centers. joint editor. F . $ 1 . $1. Frank A.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH Dr. Dr. authors of scientific publications in the 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Paris. $ 3 . Jean Vieuchange. Kyoto University. Lionel J. Paris. $ 2 . 0 0 0 . Rio de Janeiro: support of the teaching and research programs of Professor Hilgard O'Reilly Sternberg. $ 1 2 . Yale University. France: support of the program of its Science and Freedom Committee. 4 0 0 . France: to observe recent developments in virus research in the United States. Special P r o j e c t s SMALLER GRANTS Congress for Cultural Freedom. Massachusetts: support of a journal devoted to the translation of languages with the aid of machines. Department of Psychology. $ 5 . $ 4 . Massachusetts Institute of Technology. $ 6 8 2 . Brimble. 0 0 0 . 1 0 0 .750. London. Pasteur Institute. laboratory 85 chief. Cambridge.

The ture are operating activities of the Foundation in agriculconcentrated in Latin America with centers in Mexico. The extension of operating activities into the Orient is now be- ing studied by the appropriate officers of the Foundation. became one of the five major areas of Foundation interest as a result of action by the Board of Trustees. These have all now become essentially a single operation as a result of the similarity of the problems involved in the improvement of basic food crops. and extended efforts in Central America and numerous countries in South America. Rocke- feller Foundation personnel have visited a number of countries in Asia and Europe with resultant mutual benefits. for both the purposes of training and of exchange of information and experience. Colombia. This Latin American operation has recently become even more international in scope as increasing numbers of scientists from other areas have visited the several research centers in Latin America and have received information terials for trial in their own and genetic ma- countries. which began with a single staS member in Mexico in 1943. and training activities directed toward improving world food supplies through international efforts in agricultural research and education. and Chile. and the regular exchange of personnel. Similarly. appropriations.AGRICULTURE URING 1955 the agricultural program of The Rockefeller Foundation. grants in aid. the free exchange of information and plant and animal materials. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The program in agriculture consists of operating programs.

plant path- ology. Japan. These may in that they support be conventional in nature genetics. or other related sciences. At the present time. several from Europe. all phases of water research with agricultural implications. or agricultural chemistry. and so on. the training program in agricul- ture includes scholarships and fellowships for formal training in the United States or abroad. and a considerable number from India. or they may be nonconventional in that they aid research on the utilization of solar energy for agricultural purposes. cytology. agricultural education. On occasion it is necessary to provide training opportunities for young agricultural scientists at undergraduate levels where this is an obvious need in the area under consideration. parasitology. microbiology.AGRICULTURE The $ 7 training program in agriculture is considered to be of major importance. Some grants have been made in connection with operating programs to supplement their research activities by the support of collateral programs m agricultural extension. biophysics. and the Philippine Islands. in-service scholarship appointments in connection with operating centers in Latin America. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Trainees have been drawn from all the countries of Latin America. The grants and appropriations in agriculture are di- rected principally toward the support of fundamental research projects of potential long-range significance to agricultural production. Thailand. veterinary science. genetics. In all cases ap- pointees are trained for specific and sibilities in their own agricultural guaranteed respon- countries. Experience has taught that it is not always possible or desirable to limit training activities to postdoctoral or even postgraduate levels. These include positions in as professors and investigators institutions attacking fundamental problems of crop production through biochemistry. and one inter-area training program involving Indonesia and the Philippine Islands. soil science. although these do play a major role in the entire training program. marine resources as potential food supplies. entomology.

as a result. Increasing numbers of foreign spe- cialists are coming regularly to Baton Rouge for study and consultation and. The University's experimental farm at Crowley. the most important results will accrue from the activities of those individuals who have had various types of training in association with the Foundation's program in agriculture. is directly or indirectly designed to contribute to this overall objective. Already past trainees are assuming leadership in fundamental research projects of importance to their own countries and in the development of departments and institutions to carry on significant research activities and the training of future leaders in agricultural science. whether it be in the area of operation or training or grants. Louisiana. potatoes. Work 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . the institution has gained international significance for work in this field. wheat. In the long run. Aid to Research and Teaching LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY RICE RESEARCH CENTER Louisiana State University is one of the few institutions in this country where research in rice has been a longtime major interest. vegetables. beans. is one of the leading rice stations in the world. such crops as corn.THB ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION In all these activities the focus is on the improvement of the quality and quantity of world food supplies. however. It is believed that the operating programs themselves can make significant contributions through research to the improvement of food crops in those areas in which they are located. Thus. and forages have been selected for major emphasis along with certain phases of animal science including poultry and dairy and beef cattle. Each activity of the entire program. and from the results of fundamental research supported under this program. rice.

fertility.AGRICULTURE 89 is currently being done on the problems of mechanization and management. 0 0 0 to the Uni- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . New York. which currently numbers more than 3 . The expansion will establish Crowley as an in- ternational training center for rice specialists. The recent and rapid growth of the student body. In order to make the Crowley substation more conveniently and efficiently available for training and service on a world-wide basis. UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE The College of Agriculture of the University of the Philippines is a center of agricultural education not only for the Philippines. and other facilities. To aid in setting up this facility. The center will be under the general direction of Dr. however. and disease and pest control. The Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated $ 4 0 . It is helping to produce a growing corps of agricultural scientists in a part of the world where they are vitally needed. has made increased demands on faculty. 0 0 0 students in residence. Efferson. J. laboratories. particularly for those from foreign countries where rice is the staple food. New equipment and personnel will be added. better facilities will be provided for the visiting technical personnel. 0 0 0 to Louisiana State Uni- versity. but also for other countries of the Orient. In recognition of the need and opportunity. N . the funds to be available over a five-year period. the university will expand the farm's program. Ithaca. and the scope of the research program will be broadened. Located at Los Banos. for the exchange of scientists in research and teaching positions. the college has an arrangement with Cornell University. The Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated $ 1 4 0 . varietal improvement. Laguna. head of the university's experiment station.

© 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 . teaching. and extension posts in the Ministry of Agriculture and at such institutions as the Faculty of Agriculture of the University of Indonesia at Bogor and its counterpart at Jogjakarta. Recognized as one of the strongest institutions for agricultural education in Brazil. a large farm. will offer training to the students in an area where agricultural problems and practices are in large measure similar to those in Indonesia. UNIVERSITY OF SAO PAULO SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE In view of the growing importance of increased agricultural production in the economy of Brazil. The awards. and living expenses for four years. Brazil. UNIVERSITY OF THE P H I L I P P I N E S AGRICULTURAL SCHOLARSHIPS The first attempt to enable students from one Southeast Asian country to study in another country of the same region has been inaugurated with the establishment of twenty scholarships for Indonesian agricultural students at the University of the Philippines. the School of Agriculture of the University of Sao Paulo. A The two-year grant of $ 1 2 0 . and a full-time staff of professors. awarded in 1955 by Rockefeller Foundation to the University of the Philip- pines. has been carrying on research directed towards the solution of basic agricultural problems in the State of Sao Paulo and elsewhere in the country. the university has good facilities.90 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION versity of the Philippines for the purchase of laboratory equipment and teaching materials for the College of Agriculture. which will provide travel. will finance the program. The purpose of these scholarships is to increase the number of trained agricultural scientists for research. tuition.

BRAZIL COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE The College of Agriculture at the Gammon Institute. GAMMON INSTITUTE. of the Minas Gerais. an area especially adapted to the production of cereal crops.AGRICULTURE 91 Projects currently in progress represent ten different departments and include subjects such as radioisotope and biochemical studies of a number of microorganisms of agricultural importance. is a successful demonstration importance of private institutions in the service of Brazilian agriculture. The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 made a $ 1 2 0 . 0 0 0 grant to the University of Sao Paulo for use during a three-year period. the chemistry of the soils of the Sao Paulo region. For the expansion of the research program and the purchase of equipment. and climatological factors of agricultural production. places 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . AGRONOMY INSTITUTE OF THE SOUTH RESEARCH IN CEREAL IMPROVEMENT Location in the southeastern part of Brazil. Brazil. genetic studies directed toward the improvement of food crops. In continued support of increased activities in research and for the purchase of new equipment. The students participate directly in all phases of agricultural production as a part of their college experience and are prepared m both theory and practice. It is this combination which makes graduates of the school widely appreciated in Brazil. 0 0 0 to the Gammon Institute. Respected throughout the country for the quality of its graduates. the agricultural school is located in a rural area. thereby attracting many students from farm families. The Rockefeller Foundation has made a five-year grant of $ 6 0 .

fruits. ©2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and the development of research projects on cereal crop improvement at the institute has for this reason a special regional significance. The in its new The institute has been aided program by a three-year grant of $ 6 0 . Americo Groszmann of the Central Experiment Station in Rio de Janeiro as coordinator for corn improvement. to some extent. The institute now plans to expand and intensify its wheat improvement projects and to initiate a broad program of corn improvement. Argentina. Pelotas is strategically located with reference to certain wheat. It is a federal institution. The Ministry has designated Dr. and vegetables.and corn-growing areas in Uruguay. In addition to its central station at Pelotas. into the animal sciences. Japan.92 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION the Agronomy Institute of the South at Pelotas in an excellent position to study how these key crops may be improved. it has five substations situated in the several southern states of Brazil. ' NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES. JAPAN The National Institute of Agricultural Sciences in T o k y o . in addition to a very considerable national significance. Ady Raul da Silva of Pelotas as coordinator for wheat improvement throughout Brazil. 0 0 0 from Rockefeller Foundation. and Dr. which has for some time conducted research on local food crops and livestock. with the federal experiment stations of the Ministry of Agriculture. and its well-trained staff are further important a s s e t s . and Chile. and. The i n s t i t u t e ' s good basic equipment. wheat. now plans to expand its program into the more fundamental aspects of the production of rice. its land. It will cooperate in this with the several state-supported experiment stations of its region. and with similar programs in other Latin American countries.

GOVERNMENT OF UTTAR PRADESH. Previously. are still being increased. the institute commands the services of the country's leading agricultural scientists. has been conducting active research on a number of tropical and 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and the results of their work may well have great significance for similar areas in other regions. India. 5 0 0 . New build- ings were under construction for both schools at that time. Rockefeller Brazil. both for the training of students and for the research activities of the staff. Additions have been made to the staff of the School of Veterinary Medicine. To aid the program. 1957. and its facilities. 0 0 0 was given to the university for the joint use of its Schools of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture. in 1952. The Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated $ 5 0 .AGRICULTURE 93 As Japan's principal agricultural center. $ 3 0 . RURAL UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF MINAS GERAIS SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE The Rural University of the State of Minas Gerais. Approximately 2 . received renewed assistance from The Foundation last year for laboratory equipment and supplies for its School of Veterinary Medicine. 0 0 0 cruzeiros have been pledged to the school from Brazilian sources for the conversion of exhibition buildings into laboratories and for other basic needs during 1956. The Foundation has appropriated $ 5 0 . 0 0 0 to the Rural University to supplement Brazilian aid during the period ending November i. INDIA HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH STATION In an attempt to vary and improve the local diet. the Horticultural Research Station in Uttar Pradesh. 0 0 0 to the National Institute of Agricultural Sciences for the purchase of equipment during the next two years.

94 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION subtropical fruits indigenous to that part of the country. The ravages of the beetle have stimulated many types of control campaigns employing both chemical and mechanical methods. the major subsistence crop of the region and the source of its most important export product. however. Singh and his associates are planning an intensive study of the problems of refrigeration and preservation and of the production of economically valuable by-products. and pineapple. Because of the lack of refrigeration. - ooo acres planted with fruit trees. The station is located in an area of approximately 1 . SOUTH PACIFIC COMMISSION CONTROL OF THE RHINOCEROS BEETLE The Rhinoceros beetle is a serious pest of the economic crop plants of the Central and Southern Pacific Islands—the coconut and other palms. None of these has proven satisfactory. copra. The beetle has been known for. Ceylon. 0 0 0 from The Rockefeller Foundation will be used for the purchase of additional laboratory and refrigeration equipment and modern library mater iala.many years in southern India. and was first introduced into the island area of the South Pacific approximately forty years ago. the consumption of the fruit remains seasonal and the pricesfluctuateviolently. sugar cane. Dr. is now initiating a coordinated interna- 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . with headquarters at Noumea. disease and pest control. It poses a serious threat especially to the coconut crop. and the area is increasing annually. Singh. Burma. 5 0 0 . the research staff has already found ways of increasing the yields of various fruits through management techniques. L . and other Southeast Asian territories. To combat this situation. A two-year grant of $ 4 7 . New Caledonia. Under the direction of Dr. The South Pacific Commission. and nutrition.B .

To enable this institution to strengthen its research projects. 0 0 0 . have recently been extended by the establishment of a postgraduate curriculum in an effort by the school to provide more advanced training for Peruvian agricultural scientists. animal nutrition. and training scholarships for key school's expansion. 0 0 0 to the South Pacific Commission. Toward support of the program The Rockefeller Foundation has made a three-year grant of $ 4 7 . Lima. plant physiology. Currently on the staff are a number of specialists directing studies in the fields of plant breeding. Paul Surany of the State Natural History Survey of Illinois will direct research on the parasites and diseases of the coconut Rhinoceros beetle. NATIONAL SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE. Grants from the Foundation for equipment. fellowships. The Bernice P. The Rockefeller Foundation has supplemented earlier grants with an appropriation of $ 4 5 . expanded facilities. Peru. PERU POSTGRADUATE TRAINING AND RESEARCH The increased student body. and for support of the program of postgraduate instruction. Bishop Museum of Honolulu and the Pacific Science Board of the National Research Council of the United States will cooperate.AGRICULTURE 95 tional research project which will attempt to lay the groundwork for an effective program of biological control throughout the island area. and entomology. particularly on cereals. soil science. available during the next two years. and balanced curriculum of the National School of Agriculture at La Molina. personnel have assisted in the Research on cereals and other projects is being conducted by young Peruvian staff members whose training in Mexico and the United States has been aided by the Foundation. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Dr.

In 1951 the Foundation contributed $ 4 5 . 0 0 0 for use during a five-year period. Dr. During the next five-year period. Arne Miintzing. They further plan to explore the possibility that growth-inhibiting substances or compounds may combine chemically with readily that the inhibitor may available metabolites in such a way be produced by the diseased cells in situ during metabolism. Riker directs the program. The Rockefeller Foundation has made a grant to the University of Wisconsin of $ 4 8 . In support of these and related projects. He and his associates have been studying the meta- bolic factors favoring or inhibiting the growth of diseased tissues for 25 years. Professor A. is one of the important results of a research program conducted at the Institute of Genetics of the University of Lund in Sweden. J. and well adapted to sandy soils. an interspecific cross of rye and wheat which is high in gluten. of good quality. Under the direction of Dr. UNIVERSITY OF LUND INSTITUTE OF GENETICS The creation of Triticale. the institute has produced outstanding research in the field of basic plant genetics for 15 years. Riker and his group expect to compare cultures of tissues from diseased and healthy organisms for differences in fundamental physiology. © 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . and to use techniques involving isotopes and chromatography in tracing the metabolic pathways of substances which either inhibit or encourage growth. 0 0 0 to the program.96 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION UNIVERSITY OF W I S C O N S I N RESEARCH IN PLANT PATHOLOGY Normal and abnormal growth and differentiation within plants and tissue cultures are the objects of a research program at the University of Wisconsin which has broad implications for the study of tumors in animals and man as well as in plants.

In 1954 a grant of $ 1 0 . In the past few years. One item of equipment of special importance which the grant made possible is a mobile clinical laboratory truck which is being used to give on-the-spot help to poultry and livestock raisers. UNIVERSITY OF THE REPUBLIC COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE The College of Veterinary Medicine of the University of the Republic.AGRICULTURE Among the current investigations conducted by 97 Dr. BRAZIL PLANT VIRUS RESEARCH Recognizing the significance of plant virus diseases to 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Gaggero. Research and teaching in poultry pathology. on inbreeding and self-sterility in rye. A 1955 grant of $ 3 0 . on the negative effects which accessory chromosomes have on fertility and vigor. ooo since 1951. INSTITUTE OF AGRONOMY. a specialty of importance to the farmers of Uruguay. Montevideo. an expanded research program and improvements in teaching facilities have increased the institution's value to the region. under the leadership of Dean Alfonso H . Uruguay. The mobile unit also serves as a base for more effective field experience for the students. In 1955 The Rockefeller Foundation made a further grant of $ 4 0 . 0 0 0 for an 18-month period is helping in the purchase of teaching and research equipment. and on mutations and other cytological problems. Foundation aid to the Institute of Genetics totals $ 5 5 . 0 0 0 from The Rockefeller Foundation aided in the establishment of the work in poultry pathology. is the most recent addition to the curriculum. serves an important function in relation to the country's chief agricultural industry. Miintzing and his associates are studies on the induction of polyploidy by means of nitrous oxide. 0 0 0 to the University of Lund for use by the Institute of Genetics during the next three years.

bringing to $ 1 0 7 . Thailand. and to obtain an ultracentrifuge. Dr. Here the university hopes to train thirty or forty young women annually to serve in rural areas throughout the country. Kasetsart University. but will be of great interest to neighboring countries. The Foundation has made a $ 3 0 . Brazil. During 1955 The Rockefeller Foundation appropri- ated $ 2 5 . One of his major projects has been the "tristeza" ( q u i c k decline of citrus t r e e s ) . and in 1954 a Section of Plant Virology was set up under the direction of Dr. The project has grown during subsequent years. near Bangkok. 0 0 0 to Kasetsart University for the purchase of laboratory supplies and equipment and library materials for the Department of Home Economics. For the purchase of two greenhouses to test plant Rockefeller stocks. has recently established a Department of Home Economics and has just completed construction on its campus of an excellent home economics building. ©2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . began studies of certain important virus troubles in 1 9 3 9 . Alvaro Santos C o s t a . Costa has collaborated with a number of foreign virologists in work at Campinas on plant viruses of international significance. 0 0 0 grant to the Institute of Agronomy. The new home economics course will not only enable the women of Thailand to take a more active role in the intellectual life of the community. which is of economic importance in many citrus-growing areas of this hemisphere. 3 9 0 the amount contributed since 1 9 4 9 .98 THB ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION crop production. the Institute of Agronomy at Campinas. KASETSART UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS To aid in the expansion of education facilities for rural women.

swine. E . J. In dealing with the nature and distribution of nitrogen compounds in germinating seeds. PURDUE UNIVERSITY GENETICS RESEARCH Although the spectacular results which can be achieved through the genetic effect known as hybrid vigor are visible in the modern cornfields of the United States. The director of the research program. the genetic mechanisms involved in hybrid vigor are still not understood. To aid Dr. and his associates hope to obtain basic information on plant metabolism during the critical period from seed germination to the establishment of the seedling as an independent unit. and even with dairy and beef cattle. the group will study protease activity. Varner. currently under study in the Department of Agricultural Biochemistry of Ohio State University. The ooo to Ohio State University to be used toward the purchase of a Spinco preparative centrifuge and other research expenses. and the synthesis of new proteins in seedlings from reserve proteins of the seeds. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and attempts are being made to evaluate them with economic species such as corn. Dr. No one knows how widely applicable the hybrid corn technique is or the extent of its perfectibility. Several new methods have been proposed.- years. constitutes a relatively unexplored area in the nitrogen metabolism of crop plants. the interconversion of amino acids. Varner in his project during the next two Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated $25. Furthermore. it has been suggested that better methods of genetic selection can be developed. poultry.AGRICULTURE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY PLANT SCIENCE 99 The biochemistry of seed germination.

and initiate experiments with a different insect species as well. 0 0 0 to the University of Uppsala.Drosophila melanogasteri the method conventional for poultry and animal breeders.oooj ©2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . OTHER GRANTS Catholic University of Chile. In the next few years. individual and family selection within a closed population. 5 0 0 . recurrent selection for specific combining abilities with an inbred tester. inbreeding and hybridization as used in the production of hybrid corn. three institutes are carrying on investigations of such subjects as the biochemical genetics of higher plants. Since 1 9 4 9 . Indiana. fungi. Faculty of Agronomy. The Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated $ 2 5 . Lafayette. To enable the Institutes of Microbiology. Professor Don C . the identification of important and complex microbial metabolites and enzyme systems in bacteria. Santiago: field and laboratory equipment and supplies. and the conversion of nitrogen compounds in the soil.IOO THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION During the pastfiveyears. A new grant of $ 2 2 . reciprocal recurrent selection for specific combining ability. 5 0 0 to Purdue University will continue this support over the next three years. $io. have compared four methods of genetic selection in their experiments with the fruitfly. Genetics. Warren and his associates in the Department of Poultry Husbandry at Purdue University. they will continue their experiments with Drosopkila melanogaster. The Rockefeller Foundation has assisted the genetics research program with appropriations totaling $ 3 7 . and viruses. and the National Agronomy Experiment Station to buy an infrared spectrophotometer. UNIVERSITY OF UPPSALA ROYAL AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE OF SWEDEN As part of the advanced research on agricultural problems conducted by the Royal Agricultural College of Sweden.

assistant instructor. $ 1 0 . Colombia: equipment. University Laguna: Books. Medellin: a program of agricultural communication. supplies. $ 1 0 . Guatemala City: field and laboratory equipment and supplies and one special purpose vehicle. 1956. Toward the cost of the International Wheat Rust Conference held in Mexico during March. 0 0 0 . College of Veterinary Science. research associate professor of plant breeding. School of Agriculture.AGRICULTURE IOI University of Chile. and library materials. Ciudad Juarez. $ 1 0 . supplies. 0 0 0 . 2 0 0 . equipment. Department of Agricultural Chemistry. 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . $ 1 0 . to pursue graduate study in agricultural biochemistry at Ohio State University. Dr. University of San Carlos. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . periodicals. College of Agriculture. University of Salonica. Faculty of Agronomy. University of Caldas. $ 1 0 . $ 1 0 . 0 0 0 . Dioscoro L. 0 0 0 . to attend the Sixth Food and Agricultural Organization meeting of the International Rice Commission's Working Party in Rice Breeding. National University of Colombia. Santiago: field and laboratory equipment and $ 1 0 . Chihuahua. Umali. Malaya. Calo. $ 1 0 . Faculty of Agronomy. and supplies for the library. supplies and one special purpose vehicle. San Jose: equipment. 0 0 0 . Faculty of Agronomy. Faculty of Agronomy. and to visit West Java of the Philippines. and books. Mexico: laboratory supplies. 0 0 0 . Miss Nona L . $ 1 0 . University of Costa Rica. to be held in Penang. $ 2 . Manizales. and library materials. $ 1 0 . Greece: laboratory equipment and supplies for the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology. School of Agriculture. laboratory equipment and supplies. 0 0 0 . College. Japan: Ohara Institute for Agricultural Biology. Okayama University.

5 0 0 . $ 1 0 . : Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama. Turrialba. in August. 3 0 0 . Finland. Montevideo. Uruguay: Faculty of Agronomy. Hagan. Nicholas T . 1955.IO2 THE ROCKBFELLER FOUNDATION in Indonesia to observe corn and rice breeding research and to collect promising plant materials. Guatemala City. Cooperative program of potato research. $ 1 0 . Dr. chairman. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. 5 0 0 . 0 0 0 . to visit the Andean region of South America for studies on tomato genetics. $ 3 . 5 0 0 . $ 7 . $ 1 . Inter-American Institute of Agricultural Sciences. University of California. D . $75OJ Pan American Sanitary Bureau. 0 0 0 . Berkeley: A systematic investigation of the turpentine chemistry of the genus Pirnsf under the direction of Dr. Lexington: research on the nutrition of various plant-feeding mites. © 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . Rick. professor of vegetable crops. $ 7 . Urbana: general support of an international meeting of agricultural economists held in Helsinki. to visit laboratories of animal biology in Brazil. Costa Rica: Study of native food crops of tropical America: $ 7 . Hebert Trenchi. Dr. Peru. construction of an insectary. University of Illinois. Department of Irrigation. $ 4 . Davis. University of Kentucky. 5 0 0 .C . 0 0 0 . Washington. and Argentina. $ 1 0 . Robert M. 0 0 0 . College of Agriculture. Teaching equipment for the Graduate School. $ 1 . 3 0 0 . Mirov. Chile. an expanded program of research on the nutritive values of corn varieties and possibly other food crops for Northern Latin America. 0 0 0 . Charles M . to visit the Rockefeller Foundation Agricultural Program in Mexico. $ 1 0 . Dr. University of the Republic.

University of Aberdeen. $ 3 . Alvo Kattio. by Dr. $ 3 . University of Nebraska. Professor Fausto Lona. Paul: to visit agricultural experiment stations in Northern Europe. 6 0 0 . University of Florida. plant physiologist. Santiago: equipment and supplies for tissue culture investigations on animal viruses. $ 3 . Tanganyika. Dr. Department of Agronomy. Barnett. Botanical Institute. Chile: to visit Mexico and the United States. Santiago. Gainesville: Hugh Popenoe. associate professor. John H. Dr. Department of Agricultural Research. Alaska Agricultural Experiment 103 Station. Dr. Italy: to visit research centers on algology and photosynthesis in the United States. Peradeniya. Mozambique. 3 0 0 . Miss Adriana Ramirez. Dr. 2 5 0 . Leach of the University of West Virginia to assist in the development of a potato improvement program in Alaska. Brazil: to visit the principal bee genetics laboratories in South Africa. Aldo Gaggero. 5 0 0 . Department of Agriculture. $ 5 . $ 2 . and Angola. To enable Dr.AGRICULTURE University Palmer: of Alaska. 5 0 0 . Brazil. Piracicaba. G . St. Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics. Bacteriological Institute of Chile. particularly of foot and mouth and Newcastle diseases. director. $3. $ 5 . University of Parma. Lambert. 0 5 0 . Warwick E . Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture.ioo. Jean W . $ 4 . Kerr. Scotland: to visit centers of animal husbandry research in the United States. $ 4 . 6 0 0 . Ceylon: equipment and supplies for the laboratories of the Chemical Division. J. to review the corn breeding research program of the Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture. 0 5 0 . $ 4 . Lincoln s to visit the Colombian Agricultural Program and to visit Piracicaba. to visit agricultural experiment stations and research centers in North America and Europe. University of Minnesota. J. field trips to 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . G. 0 0 0 . Dr. Ministry of Agriculture. A. Lonnquist.

Department of Agronomy. New Program.F . Iowa State College. Sprague.IQ4 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Central America to make studies of tropical soils. J. Zaumeyer.150. Dr. Victor Bravo Ahuja and Ing. Grieve. the second in Colombia in 1950. B . Department of Botany. 5 0 0 . Karl Maramorosch. Horticultural Crops Research Branch. assistant chemist. Dr. J. Bureau of Forestry. and soil fertility experiments and analysis. Dr. York: to visit the Mexican Agricultural and Mexican Agri- Operating Programs INTRODUCTION The Foundation supports three Latin American oper- ating programs. Ing. Eduardo Chavarriaga. Ames: to visit the Colombian Agricultural Program. Reyes. Nuevo Leon. plant pathologist. $ 8 0 0 . University of Western Australia. and Mines. 4 0 0 . Ing. Mexico: to visit landgrant colleges and other agricultural research centers in the United States. $ 1 . $ 2 . Leonel Robles Gutierrez. $ 1 . Dr. head. United States Department of Agriculture. Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. Maryland: to visit the Colombian cultural Programs. head. and return. 3 0 0 . Corn and Bean Seed Increase Programs. Forest Products Laboratory. Los Banos. G . Industry. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . California Institute of Technology. W . Technological Institute. Miss Aurora C . of which thefirstwas established in Mexico more than a decade ago. Colombia: to visit commercial hybrid seed corn producers and agricultural research centers in the United States. Agricultural Research Service. 4 0 0 . 2 0 0 . Bogota. 8 0 0 . $1. $ 1 . $ 2 . Philippines: to travel to the United States for study at Syracuse University. $ 1 . Nedlands: to continue research on the water economy of sclerophylls at the Pasadena Laboratory. Beltsville. Monterrey. Credit Bank for Agriculture.

The im- portant food crops are similar and training needs and opportunities are related throughout these areas. and since that time has steadily expanded to cover many other food crops of the field and garden. and beans. corn. have gradually developed. The operation in every phase represents collaboration with the ministries of agriculture in the countries concerned. and labor. which have remained the objects of greatest attention. the basic staple of the national diet. facilities for laboratory and field research. The Mexican program began with improvement work on wheat.AGRICULTURE IOjf and the third in Chile within the past year. and Chile. the respective governments allocate funds and provide profes- sional personnel. land. the Foundation's part has been to con- tribute technical guidance. As they progress they are given increasing opportunity and 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . These programs. and the Chilean program has begun with wheat. as well as financing. First. the country's major crops. The primary purpose of this operation is to train sciwill eventually assume full entists for Latin America who responsibility for leadership in the improvement of agriculture in their countries. selected graduates of local agricultural colleges are assigned by the ministries of agriculture to work with staff members on research projects. and plant protection against insects and diseases. in the three countries where resident staffs are maintained. The training objective of the program is accomplished under three plans. The Colom- bian program similarly began with research on wheat and corn. soil management. and the Foundation's participation with six Central American countries in a corn improvement project. through extensive intercooperation. on a cooperative basis. A valuable part of it has been a direct contribution to the improvement of basic food crops in the areas where operating centers are located. into a single Latin American agricultural operation. Colombia. For the programs in Mexico.

now Com- operates four training and research centers. and Latin American scholarships to the Colombian program will be increased in 1 9 5 6 .IO6 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION own. which cooperates closely with several ex- periment stations of the state departments of agriculture and with a number belonging to the National Corn mission. usually the United States. or with commercial agricultural firms. 5 0 0 has been appropriated by the Foundation for scholarships to the Mexican program. degree. currently appointments are being made at the rate of fifteen to twenty a year. responsibility for initiating researches of their Second. 2 5 0 . For the support of its Latin American operation during 1956. 2 8 4 . The office. © 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . The their own majority have returned to countries to continue in professional agriculture in government agencies. or P h .$ 2 0 7 . In addition. for advanced study leading to the M . Under the third training plan a series of scholarships and fellowships have been provided by which selected and women who men have had basic practical training in one of the operating centers can go to another country. in 1955 two students from Brazil and Peru went to Colombia forfieldresearch similar to that provided from the beginning for nationals of Colombia. Since 1 9 4 5 . the Foundation has appropriated $ 1 . the Foundation provides scholarships for work in the operating centers to graduates in other Latin American countries. as teachers. MEXICAN AGRICULTURAL PROGRAM The number of Foundation stafi members assigned to the Office of Special Studies (Oficina de Estudios Espedales) in Mexico has increased from one to 17 since 1 9 4 3 . S . D . Nearly 400 young men and women have had training under the various plans. when it was first organized as a joint venture of the Mexican Ministry of Agriculture and The Rockefeller Foundation.

for the Central Mesa. for the highly productive small grains region of the Pacific northwest. and a fourth. rice. Colima. The tropical research program now getting under way in Veracruz should prove of interest around the globe where climates and problems are similar. Also in special need of agricultural research are the vast areas now being opened up by irrigation on the dry Pacific coastal plains of Sonora and Smaloa. for tropical zones. established by the Office of Special Studies on land provided by the Ministry of Agriculture. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . at Chapingo. The new experiment stations in Veracruz and Sonora. early in 1955. Tropical conditions similar to those in Veracruz on the east coast exist in the States of Nayarit. Previous research on corn in Veracruz has yielded results significant not only to Mexico but also to Central America and the Caribbean area. and forage crops were started as soon as the land became available. will go a long way toward meeting the needs of these areas. Jalisco. and carried on throughout the year as the densely vegetated sites were being cleared. and Michoacan on the west coast. Veracruz. For the Veracruz project—including a substation on the peninsula near Campeche as well as the station near Cotaxtla—about 600 acres were purchased by the Ministry. and many of the results of research obtained at the new Veracruz station readily apply in these areas along the Pacific. beans. vegetables. Experiments with corn. at Cotaxtla. Sonora. La Cal Grande for the area known as the Bajio—sometimes called the nation's "breadbasket"—. in important geographical regions of Mexico: the main one. Mexico's tropics represent one of its greatest opportunities to increase food production. 2 0 0 feet. and the new station is providing experimental and technical services for the Central American Corn Improvement Project.AGRICULTURE IO7 at altitudes ranging from sea level to 7 . a station opened in 1955 at Ciudad Obregon. also opened in 1955.

beans. In the valley of Toluca region. it should greatly simplify seed production and distribution in this important corn producing area. Whether these qualities are exhibited by the harvested grain depends on its protein content. an outstanding new synthetic type was developed—Bajio V S 4 . which in turn is greatly influenced by the availability of nitrogen in the soil during grain formation. where average yields have increased from 15 to 20 per cent since 1 9 4 4 . and vegetables—. An open-pollinated variety. fertilizers. Research at Ciudad Obregon in the first year centered around major crops of the region—wheat. sorghums. at 9 . work which has already met with such notable success that Mexico no longer must import corn for domestic requirements. as elsewhere in Mexico. and the control of insect pests. As in the case of corn. One of the important current aims of the wheat improvement section is to en- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 feet. with the increased use of fertilizer and the introduction of new varieties.IO8 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION For the Sonora research center about 250 acres of ir- rigated crop land were purchased by the Ministry on one of the principal paved roads leading out of Ciudad Obregon into the fertile Yaqui Valley. wheat improvement work in Mexico has eliminated the necessity of importing wheat. All the desirable quality characteristics are available in many of the improved wheats developed by the Office of Special Studies. During the past year seed of five new rust resistant varie- ties sufficient for the needs of the next crop season became available. In all the experiment stations progress continued during the year in corn improvement. For the Bajio. Experimental tests of the outstanding varieties now available for high-altitude grow- ing showed the further potentialities of the valley in 1955. the average corn yield has risen by four bushels to 20 bushels per acre in the past several years and continues to rise. with yields of from 112 to 128 bushels per acre.

this variety. was crease by the bean program in 1955. to develop new types. during the time of grain formation when they do not generally increase the yield but increase protein concentration. Canario 101. where beans are the primary source of protein in the national diet. In addition to being productive. During the year the vegetable crops program expanded to parts of northern Mexico and the Pacific northwest. and root rots—with the methods of combating them. anthracnose. The bean program seeks to weigh the nutritional values of various types. During the year the wheat section continued to work on "composite" varieties—varieties composed of a number of visually indistinguishable but genetically distinct wheats. and to study the major bean diseases in Mex- ico—rust. Canario 101 is particularly well adapted to the Bajfo. can scarcely be overemphasized. The expectation is that new races of rust. a constant threat to wheat all over the world. A new variety of the popular Canreleased for commercial in- ario bean. called Cotaxtla i after the new station in Veracruz. Two highlights of the year's work in vegetables at the 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . This new idea may eventually result in the permanent limitation of losses from rust. in 1955 the first outstanding tomato variety developed through breeding for winter tomato growing in the lowlands was released for commercial production. bears well-formed globed-shaped fruit more resistant to sun scald than the fruit of most other varieties and capable of withstanding long-distance transportation over rough roads. Also where seed production problems are being studied. each of which incorporates a different factor or factors for resistance to rust.AGRICULTURE courage late applications of nitrate fertilizers. are not likely in any one year to attack all the different resistance factors in a field planted with a "composite" variety wheat. The importance of the bean crop in Mexico. where beans are produced under irrigation between February and May.

weed control. Attention is being focused in the forage crop program on alfalfa. Agricultura Tecnica en Mexico. and the establishment of a new introduction garden for experimental and demonstrational purposes at Cotaxtla in Veracruz were features of expansion during the year. which has shown excellent adaptability under irrigated conditions in various regions of Mexico and is one of the country's chief forage crops. As a result of increased production.110 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Veracruz station were discoveries in the dry and cool seasons respectively. Economic ways recently to control insect pests in stored grain were among the problems studied. the development of several observation plots for these collections in the north. The tion of native grasses in northern Mexico. The section on forage crops was established originally as a first step toward the introduction of an animal husbandry program in Mexico. The office collaborated in 1955 with the Direction General de Agricultiira of the Ministry of Agriculture in the establishment of a new journal. Published by the Ministry. more grain'is being stored in Mexico than ever before and each year the insects preying on it become more important. In the dry season it was found that most vegetables mature to market stage in this tropical area in less than half the time required in the Central Mesa. a advise farmers through- group of trained agronomists who 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Studies of fertilizer practices. The program for the improvement of forage crops collec- in Mexico completed itsfirsttwo years in 1955. and plant diseases and insect pests were continued. the journal reports research results for state and federal extension workers. As a further step in the same direction a specialist on poultry husbandry was added to the staff. In the cool season Swiss chard prospered under climatic and soil conditions favorable to none of the other typical cool season crops—a fact of very considerable significance since leafy green vegetables are generally lacking in the tropics.

One central station. smaller installation. and wheat breeding. Nicaragua. and soil science sections. climates in Colombia vary drastically from tropical regions to year-round cold. especially the entomology. and horticulture. Also as in Mexico. entomology. depending on altitude. Tibaitata (near Bogota). and horticulture. In 1955 scholarships and fellowships—some awarded by outside agencies—brought 30 young scholars from other Latin American countries to Mexico for study in corn. As this large. was established in 1 9 5 0 . The Tibaitata experiment station. well-planned sta- tion has come into full operation it has enabled the various sections of the office to increase the scope of their activities. COLOMBIAN AGRICULTURAL PROGRAM The Colombian Office of Special Research (Oftcina de Investigadones Especiales). Brazil. sorghums. agricultural research facilities in Colombia are distributed with reference to these climatic variations. with headquarters in Bogota. constructed entirely at the expense of the Ministry of Agriculture. and four substations serve for high-altitude research. three stations are used for research in the tropics. plant pathology. wheat. Like its Mexican counterpart.AGRICULTURE out the country on numerous problems and who 111 seek to in- struct them in the use of improved seed and better methods. supplemented by a third. appeared in July. and Honduras were some of the countries represented. it is jointly staffed and supported by the national Ministry Rockefeller Foundation. the control of aphids. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . whosefieldwork can now be supplemented by more extensive laboratory and greenhouse research. of Agriculture and The As in Mexico. two stations. bean. including articles on fertilizers. potato. Bolivia. The first issue of the new journal. are available for work in the intermediate altitudes. opened officially in January of 1954.

9 0 0 . miles of new More than five irrigation and drainage canals were built. The director of the wheat improvement program in Colombia left to direct the new cooperative agency established in Chile by the Chilean Ministry of Agriculture in conjunction tion. Some interchange of personnel among the various parts of the Latin American agricultural program also occurred. Nine agronomists associated with the Colombian program were awarded Foundation scholarships and fellowships for advanced study in Mexico and the United States during the course of the year. 3 0 0 to a total of 4 . In the spring of 1955 all the research activities of the Ministry of Agriculture were integrated within a new administrative unit. As in previous years. about five miles of roads were constructed. the Office of Special Research cooperated in various international projects during 19551 including the Central American Corn Improvement Project and the International Corn Germ Plasm Bank to collect and preserve indigenous varieties of corn throughout Latin America. increased by about 1 . The work of © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . the Department of Agricultural Investigations. a new with the Founda- director for the wheat program in Colombia arrived from the Office of Special Studies in Mexico. bridges were built and improved. and over seven miles of existing canals were deepened and cleaned.112 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION During 1955 major improvements on the farm at the Tibaitata station were carried forward. Also in 1955 the office was designated an international training center for the agricultural scholarship plan of the Foundation. and a member of the Colombian corn improvement section left for Mexico to represent the Foundation in the Central American Corn Improvement Project. A collection of corn specimens in the bank at Medellin. and direction of the technical aspects of the de- partment's work was assigned to the Office of Special Research. the depository for the High Andean collection.

conducted a survey of corn breeding facilities in India. a 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Phytopathologists. and Soil Scientists. two Foundation staff members. The by The Rockefeller conference was aided financially Foundation. as were the two held in previous years. and are furnishing sources of rust resistance in South Africa. Colombian corn lines have performed well in the Philippine Islands. Entomologists. with the object of evaluating foreign varieties for use in Colombia and of contributing Colombian material for evaluation elsewhere. one from ico. the other from Colombia. Representatives of 23 countries and territories in the Western Hemisphere met at Bogota in June for the third Latin American Conference of Phytogeneticists. who made inspection trips to the experiment station at Palmira or the coffee research center at Chinchina before moving to Medellm for the closing meetings. in 1955 plantings of Colombian as well as of Cen- tral American and Mexican corn were made in India for observation.AGRICULTURE 113 analyzing and classifying these specimens by race is well under way. In the lowlands around Valledupar. As part of an effort to extend the application of Colombian research to other parts of the world. and the bean breeding section exchanged material with the United States Department of Agriculture and other agencies abroad. The various sections of the Office of Special Research continued to develop plant types suitable for the different areas of Colombia. sponsored by the Colombian Ministry of Agriculture and the colleges of agriculture at Medellm and Palmira. One hundred and forty-nine technical papers and reports of research in progress were presented to the delegates. staff of the potato section again cooperated in the The late blight studies sponsored by the American Potato Association and the United States Department of Agriculture. At the invitation of the Indian Ministry of Mex- Agriculture.

the corn varieties now being grown take from u to 13 months to develop and a quicker growing type is needed. which performs the same services with respect to all the improved seed developed by the office. Col. which proved susceptible in 1954-55 to a new race of yellow rust which had become prevalent. Among the results. 9 0 0 feet). A series of maximum yield trials were started during the year by the corn section in cooperation with the sections on soil and entomology. varieties from Bogota which usually develop in a minimum of seven to eight months produced fairly good ears in less than six months in the Popayan area. at Medellin. 2 0 0 feet) and similarly around Popayan ( 5 . to replace Menkemen. Around La Ceja ( 7 . the yield was nearly three times that considered good by Colombian farmers and more than five times the national average. It opened two new sections for'the production and distribution of seed In 1955 and plans in the near future to complete two more. was not the best.114 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION good crop for rotation with cotton. developed by the Office of Special Research. the best yellow hybrid available for intermediate altitudes. Bonza. is not only more rust resistant 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Commercial increase and distribution of the corn section's improved varieties and hybrids are handled by the Seed Campaign of the C a j a Agraria. This district could become an important corn growing region if good varieties and hybrids could be developed for it. the national bank for agricultural credit. H-2O3. the principal crop. on one of which work has already started. Although the land available for thefirsttrial. and a drought occurred toward the end of the growing season. is badly needed. In the two years since its establishment as part of the Caja Agrana^ the Seed Campaign has expanded seed sales until it is nearly self-supporting. was thefirsttype tested. Bonza. In 1955 the Seed Campaign accelerated increase of a new wheat variety. The corn section conducted preliminary trials in all these places in 1955.

This has been the case with barley improvement. and to select basic material for breeding. was increased for commercial use during the year to the extent that sufficient seed became available for barley growers in four states. In an effort to minimize the hazards of shifting rust race populations.AGRICULTURE but also more adaptable than any of the varieties previously developed for Colombia. A selected barley variety. and that some breeds of sheep. The work of the pathology section was concerned during the year with diseases of beans. undertakes a series of tests of existing native and a new foreign material simultaneously with Superior varieties are usually breeding program. For immediate results. pathology. and entomology sections are the other established phases of the Colombian program. breeds were added to the Colombian program in 1955. the Office of Special Research. Among the year's results. About 113 tons were planted on 65 farms during the year. corn. and the soil science. It takes time for breeding programs to yield results. The barley. Two sections. The of cattle raised at present in Colombia could produce more milk and beef than they currently do. swine. and Crotalaria. Pastures rather than grain feeds now furnish the 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Funza. and potato improvement sections. animal husbandry and forage crops. the wheat improvement section has transferred its main emphasis in the breeding program to the formation of "composite" varieties such as are being developed in Mexico. like the Office of Special Studies in Mexico. sources of resistance to corn stalk rot and to the principal bean diseases were found. It also appears that with appropriate care a number of other breeds of cattle could do well in most areas of the country. and poultry which thrive in the United States may be successful there. selected for commercial increase before the breeding program has had time to develop. bean.

Various types of fruit.Il6 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION major portion of nutrients for all species of animals in the country. and rice industries offer possibilities as a source of carbohydrates and fats. and certain by-products of the brewing. Temuco. There is every indication that a concerted effort utilizing modern research methods will result in a significant increase in yields. CHILEAN AGRICULTURAL PROGRAM The program established in Chile in May of 1955 is the newest of the Foundation's agricultural operating programs and is not yet fully under way. such as the banana. More efficient usage of pastures and legumes and their preservation for use during dry seasons as hay or as pasture offer promise for the improvement of the livestock industry. in the heart of the winter wheat region. abundant local foods used mainly for human consumption might possibly be used as a source of nutrition for animals. and Los Andes. about 45 miles south of Santiago. Corn improvement programs in each of the member countries (now increased to six) are unified through the project under a central advisory office directed © 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . sugar manufacturing. CORN IMPROVEMENT PROJECT: CENTRAL AMERICA The Corn Imporvement Project was inaugurated early in 1954 with five Central American ministries of agriculture participating. Wheat and forage crops were selected as the first crops for study because of their critical importance in Chile. Headquarters are in Santiago and experimentation and other technical work is done at three stations: Paine. about 80 miles northwest of Santiago. and a country-wide project on wheat was initiated in the first year. In addition.

The tropical corn breeding center established by the Veracruz ex- Mexican Agricultural Program at the new periment station is serving the Corn Improvement Project as well as Mexico. Costa Rica. El Salvador. to encourage cooperation among them.AGRICULTURE 117 by a Foundation stafi member. Its objectives are to obtain improved corns for the hot tropics of Mexico and Central America. Nicaragua. to provide breeding materials for local programs in each of the countries cooperating in the Central American project. Turrialba. and to conduct research on the problems of corn culture in the tropics. and to maintain a system for the mutual exchange of information and planting materials. The training of young agronomists to help meet the current shortage of personnel in the six countries. OTHER GRANTS Latin American scholarships to Rockefeller Foundation agricultural 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and the purchase of necessary pieces of equipment when local funds are not available are important phases of project activity. The aims of the project are to strengthen the existing programs in the individual countries. joined Honduras. the new participant. Five short-term fellowships were granted to Central American agronomists under project auspices during 1955 for advanced training in the Colombian and Mexican programs and in the United States. Corn plays a dominant role in the national diets of all the countries concerned. Guatemala. and Panama for a general conference on the "Breeding and Pro- duction of Corns for the Tropics. An annual meeting brought delegates from all the co- operating countries together at the Inter-American Institute of Agricultural Sciences." Special emphasis was placed on the problems of seed production to meet the needs of countries initiating seed Increase programs. in December of 1955. Costa Rica.

At the same time there is a growing conviction that conventional sources of energy. The to await total quantity of en- ergy available. experimentation with the forced culture of lower order plants and animals. It is available in great surplus—approximately 1 0 0 . In the last decade technological developments in solid state physics. and even possible atomic sources. which studies in the pertinent basic sciences and the development 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . increased understanding of organic and inorganic photosynthesis. 8 9 . available with balance from previous appropriation through December 31. is diffuse. Progress in the use of solar energy has had advances in related basic sciences. available with balance from previous appropriation. A research program is now being undertaken at the will include University of Wisconsin. 0 0 0 Mexican pesos (approximately $ 7 . variable in intensity. and hard to capture.118 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION funds for scholarships awarded operating activities: supplementary in 1953. G r a n t s with L o n g R a n g e Relation to W o r l d ' s F o o d Supply UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN AND THE STANFORD RESEARCH INSTITUTE SOLAR ENERGY The only renewable kind of energy for the earth is solar energy. 0 0 0 times the total present demand—and yet it is ineffectively used. $35>oooj Mexican Agricultural Program: to permit completion of the publications program for 1955. 3 0 0 ) . especially in the underdeveloped areas. 1955. and the development of many types of solar devices have made direct utilization of solar energy a much nearer objective. may be inadequate to meet the needs of a rapidly increasing world population. although tremendous. Madison.

Professor Farrington Daniels. from November 2 to 5. The Foundation supported solar energy studies also with a smaller. 1955. engineers. To who bring together the scientists. chairman of the Department of Chemistry. to assist in financing the attendance of foreign scientists at the first- World Symposium on Applied Solar Energy. 0 0 0 in support of the program during the nest four years. and pumps.AGRICULTURE 119 of simple. Certain aspects of the mass culture of algae. and trical energy by methods which promise hope of large-scale utilization of solar energy for both nonindustnal and dustrial areas. conceived as a means of improving living conditions in underdeveloped areas in the foreseeable future. low cost equipment for utilization of solar energy. will be among the immediate objectives. John Duffie. The development of such equipment. sponsored the symposium at Phoenix. particularly their harvesting and drying. are to be studied in addition to mechanical solar devices. assisted by Dr. California. will direct the program. the storage of elec- photosynthesis. The longer-range program includes photochemistry. The program will stress solar engines and irrigation refrigerators. The Rockefeller Foundation has made an appropriin- ation of $ 2 5 0 . in cooperation with the Association for Applied Solar Energy and the University of Arizona. the Stanford Research Institute. solar cookers. 0 0 0 to the Stanford Research Institute. Arizona. solar operated solar distillation of salt water. and with the cooperation of about twenty faculty members representing ten departments of the university. photoelectricity. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and others can contribute to furtherance of solar energy studies. Menlo Park. Field experiments to test laboratory developments and to secure basic data will be an important part of the program. one-year grant of $ 2 6 .

Gotaas. supplies. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND ALGAL STUDIES The importance of marine and fresh water algae as a : : possible source for supplementing the world's food supply has emphasized the need for more training centers for scientists in this field. The Rockefeller Foundation be demonstrated in the has appropriated $ 6 0 . ! 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The possibilities of producing large quantities of algae being : i : j : i j . For salaries. As a result of this discovery. that may result. as one of the results of which a practical way of mass producing such photosynthetic organisms as Chlorella may period just ahead.B . Robert Krauss in the Department of Botany of the University of Maryland have become a major center for research and one of the few places where students can go to acquire training in algal physiology. . and travel in connection with the project. H . The laboratories of Dr. found that it is possible to grow the algae Chlorella in sewage. which is also investigating the other usable by-products. in Berkeley. in sewage as a source of food and energy are now studied by this group. a research group under the direction of Dr. 0 0 0 to the university for a two-year period. at the University of California. such as fertilizer and dustrial water. pilot plant expansion.120 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA ALGAL STUDIES i j i In their search for a biological method to remove material from liquid wastes to permit re-use of the water fraction. of California has irrigation or in- This research at the University opened up new lines of investigation. they started a project on the culture of algae using waste products as nutrients.

To support these and related research projects. Myers and his associates plan to investigate subcellular preparations of blue-green algae in an effort to achieve the complete carbon dioxide reduction of such preparations. Dr. OTHER GRANTS University of Arizona. $ 1 0 . to search for new algae with characteristics of possible experimental or economic importance. and to develop types ideally suited for production in mass culture. Jack Myers at the University of Texas. 0 0 0 . since 1941. and to extend the training program in the Department of Botany. They are attempting to produce new strains of algae in order to gain a basic understanding of their genetics.AGRICULTURE 121 Dr. In the immediate future. Special emphasis has been placed on the large-scale production of algae for food. They are also analyzing algae biochemically for sterols. available during a three-year period. the Foundation has made a $ 3 3 . Austin. cortisone precursors. 0 0 0 grant to the University of Maryland. 1956. 0 0 0 for use during a three-year period. the Foundation has appropriated $ 3 0 . UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS LABORATORY OF ALGAL PHYSIOLOGY A program of basic research on the biochemistry and physiology of algae has been developing under the direction of Dr. Krauss and his associates are making a comprehensive study of the limiting factors in the inorganic nutrition of algae. and other chemicals of medicinal or industrial use. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and to study algal metabolism with the partial objective of securing valuable intermediate metabolic products. held in Tucson during March. Tucson: expenses of a group of scientists invited to participate in a conference on the problem of cloud physics research. Toward support of this research.

preparatory study for the organization of a Water Resources Seminar. Afive-yeargrant of $ 5 0 . County agents. as well as radio and television stations and newspapers. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . park rangers. Massachusetts: Graduate School of Public Administration. both as an educational program for the 3 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 members of the Scouts. 0 0 0 conservation projects. A report from the Scout troops involved at the end of 1954 listed as accomplished or in progress over 1 4 0 . Cambridge. will be further exConex- plored in the next five years. over 6 . and as a public information service. director. 5 8 . Tokyo. 0 0 0 meetings. 0 0 0 trees had period covered by the report. and teachers. In addibeen planted during the tion. 0 0 0 exhibits. foresters. 0 0 0 from The Rockefeller Foundation will help defray the costs of scientific advice for the project during this period.THB ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Harvard University. the "National Conservation Good Turn" program attracted over a million participants in itsfirstyear. Professor Hiroshi Tamiya. 5 0 0 . Japan: to visit research institutions in the United States. cooperate hi the program. $ 8 0 0 . $ 1 0 . and 300 television programs on conservation subjects. when the "National servation Good Turn1* idea will be continued and panded. 4 0 . Its potentialities. Tokugawa Institute for Biological Research. 0 0 0 . Special P r o j e c t s BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES Established by the Boy Scouts of America in 1954 to stimulate Scout and public interest in the importance and techniques of natural resources conservation.

Brazil. to visit the State of Sao Paulo.AGRICULTURE 123 OTHER GRANTS Fund for grants of amounts not exceeding $ 5 0 0 for allocation under the supervision of the Director. Brazil. 9 0 0 . to attend the International Symposium of the Biometrics Society. $ 3 . 1955. 2 0 0 . Gertrude M. University of North Carolina. Institute of Statistics. held in Campinas. Institute of Statistics. 1 0 0 . Snedecor. $ 2 . Cox. Des Moines. to review the organization of a research and training center of statistics. Raleigh: Professor G . $ 4 . Iowa: travel expenses of conference discussion leaders participating in a meeting held in Panama during April. 9 0 0 . Dr. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . $ 1 . 1955. during July. National Catholic Rural Life Conference.W .

Not all segments of the social sciences seem to be equally germane to the problems of today's world.THE SOCIAL SCIENCES SOCIAL SCIENCES are primarily concerned with the scientific study of human societies. and geography. economic history. man's conscious concern with his own social environcon- ment keeps changing as that environment changes. demography and population. political science. and sociology are the social sciences among the academic disciplines. new advances in related fields occur frequently and because. Economics. however. Notwithstanding all the ramifications that the scientific study of human society has come to assume in the presentday world.finally. or achieve perspective. on the one hand. Moreover. sharpen the analysis. as a whole and by segments. to be equal in the feasibility or likelihood of their making significant advances. The sequence is that the social sciences have at once a high rate of progress and a high rate of obsolescence. on the other.to be © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . This trilogy. cultural anthropology. is nowadays usually interpreted broadly to include international relations. the Foundation's program in the social sciences must necessarily be somewhat restricted. what ancillary approaches and techniques can be usefully applied to the study of man in society change rather rapidly because. along with parts of mathematics and statistics. with all their complexities and problems and in their relation to one another. legal and political philosophy. in order to widen comprehension. and.

economic. to assist in the development of social scientists and social science research in these areas themselves. the development of new analytical techniques. has done more than anything else to improve our human lot. These considerations—along with due regard to the principle of the division of labor and the practical impossibility of being concerned with everything simultaneously—have largely determined the present program in the social sciences. The program in the social sciences endeavors. No less important. or at the uncertain borders where they spill over into one another and rush on into theretofore unknown fields. of course. which call for the utmost in skill. social scientists in the more developed countries can help in this process by their own researches and by offering training facilities to their countries.THE SOCIAL SCIENCES equally pertinent in their subject emphasis and 125 geographical range to other programs of the Foundation.are rarely motivated by a concern with immediately "practical** problems. therefore. Consequently extensions of fundamental theory. imagination. some of the most valuable work is commonly at the periphery of the disciplines. The social confreres from the less developed 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . all have a high priority in the program of the social sciences. generalizing. is basic work at the heart of the central problems in any discipline. Yet the unfettered pursuit of knowledge without reference to its immediate application is central in the Western intellectual tradition and. nowadays claim a larger share of the attention of all of us. Such efforts. devotion. At the same time. over the long pull. and high intellectual competence with a certainflair. These countries are confronted with political. and social problems which probably can only be analyzed and dealt with by trained indigenous social scientists. and the synthesizing. however. however. The economically (and sometimes politically) less de- veloped countries. and integrating of theory and fact in any one social science discipline or between and among different disciplines. In the social as in other sciences.

certain major problems confronting our own society seem to be so important that they cannot be omitted from even a restricted program. analysis. surely.126 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION science program is intended to assist where it can promote both purposes. These. of course. Notwithstanding the now special claims of the underde- veloped areas and the ever-present need for significant basic work in the social science disciplines. and extend the values for which Western society traditionally has stood while at the same time assuring that it evolves and adapts to the dynamic changes which are forever arising within it and impinging upon it from without A second is how can Western societies cope with the problem of living in peace and harmony with one another and with other societies with a non-Western tradition so that man's ingenuity. knowledge. One such. too little is known about the actual workings of political democracy in a modern nation. the only known route to their possible alleviation is through research. and reflection by human beings. vitalize. are the main strands of the program in the social sciences as the officers see it for the days immediately ahead. that these congeries of problems are solvable in the sense that a problem in machine design is solvable. and skills can work towards improving his spiritual and material well-being instead of their nullification. The Social Sciences as Scientific Disciplines UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SURVEY RESEARCH CENTER Although Americans are deeply attached to democratic political institutions. Among the many efforts now being made to increase understanding 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . All the same. then. among them social scientists. is how to preserve. No one sup- poses.

and attitude concerning candidates. position on leading political issues. Increasingly determined and vigorous efforts to raise living standards in areas of dense population and slight industrial development are directing attention to relationships between population and resources. With the aim of developing a general theory of voting behavior based on observations of actual voting behavior and tested under varying circumstances.THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 127 of democratic political processes. he will examine the influence of political ideology. of identification with major economic. During 1955 The Rockefeller Foundation made a grant of $i 1 0 . Building on a similar study he made of the 1952 election with the sponsorship and assistance of the Social Science Research Council's Committee on Political Behavior. none. and especially to the need for better knowledge of the effects of social and economic change on human populations. and religious groupings. Professor Campbell will explore the underlying motivational factors which influence the political participation and partisanship of American voters. 0 0 0 to the University of Michigan to support this study for a three-year period. Professor Angus Campbell. In addition to analyzing the relative importance of party identification. PRINCETON UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF POPULATION RESEARCH The need for increased study of population problems in areas of great present or potential population pressure has been widely recognized. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . perhaps. and of certain personality characteristics. is more important than that concerned with the electoral process. for here the citizens' interest and participation are most directly and widely engaged. director of the Survey Research Center of the University of Michigan. social. is planning to study the voting behavior of a national cross section of voters in the 1956 presidential election.

During the next few years the office plans to direct its research interest primarily toward studies of relations between population and economic change. the Netherlands. Population Index. Since 1 9 4 4 The Rockefeller Foundation has con- tributed a total of $ 3 5 8 . Continuing this long-term interest in population problems. HARVARD UNIVERSITY ECONOMIC RESEARCH Since Professor Wassily Leontief originated the concept of input-output analysis in 1936. and government agencies in the United States. and particularly international demographic problems. provides facilities and consultation to visiting foreign scholars and others concerned with population problems. established in 1936. Input-output analysis is based on the concept that in 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . A number of other countries are planning to initiate similar studies in the near future. There is now a large literature on the subject. 0 0 0 toward support of the office during the next ten years. It serves as a clearinghouse for research workers in the field. Norway. the Office of Population Research publishes the bibliographical quarterly. and India have undertaken input-output analyses of their economies. and is the principal university center in this country for the training of foreign students and visitors in demography. Great Britain. and gives training and younger men research supervision to at both the pre. the Foundation in 1955 appropriated $ 5 0 0 .and postdoctoral levels. Italy. with special reference to underdeveloped countries. In addition to its research program. it has won wide recognition as a useful tool in economic research. 2 0 0 to Princeton University for the program of the Office of Population Research.128 The THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Office of Population Research of Princeton Uni- versity. Canada. has become one of the leading university organizations in the United States for the study of population problems.

wage changes. it is possible to test the hypotheses developed against a wealth of empirical dafa and thus. for example) from disposes of its "outconcept other segments of the economy. depending upon the number of economic units included. as the work proceeds. SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL FELLOWSHIPS The Social Science Research Council's research training fellowship program. investment. theory is being brought into increasingly close conformity with the data.to six-year period. and of tracing the effects of changes in any one part on all the other parts.THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 129 any economy in which there is specialization of function or division of labor. The permits the preparation of tables or matrixes of varying complexity. A 1955 grant of $ 2 4 0 . which show the fabric of the economy and how its parts are woven together by the flow of trade. A large part of their future research will be directed toward determining to what extent subsequent technical progress. 0 0 0 from The Rockefeller Foundation to Harvard University will support Professor Leontief's research during a three. national in scope. affect the relationships in input-output analysis. Although these studies are theoretical. and puts" (its product) to certain other segments. consumers' expenditures. is maintained exclusively for advanced training for research in the social 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Professor Leontief and his associates have gone beyond the analysis of a single economy to studies of interregional economic analysis. toward a more careful analysis of the dynamics of technological change. These provide a useful method of examining the interrelationships between the different parts of a modern economy. each industry or economic unit draws its "inputs" (raw materials for its product. and other factors. changes in relative costs of inputs. and so on.

be administered with a view to offering each appointee the particular kind of opportunity which seems best calculated to advance his development as a research scholar. The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 appropriated $ 4 8 5 . economic. the council's fellowship program is widely recognized to have been a major factor in the development m this country of a distinguished body of productive research workers in the social sciences. OTHER GRANTS Japan Sociological Society. under the direction of Professor Ernest W . The Foundation and the for- mer Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial have aided the program continuously since its establishment. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . therefore. Massachusetts: Laboratory of Social Relations. studies of factors which contribute to the basic social. or the kind of training for which appointments may be made. Burgess. $ 8 . Cambridge. Tokyo: studies of social stratification and social mobility in Japan. University of Vienna. Leopold Rosenmayr. Social Science Research Laboratory. It can. but is otherwise unrestricted as to disciplinary field. 5 0 0 . 0 0 0 to the Social Science Research Council to extend for an additional three years its support of the research training fellowship program. $ 1 3 . area of substantive interest. Because both the advancement of knowledge of human affairs and its effective application to social problems depend on the development of increasing numbers of well-trained social scientists for research and teaching posts. 0 0 0 . Illinois: study of adjustment during the middle years of marriage.130 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION sciences. the importance of the program is as great as in earlier periods. and political views of major groups in Vienna. 8 2 0 . advanced research training of especially promising young men in the laboratory. University of Chicago. Austria: Department of Sociology. $ 1 0 . 0 0 0 for a two-year period. Harvard University. In operation since 1925. $ 9 . under the direction of Dr.

or research posts concerned with the Far East. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Since that time a number of important studies have been published under the auspices of the institute. teaching. England. which advises the Foundation on the selection of fellows in the social sciences from Australia and New Zealand. Barback. Oxford . the Netherlands. P. Canberra University College. Ronald H . $ 9 0 0 . 7 6 0 ) for a three-year period. Shmichi Ichimura. and the United States. 4 0 0 .THE SOCIAL SCIENCES Fund for grants of amounts not exceeding $ 5 0 0 for allocation under the supervision of the Director. and 27 former students are working in government. The institute has emphasized in Its program the devel- opment of research in the social sciences oriented toward the Far East. $ 1 . $ 5 . 400 Australian pounds (about $ 9 0 0 ) . England: to visit American universities and economic research centers. Institute of Social and Economic Research. 0 0 0 . Japan: Dr. The Quest for Economic Development COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY EAST ASIAN INSTITUTE The East Asian Institute of Columbia University be- gan its work in 1949 with the twofold aim of preparing a limited number of graduate students as regional specialists on China and Japan. to visit research centers in econometrics in Italy.2OO Australian pounds (about $ 2 . l. and has included in its curriculum work in history. senior lecturer in economics. Bauer. Osaka University. T . and advancing general knowledge and understanding of East Asia through an integrated program of teaching and research. Australia: to complete studies at Nuffield College. Australia-New Zealand Fellowship Committee: toward the expenses of this committee. University of Cambridge. lecturer in economics.

and a research and publication program which has produced a number of important works. with earlier appropriation. 1959. the best library in public administration in the Far East. and of serving as a training center for other Southeast Asian countries faced with similar problems in public administration in connection with their development programs. During the next four years the institute plans to continue to strengthen its course offerings in the social sciences. To assist the institute during an important period in its Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 approfunds remaining from an development. With vigorous leadership and the assistance of the Philippine and United States Governments and the University of Michigan. The priated $ 9 5 . © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . to intensify its summer language program. the institute has developed a full-scale academic program leading to both undergraduate and graduate degrees. It plans also to invite one or two young specialists to participate in research and teaching at the institute for a year as part of their own advanced training. and to continue its program of visiting professors and lecturers. will be available during the period ending June 30. UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION The Institute of Public Administration of the Univer- sity of the Philippines was established in 1952 for the purpose of improving public administration within the Philippines.132 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION language. and literature. Far Eastern specialists from other institutions in the United States and the Far East have been brought to Columbia on visiting appointments to supplement the teaching and research activities of the permanent staff members. 0 0 0 which.

Until recently there has been no means of accurately measuring the effectiveness of these programs. 5 0 0 graduate students from countries of the free world were assisted by the International Exchange Service of the United States Department of State in their studies at American educational institutions. Stuart Cook. For the further strengthening of its program. the Institute of Public Administration wishes to send two staff mem- bers to the United States for study for one year each. to bring two senior American specialists to Manila for one year each. and Thailand.THE SOCIAL SCIENCES The 133 institute began by giving intensive in-service train- ing to some thousands of government employees. Of this number approximately 1 . For several years the service has provided for the students who come to the United States under its sponsorship an orientation program designed to facilitate the student's adjustment to life and work on an American campus and thereby make his study experience more rewarding. 0 0 0 from The Rockefeller Foundation will be used for these purposes during the next two years. More recently it has shifted its emphasis toward the preparation of instructors within the government who ployees. however. 0 0 0 foreign students came from all parts of the world to study in American colleges and universities. These programs are carefully prepared to meet the needs of the students in understanding their new environment. In 1954. A grant of $ 6 8 . Indonesia. During the course of this study he plans to compare a substantial 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . director of the Research Center for Human Relations of New York University began a study of the ascertainable effects of the programs. the institute is also training students from Burma. NEW YORK UNIVERSITY STUDY OF FOREIGN STUDENT ORIENTATION PROGRAM In 1955 more than 3 5 . will train other em- Through a scholarship program. and to purchase books and periodicals. Dr.

Under the leadership of its director. In 1955 The Rockefeller Foundation made an outright grant of $ 1 5 0 . During recent years the National Planning Commission and other departments and ministries of the Government of India have turned repeatedly to the institute for research assistance on these and similar problems and for trained personnel. The institute has pioneered in field investigations and analyses of a considerable number of factors which affect Indian development. the work has been oriented toward the solution of India's present-day political and economic problems and toward the development of materials on Indian rural and urban life and institutions. including the economic effects of irrigation. agricultural marketing. The results of this study should prove of value to all agencies concerned with programs of foreign student exchange in this country. 0 0 0 to the Gokhale Institute. appropriated $ 1 5 . land reform. D . and a growing corps of technical assistants and field investigators. payable as re- © 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . The staff includes several younger social scientists trained at the institute. Dr. 0 0 0 to New York University.1 3 4 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION sample of the students who attended the State Department course with a closely matched sample of students who did not attend. India. farm accounting. The greatest present need of the institute is sufficient assured income to maintain a core staff and research program on a longer-range basis than is possible with temporary grants and contracts for specific projects. R. in 1955. is a major independent center for social science research and the training of young Indian social scientists. Gadgil is attempting to build up an endowment fund during the next few years to secure the stable income required for these purposes. Gadgil. Toward the costs of this study The Rockefeller Foundation. Dr. and population. GOKHALE I N S T I T U T E OF POLITICS AND ECONOMICS The Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics in Poona.

As the work at the center has progressed. is industrial development a continuing process in some societies while in others with comparable capital resources it is virtually absent? During the next three years the center will undertake a study. An equal amount of atten- tion has been given the broad political problems associated with development in the three countries. which it is hoped will provide thefinancialbase needed for the development of a permanent staff and research program while the institute builds up its endowment income. to save and to invest savings in industry. and entrepreneurial careers. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and then check these hypotheses against the historical experience of industrialized countries. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES The Center for International Studies directed by ProF . it has become increasingly apparent that noneconomic factors arising from the value system and social structure are more important than was realized initially. 1965. Millikan at the Massachusetts Institute of fessor Max Technology has been engaged since 1952 on comprehensive studies of economic development in India. Why. for example. The to engage in research group will examine existing theories. under the direction of Professor Everett E . Italy. and the relations between industry and agriculture. and the current experience of countries now bent on development. Hagen. and Indonesia which have involved comparative economic analysis of such factors as investment plans and capital formation. of the factors which encourage the development and spread in a society of the motivations conducive to economic development—motivations which prompt people throughout the society to seek and to accept technological innovations. development of an industrial labor force. the more recent experience of Japan and Russia.THB SOCIAL SCIENCES 135 quested through December 31.

Indonesia. In 1955 The Rockefeller Foundation appropriated appear- $ 1 5 0 . 0 0 0 from The Rockefeller Foundation to the University of Chicago will support the field studies during a three-year period. and other countries. A grant of $ 2 0 . One part of the project will consist of studies concen- trating on three Tagalog agricultural communities. with special reference to their social and cultural characteristics and differences.THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION In their work the group at the center will have the assistance of an advisory board of economic historians and specialists in cultural anthropology and sociology. in cultural anthropology with special reference to the Philippines. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . with the object of revealing the complex of activities in the area. both Filipino and American. the interrelation of these to the larger economy. Italy. Also planned is a socio-economic study of a Bisayan fishing community. designed to supplement its research program and also to reveal the social and cultural factors which are importantly related to plans and programs for the economic development of the Islands. and the ways in which they are changing under the impact of Western technology. UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO PHILIPPINE STUDIES PROGRAM The Philippine Studies Program directed by Professor Fred Eggan was established at the University of Chicago in 1953 for the purposes of accumulating research materials and data of a cultural-anthropological nature on the Philippines. and of training younger scholars. and of a small number of scholars commissioned to do special studies of innovation and entrepreneurship as they are now ing in India. and their relationship to the central govern- ment. The program will now undertake field studies at the village and regional level in several Philippine communities. 0 0 0 to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to support the study during the next three years.

THB SOCIAL SCIENCES OTHER GRANTS

137

Selection, purchase, and shipment of books in the social sciences to the Library of Political and Social History, Djakarta, Indonesia; $ 7 , 3 5 0 ; University of Baroda, India: Department of Sociology; a study of Mahuva, a small coastal town in the State of Saurashtra; 33>22O rupees (about $ 7 , 3 * 5) I Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois: Dr. Francis L .K . Hsu, professor of anthropology; to study in India the relations between Hindu values and way of life; $ 6 , 9 0 0 ; Stanford University, California: Nobushige Ukai, Tokyo University, Japan; to serve as visiting professor in the School of Law and the Department of Political Science

during the calendar year 1956; $ 6 , 7 0 0 ; Shinzo Kaji, professor of economic geography, Tokyo University, Japan; to serve as visiting professor for an additional six months; $ 2 , 5 0 0 ; University of Lucknow, India: Dean R. U . Singh, director, Institute of Public Administration; to visit centers of public administration in Southeast Asia, the United States, Europe, and the Near East; $ 5 , 0 0 0 ; Tokyo Institute for Municipal Research, Japan: Reiichi Kojima, chief of operations and acting chief of research; to study the organization and administration of municipal research and of large cities in the United States and Europe; $4,150; Kobe University, Japan: Ki'nji Tanaka, professor of economics, School of Business Administration; to visit the United States; $ 3 , 2 2 5 ; Keio University, Tokyo, Japan: interdisciplinary studies of problems of Japanese fishing villages; 1 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 yen (about $ 3 , 0 0 0 ) ; University of Wisconsin, Madison: completion of a study of the economic development of Japanese agriculture with respect to land tenure from 1868 to 1953, by Professor Motosuke Kaihara; $ 2 , 3 0 0 ; University of Calcutta, India: Amlan K. Datta, lecturer in economics; to study for three months in the United States; $2,125 J The American Society of International Law, Washington, D .C . : an

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THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Conference, held in Washington dur-

International Investment Law ing February, 1 9 5 6 ;$ 2 , 0 0 0j

University of the Philippines, Quezon City: to bring an American sociologist to the university for two years of teaching and research; $ 1 , 6 0 0 ; University of Ceylon, Colombo: Mr. and M r s . Rudolph Wikkramatileke; to study in Western Europe problems of human and ecoomic geography; £ 4 7 3 (about $ 1 , 4 2 5 ) J University of Melbourne, Australia: Miss Mary M. Bayne, senior lecturer in economic geography; study in Japan of problems of economic development; $ 1 , 0 0 0 ; Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana: Nathaniel B . Tablante, agricultural economist, Philippine Department of Agriculture and

Natural Resources; to complete studies in agricultural economics at Purdue; $ 1 , 0 0 0 ; University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill: Dr. Gordon W . Blackwell, director, Institute for Research in Social Science; to attend the International Conference on Regional Planning and Development at Bedford College, London, England, September 29 to October 2,

1955; $ 7 0 0 .

Social Science Problems of Contemporary Western Society

COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS, INC. RESEARCH ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS The Council on Foreign Relations, which has received

financial assistance from the Foundation since 1928, seeks to bring the country's best intellectual resources to bear on contemporary international problems. During the last 25 years, through the efforts of a membership including responsible diplomats, business and professional men, former government officials, and established scholars, it has come to play

a unique role in the field of its interest.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

THE SOCIAL SCIENCES The

139

council has developed important techniques for

identifying emergent problems before they become matters for public policy. To throw light on these problems both before and after they are fully apparent, to seek their solution, and to facilitate on an international basis the exchange of ideas and opinions about them, are among its major objectives. Through formal and informal discussion and meetings, an study

important part of its program, the council of affairs,

helps to bridge the gap between scholars and men

giving scholars greater access to the practical knowledge and experience of leaders in government and business, and practitioners greater access to the counsel of academic authorities. The council's publications include a quarterly journal,

Foreign Affairs, The Political Handbook of the World, and an annual volume, The United States in World A fairs. Over the last 25 years it has published more than 40 special

studies including Newton D . Baker's Why We

Went to

Warf Henry L . Stimson's Far Eastern Crisis, and a twovolume history of United States foreign relations from 1939 to 1941, The War Challenge to Isolation and The Undeclared S . Everett

by Professors William L. Langer and

Gleason. To aid the council's research program during the next

decade, in part through a contribution to the costs of research leadership on a full-time basis, The Rockefeller Foundation made an outright grant in 1955 of $ 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 .

HAGUE ACADEMY OF INTERNATIONAL LAW CENTER FOR STUDY AND RESEARCH IN INTERNATIONAL LAW AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS The Hague Academy of International Law, established shortly after World War I with substantial support from

the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, provides unique opportunities for study and research in the field, Be-

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

I4O

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION

cause the Hague is also the home of the International Court of Justice, the academy has been able to number among its lecturers distinguished jurists, scholars, and publicists of international l a w . Available to students at the academy are

the 3 0 0 , 0 0 0 volumes on public and private international and comparative law and international relations contained in the Library of the Peace Palace. In past years the emphasis of the Hague Academy has been on the training of large groups of students in the fundamentals of international law through public lectures.

Better to prepare able young scholars in international law, the academy now proposes, through the establishment of a Center for Study and Research in International Law and

International Relations, to stress the intensive training and individual research of perhaps a dozen promising young scholars with advanced university degrees or considerable practical experience in international affairs. Under the supervision of two directors for studies, the group will explore both current issues in international law and the more fundamental problems involved in the search for viable norms for conduct in international relations. In 1955 The Rockefeller Foundation appropriated

$ 1 2 2 , 0 0 0 to the Hague Academy of International Law for use by the new center during afive-yearperiod.

UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Two previous grants from the Foundation have helped

the Committee on International Relations at the University of Notre Dame carry on a research program with special emphasis on cultural, political, and in international relations. Under its first chairman, the late Dr. Waldemar philosophical problems

Gurian, the committee focused on Soviet and East European

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

THE SOCIAL SCIENCES affairs in connection with its interest in the rise of political religions and their impact on the conduct of foreign afiairs. At the same time, through symposia, visiting professorships, lecture programs, and special seminars, it has from the beginning tried to foster student and problems of international relations. In addition to more than 50 articles, thefive-mancommittee has published ten major books in the last five years. Its articles appear regularly in the Review of Politics^ a journal devoted to the history and philosophy of international relations and characterized by Walter Lippmann as "having very few equals and no superiors in the Englishspeaking world in the serious discussion of international politics." Recently the committee's work on the Soviet and Eastern Europe has been taken over by specialists on Eastern Europe working independently in a separate center at Notre Dame, and a new orientation for its own research in the next five years has been proposed. The dilemma of liberal and democratic governments in formulating and carrying out foreign policy, especially contemporary as reflected in the conduct of community interest in

foreign policy, will be studied.

The com-

mittee expects also to continue and

bring to fruition coII and on

operative research on the origins of World War

the political significance of military and diplomatic decisions
in the war.

Dr. Stephen Kertesz, author of Diplomacy in a Whirlpool, will direct the program. A former Hungarian diplomat and scholar, Dr. Kertesz assumes the responsibilities carried on for a number of years by Dr. Gurian, while Dr. M. A. Fitzsimons, historian and analyst of British foreign policy, becomes the new editor of the Review, The Rockefeller Foundation appropriated $ 1 0 0 , 0 0 0

in 1955 to the University of Notre Dame in support of the committee's work over the nextfiveyears.

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142

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE FELLOWSHIPS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Broader and more integrated training in international

relations than has previously been given in any of its single departments will be offered by the London School of Economics and Political Science under a new program now being developed. The school's work in international relations has been

recognized throughout the world. Its resources for teaching in this field include a distinguished tradition associated with the names of Professor Hersh Lauterpacht, Sir Charles Webster, and Lord McNair; substantial course offerings in the Departments of tional Law, International Relations, Interna• | i '

International Economics, and International

History; and established work in the comparative study of governments in the Department of Government. Taken together, and coupled with the work being done at the school in relatedfieldssuch as anthropology, sociology, and demography, these are the elements from which the new program will be developed. As a key part of the project, the London School in the next five years plans to award a limited number of predoctoral and postdoctoral graduate fellowships to promising young scholars who wish to broaden their training in intertraining

' j j ' ;

;

national affairs across the boundaries of single departments. The Foundation has appropriated £ 1 8 , 4 0 0 (approximately i '

$ 5 5 , 2 0 0 ) to support this fellowship program.

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY INTERNATIONAL LAW To reappraise international law in the light of new ! j

social, political, and economic findings drawn from the study of international politics is the common object of three activities planned for an 18-month period by the Department of

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THE SOCIAL SCIENCES Public Law and Government of Columbia University.

143 The

Rockefeller Foundation appropriated $ 2 4 , 0 0 0 to Columbia in 1955 for these activities. Professor Julius Stone of the University of Sydney, Australia, will visit the Columbia campus during the academic year 1955-56. Professor Stone is a leader of the legal realism school of jurisprudence—sometimes characterized as sociological jurisprudence—which emphasizes not only the importance of law as a creative force, but also the importance of the nonlegal factors which obstruct or favor its effectiveness. Sir Zafrulla Khan, recently appointed judge of the International Court of Justice, will also join the Columbia staff for a temporary period. A former foreign minister of Pakistan, his first-hand experience of international law in relation to the problems of new especially valuable. The third part of the program involves research and following a nations makes his perspective

travel by Professor Philip C . Jessup, who,

period of public service, will devote himself to exploring further thefieldsmarked out in his earlier books.

UNIVERSITY OF HEIDELBERG POLITICAL SCIENCE The University of Heidelberg has developed since the end of World War II one of the most active centers in Ger-

many for teaching and research in political science. Under the direction of Dr. Dolf Sternberger, the university has organized a seminar and research program on parliamentary government with special attention to the structure and functioning of political parties in multi-party political systems. This work is now being focused especially on the legal

status, political roles, and influence on legislation of opposition parties in various European countries and during different periods in Germany,

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

1 4 4 To

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION strengthen and expand the research and teaching

program, the university has appointed Dr. Sternberger to the post of Honorarprofessor in the philosophical faculty, and has invited Professor Carl J. Friedrich of Harvard

University to ofier advanced courses in political science in the Faculty of Law during half of each academic year until

a suitable permanent appointment can be made. The Rockefeller Foundation, which has assisted the political science program at the University of Heidelberg during the past three years, in 1955 renewed its support with a grant of $ 3 7 , 1 5 0 , available during the period ending October 31, 1958.

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN STUDY OF TAX ADMINISTRATION Major dependence upon income tax for public revenue in the United States places high importance on the effectiveness of tax administration. In 1952, for example, approximately 80 per cent of federal, and 60 per cent of total tax revenues — federal, state, and local—came from income taxes. Important questions of tax policy depend in part on the quality of tax administration, for the presumed equity of the income tax can be seriously impaired by its uneven administration with respect to such major segments of income as wages, farm and professional income, rent, interest, and dividends. In the State of Wisconsin, which has had a long and full experience with income tax, Professor Harold M.

Groves of the University of Wisconsin is conducting a twoyear study of tax administration in Wisconsin with the close cooperation of the State Tax Department. The research includes detailed studies of the effectiveness of tax administration as regards major segments of income, an appraisal of present administrative procedures, and a study of the possibilities for their improvement,

© 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

$ 5 . 0 0 0 to the University of Wisconsin. Armstrong and Ernest Lefever. lecturer in Far Eastern History and Professor 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Baltimore. Poughkeepsie.THE SOCIAL SCIENCES Toward the costs of this program. $ 9 . S. Armstrong. Continuation of research into the classical background of modern political theory. Additional expenses of research in international relations by Professors John P. New York: A study of British-Soviet-American relations from 1 9 4 0 to 1947* by Dr. University of Michigan. Harvey. 0 0 0 . by Professor William B. Completion of studies of Thomistic legal and political thought. 0 0 0 . $ 1 0 . $ 5 . New York: a study of foreign policy making in Ceylon. Howard Wriggins. by Ernest Lefever. by Professor Robert D . Columbia University. Ann Arbor: continuation of studies in the field of jurisprudence in England and Germany. Purcell. 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 for a two-year period. 8 0 0 for a two-year period. $ 9 . by Professor Emeritus Dino Bigongiari. 4 0 0 . $ 5 . Study in the field of jurisprudence. $ 4 . $ 1 0 . by a member of the Law Review staff. Johns Hopkins University. OTHER GRANTS Vassar College. School of Advanced International Studies. by Professor John P. 4 0 0 . 0 5 0 . $ 1 4 . held during the 1955 summer session. Victor W. Gumming. during the summer of 1955. W. $ 6 . $ 5 0 0 . The 145 Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 granted $ 3 6 . Research in the area of ethics and foreign policy. Conference on Nationalism and Progress in South and Southeast Asia. A senior seminar in the theory of international politics. Dr. by Assistant Professor W . 8 5 0 . Herbert Feis. 5 0 0 . Maryland: Comparative study of the foreign policies of two recent Secretaries of State of the United States.

8 3 0 . by Professor Louis J. by Professor J. Aspaturian. 4 0 0 ) . $ 7 . continued study of Anglo-American law at the University of Chicago Law School. University of Utah. 9 0 0 . Columbus: research on the problem of political power and political values. 5 0 0 . by Professor William H . $ 2 .1 4 6 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Extra-Mural Southeast Asia Studies. $ 7 . Professor Jaroslav Mayda. by Professor Edgar Bodenheimer. University of the Saar." by Professor Arnold Wolfers. by Assistant Professor Vernon V. Department of Economics. Yale University. 0 0 0 . Oberlin College. Tufts. University of Wisconsin. 0 0 0 . University of Virginia. 0 0 0 French francs (about $ 8 . Saarbriicken: research on problems of FrancoAmerican relations contributing to the establishment of a theory of foreign policy. to serve as visiting lecturer during the first term. Salt Lake City: research and writing in the field of jurisprudence. $ 9 . $ 7 . $ 8 . University of Cambridge. chairman. Halle. © 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation .. Ohio State University. Sewell. $ 2 . 8 0 0 . Ohio: study and research toward completion of his doctorate in international relations. England. $ 6 . by Professor Robert W . Charlottesville: research on the history of limited warfare and the evolution of America's responsibilities in the Far East. 7 4 0 . Madison: Exploratory study of talent loss in the United States. Pennsylvania State University. Duroselle. 2 9 5 . Politics and Peace Strategy. Social Science Research Committee. New Haven. B. 19551956. by Professor David Spitz. 5 0 0 . 5 0 0 . Research in the field of jurisprudence by the Law $ 7 0 0 . $ 6 . 2 . $ 9 . Connecticut: research on "Power Review staff. University Park: research into the role of Soviet ideology and national interest in the formulation of Soviet foreign policy. 0 0 0 . Jr. A research seminar on problems in the law of land use control.

$ 4 . $ 5 . Hart.365. Pennsylvania: completion of research on the origins of political realism in sixteenth-century Italy. University of Oxford. Riker. New York: Robert B. $ 5 . Bryn Mawr College. by A. A. 0 0 0 . Middletown. 5 0 0 . $ 4 . University of Missouri. to serve as visiting professor of jurisprudence at Harvard. $ 5 . Korea. Honore. 4 0 0 . under the direction of Professor C . Looper. Philadelphia: Studj of the British concept of the judicial function. Schwartz. University of Pennsylvania. 0 0 0 .E . Lively. by Professor Sigmund Neumann. Berkes. 1 0 0 . Oxford. $ 2 . $ 2 . 2 4 5. Cambridge. on the legal problems of the welfare state. former judge of the Seoul District vestment. by Kyu Dai Court. 0 0 0 . Connecticut: research on the role of parliamentary parties in foreign policy formation. Massachusetts: Professor Herbert L . 4 0 0 . Columbia: completion of a study of the rural church as a social institution in Missouri.THE SOCIAL SCIENCES Harvard University. 4 0 0 . University of Southern California. $5. Los Angeles: comparative study of attitudes and policies of Great Britain and the United States toward contemporary Asiatic problems. Queen's College. A study of the assumptions and goals of European criminal law. Lawrence College. $ 1 . Wisconsin: continuation of research and writing on the political theory of Federalism. research at Nuffield College. Appleton. New York University. by Professor Paul J. by Professor Felix Gilbert. M. study of legal aspects of international trade and inJoe. by Professor William H . Law School. $ 5 . by Professor Ross N. Wesleyan University. England. $ 5 . Mishkin. England. England: continuation of research on causation in the law. University of Oxford. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . by Professor Louis B. $ 6 . 5 0 0 . 4 0 0 . Studies in the field of jurisprudence by members of the Harvard Law Review staff.

$ 3 . $ 2 . 1 7 5 . Princeton University. England: Dr. New York: program of discussions on re- cruitment for the United States foreign service. 0 0 0 .1 4 8 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION University of California. held in Washington during October. 1955. Switzerland: to visit American universities. Yosal Rogat. Wriston. $ 3 . Berkeley: Comparative study of the party systems in Great Britain and Switzerland. Wood. American Historical Association. Gilbert Frank Gilchrist. by Dr. Sewanee. England. 0 0 0 . by Professor John Bowditch. University of Cambridge. to visit Southeast Asia. Foreign Policy Association. Minneapolis: study of the development of the concept of total war in the period from the eighteenth century to the present. Woodrow Wilson School. $ 4 . 8 0 0 . 7 0 0 . D . Illinois: studies in the field of jurisprudence by members of the Chicago Law Review stafi. international studies centers. $ 1 . S. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and libraries. : a meeting to discuss problems related to German war documents now in the United States. Washington. Purcell. W . 4 0 0 . $ 2 . 5 0 0 . $ 4 . to be conducted by Henry M . 4 0 0 . University of Chicago. University of the South. President Emeritus of Brown University. $ 1 . Professor Takeo Horikawa. lecturer in Far Eastern history.C . University of Minnesota. director. New Jersey: Center of International Studies. 2 3 0 . 7 5 0 . Hiroshima University. translation by Professor Percy E . $ 4 . $ 3 . Neal N. $ 8 0 0 . Japan: research in international relations in the United States. Stanford University. Tennessee: continued research on the political writings of James Harrington. Graduate Institute of International Studies. California: studies in the field of jurisprudence by members of the Stanford Law Review. continued study in the United Kingdom of academic Marxist thought in contemporary Britain. Professor Jacques Freymond. Dr. 9 0 0 . 0 0 0 . Geneva. Victor W. $ 2 . Corbett of Judge Charles de Visscher's Theories et Realties en Droit International Public and ks publication in English. supplement to previous grant for study of comparative private law at the University of Oxford. $ 1 . by Professor Leslie Lipson.

and how to understand. and Special Actually. As a result. the major universities of the world have evident advantages in the enduring character of their 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . $872. each country is host to a profusion of impressions. philosophical.224 was for Intercultural Studies. and attitudes How regarding other cultures. and the arts. grants are listed under Humanistic four major headings: Research.575 for Special Projects.151 for the Arts.THE HUMANITIES N THE humanities. and $390. except for the primacy of this aim. linguistics. mainly in the humane aspects of higher education. of which $1. For such studies. grants which aim usually depend on at intercultural understanding linguistic historical. presumptions. nearby and remote. Humanistic Research. Projects. Arts. $354. might as well be listed under the more general heading. INTERCULTURAL STUDIES During the last decade.601.622. to judge.651 for other projects of Humanistic Research. To contribute to such knowledge is the aim Rockefeller of the intercultural studies supported by The Foundation for more than two decades. and research and. Appropriations for 1955 totaled $3. The Intercultural Studies. The Rockefeller Foundation is now mainly concerned with history.239. philosophy. For the purpose of reporting. interaction among the people of the world has developed at a spectacular rate. how to deal with different peoples require as never be- fore knowledge of the forces and ideas at work in all parts of the world.

and ethics which are the concern of millions from North Africa. India.Muslem and non-Muslem. How widely universities are recog- nizing intercultural studies as an opportunity. The emergence of inter-university 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 . and in the possibility of broadening and enriching their educational offering. In undertaking such studies they not only contribute to knowledge but train others for its pursuit. Great Britain. has made it a respected and congenial center for the critical scrutiny of the prob- lems of Islam. Selected scholars. older and younger. Egypt. for its part. During 1955 the Foundation continued to aid in the development of American studies in universities outside the United States with grants totaling more than $ 3 0 0 . which. through the Near East. in their established library services. Also observable is the growth of cooperation and effective communication among universities in countries distant from each other. The work of the in- stitute since its establishment in 1951. to Pakistan and Indonesia. with the result that new knowledge and perspectives are quickly shared. and Japan. the institute deals with problems of theology. has long maintained a program of Japanese studies. and an obligation. Turkey. In its study of Islam as a religious and cultural phenomenon of the modern world. and there is a constant flow of information and insights between the institute and scholars iii thefield. France. from those areas work at the institute. politics. These considerations are reflected in the Foundation's grant of $ 5 1 0 .I5O THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION effort. One such grant provides for cooperation in this effort be- tween two Japanese universities at Kyoto—Kyoto University and Doshisha University—and the University of Michigan. is illustrated by grants made during 1955 in countries other than the United States including Canada. despite its geographical distance from the Muslem world. 0 0 0 to McGill University in Canada for the work of its Institute of Islamic Studies. in their scholarly resources.

studies of modernization in the Arab States and in Turkey. responsible journalists have been concerned with its fulfillment of this function. philosophy. and a conference on historical writing on Southern Asia. A grant of $ 9 4 . The foregoing emphasis on university or inter-univer- sity enterprise implies no possible disregard for the contribution of the individual scholar or of small groups of scholars. and Southeast Asia. 0 0 0 to expand its program of international conferences and the inter- change of personnel.THE HUMANITIES 15! concern in the development of American studies is marked by grants to the German Association of American Studies. For the general development of intercultural under- standing. The International Press Instiaided in 1951 by the tute. received a further grant of $ 1 0 0 . Grants of this type represent a considerable range of subjects. and linguistics can contribute to the in- dividual's better understanding of his past. Oxford. a study of the cultural and literary history of Thailand. and his intercommunications with his 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Two of their efforts to enhance the contribution of the press to intercultural understanding were aided by the Foundation during 1955. 0 0 0 enables the American Press Institute of Columbia University to include in its seminars editors from Latin America. at which the British Association of American Studies was organized. a study of the problems of linguistic policies. there is probably no greater force than that of the press. the Near East. more than ever. his position in the world of thought. and recently. including a comprehensive description of the Russian language. the establishment of which was Foundation. HUMANISTIC RESEARCH Grants reported in this section reflect the continuing interest of the Foundation in what scholarly research in history. and for a summer conference held at University College.

A grant to the university will enable a younger prove parallel or con- scholar. The may financial needs of humanistic research. linguistics. approved in 1955. and mathematics. travel 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . One such institution is . whose earlier work had prepared him for this task.152 fellow men. More generally. Professor Federico Chabod. Dr. may vergent. but in the training it affords. for example. are no less crucial: typically. and economic history of the city. approved in 1955. A grant of $55. THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Three major grants illustrate the range of For years Professor Jean Piaget of the University of Geneva has worked on his now well-known studies of how knowledge comes to being in the minds of children. A grant.the Italian Institute of Historical Studies. while they seem modest by comparison. to his university enables him during the next two years to study how the outcome of his earlier work relates to the development of knowledge in such fields as logic. Missouri. R. its outcomes should contribute substantially to a better understanding of the historical development which the emergence of cities of metropolitan character in the United States represents. Richard Wohl. while different. established in Naples by the late Benedetto Croce and now directed by his associate. with those of the sciences.ooo. From time to time an institution emerges in which humanistic research assumes new dimensions and new penetration. the scholar in the humanities needs time for research and writing. by the Committee on Human Development of the University of Chicago came to the point where they needed the background which could be provided by a social. continues earlier support of its work. Studies of Kansas City. to have the necessary time and assistance to carry it through. this interest. largely through the collaboration at Geneva with consultants whose approaches to this problem. Its influence comes to be felt not only in its publications. cultural.

more often than not because funds to finance an experiment were lacking. THE ARTS In the arts. there seems to be consensus on one strategic need. and. and in a larger measure of public support for them after the necessarily limited period of Foundation aid. a 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .THE HUMANITIES 153 to consult with others or to bring them to consult with him. Certainly. and differ further region by region and country by country. the aim is not patronage but assistance which will result in a broader enjoyment of the arts. in the United States. For such an effort there appear to be few precedents. to work toward its achieve- ment. without disregard of promising opportunities elsewhere. state support. contributions to make up current deficits. the assistance of younger scholars who dentally. With the exigencies of publishing what they are. that for fellowships which may enable writers of promise. the problem is somewhat different. Such assistance as the arts have ordinarily received has been in the form of subsidy: in many countries. the Foundation is still primarily concerned with how it can assist in the develop- ment of the arts in the United States. who yet won have not general recognition. As grants reported under this heading indicate. inci- problem for a foundation is to discover instances in which money can meet these needs. In the case of literature in the United States. The assumption seems to have been that the arts cannot survive without such subsidy. The can. there is no over-all pattern for assistance which might help the arts to enhance their situation: the problems of each art are different. The For Rockefeller Foundation. learn by working with him. with reasonable promise of significant results. library resources and a desk to work at. in some cases. But all too rarely has an attempt been made to explore the contrary proposition.

the decentralization of awards through several such agencies.. and to achieve a larger measure of public support. will test the possibilities of its offering concerts in more communities of the Bay Re- gion. the earlier grants to The Kenyan Review and The Sewanee Review were extended another three years in 1955. Much of the larger audience for music conies as it gains young recruits: a grant to Young Audiences. A strategic need in music in the United States appears to be advanced training for conductors: the feasibility of arranging it is being tested under a grant to the American Symphony Orchestra League. Accordingly. an art may develop in a new location. Different needs in different arts are illustrated by three grants in music. California. The Kenyan Review and The Sewanee Review. To offer an enjoyment of music to more people. but with somewhat differing points of view. those to the Art Institute of Chicago and to the San Francisco Museum of Art for an extension of their services in lending original paintings to the schools. two smaller grants in another art are noteworthy. all with high literary standards. In this regard. performing organizations must reach a larger constituency: a grant to the Little Symphony Society of Berkeley. providing for a total of 16 awards a year during this period. A three-year experiment with the award of literary fellow- ships through two literary reviews. or in a new direction. Finally. A grant to the Virginia Museum of Fine © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . seems to assure a fair allotment. and similar grants were approved to The Hudson Review and to the Partisan Review early in 1956. will determine the extent to which its concerts in the schools can be expanded with this outcome. seemed to show merit: the editors of such magazines are sufficiently close to coming writers to judge whose work would most benefit from an award in any given year.154 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION further in the practice of his writer must apparently go art than formerly before his work attracts a reading public. Inc.

in the United States and elsewhere—and is keenly aware of the disparity of its resources and the magnitude of those The needs. and others concerned with radio. or. By this same token.THE HUMANITIES Arts in Richmond will help in discovering how 155 a state insti- tution devoted to the arts in general can bring drama within the scope of its activities. what might be termed the humane how grants aspects of higher education. Though drama and religion have been closely linked. selective rather than systematically inclusive as to recipients. It is for such reasons that the assistance of Rockefeller Foundation in the arts must remain relatively modest. the larger possibilities of religious drama seem not to have been realized in the United States: a grant to the Union Theological Seminary of New York will allow an exploration of these possibilities by students. less formally stated. The Foundation can hardly confront the apparent need of subsidy. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . clergymen. in terms of approved. The Foundation is keenly aware of broader needs in the arts. SPECIAL PROJECTS While the principal interests of the Foundation in the humanities remain those of the three preceding headings. individual students may become more individually involved in the process of higher education. As implied. and the theatre. the Foundation cannot neglect other "special" opportunities. the grants here reported cannot be regarded as precedents for other grants. the Foundation may ing its way be said to be learn- in the arts. it can only help a few agencies in the arts to explore ways in which these seemingly persistent needs may he resolved. In recent years these have comprised. strategic rather than remedial in character. with few precedents for guidance. In all probability only the general principles they embody are constant. television. of patronage.

with a sympathetic understanding of its values and meaning. It has been concerned with discovering and exploring possible avenues of mutual understanding between Islam and Christianity. it is to be expected. Canada.and postdoctoral fellowships to the Humanities Research Council of Canada. For example. Canada shortly. have a similar bearing. each in its own way. the Institute of Islamic Studies of McGill University. and history. Montreal. the Foundation made what is to be regarded as its final contribution toward the advanced training of humanistic personnel in Canada through a grant for pre. and has sought to develop a program which would give students an opportunity to supplement disciplined and scientific knowledge of Islam. Other grants under this heading.156 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Perhaps the desirability of such involvement is most urgent in higher education that is predominantly scientific or technical. formulations. has given special emphasis to the study of Islam as both a religious and cultural phenomenon of the modern world. Thus. Fundamental to the institute's approach to the interpretation of Islam has been cooperative study by both West- © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . with its growing resources will meet for itself its own needs in the humanities: pending these develop- ments. the major grant of 1955 under this heading was to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the development of a course in which the study of man and society has a more important place than is usually the case. Intercultural Studies MCGILL UNIVERSITY INSTITUTE OF ISLAMIC STUDIES In the four years since its establishment in 1952. its institutions.

and Modern Trends in Islam in India and Pakistan —and the curriculum includes formal courses on the heritage of classical Islam. and languages. 0 0 0 ) . In 1953 a Master's degree in Islamic Studies was established by McGill. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . For general support of the Institute of Islamic Studies. particularly Northeast Asia. and Musleras are represented also in the student body. and for this purpose Muslem scholars have been invited to the institute to participate in both teaching and research. Under the leadership of Professor Wilfred C . Since thefirstdecade of the twentieth century the university has included work on the Far East. Turkey. geography. has led to a natural concern with the Far East at the University of Washington—a concern which is reflected in local business and public interest. 0 0 0 (about $ 5 1 0 . The grant will be used primarily to ensure the continuation of Muslem participation on the staff of the institute. The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 made an outright grant of € $ 5 0 0 . and for further library acquisitions. and Pakistan. the Development of Secularism in Modern Turkey. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON RESEARCH ON NORTHEAST ASIA Its location in Seattle. the director. and by the end of the academic year 1954-1955 six theses for the degree had been accepted and three more were in preparation. an important port for commerce with the Orient and increasingly a point of entry for visitors by air. current work at the institute centers in three research seminars—Islamic Developments in the Modern Arab World. At present the staff includes visiting professors from Egypt. with the understanding that during an initial ten-year period the university will expend only the income from this fund. Smith. Islamic history. in its curriculum. for travel to and from the Muslem world.THE HUMANITIES 157 erners and Musleras.

and Korea—and Central Asia involve professors in a considerable number of different departments. Initiated in 1952 as a summer seminar. Through emphasis on the Soviet Far East. political science. the Amer- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . KYOTO UNIVERSITY. each for half of the school year.I <J8 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Both the teaching and research programs on Northeast Asia—China. and Far Eastern and Slavic Languages and Literature. Taylor. and coordination of the research projects is provided by a Far Eastern and Russian Institute directed by Professor George E . Russian studies at the university are closely integrated with the work on the Far East. During the summer months when both are in residence. The Foundation's grant has been made with the understanding that during an initial ten-year period the university will hold the principal of the fund intact. offering regular courses at the two Japanese universities on American affairs and thought. the American studies program has since developed into a yearround activity. In 1955 the Foundation appropriated $ 2 5 0 . and expend the income only as it is matched by funds received from other sources for the same purpose. including history. with two American professors. DOSHISHA UNIVERSITY. Doshisha University. and the University of Michigan. economics. The Rockefeller Foundation has long supported pro- grams in American universities contributing to more adequate American understanding of and relations with the other countries of the world. AND THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM One of the two leading American studies programs in Japan is that maintained in Kyoto under the sponsorship of Kyoto University. Japan. anthropology. 0 0 0 as an outright grant to assist the University of Washington in stabilizing the programs on Northeast Asia and in recruiting able leadership for the work.

both formal and informal. are employed as methods of instruction. ranging from university doctoral candidates to judges. Since the organization of the Salzburg Seminar in American Studies. 7 0 0 Europeans. professors. for example—• have recently been added to the curriculum. 4 0 0 . the Foundation in 1955 supplemented these earlier appropriations with grants of 1 5 . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Recently provision was included in the program for visits by Japanese professors to the University of Michigan. for periods of four weeks. At other times during the year. to provide for its continuation during the next three years. 0 0 0 to the University of Michigan. intensive attention is given to a single subject. music and art. and civil servants of established position. the seminar has offered a unique opportunity for scholarly and objective study of American civilization. more than 1 . international relations and law. and sociology. seminars. In response to the needs of its students. which has long maintained a Japanese studies program. and $ 8 4 . INC. During the summer months the seminar offers instruction in American literature. in 1 9 4 7 . theatre. To the many mature Europeans who are unable to visit the United States. Since 1952 The Rockefeller Foundation has given regular support to the American studies program.. Lectures. economics.THE HUMANITIES 159 ican professors cooperate with Japanese professors in organizing and teaching the summer seminar. political science. 0 0 0 yen (about $ 4 6 . other subjects —American labor and industrial relations. and discussions. have studied various aspects of American life and thought at the seminar under the direction of 150 visiting American professors. Inc. 0 0 0 ) for the use of the joint Kyoto University-Doshisha University Committee on American Studies. history. SALZBURG SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES.

The present grant brings to a total of $ 3 2 8 . 0 0 0 during 1955. It publishes the L P . The feller Foundation appropriated $ 1 0 0 . 0 0 0 to the Salzburg Seminar for use during the next five years. of newspapers devoted to the principles of freedom of the press. and special reports. a monthly bulletin dealing with current developments in international journalism. Switzerland. the Interna- tional Press Institute has sponsored during the past few years a number of bi-national discussions among journalists. In addition to its own annual meetings. It is hoped that with a stronger financial base it'may be possible for the institute to serve effectively the free press in all parts of the world. notably a series of surveys on such topics as The News from Russia and The News from the Middle East. the Proceedings of its annual General Assemblies. 0 0 0 the amount contributed by the Foundation toward support of the seminar. INTERNATIONAL PRESS INSTITUTE Established in 1951 with the aid of funds from Rockefeller Foundation and The from other sources. Its membership is composed of staff members. L Report. Another special publication was a major study entitled The Flow of the News.l6o During THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION 1955 The Rockefeller Foundation made a grant of $ 1 2 5 . a portion of which is contingent upon the institute's securing increased amounts in dues and donations from the press. and has encouraged exchanges of ideas and personnel. the Inter- national Press Institute. Zurich. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . To help the institute expand its program of internaRocke- tional conferences and exchanges of personnel. is an autonomous agency representative of and supported by the free press of the world. bearing responsibility for editorial and news policies.

the editors will spend several weeks working with both small and large newspapers in cities whose economies might be similar to those of the guests' homes. and its secre- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . ECOLE PRATIQUE DES HAUTES ETUDES AREA STUDIES The Sixth Section of the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes. In addition to discussions at the Institute. The foreign editors have observed and discussed such aspects of journalism as the functions of a newspaper in its community.THE HUMANITIES COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY AMERICAN PRESS INSTITUTE l6l The American Press Institute of Columbia University has since 1948 conducted during the summer months nine seminars for foreign journalists chosen each year from a different country or region. SIXTH SECTION. in 1955 appropriated $ 9 4 . and Islamic worlds. Under the leadership of its president. which has given support to the earlier seminars. Paris. Slavic. The seminar program has combined training in and discussion of the principles and tech- niques of a free press with practical experience on selected American newspapers. and the operation of both large and small newspapers. the Near East. Each year editors from Latin America. the relations between government and the press. A program planned for the next five years by the in- stitute represents an important extension of these earlier seminars. or Southeast Asia will be invited to the institute for study designed to meet the special needs of the press in their particular region. has become the most active French center for study of the modern Asiatic. established in 1947 to combine theoretical instruction with training and research in history and the social sciences. 0 0 0 toward the costs of the expanded program. The Rockefeller Foundation. Lucien Febvre.

and Islamic studies at the Sixth Section. 0 0 0 in 1955 toward its continuation during the next three years. and distinguished scholars drawn from many fields have been associated with the area studies programs. and other phases of the study are expected to be similarly pioneering. The central purpose of the Harvard project is an in- tensive examination of the Russian language under six categories: sound pattern. Collaborative courses and research projects have been organized. which in 1950 con- tributed $ 5 0 . The work already published has set new standards for the integration of anatomy and acoustics in speech analysis. and travel and fellowships to the United States. The Rockefeller Foundation. © 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 toward the Russian language project at Harvard University. sentence pattern. appropriated $ 3 0 .162 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION tary. and cultural and political problems. Professor Fernand Braudel. vocabulary and phraseology. The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 appropriated $ 6 0 . Carried on in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures under the direction of Professor Roman Jakobson. the strengthening of library resources. which will be used primarily for research grants for both staff and students. the study has had the participation of scholars from other Harvard units and from many universities in the United States and Europe. stylistics. To a s s i s t in the development during the next two years of Asiatic. 0 0 0 . the section has developed the interdisciplinary approach and group cooperation necessary to effective study of other cultures. Slavic. HARVARD UNIVERSITY RUSSIAN LANGUAGE RESEARCH In 1950 Harvard University began a study of the Russian language which is unusual both for exhaustiveness of analysis and for cooperative effort by specialists from a wide variety of disciplines. word pattern.

centers of research on the history and culture of Canada have been slow to develop. Through the cooperation of faculty members representing various disciplines. as well as grants to younger scholars for aid in teaching and 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 5 0 0 . made of Rochester in assist the University strengthening the Canadian studies program during the next five years. In 1952. To develop its work in Canadian history. the University of Rochester became thefirstAmerican university to undertake a long-term commitment for work on Canada. language. Its activities include meetings and conferences on the place of American studies in German universities and scholarly work in the field. long recognized as a leading scholar in Canadian history and the author of a distinguished volume on French Canada. Its library resources in the field are being expanded. and economics. the university is organizing a systematic program in Canadian studies in its College of Arts and Science. GERMAN ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN STUDIES The German Association of American Studies was formed in 1953 for the purpose of furthering the development of American studies in Germany. will grant of $ 3 7 . and in the summer of 1954 thefirstof a series of conferences on Canadian-American relations was held.THE HUMANITIES UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER CANADIAN STUDIES 163 Although in recent years universities in the United States have inaugurated area studies programs dealing with almost every region of the globe. the university has appointed to its faculty Mason Wade. history. A during Rockefeller Foundation 1955. motivated by the belief that Americans should achieve greater awareness of a country linked to the United States by facts of geography.

The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 appropriated 9 0 . and toward the costs of research grants and conferences. EGYPTIAN SOCIETY FOR HISTORICAL STUDIES Within the past few years a number of conferences have been held in the Arab countries to discuss ways in which Arab scholars can contribute to a better interpretation of Arab tradition. $ 2 4 .An introduction and a summary of the period since the end of the war will be provided by Dr. covering the period from thefirstdecade of the nineteenth century to the outbreak of World War I I . economics. Brian R. the book will explore developments in Egypt. The volume. which has given previous support to the Arab studies conferences. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Mohamed Shafik Ghorbal. 0 0 0 for a twoyear period. held in 1954 by the Egyptian Society for Historical Studies. thought. The Rockefeller Foundation. THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Recently the association has begun publication of a Yearbook. language and literature. Syria. in 1955 appropriated 6 . and Iraq. A plan for a volume on significant aspects of modernization in the Arab world emerged from the most recent of these conferences. religion—written by Arab specialists in thesefields. 5 0 0 Egyptian pounds (about $ 1 9 .1 6 4 research. While the majority of the contributors will be Egyptian. As a contribution toward the association's general expenses. Elliott. senior lecturer in English literature. 5 0 0 ) to the society to make possible the preparation of the proposed volume. Australia: development of a Program in American Studies through studies in the United States by Dr. will include chapters on a variety of topics—social structure. Lebanon. Jordan. 0 0 0 )f o r u s e during a three-year period. 0 0 0 German marks a n d$ 7 . 5 0 0 ( a b o u t$ 3 0 . and outlook. OTHER GRANTS University of Adelaide.

$ 8 . and the cultural scene in the Near East. $ 8 . by Professor Uriel Weinreich. 0 0 0 . 3 8 5 . under the direction of Professor C . editors. William J. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . under the direction of Professor Bisheshwar Prasad. University of Delhi. New Haven. New York: A study of problems of linguistic policies.130 for a two-year period. Research on comparative problems in the study of standardized languages. to visit Southeast Asia and to study relations between countries in that area and Japan. Philips. dean. New York. 5 0 0 . to study the literary situation in India and Great Britain through contacts with writers. Ithaca. and to obtain a direct acquaintance with writers. $ 1 0 . University of the South. Yale Review. India: research and training in modern Indian history. Connecticut: Professor Chitoshi Yanaga.125. 0 0 0 . Duri. Iraq: research by the Arts Faculty under the direction of Dr. $ 2 3 . Turkish American University Association.THE HUMANITIES 165 University of London. $i 5. Language and Communication Research Center. College of Arts and Sciences. editor. Sewanee. Columbia University. 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 for a two-year period. $ 6 . $ 1 0 . England: a conference on historical writing on Southern Asia. director. Yale University. $ 1 0 . $3. editor. University College. A. Cornell University. Gedney. School of Oriental and African Studies. Tennessee: Monroe K. $ 1 2 . 5 0 0 . University of Oxford. including a trip to Asia in the summer of 1 9 5 6 .the development of modern Turkey. A. under the supervision of Professor John Lotz. Istanbul: preparation of a book on . The Sewanee Review. John Palmer. critics. by Dr. $ 2 1 . New York: a study of the cultural and literary history of Thailand since 1830. 0 0 0 .H . and editors. travel in connection with planning a writing seminar for scholars. England: a conference on American studies and fellowships in American studies. Baghdad. publishers. 0 0 0 . Spears.

0 0 0 . Georgetown University. language. $ 6 . $ 2 . Switzerland: Professor Rene Rapin. by Richard P. McKinnon. Uriel Heyd and Dr. $ 5 . : Institute of Languages and Linguistics. 2 0 0 . Massachusetts: Toward the appointment of Dr.L . research in language and international communication by Edmund S . Glenn. Jerusalem. study of the Muslem Brotherhood. $ 3 . Seattle: Study of modem literature and drama in Japan. 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . by Dr. Silliman University. Dumaguete. 3 5 0 . $ 4 . 1. University of Washington. 3 0 0 .C . Study of relations between the Soviet Union and the Muslem world. Professor Rasvihary D a s . New Jersey: preparation for publication of a related problems in educational research in Ceylon. 5 5 0 ) . by Dr. Green. $ 4 . Hebrew University. India. the Philippines: development of library resources on other countries in Asia.500 Australian pounds (about $ 3 . 5 0 0 . Australia: development of its library collection on Indonesia. University of Lausanne. by Dr. 5 0 0 .166 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Acquisition of a collection of objects and lantern slides relevant to the modern culture of China. University of Calcutta. Helen A. 0 0 0 . to teach Indian philosophy at Harvard during the academic year 1955- 1956. Colombo: to consult with scholars in Great Britain and the United States on values. University of Melbourne. Rivlin as a research fellow in the Center for Middle Eastern Studies. Mitchell. Cambridge. Richard N . Israel: studies of Near Eastern history. and $ 3 . Professor T . $ 6 . Washington. $ 2 . D . $ 3 . 0 0 0 . Ivar Spector. 8 7 5 . 5 0 0 . David Ayalon. University of Ceylon. 2 0 0 . Princeton University. Harvard University. $ 5 . research in the United States on American literature and observation of American academic procedures.

McGill University. 5 0 0 . 8 0 0 ) . Far Eastern Association: meetings of its Committee on South Asia on ways to promote South Asian studies in the United States. Henri Chambre. $ 2 . related re- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Blythe. to travel in South and Southeast Asia to study the relations of these areas with Australia. $ 2 . 6 5 0 . $ 2 . 5 0 0 .THE HUMANITIES 167 Mohamad Rasjidi. 5 0 0 . Clark. former colonial secretary in Singapore for the British government. Professor Jean Train. Gainesville: staff travel in the Caribbean area in connection with development of the university's library collection. $ 1 . Walter Wallbank. by P. 1 0 0 . and Mrs. $ 2 . Montreal. $3>i45>* Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes. 8 0 0 ) . Singapore: study of Chinese societies by W . Clark. University of Florida. Los Angeles: a study of the recent history of India and Pakistan. Department of History. Sixth Section. France: Professor Fernand Braudel. Canberra University College. University of Southern California. Indonesian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Canada: conferences to be held during 1956 to develop studies of Pakistan in Canada and the United States. 800 Australian pounds (about $ 1 . to visit the United States in connection with the development of area studies programs and search. University of Cambridge. Australia: Professor Charles Manning H. £928 (about $ 2 . University of Malaya. 0 0 0 . by Professor T . to obtain a direct acquaintance in the United States with the organization of area studies programs and related subjects.L . 6 5 0 . Djakarta: to study in Paris and to visit other countries en route. P. $ 2 . Pans. to visit the United States in connection with the teaching of Russian in area studies programs. $ 2 . van der Loon. England: completion of a Union List of Chinese Ts'ung-shu in British and Continental collections. R. $ 3 . 5 0 0 .

Dr. AND LOGIC During the past thirty years Professor Jean Piaget of the University of Geneva. Professor William C . Hideo Kishimoto. University of Glasgow. $525. held in Montreal during November. to visit the Arab countries to gain a direct acquaintance witb Near Eastern studies. Turkey: Dr. Karnatak University. $ 1 . has become recognized as one of the most original and perceptive scholars in © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Japan: research by Dr. and for the purchase of books. Harrrit Dereli. 2 5 0 . professor of English. and culture. literature. Paul Stirling. Dharwar. Atkinson. A conference to promote study of Pakistan in the United States and Canada. Tokyo University. Turkey: Dr. University of Ankara. Switzerland. to visit centers of study of American literature in the United States. Scotland: continuation of studies in the history of Latin American literature. $ 1 . professor of law. England: continuation in Turkey of a study of the social structure of Turkish peasant communities. Faculty of Letters.j 6 8 THB ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION University of Istanbul. $ 1 . 2 5 0 . Osman Okyar. PHILOSOPHY. University of California. $ 1 . Hifzi Timur. Dr. $ 5 0 0 . $ 5 5 0 . $ 4 0 0 . to visit the Arab countries to gain a direct acquaintance with Near Eastern studies. 1955. 2 0 0 . decent in economics. lecturer. professor of religion. $ 6 0 0 . Humanistic Research UNIVERSITY OF GENEVA PSYCHOLOGY. Berkeley: collection and distribution in the United States of information on current research and teaching on South Asia. A. 0 0 0 . India: books on language. London School of Economics and Political Science.

The interdisciplinary collaboration proposed promises both to carry the work forward. and which he wishes to explore with specialists in these fields. In the course of his research he has endeavored to determine precisely the progressive stages by which a child acquires knowledge and control of the world around him. he has formed ideas which appear to be significantly related to current studies in psychology. physiology. 0 0 0 Swiss francs (about $ 6 9 . communication theory. and the philosophy and history of science. as well as other necessary expenditures. To his work Professor Piaget has given the term "genetic epistemology"—the study of knowledge as it develops in the growing human child. D . 0 0 0 ) to the University of Geneva to cover the expenses of visiting specialists in various fields and of a symposium for approximately ten scholars from other universities. As Professor Piaget has pursued more deeply his study of the development of abstract thought in children. and to assist in the wider communication and use of its results. The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 appropriated 2 8 8 . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . which will be undertaken by the Committee on Human Development of the University of Chicago. Dur- ing *955 a third grant was made to support a similar study of Kansas City. from hisfirstkaleidoscopic sensations to his eventual comprehension and use of abstract concepts. logic. Rockefeller Foundation in 1954 gave support to sevthe development and distinctive eral studies focusing on characteristics of New York and Washington. Missouri. UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO STUDY OF KANSAS CITY Because the emergence of cities of metropolitan character is one The of the striking features of American history.THE HUMANITIES 169 the field of child psychology.C .

directed by Dr. will explore the social. 5 0 0 will be available for expenses of the study during the next three years. Richard Wohl. the institute has become a major center for the training of younger Italian historians. ITALIAN INSTITUTE OF HISTORICAL STUDIES Since its establishment in 1946 by the late Benedetto Croce. has played an increasingly important role in postwar Italian intellectual activity. Now under the distinguished leadership of Professor Federico Chabod. Naples. and have been recognized as contributing importantly to historical research. R. and the changing urban mode of life from that of an inland frontier community to an air transportation center with growing national and international contacts. Associate Professor of the Social Sciences. and is receiving a steadily increasing number of requests from foreign students who wish to study at the institute. particularly in the field of modern history. associations. and a number of its former students have received appointments in Italian universities. the Italian Institute of Historical Studies. the institute also admits each year from five to eight students from other European countries and the United States. Seven volumes by faculty members and students have been published during the past five years.. Although its enrollment is limited to approximately thirty students. noted historian and philosopher. and in the creation of an urban way Among the subjects of study will be the influence on its history of the city's location on the rim of the Great Plains. and economic history of Kansas City with the aim of tracing the development of the city's life as it is reflected in economic change and in the emergence of the city's institutions and growth. cultural. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The Foundation's grant of $ 6 4 . the varying responses made over the years to the challenge of its environmental opportunities. voluntary of life.1 7 0 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION The University of Chicago study.

by Miss G . preparation of a history of the Americas. Canada: Studies in the life of W. $ 1 3 . Pennsylvania: continued research on the British Empire before the American Revolution. 8 5 0 ) . M. McGill University. 9 0 0 . travel and research in the field of eastern European studies. $13. 1960. Mexico City: Commission on History. completion of translation and editing for publication of Ludwig Wittgenstein's manuscripts. Montreal. Stanislas Kot. Bethlehem. research on the history of the Reformation in Poland and Lithuania. Walsh. 7 0 0 ) for a three-year period. 0 0 0 . by Dr. $ 8 . Pan American Institute of Geography and History. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Wolff.500. 0 0 0 (about $ 1 7 . $ 2 1 . under the direction of Dr. to be used for the acquisition of library materials. Atlanta University. Georgia: a study of religion m Rushton Coulborn. Mackenzie King. Gipson. by Professor Lawrence H . 2 5 0 . OTHER GRANTS Lehigh University. Massachusetts: Professor Robert L. Anscombe. H. under the direction of Daniel Cosfo Villegas.$7. by Professor H.THE HUMANITIES The Rockefeller Foundation. Completion of study on religion in Canadian history. professor of history. which has contributed toward the support of the Italian Institute of Historical Studies since 1 9 4 9 . fellowships for foreign students. made a further grant in 1955 of $ 5 5 . 8 8 0 for a two-year period. by Dr. Silvio Zavala. University of Oxford. C $1 7 . $ 2 . £ 2 . $15. 0 0 0 for a three-year period. Cambridge. 9 0 0 {about $ 8 . Colegio de Mexico. and travel by both staff and students during the period ending September 30. Mexico City: research and a training seminar on contemporary Mexican history. L . England: St. E.500. Antony's College.000 for a twoyear period. history. Harvard University. Somerville College.

9 0 0 . India: study of the main trends of cultural and social development in twentieth century Bengal. American Philosophical Association. University of Chicago. Germany: to strengthen its program in linguistics. Waseda University. Literary Society of Bengal.OOO Philippine pesos (about $ 3 . 2 6 4 . by Professor Herbert Spiegelberg. Philippine Women's University. Western Division. by Professor David H . Lawrence College. $ 4 . by Professor Masato Hori. Greene. purchase of books needed to complete his history of modern Dutch literature. Appleton. Tokyo. Wisconsin: completion of a book on phenomenology.1*72 Dr. New York University. $ 6 . 6 4 0 ) . M. to continue philosophical studies in the United States. THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Paul Zifi assistant professor of philosophy. Manila: preparation of a biography of General Emilio Aguinaldo. 5 0 0 . $ 1 . Nippon University. Japan: comparative study of mysticism in English. Synge. $ 6 . $ 2 . Japan: research on the impact of the Japanese Military Administration on the Indonesian Independence Movement. Irish playwright. 6 0 0j © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . University of Hamburg. Illinois: Research in American historiography. Kansai University. Tokyo. Gambier. 2 9 0 . under the direction of Shigetada Nishijima. and Oriental literatures. $ 6 . 0 0 0 rupees (about $ 2 . Ohio: continued exploration of promising new approaches in political and social philosophy. New York: Preparation of a biography of J. 0 0 0 . 5 0 0 . o o o . preparation in Great Britain and Italy of a book on the philosophy of art. Professor Seymour L . Flaxman. by Carlos Quirino. Osaka. $ 4 . by Sibnarayan Rayj 1 2 . 6. Professor Seizo Ohe. $ 6 . by Eric McKitrick and Stanley Elkins. 5 0 0 . Japan. $ 5 0 0 . Calcutta. American. o o o ) . $ 3 .

F . Providence. 5 0 0 . $ 1 . under the direction of Professor Yoshitake Oka. Princeton University. 5 0 0 . Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. Labib Habashi. $ 7 0 7 . Japan: language study by Pro1 fessor Takenosuke Miyamoto. New Jersey: study of contemporary philosophy in German-speaking countries of Europe. Egyptian Service of Antiquities: to consult with Egyptologists in Europe on the interpretation of the Kamose stela recently discovered at Karnak. Massachusetts: a study of the papers of Sir Mark Sykes and related materials in Great Britain. $ 2 . Twaddell. 6 0 0 . The Arts KENYON COLLEGE AND THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH CREATIVE WRITING FELLOWSHIPS The contribution which the award of fellowships can make to the development of personnel in the scientific and humanistic disciplines has long been recognized. by Miss Jane Harbaugh. consultation and cooperation with German linguists at the University of Hamburg. Brown University. $ 2 . In most of these fields awards are made for advanced study and re- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Medford. 4 5 0 . Rhode Island: Professor W . $ 1 . by Professor Walter Kaufmann.THE HUMANITIES 1 7 3 Tokyo University. Dr. inspector of antiquities in Upper Egypt.OOO| i Tokyo Union Theological Seminary. Japan: development of its library collection of political biographies. $i.

applications for these fellowships will be accepted by the editors only on their invitation. however. During 1955 the Foundation made grants to two leading American literary reviews to enable them to continue the award of fellowships initiated three years ago with Foundation assistance. formal study. 2 0 0 available to Kenyon College. or supervision. those responsible for the programs are prepared to give fellows such professional guidance and may assistance as they request. The THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION manner in which creative writing can be fostered. One grant makes $ 5 2 . Early in 1956 the Foundation followed the grants to Kenyon College and the University of the South with similar appropriations for fellowship awards by the editors of the Partisan Review and The Hudson Review. In the administration of the fellowship programs. 2 0 0 . for the award by the editors of The Kenyon Review of approximately four fellowships yearly during the next three years. also for $ 5 2 . which best suits his individual Rockefeller For several years The Foundation has sought to encourage and assist creative work in literature through grants to other agencies for fellowships in creative writing. will provide for a similar number of fellowships yearly to be awarded by the editors of The Sewanee Review of the University of the South. Although the awards offered by the reviews involve no requirements of residence.174 search. Ordinarily. but rather for the opportunity to practice his art in the way needs and aspirations. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . for the writer's need is not for a program of study. the four journals have the advantages of wide acquaintance with the current work of younger authors and the tradition of long-standing devotion to high standards of literary excellence. has been less clear. Sewanee. The second grant. Ohio. Gambier. Grants have been made to four different literary reviews in the hope that this decentralized approach would encourage both diversity of point of view and wider geographical distribution in the award of fellowships. Tennessee.

another project to extend its public service beyond the limits strictly conventional for a state museum. and often supported by the established church. built in part by private contributions. and the maintenance of a satisfactory program during an initial three-year period. unusual expenses.THE HUMANITIES VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS COMMUNITY DRAMA PROGRAM The Virginia 175 Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. whose "Artmobile"—a gallery on wheels used to display museum collections throughout Virginia—attracted national attention two years ago. the expenses of a professional staff. been closely linked with religion. drama has. In an attractive new theatre with a seating capacity of about 550. Drawing upon the experience of notable British and American directors 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . in most cultures and times. A portion of the grant was a contribution to a capital fund to be drawn on to meet special and talent. has now initiated a community drama program. informed by religious ideas. the museum's officers are developing a community drama program under professional guidance but relying chiefly voluntary participation. such as occasional visiting UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY PROGRAM IN RELIGIOUS DRAMA Since its earliest origin in religious ceremony. Toward initial equipment on costs. the Union Theological Seminary in New York has planned an experimental program in religious drama. 0 0 0 . Church-sponsored performances still constitute an important part of dramatic activity. In an effort to raise standards of religious drama in the United States. and to provide clergymen responsible for community dramatic activities with training and experience. The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 made an outright grant to the museum of $ 1 5 0 .

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION and playwrights. include a period at Tanglewood among their educational experiences. to be used during the next four years toward expenses of visiting staff. and television in New religious drama. years later the orchestra opened a school at Tangle-wood where more than 4 . scholarships. The new course will be available to regular students at the seminary. have since studied orchestral performance. site in the Berkshire Hills in 1 9 3 8 . and a drama workshop where three productions will be prepared during each semester. and to those concerned with theatre. and necessary equipment. A considerable proportion of the personnel of the major United States symphony orchestras. To assist the Union Theological Seminary in inauguRockefeller York who are also interested in rating the program in religious drama. 0 0 0 students. and many others active in the field of music in this country. 0 0 0 . and composition during the summer months. radio. to directors of religious drama who will be encouraged to come to the seminary for a year or more of study. the program will consist of a general course on religion and the arts with special reference to drama. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . In a substantial number of instances this has been made possible by the school's generous scholarship policy. chamber music. The Foundation in 1955 appropriated $ 5 5 . a course on technical problems of production. Efforts are now being made to broaden the base of support for the fund throughout the country. BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA TANGLEWOOD REVOLVING SCHOLARSHIP FUND The shire Boston Symphony Orchestra gave thefirstBerkconcerts on their present Tanglewood. opera. choral singing. including several hundred from other countries. Two Festival Massachusetts. for which the Tanglewood Revolving Scholarship Fund was set up some years ago.

Half-hour programs based on recordings ran for 13 weeks in 1954 on a major United States radio network. one of the special values of which has been its combination of direct financial assistance to individual composers with the assurance of a broad public hearing for their work. The society had carried on these activi- ties to a lesser extent for a number of previous years. performing. aided by a grant of $ 4 0 0 . It is hoped that the contingent nature of the grant. Over 20 of the commissioned orchestral works and one opera have been recorded and issued to subscribers following their performance in Louisville. and recording new music. the United States 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and subscriptions for the record series are held by more than 20 broadcasting systems in other countries.THE HUMANITIES The 177 Rockefeller Foundation assisted the Boston Sym- phony Orchestra with the costs of opening the Berkshire Music Center in 1940. and in 1955 appropriated $125. LOUISVILLE PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY. will be helpful in stimulating an increase in the capital of the fund. INC. In addition. NEW MUSIC BY LIVING COMPOSERS The undertook Louisville Philharmonic Society two years ago a major project to encourage contemporary composers by commissioning. and 20 for student compositions. 0 0 0 from The Rockefeller Foundation. a number of the commissioned pieces have been performed by other orchestras both in this country and abroad. four for short operas. Under its new program. They have also received general hearings through records. 0 0 0 raised each year from other sources for the same purpose. In addition to their initial performance. which is payable in amounts equal to the sura in excess of $ 1 5 . the society has awarded 73 commissions for orchestral works.000 to the orchestra for the center's scholarship fund.

Inc. 1956. INC. are given in schools.. available over five years. but have also provided a wider base of support for musicians. Inc... 0 0 0 .178 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Information Agency has purchased 117 sets of the first records issued for its libraries overseas. Toward the costs of expanding the program. has aroused in both audiences and musicians has been such that local and regional groups are rapidly developing to carry it on in different communities. has sponsored more than 350 chamber music concerts directed primarily toward the musical interest and experience of children. YOUNG AUDIENCES. These concerts have not only brought live music to a larger number of American communities than could be reached by touring orchestras. The musicians explain the properties of their instruments and of the music they are to play. The majority of concerts booked by Young Audiences Inc. The enthusiasm which the program of Young Auinvite their young audiences to ask diences. AMERICAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA LEAGUE. Since 1952 Young Audiences. the Foundation has appropriated $ 7 5 . Usually afirstfree demonstration concert is followed by several concerts paid for by interested groups such as Parent-Teacher Associations. and questions. INC. has sponsored a series of workshops for the 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .. ADVANCED TRAINING FOR CONDUCTORS For several years the American Symphony Orchestra League. The Foundation in 1955 concluded its assistance to the project with a grant of $ 1 0 0 . $ 2 5 . Of the new grant. 0 0 0 was a contribution to a revolving fund established by the society in connection with the program. 0 0 0 . available with funds remaining from the earlier grant through June 31. Inc.

West Virginia. and discuss various problems of conducting with the orchestras' regular conductors and leading members. and played with notable success at both public performances in Berkeley and San Francisco and private chamber music concerts in the homes of its members. California. The Rockefeller Foundation appropriated $ 4 9 . the Little Symphony Society of Berkeley. During the next three years the league will make arrangements for three conductors to work both with major symphony orchestras and professional opera of master companies. direct the orchestras. To provide richer mu- sical opportunities for additional small communities in the San Francisco Bay area. Charleston. with the expenses of the grant includes a modest contribution to- new program. LITTLE SYMPHONY SOCIETY OF BERKELEY Since its organization in 1951. the Little Symphony has undertaken to expand its activities to other localities which can reached without extensive travel. The ward the costs of the participating orchestras. Because the experience of the Little Symphony suggests a possible solution to the complementary problems of 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . intensive training in their art not ordinarily available to musicians in this country. Inc..THE HUMANITIES conductors of smaller orchestras which have 179 proved beneficial in raising standards of conducting throughout the United States. has developed an supporting membership now numbering nearly active 2 0 0 . Under the close supervision conductors. as well as better support for its an effort be musicians. the "apprentice" conductors will participate in rehearsals. 5 0 0 in 1955 to assist the American Symphony Orchestra League. Its experience with the workshops has suggested to the league a program which will offer a few of the most promising younger conductors an opportunity for final.

These records. OTHER GRANTS Silliman University. CONNECTICUT COLLEGE SUMMER SCHOOL AND FESTIVAL OF THE DANCE The Connecticut College Summer School and Festival of the Dance. by Miss Priscttla V. Dumaguete. available for use at other institutions throughout the country as well as at Connecticut College.180 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION achieving a wider base of support for small concert ensembles. 9 0 0 for a two-year period. $ 1 3 . 0 0 0 to assist the Little Symphony in establishing the personal contacts needed to augment its membership and to include in its concert schedule a larger number of small communities. and of increasing the availability of live sym- phonic music in communities unable to meet the high booking costs of major symphonies. The college will experiment with filming and notation by the new system. Such leaders in modern dance as Martha Graham and Doris Humphrey will personally direct the presentation and own productions. "Labanotation. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . will record and publish the choreography of a number of modern dance productions in the next several years. and performance of Philippine musk. The Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated $ 2 1 . Magdamo. The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 approprirecording of their ated $ 3 3 . one of the principal centers of instruction in modern dance in the United States. recording. will provide the beginning of an archive as background for further development in this field. including the development of a series of public lectures on aesthetics. For this and other phases of the dance program." the recent development of which made the project possible. the Philippines: study. arranging. 4 0 0 to Connecticut College for use during the next three years.

THB HUMANITIES l8l Curtis Institute of Music. $ 6 . $ 8 . study of recent developments in electronic music as they affect musical composition. $ 4 . Educational Television and Radio Center. 0 0 0 .875. by Miss Ann Hutchinson. Inc. Further study of the potential audience for the performing arts in the New York Metropolitan area. New York: Barnard College. $ 9 . Victoria University of Manchester. England: Dr. $ 1 2 . for expenses incurred in bringing authors to Cambridge during the production of their work. $9. Herbert Graf. American Symphony Orchestra League. Queen's University.. Kingston. New York: preparation of textbooks on Laban dance notation. related groups in the United States and Canada. and for the purchase of a tape recorder. $ 1 0 . $ 1 0 . Canada: conference on The Writer. Ann Arbor. 2 5 0 . Canadian 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . under the direction of Lewis Hill. by Dr. senior lecturer in architecture.. Thomas Howarth. $ 6 . by Professor Otto Luening and Professor Vladimir Ussachevsky. by Chou Wen-chung.955. Charleston. Columbia University. Adaptation of traditional Chinese drama for music and dance production in the United States. Dance Notation Bureau. Preparation of model patterns of organization and procedures for the executive boards of symphony orchestras in the United States and Canada . His Media and His Public. Inc. 3 0 0 . 6 5 0 . to study architectural education and practices in the United States. Michigan: experimentation in the treatment of poetry by radio. Philadelphia. Pennsylvania: an analysis of the production problems of modern opera. West Virginia: Organization in the league's office of information on symphony orchestras and $ 7 . 0 0 0 . Poets' Theatre. 0 8 2 . 0 0 0 . Cambridge. Massachusetts: for the appointment of playwrights in residence. $7. 0 0 0 for a two-year period. 0 0 0 .

Indian Institute of Art in Industry. by Miss Ellen D . San Francisco Museum of Art.. Japan. $ 3 . Illinois: experimental program to increase interest in contemporary original works of art in the public schools of Chicago. Honolulu: collection of materials on Western music and travel in Asia in this connection. Japan: to study design and architecture in Europe en route back to Japan from the United States. University of California. director. Los Angeles: appointment of playwrights in residence in the Department of Theatre Arts j $ 6 . 3 6 4 . $ 4 . Djakarta: to visit schools of drama principally in the United States and Europe. and to observe methods of instruction in this field. $ 2 . California: experimental program to increase interest in contemporary original works of art in the public schools of San Francisco. Indonesia. to visit centers of new work in design and the visual arts in Europe.182 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION non- University of Hawaii. 0 0 0 . Philadelphia. Professor Seike Kiyosi. Lebanon: equipment and supplies for the conservatory. 5 0 0 . Pennsylvania: continued study in Japan of modern Japanese painting. Bryn Mawr College. The Indonesian National Theatre Academy Foundation. $ 1 . Smith. 0 0 0 . held at Vanderbilt University during May. New York: preparation of a book on the problems attendant upon organizing and running professional arena theatres. 7 0 0 . $ 5 . by Edward Mangum. Djakarta: books and materials on drama and related arts. producer-director. $ 5 . Beirut. American Studies Association. 6 7 5 . National Conservatory of Music. $ 6 . director. Tokyo Institute of Technology. Calcutta: Ajit Mookerjee. and India. 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . 9 5 0 . Pennsylvania: a conference on the group of American poets known as the Fugitives. Psaty.5OOj Art Institute of Chicago. Indonesian National Film Com- pany. Anis Fuleihan. Department of Music. 0 0 0 . 1956. $ 3 . associate professor. 0 0 0 . by Miss Barbara B . the United States. $ 4 . Usmar Isma'il. 6 5 0 . 0 0 0 . $3. Ltd. $ 2 . American National Theatre and Academy.

American Music Center. the institute in a dual major program which extends importantly the emphasis on general education in which it has pioneered. one of the foremost technological institutions in the United States. Mustafa Mosharaffa. Neil Hutchison. and required all underregular scientific and technical graduate students in the courses to take substantial work In general education. $ 1 .. Modern Poetry Association. has for many years maintained distinguished programs in the humanities and social sciences. director of drama and features. $1.150. Australian Broadcasting Commission: to gain a direct acquaintance with work in radio and television in the United States and Canada. Special Projects MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY DUAL MAJOR PROGRAM The Massachusetts Institute of Technology.THE HUMANITIES 183 Dr. 0 0 0 . Cairo. 0 0 0 . Chicago. University of Ceylon. $1. Illinois: preparation of a special issue of Poetry devoted to modern Japanese poetry in English translation. Egypt: study of current activities in music in Egypt. $ 1 . Inc.500. In an effort to encourage a still more fruitful cooperation between scientific and 1955 inaugurated humanistic education. under the direction of Satoru Sato. Colombo: books on drama and related arts. The new dual major program permits a student to elect a major in the humanities or social sciences concur- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . $ 8 5 0 . New York: to purchase and present collections of American music to the Turkish State Conservatory in Ankara and to the Istanbul Conservatory.

Ap- proximately equal emphasis is placed on the two major subjects over a four-year period. HUMANITIES RESEARCH COUNCIL OF CANADA Formed in 1943. An unprecedented population growth and economic expansion have created an urgent need for humanities personnel tofillposts in Canada's colleges and universities. and. the Humanities Research Council of Canada is supported in part by subscriptions from Canadian universities and is directed by 16 scholars representative of different disciplines and universities. and a special effort is being made in planning the upper class courses. but may qualify for a professional degree in any of the engineering fields represented at M . sponsorship of regional and national conferences of humanists. During 1955 The Rockefeller Foundation made an outright grant of $ 3 0 0 .I 84 THB ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION « rently with one in a field of science or technology. and the organization of local associations of laymen and scholars interested in the humanities. by taking a fifth year of study in their particular scientific field. to provide reciprocal benefits between the work in the humanities and social sciences and the students' technical or scientific courses. I . T . the council's 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . degree without professional status at the end of the four-year course. One of the council's most important activities is a pre- and postdoctoral fellowship program which during the past two years has enabled approximately 100 younger scholars to pursue advanced training. S . It seeks to encourage the development of humanistic studies in Canada through the initiation of research projects. Students following the program will receive a B . with a few exceptions. and particularly the senior seminars. 0 0 0 to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to assist in the development of the dual major program during the next ten years.

2 0 0 . 5 0 0 ) . Netherlands: Dr. 0 5 0 . $ 4 . Jr. New York: faculty studies of the role of the humanities in the university's program of general education. Thompson Webb. Chosho Goeku. Previous grants to the council total more than $ 1 0 0 .575. To assist the Humanities Research Council of Canada to continue its fellowship program and other activities. Professor Natividad P. Netherlands: A. $ 2 . director. to observe British and American educational practices. Verzosa. 3 0 0 . A. President Monfcichi Namba. 0 0 0 . 0 5 0 . Kobe College. 0 0 0 . Department of Library Science. $ 1 0 . Quezon City: to visit libraries in the United States and western Europe. to observe British and American educational practices. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . dean of students. University of Wisconsin Press. Shuri City.ooo (about $ 5 2 . payable on a matching basis of one dollar for every dollar secured from Canadian sources for the same purpose. Japan: to study and observe women's educational institutions in the United States. $ 3 .. Madison: to explore the feasibility of a program of scholarly publications by means other than conventional printing. Delft. University of the Ryukyus Foundation. president.• OTHER GRANTS Colgate University) Hamilton. University of the Philippines. dean of students. Kiers.150. $ 3 . The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 appropriated C$5O.. Okinawa: to visit the United States accompanied by Roy Nakada. J. $4. $ 2 . $2. Technological University. University of Leiden. 0 0 0 . van den Brandeler.THE HUMANITIES fellowship program is the only avenue through I$5 which students in the humanities can seek financial aid for advanced study. Fund for grants of amounts not exceeding $ 5 0 0 for allocation under the supervision of the Director.

I 86

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION

National Higher School of Islam Religion, Jogjakarta, Indonesia: purchase of books and publications outside Indonesia; $ 2 , 0 0 0 ; Muslem University of Indonesia, Makassar: purchase of books and publications outside Indonesia; $ 2 , 0 0 0 ; University of Louisville, Kentucky: Dr. J. J. Oppenheimer, dean, College of Arts and Sciences; to examine recent developments in higher education in Germany; $i , 7 5 0 ; Lady Mary Ogilvie, principal, St. Anne's College, University of Oxford, England: to visit the United States in connection with problems of higher education for women in the United Kingdom j $ 1 , 0 0 0 .

© 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation

OTHER

APPROPRIATIONS

RANTS which fall somewhat outside the specific programs, or which include elements relating to more than one aspect of the Foundation's work, are taken from general funds. In 1955 four appropriations and nine smaller grants were of this character.

COMMONWEALTH SCIENTIFIC AND RESEARCH ORGANIZATION

INDUSTRIAL

CONSTRUCTION OF A RADIO TELESCOPE The science of radio astronomy, although originating

about twenty years ago, has come into prominence only since the end of World War II, largely as a result of wartime

developments in electronics and radar. In a very short time it has taken an important place beside optical astronomy, and already has a number of discoveries to its credit. The new science is the study of celestial bodies through

the "radio waves" they reflect or emit. Radio waves are one of the two important wave-length bands of electromagnetic radiation which penetrate to the earth's surface from outer space. They are emitted in the heavens by hot and cool clouds of hydrogen, by the sun, by powerful discrete sources both within and outside our galaxy known at present as "radio stars," and also by other dispersed sources still not understood. Radio waves can be used to discover a number of facts about their sources, such as distance and size, It is possible

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

188

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION

; i

to receive and study them with the help of the extremely large antenna system of a radio " t e l e s c o p e . " The antenna system of a radio telescope has to be large for two basic reasons: to gather a useful amount of energy, and to give a usefully sharp indication of the direction from which it comes. The major radio telescope in the world at

the present time is being completed at Manchester, England. It has an antenna in the form of a parabolic "dish" 150 feet in diameter, mounted so that it can be pointed toward any section of the sky, and can be turned to follow a celestial point as the earth rotates. Plans are going forward for the construction of similarly large telescopes in many other parts of the world. Of these, only one will provide for observation of the southern hemisphere of the sky. The southern telescope will be built in Australia by the

radiophysics division of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization. Under the direction of Dr. E . G . Bowen, this group has already done extensive work in radio astronomy, obtaining facts about many parts of the universe formerly unknown. In addition to a number of smaller experimental aerial installations, the group has constructed a parabolic dish 36 feet in diameter and an 80foot reflector. The present dish can be moved in elevation

only and the reflector is of fixed position. Toward the costs of the new Australian radio tele-

scope, to be built during the next three years half at government expense and half with funds collected from other The

sources, the Foundation has appropriated $ 2 5 0 , 0 0 0 . total cost is expected to be well over a million dollars.

THE CONSERVATION FOUNDATION During the seven years since its organization, the Conservation Foundation has sought "to promote conservation of the earth's life-supporting resources," and to encourage

© 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation"

OTHER APPROPRIATIONS

I 89

wider knowledge and understanding of their distribution, wise employment, and relationship to each other and to human existence. It has been equally concerned with the

changing demands made upon natural resources by growing populations and altered modes of life. The Conservation Foundation seeks to advance its

purposes through research and education. It carries out surveys, basic engineering studies, and studies of public policy and administration with respect to natural resources. Upon completion of a research project, the foundation seeks to make it effective through such educational media as publications, documentary films, and television features. The foun-

dation has also made a critical inventory at the college and university level of the present status of conservation teaching. A $ 4 5 , 0 0 0 grant from The Rockefeller Foundation,

together with funds remaining from an earlier appropriation, will provide the Conservation Foundation with $10,ooo a year for its general administrative budget during each of the five years beginning July i, 1955.

MEXICAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE One of a series of binational cultural centers In the dif-

ferent capitals of Latin America, the Mexican-American Cultural Institute in Mexico City plays an important role in cultural life in Mexico and in relations between the two countries. While perhaps its largest single function is the provision of Spanish and English language instruction, the institute's varied activities include art exhibitions, in some cases assistance to the fellowship programs of other organizations, and sponsorship of the bilingual Writing Center,

which has contributed substantially to the development of Mexican Mexico. Two years ago the institute embarked on a campaign authors and of American authors resident in

for the funds needed to establish permanent headquarters

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION in Mexico City. Although Mexican firms and individuals and the American community in Mexico have given generously toward the institute's support, additional funds are necessary to meet the costs of purchase and improvement of the site now occupied by the institute. During 1955 The

Rockefeller Foundation, which has a sizeable field staff resident in Mexico City, contributed $ 3 5 , 0 0 0 to assist the institute in meeting these expenses.

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES ATOMIC RADIATION The effect of atomic radiation on living organisms has

become a matter of urgent concern not only because of the development of nuclear weapons, but also because nuclear energy and radioactive materials will be increasingly used throughout the world for peaceful purposes, as for example in medical research and treatment, and in industrial power installations. The effects of radiation on food, its genetic effects in to

human beings and animals, and such problems as how

dispose of radioactive wastes safely are only a few aspects of the general problem. The clear Foundation gave financial support to various nubefore either the creative

research projects long

promise or the implicit threats of nuclear research began to materialize. grants In 1955 The $ 2 5 , 0 0 0 Rockefeller to the Foundation made Academy of

totaling

National

Sciences in Washington for preliminary work toward a fullscale study of the effects of atomic radiation on living organisms,

OTHER GRANTS Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, New York: study of the post-

college experience of former students as it relates to the educational program; $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 ;

© 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

OTHER APPROPRIATIONS United States Committee for the United Nations, Washington, D . C . : toward the expenses of a tenth anniversary program of information and education, to be carried on in cooperation with the American Association for the United Nations; $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 ; John Carroll University, Cleveland, Ohio: a study of problems involved in increasing student enrollments in the institutions of higher education in Ohio, to be undertaken by the Committee on Expanding Student Population of the Ohio College Association; $ 7 , 5 0 0 ; Dr. Leona Baumgartner, Commissioner of Health of the City of New York, and Dr. Nathaniel Elias, chemical engineer, New York:

to serve as consultants to the Ministry of Health of India, and to visit other countries in Southern Asia; $ 6 , 5 0 0 ; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor: Dr, James M . Davis, director, International Center; to visit countries from which foreign students come to the University of Michigan; $ 4 , 5 0 0 ; Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts: Wilbur J. Bender, dean of admissions and financial aids; study of college and university admission policies in Great Britain; $ 2 , 4 0 0 ; American Hospital of Paris, France: for operating costs of a mass miniature chest X-ray apparatus; $1,500; Columbia University, New York: Dean Louis M, Hacker, School

of General Studies; study in England of university experience with the award of external degrees through qualifying examinations; $1,500.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

FELLOWSHIPS OTHER STUDY

AND

AWARDS

Foundation's fellowship appointments are integrated with the interests of its several programs.

I

Through fellowships, chiefly for postdoctoral study,

the Foundation seeks to advance knowledge in a wide variety of fields in medical education and public health, biological and medical research, agriculture, the social sciences, and the humanities. Fellowships are awarded on an international basis to outstanding men and women who have

completed their specialized training, and who

have shown

promise of making important contributions to their fields in their native countries. During 1955 a total of 357 persons held Foundation fellowships. This number includes 181 fellowships awarded in previous years and continued into 1955, and 176 new

awards. Their distribution by program is as follows: Number of fellows in 1955 Agriculture Biological a n d Medical Research Division of Medicine and Public Health1 Humanities Medical Education and Public Health Division of Natural Sciences and Agriculture1 Social Sciences 94 40 30 20 64 20 106 50 44 29 30 44 77 20 o 15 8 Awards made in J 955 15 8 Awards continued into 1955 o 0

357

176

181

1 As a result of action by the Board of Trustees during April, 1955, Divisions have been eliminated as formal units,

© 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

FELLOWSHIPS

Ip3

The fellows in 1955 came from 44 different countries. Countries represented by three or more fellows were: Argentina Australia Brazil Chile Colombia Denmark France Germany Great Britain India Italy Japan Korea Lebanon Mexico Netherlands Norway Peru Philippines Sweden Switzerland Turkey United States Uruguay 5 8 43 14 19 4 10 13 19 29 ii 34 5 7 19 5 6 15 10 9 4 6 16 10

Fellowships were also held during 1955 by individuals from the following countries: Austria British West Indies ( 2 ) ; Belgium (2) ;

(i); Burma (i); Ceylon (i); Na-

tional Republic of China (2); Costa Rica (i); Cuba (i); Egypt (2); Finland (2); Guatemala (i); Honduras (i); Indonesia (2); New Zealand ( 2 ) ; Pakistan ( 2 ) ; Portugal

(2); Spain (i); Syria (i); Uganda (i); and the Union of South Africa ( 2 ) . Six fellows during 1955 were appointed from the World Health Organization. The Rockefeller Foundation made available a total of $1,175,000 for its fellowship activities during 1955, allo-

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

and the five fellows appointed during 1955 by the Medical Research Council of Great Britain. These agencies administered a total of 1 13 fellowships during 1955 : National Research Council Medical Sciences Natural Sciences Social Science Research Council British Medical Research Council Canadian Social Science Research Council 12 6 52 12 31 During 1955 the Foundation appropriated $ 4 8 5 . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 2 5 5 . major field of interest. 1959. To support the fellowship program during 1956 the Foundation has appropriated $ 1 . 0 0 0 . $ 1 8 0 . 0 0 0 . highest degree. Humanities. $ 1 7 5 . Biological and Medical Research. country of origin. and date of fellowship. The following information is included for each indi- vidual: name. and Social Sciences. 0 0 0 .000. national agencies have awarded fellowships with funds contributed in 1955 and previous years by the Foundation. Below is a listing of the 176 individuals who in 1955 were awarded fellowships by The Rockefeller Foundation. $ 2 0 0 . institution with which fellow was affiliated when appointed. date of birth. Medical Education and Public Health.1 9 4 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION cated for use by the programs as follows: Agriculture. In addition to the fellowships awarded and administered directly by the Foundation. $215. principal countries of fellowship study. The fellowships awarded by the BMRC have been included in this listing because the fellows received guidance and supervisory assistance from Foundation fellowship advisers. 0 0 0 . fellowship-awarding agency or program. 0 0 0 . $ 4 0 5 . 0 0 0 to the Social Science Research Council to be used for fellowship awards during the period ending June 30.

A . AnPlant Science (Plant Breeding) kara. . ( D H ) . GUSTAVO ALBANI. AYSE YILDIZ (Turkey) b. HIROYUKI (Japan) b. (MEPH). Univ. Univ. Univ. 1955-. D . land) b. Literary Criticism ( D H ) . Place of of Study: U . of Oxford. Nara. . Biochemistry Univ. AYYAD. Place of Study: ASTRALAGA DI RUGGIERO. of ASSBLINEAU. tration ( I H D ) . London. A . VetAires 1938. Ing. Nursing Dipl. Philosophy hall School of Music. Sweden.. Place of Study: American Univ. Appointed from Nara 1 9 3 6 . A . Appointed Liberal Arts Univ. A .1 9 5 5 . Medicine (France) b.D . Appointed from 1952. Public Health Place of Study: U . Music ( H ) . Place of ( D N S A ) . 1 9 0 8 .. . M . ROBERTO U . Place of Study: 1 9 2 0 . A . ( B M R C ) . MASAO (Japan) b. P u b l i c Health Nursing ARNITA. D . Paris. Place Theatre. Univ. D . Drama ( H ) . A .B . Manila.. of Buenos of San Marcos. 1 9 4 4 . A . Intercuhural 1 9 2 9 . S . U . 1 9 1 S . Ankara. . ACHESON. Place of Study: France. Agriculture — School of Dramatic Art. Ing.. Appointed Marcos. Hikone City. 1955-. of OxU . S . 1 9 2 1 . Agriculture (Nonerinary Science—Radiology ( A ) . AYLLON RODRIGUEZ. Place from the American Univ. M . Place of Study: U . S . Turkish State dellin.. Literature ( H ) . B . 1955-. A . 1 9 5 5 . Grad. 1 9 2 9 . (Colombia) b. Palmira. YOSHIYUKI (Japan) b. Nat'l Univ. . Appointed from Minpointed from Turkish State istry of Agric. from Ministry of Agric. 1955-. Men1955-. S c .. . S . of Tokyo. Philippines. Appointed from 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 1 9 2 4 .. . Kyoto Imperial Univ. S . S . of of Study: U . S . SALVADOR (Lebanon) b. Ap( D N S A ) . of the Philippines. S . Univ. Agr. of the anon) b. A . . (Egypt) b. Teacher's Dipl. Univ. 1 9 1 5 . Me1 9 2 8 . . S . 1955-. B . The GuildKyoto Univ. doza. ALVAREZ.. Bacteriology ( D M P H ) . 1953. Univ. Univ. . of Oxford Studies ( H ) . 1 9 5 2 . Statistics ( S S ) . Univ.. Nat'l Center of Scientific ReAGAWA. FELIX (Argentina) b. Beirut. of Beirut 1952. . Place of Study: Appointed from Univ. A . . ROY MALCOLM (Eng1955-. Ap. of Cairo 1953. 1921. Appointed 1940. Lima. conventional—Experimental CliAppointed from Univ. ABD-ELFATTAH SHUKRY 1955-. Place of Study: U . Public Health Admlnisfrom Shiga Univ. Agr.M . 1 9 1 4 . . 1 9 4 8 . 1955-. Appointed from of Paris 1 9 5 0 . . . ARAGON. search. S . 1941-1942. BATISHWA Loco (Lebpointed twice from Univ. . B . A .BADAWI. 1 9 1 5 . S . 1 9 2 9 . A . of Colombia. . A . ford. (Philippines) b. 1 9 5 5 . Appointed from the Study: U . D r . ALFRED (England) b. 1955-. of San matology) ( D N S A ) . V . A . AKQAN. JEAN MARCEL Oxford 1954. Place of Study: U . Study: U . 1 9 2 1 . POTENCIANO ROSARIO BABA. S . 1934. . of Cairo.P h . (Peru) b.FELLOWSHIPS ABE.

Philippines. A . Nursing EduPlace of Study: U . EDMUNDO of Cartagena 1 9 5 5 . Eng. Appointed BETANCOURT CASTELLAR. . Univ. VARGIIESE (India) b. Place of Univ. Coll. S . of Bahia. of Birmingham. D . Manila. Univ. Curitiba. . Sciences. ApTnst. . of Cartagena 1955. S . Appointed from —Enzymes ( D N S A ) . Monpointed from Purdue Univ. Appointed CLAYDH TEIXETRA (Brazil) b. 1955-. Univ. of Bir19S5-. Agr. of Study: Colombia. Centre de BARKER. Montevideo. Photosynthesis BERTONI. Place of Study: U . ANTONIO MOTTA DE BERTHET. Agriculture — Agronomy b. EDUARDO SERVANDO (Vrutcrnal Medicine ( M E P H ) . Appointed from Univ. Beirut. 1955-.M . Appointed Univ. Interumversitaire des Study: U . A .WILLIAM OLIVER ( U . 1951. JACQUES HENRI LEON SOUZA ( B r a z i l ) b. . 1 9 2 4 . M . SSo Paulo 1947.. Univ. from Inst. Place of Study: U . S . of California. LAURO DE CASTRO (Brab. Place tevideo. D . Medicine ( M E P H ) . 1 9 5 4 . CABRERA. Place of Study: of Agric. . Ing. 1955-. Place of Study: U . 1 9 2 6 . Campinas. 1 9 5 5 . Place of from Inst. . Berkeley. 1 9 2 0 . Place of Place of Study: U . (PhilipColl. 1955-. Agriculture—BiochemisAppointed from Inter-American try (Nutrition) ( D N S A ) . Es- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . M . U . from Christian Med. . Hosp. RAFAEL (CoU . BENJAMIN D . (Pasture Management) ( A ) . BARBOSA. . S . Sciences Nucleates. 1 9 2 5 . A . S .1 9 5 5 . Appointed from Univ. of ical Care ( M E P H ) . D . M . . A . 1 9 2 2 . ( D N S A ) . RICARDO (Guatemala) 1955. Univ.1 9 5 5 . . (Colombia) b. Place of Study: Study: U . . Cybernetics of Louvaln 1 9 5 0 . 1928. 1 9 2 2 .A. BRESSANI. 1 9 4 7 . M . InBELLO. MARIA Conservation) ( A ) . A . D . lore. VelMedical Entomology ( D M P H ) . M . ) BKLTRAO. A . AnatStudies ( D H ) . Appointed from Univ. Appointed the Philippines. of the 1955-. M . South Asian Parana. S . ALFONSO from Univ. Salvador. of Agron. M . M . S J . . D . Biochemistry ( D M P H ) . 1955-. 1955-. S .. SIDNEY ALAN (England) Louvain.1 9 5 S . S . cation (MEPH). of Califorzil) b. D . . BENJAMIN. A . mingham 1 9 5 0 .. B. Piracicaba.196 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION American Univ. Univ. . 1931. . 1 9 5 5 . 1 9 2 7 . D . of Recife 1953. B . 1 9 2 3 .P h . Univ.. S . A . Study: Colombia. A . Univ. 1 9 2 6 . Appointed from omy ( M E P H ) . of the Republic. Place of Study: BERM^DEZ BOLANO. lombia) b. . Place of Study: Canada. Internal (Mexico) b. 1 9 4 5 . 1 9 4 3 . (Belgium) b. B . . S . Luiz de Queiroz Coll. 1949. 1 9 1 8 . Univ. Agr. S . of State of Sao Paulo. of Agric. Brazil. Madras Med. BRIGHT. of Study: U . Agriculture—Soil Science (Soil BARROSO DB OLIVEIRA.... of the 1 9 2 3 . . . of nia. S . A . Place auay) b. D . CALVA CUADRILLA. Josfe (Brazil) b. b. of Recife. . of Parana. Nursing grad. Univ. 1955-. 1 9 2 6 . Comprehensive Medpines) b. . Iowa State Coll.

OTTAR (Norway) b. S . Appointed from Univ. Appointed from Univ. Escola Tecnica de Enfermeiras. 1 9 5 5 . Coll. 1 9 2 4 . 1 9 1 9 . of MaryCenter in Paris. Human Genetics ( D M P H ) . . Study: U . ( H ) . . caba. Place of Study: land 1 9 5 2 . A . Milan 1 9 5 2 . Appointed from Univ. of Oslo 1955-. ( M E P H ) . Univ.. of Place of Study: Canada. Place of 1917. Univ. Univ. Appointed from xil) b. Dr. Appointed from CHAIN. public. S . Appointed from 1) Univ. Logic. AgriCOCRON. Intercultural Studies U . P h . ANCELO PABS DE ( B r a (MEPH). of Oslo. 1955-. A . pointed from Univ. Place of Study: ( D H ) . 1955-. Grad. Place of Study: U . ( D S S ) . 2) Austrian Cultural b. History ( H ) .SA. 1952-1954. Univ. S A .FELLOWSHIPS 1 9 7 cucla Medico Militar. STANFORD TUN AUNG Inst. Eng. 1 9 1 6 .. U. 1944. Mexico. of Vienna 1 9 4 8 . Agriculture — Cli1955-. (DNSA). Univ.). S A . Agr. Campinas. FRITZ (Austria) b. Veterinary Science (Physiology COSTA REIS. of Milan 1944. D . of Agric. D . Psychiatric Nurs1955-. culture — Food Technology P h . Espointed from Univ. Lisbon. 1927. CARLOS ton. S .. Piracicaba. RODOLPHO DB (Brazil) goon. 1955-. KENNETH McKeNziE 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . ATHOL ALEXANDER the Philippines. A . S . 1952. GIAN CARLO (Italy) b. Place of Study: U . Economics ( S S ) . RUGGERO (Italy) b. A . ing (MEPH). Grad. WellingCARLEVARO CASTELLA. Univ. 1 9 3 7 . Appointed from CARLUCCI. . CHACKO. of Milan.. D . (Philippines) of Paris. A . DAHL.. Appointed CBPPELLINI. in Law. Vellore. S . Agriculture — AniFrance and U . S A 1955-. AMADO C . 1955-. S A . . 1929. History ( H ) . . of the State of (Burma) b. mal Science (Animal Breeding) U . U. Place of Study: Montevideo. 1 9 1 0 .SA. Ap(Portugal) b. of RanCAMARGO. M . 1 9 4 6 . MARIA MANUELA — Reproduction) (DNSA). of CONGALTON. of the Recola Tecnica de Enfermeiras.1 9 5 5 . from Univ.M . 1 9 4 7 . Appointed from Univ. ( A ) . 1 9 3 3 . 1918. 1 9 2 8 . S A . 1951. . 1 9 5 3 . b. (Hons. . Univ. Paulo. of Oxford 1951. S . of Milan and 1st. Univ. CAMPOS. Luiz de Christian Med. Appointed from Victoria D . Social Psychology HUMBERTO (Uruffuay) b. A . U . M . Milan. . matology ( A ) . of the Republic. LIZA WALLAPURAKAL of Wisconsin. M .B . Place of Study: (India) b. per gli Studi di Econ. 1 9 1 4 . Agriculture— U . 1955-. Univ. 1 9 2 4 . Place of Study: U . Coll. . Sao Paulo. Place of Study: (New Zealand) b. . Dr. Victoria Univ. A .. Agr. S A . V . of Agron. Anatomy CAMARGO. Study: U .. Queiroz Coll. PiraciPlace of Study: Australia. Appointed from Univ. . and Symbolism of Sao Paulo. Language. Univ. Physiological Chemistry Place of Study: U .DALLAS. 1955-. Ap. Coll. Place of of Rangoon 1954. of Sao 1955-. .

Health Organization) b. B .. Appointed from Univ. MARIA SALOME tomology ( M E P H ) . b. Univ. . Medical EnDEL ROSARIO. Montevideo. Appointed from DE FREITAS. 1 9 2 4 . . . D . DINTZIS. Belo Horizonte. of Geneva 1 9 3 7 . Physiology (MEPH). Study: U . 1 9 5 5 . 1 9 2 1 . S . 1950. . S . of Tasmania. 195S-. HOWARD M A R V I N 1 9 4 7 . of 1955-. pines. . EUSTACE JOSEPH (India) ( B M R ) . A . L . State Univ. Harpointed from Faculty of Med. S . 1955-. (Plant Parasitology) ( A ) . 1 9 3 2 . MARIANA DULCE Nursing Education ( D M P H ) . Grad. (India) b. JOZEF (Belgium) b. Place of Study: Sunderdas Med. S . Bombay. drates ( D N S A ) . Economics ( D S S ) . Montevideo. Appointed 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . U . B . Place of M . EsAppointed from Univ. b. Place of Study: U . Grad. PIERRE (World 1 9 4 4 . ^ .1 9 S S .. Place of Study: of Bombay 1 9 4 2 . A . MYRIAM PIRIA ( U r n pointed from Topiwala Nat'l guay) b. . A . C o l l . 1952. DALZIEL. ford. 1 9 2 1 . . Tambaram. Fellowship for work at Univ.. D . Appointed from Univ.1 9 5 5 . . 1 9 2 5 . . D . Univ. BiochemistryJuiz de Fora.198 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION (Australia) b. Univ. Coll. S . of the Philippines 1 9 5 4 . ' U . . of OxM . S . of Med. pointed from Univ. KEITH (England) b. 1 9 0 2 . S c . Bombay. D . U . 5 . Hobart. ) b. ApAgriculture — Plant Science pointed from Univ. ApDE ALSO. (Portugal) b. Place of Study: U . 1 9 2 4 . History ( H ) . V. . 1953. Nursing Education ( D M P H ) . of the cola Tecnica de Enfermeiras. zil) b. 1953. field 1 9 5 4 . A . of P h . Univ. . Biochemistry—Plants DE SOUZA. Anatomy ( M E P H ) . . A . Lisbon. 1955-. S . ( M E P H ) . ApPlace of Study: Great Britain.. of Tasmania. Grad.Ap( 1 7 .. . 1955-. A . Place of Study .. Seth Gordhandas of Oxford. Biochemistry ( B M R C ) . . DAVID DENZIL (England) World Health Organization. State Univ. 1 9 2 1 . Montevideo. of ShefPlace of Study: U . DIGHE. Obstetrical Nurs1955-. guay) b. Place of the Republic. S . of vard Univ. Univ. (Philippines) b. SOFIA GONZALEZ (Urubay. Univ. A . 1 9 2 8 . . Place of Study: Sweden.P h . ing ( M E P H ) . P h . M . Com. 1 9 1 1 . of Place of Study: U . B . Place of Study: 1 9 4 9 .P h . Public Health Administration 1955-. Appointed Brazil. Univ. DALTON LINTZ (BraEscola Tecnica de Enfermeiras. DXNIZ DE SOUSA. . 1941.M . Place of Study: Proteins ( B M R ) . Republic. . (India) b. 1953. of Ghent. D . S . Appointed from DORAISAMY. Madras Christian C o l l . . Appointed from Govt. of BomDE Cocco. of the Philip1 9 5 5 . 1 9 2 1 . of London DBSCOEUDRES. S . Study: U . 1 9 5 5 . A . A . Univ. 1955-. 1 9 2 9 . from Nat'l Science Foundation DE LEY. of Ghent Cambridge. Univ. 1 9 0 6 . VISHWANATH GOVIND Appointed from Clinic Hosp. . S . . 1 9 2 1 . 1 9 2 8 . Biochemistry — CarbohyGreat Britain. the Republic. D . Appointed from DAVIES. S . Minas Gerais.

. CARLOS H. S A . 1 9 5 5 . . Appointed from Univ. 1955-. D . U . A .. Univ. FUKUSHIMA. Univ. School of Nursing. A . 1945. of Heidelberg. AgriTechnology) ( D N S A ) . of Chattanooga 1 9 4 7 . Vellore. .M . don 1952. bourne 1938. Place of Study : U . Virology ( D M P H ) . Agriculture Library Science ( D M P H ) . Economics ( D S S ) . ENKERLIN SCHALLENMUELLER. . 1 9 2 9 . P h . Univ. 1 9 2 3 . Place of Study. P h . HAROLD LANE ( U . Place of Study: GATES. Place of Study: U . S . A . Place of from Technological Inst of Study: U . Agri(Chile) b. FLORES DEL FIBRRO. D . Univ. 1955-. 1 9 5 3 . Appointed 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . of Chile. 1 9 2 3 . 1 9 2 1 . A . Place of Study. Sanitary Chemistry and Sanitary Engineering ( D M P H ) . Univ. Nursing Education ( M E P H ) . S . T o w n ' s Hosp. 1 9 1 3 .1 9 5 5 . M . D . Ing. . Crops) ( D N S A ) . M . . Place of Study: FOWDEN. of London GOLDBERG. 1954-1955. of Oxford 1952. Place of Study: England. Entebbe.. Ap— Plant Science (Plant Parasipointed from Christian Med. Santiago. Sendai. . Appointed from Univ. .FELLOWSHIPS from Madras Med. 199 Santiago. A . S A . FRIEDRICH. ICHIRO (Japan) b. MARIO land. A .1 9 5 5 . of Guadalajara 1 9 5 0 . S . 1 9 2 6 . 1955-. ANA MAR!A (Mexico) b. . Chattanooga. . MARLENB A N N A DOROTHEA (Germany] b. Coll. Place of Study: U . Hosp. of Syd(Chile) b. Univ. . C o m . (Chile) b.. Appointed from Virus Research 1955-. D . Univ. S J L . . . Apculture — Agronomy (Forage pointed from Ministry of Agric. Appointed from Tennessee Valley Authority. 1 9 4 4 . 1947. S . Inst. Monterrey. 1955-. Place of Study: U . 1 9 5 S . Agr. HIRAM of Chile. Agri1955-. DANIEL (India) b. Biochemistry — Plants 1 9 0 8 . U .. 1 9 2 3 . . 1 9 5 5 . 1 9 2 2 . Univ. Agr. Louis (Australia) b. 1 9 3 0 . culture—Plant Science (Food of Chile. GAJARAJ. DURAN. GROVE VALENZUELA. Place of Study: Appointed from Univ. ney. tology) ( D N S A ) . $ d .. Place of Study: U .. of Tokyo 1 9 4 6 . S . 1952. SA . EngFRANZANI PINOCHET. A . Ajmer Univ. Univ. B . .M . Appointed from Univ. Ing. of Lonpointed from Ministry of Agric. S . 1 9 1 8 . 1 9 2 5 . M . Place of Study: U . Accounting ( D S S ) . S . ELMORE. Public Health Education ( D M P H ) . ) b. Westphalia. of Mel(DNSA).. of Guadalajara. culture — Veterinary Science GILLETT. 1950. ADb. tralia) b. RONALD CECIL (AusU . Santiago. 1 9 2 4 . Santiago.1 9 5 5 . Appointed Coll. . Santiago. Public Health Nursing ( M E P H ) . S . Appointed from Univ. V . JOHN DAVID (Uganda) (Bacteriology) ( D N S A ) . DIETER (Mexico) b. of London. A . Appointed from Tohofcu Univ.. S . bourne. Univ. D . . Cornell Univ. Grad. of MelU . LESLIE (England) b. D i p ! . Bielefeld.1 9 5 5 .

Univ. John's Coll.SA. Univ. . de Enfermedades de ( D N S A ) . . Writing Center. Appointed from Mexican pointed from Lucknow Univ. BA. . SantiAnnapolis. Agriculture — Plant Univ. Mexico City. Place of Study: 1953. Agriculture Economics ( D S S ) . Dr. East Studies ( H ) . 1955-. Appointed — Plant Science (Parasitology) from Swiss Inst. M . NITYA HAND (India'] b. of Study: U . Ohio State tralia) b. ington Univ. M . . Place of Study: of Agric. Md.M . GURGEL. U. SANTIAGO AMARAL (Brazil) b. 1 9 5 3 . D r . Place of Study: U . St. Neurophysiol( D N S A ) . 1 9 2 8 . S A .SA.. D . . of BudaSvalof. 1 9 3 1 . HERNANDEZ. M . of Mexico 1 9 5 3 . Agriculture—Plant U. ERNST THEODOR VALENGUZMAN-NARANJO. Botany ( A ) . of Sao Paulo 1937. Univ. GUEVARA CALDER6N. HAGBERG. Appointed HORVATH SUMI.M .. ROBERT GEORGE ( 1 7 . Place of Sao Paulo. of Freiburg 1945. Place of Study: U. (Mexico) b. 1 9 2 2 . of Lund Kyoto Univ. Gallen. 1 9 1 4 . S . of Chile. HEUSS. Josfc THEOPHILO DO HERNANDEZ ORNELAS. Breeding ( D N S A ) .M . Leon.. . 1 9 4 9 . 1955-. Appointed from HAEO.1 9 5 5 . Piractcaba. Appointed from ( A ) . Fil. 1955-. B . D . HIROE.. S A . Biochemistry — Proteins Gottingen 1 9 4 7 . Bandung. . of Sydney. Place of Study: b. B i o c h e m i s t r y 1955-. Place Study: U . D . HANS-DIETER (Ger1 9 2 1 .. . Appointed from MinTrade Research. . . Place of U . Univ. . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Appointed (Plant Breeding—Cytogenetics) from Hosp. S A . S A . B . Place of 1 9 5 5 . ogy ( D M P H ) .1 9 5 5 ..M . Appointed from 1 9 1 9 . ANTONIO (Chile) from Swedish Seed Assoc. NILS ARNE (Sweden) b. S . b. 1955-% GRUBER. Chapingo. . A . Grad. 1952. Washrer. Univ. 5 J . LUISA JOSEFINA GUPTA. of 1952. of Study: U . of Study: Sweden. Nat'l 1 9 1 9 .. 1 9 5 5 . 1921. Appointed from of Indonesia. 1 9 1 9 . Place of Study: U .SA.SA.SA. of Sydney 1950. 1955-. 1 9 2 0 . 1955-. Univ. S . S . Place Place of Study: U . D . 1 9 2 8 . BiochemScience (Plant Parasitology) istry ( B M R ) . of Utrecht many) b. Eng. Study: Iraq. Place of Study: U . Study: U. Univ. Place of Univ. BioAgriculture — Plant Science chemistry (MEPH). S A .1 9 5 5 . istry of Agric. 1 9 4 5 . 1 9 4 5 . . Drama 1943. D . Univ. of Guanajuato. St.1 9 5 5 . P h . of Marburg/Lahn. Lucknow Univ. HENATSCH. p e s t 1945. Kyoto Univ. JULIA (CoTIN (Switzerland) b. Near ago. 1 9 2 1 . WILLIAM JOSEPH (Ausico) b. Univ. 1 9 2 6 . MINOSUKE (Japan) bt 1914. (Mexico) b.. for Foreign ( D N S A ) . MAX (Netherlands} b. .. Mexico City. Josfi (MexHBNSLBY. lombia) b. S A . MA. la Nutricion. Agr.pol. ) Univ. Univ. Appointed from Nat'l Coll. Psychiatry (MEPH). Appointed from Univ. Place of Study: U. Bogota. S A . . 1955-.2 0 O THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION from Ministry of Agric. 1955-. ( M E P H ) . Appointed from Univ.Ap( H ) .

Place (Mexico) b. MonStudy: U . 1 9 5 3 . of Health.. demlology (MEPH). Porto Alegre. JAEGER. 1955-. A .SA. TORU (Japan) b. B . S A . D . S . B . Dr.. b. and U . Place of Study: U . Univ. Place of Study: U . of the Republic. Tokyo. Slavic Studies (DH). ing ( D H ) . Univ. D . Appointed from Keio Univ. Place of Study: Canada KATO. of Buenos Aires 1 9 5 0 . Helsinki. Public Health NursMA. Place of Study: U . Univ. Appointed from Univ. Bombay. . 1 9 5 5 . 1955-. Place of Study: U . Place of 2) Univ. ( S S ) . HIROSHI (Japan) b. S A . 1 9 1 8 .. Appointed from bourne.SA. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Tokyo.Ap.. .. CHIHIRO (Japan) b. JORGE Appointed from Keio Univ. Place of Study: 1 9 3 5 . 1 9 2 7 . of Tokyo Study: U . Tokyo. 1955-. Intercultural UnderstandU. of Buenos Aires.. Sci. . Bombay. Place of Study: U . Place of Bungakushi. of ToSchool of Nursing. Appointed from 1) ( M E P H ) . . 1944-1946. IBARGUENGOITIA ANTILLON. 1 9 4 4 .SA. ing ( I H D ) . Basel 1937. . Appointed from Hitotsubashi Univ. Place of Study: and Economic Development U. International Trade Mexico City..KORGAONKLAR. Pathology ( D M P H ) . Bachelor. . 1 9 2 4 . Theoretical EpiRAO (India) b.. 1 9 2 7 . ASHER (England) b. 1 9 5 2 . Univ. 1 9 1 4 . pointed from Tokyo Women's Tokyo Teikohu Daigu-ku. Keio Univ. . DORA MAR!A KARTTUNBN. . L L . Appointed from Coll.KOBA. Montevideo. S A . 1955-. Appointed from Tokyo IWAMA. of Rio Grande KORNBR. of Mel. Political Science ( S S ) . IBARBURU IRAZUSTA. Tokyo. Melphysics (BMR). 1936. Internal Medicine (MEPH). KASHINATH SHAMbourne 1 9 5 4 . CYRIL KEITH (Australia) Study: U. 1955-. 1 9 4 7 . D . Inst. 1 9 5 5 . Univ. 1 9 2 8 . Metropolitan Univ. Drama ( H ) . A . Dept. HOUSSAY. Indian Cancer Research Centre. M . 1 9 1 1 . Appointed of Science. Univ. 201 do Sul. 1940-1943. Appointed from Univ. A . CELSO PAULO (Brazil) b. M . RAUL HORACIO (Argentina) b.FELLOWSHIPS HOSOYA. Lie. of Nursing. Keio Univ. KITAMURA. S A . S A . Medicine {MEPH). S A . S . 1 9 1 8 . . Univ. 1955-. of Study: U . Biofrom State Health Dept. Appointed from Meiji Univ. 1955-. KAGEYAMA. 1917. 1955-. Colegio Morelos. Mexico City. KIRSTI MARJATTA (Uruauay) b. of from Mexican Writing Center. M . 1 9 5 2 . 1955-. ICHIRO (Japan) b. 1955-. 1 9 2 5 . A . P h . S A . ronto 1946. of Tokyo 1 9 4 5 . 1 9 2 0 . EllCHl (Japan) b. tevideo. S . Place of JACKA. 1 9 2 7 . Appointed 1 9 0 9 . Experimental Biology — Chemical Genetics ( D N S A ) . Pol. Place of Study: U . Helsinki Univ. of Rio Grande do S u l . S A . Nursing (Finland) b. Helsinki Education dipl. D . Nursing Education Nursing Education and Research ( M E P H ) . . U . 1 9 4 4 . 1 9 2 0 . 1931Christian Coll. KBIZO (Japan) b. 1955-.

S . of do Sul. 1955-. BHADRIRAJU Sociology ( S S ) . The DisBatavia. GenStudies ( D H ) . . A . Rural Univ. of Tokyo 1 9 4 4 . of Indonesia. Place of Study: LEE. Riisskov. M . Appointed from nomics ( D S S ) . Psychiatric Nursing Harvard Univ. of Rio Grande do Sul. S . 1 9 2 1 . B .. of 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Place of ( B M R ) . 1 9 5 0 . Study: U . Virology (BMRC). . JACQUES FRANQOIS (France) b. S . . A . ANACLBTO (Philippines') ing. . Agriculture — Soil 1 9 1 9 . 1921. Economics ( D S S ) . Univ. LARSEN. Univ. 1955-. of the Philippines. 1955-. 1955-. A . S ... Univ. A . 1 9 2 8 . JEAN (France) b. London. A . 1 9 2 8 . 1955-. . S . B . Place of LEWIS. 1 9 2 3 . Appointed from Keio Janeiro. A .. 1 9 2 8 . Rio de ( M E P H ) . Univ. Ecole Nationale Superieure b. of Pan's 1955. 1955-. S . . riculture — Plant Science (Plant Appointed from Virus Reference Breeding) ( A ) . tural Understanding (DH). DAN (England) b. LEE. Porto Alegre. Bayfordbury. Eng. D . LIE. . Paris. . Univ. S .1 9 5 5 . 1 9 2 8 .M A . of the Philipdes Mines de Paris 1953. . 1921. RUBEN (Brazil) b. Walfair. Agr. A . Tokyo. 1955-. 1 9 5 4 . . A . Environmental Hygiene from Ministry of Agric. and Genetics) ( A ) . . B .. . 1943. 1 9 1 0 .2O2 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION P h . Univ. N . MASCARENHAS. Agronomique. Place of Study: U .. D .. Dip]. . MASAKAZU (Japan) b. of Rio Grande land) b. Sociology ( S S ) . 1 9 4 9 . Place of tre National de la Recherche Study: U . A . neiro. Place CRUZ (Brazil) b. Appointed from The U . Place of Study: U . R . InterculU . of London 1951. Appointed from (India) b.. D. . PETEZVAL DE OLIVEIRA E pointed from Andhra Univ. A . Study: U . . TEK TJENG (Indonesia) b. KRISHNAMURTI. Keio Univ. AgLondonl950. A . MAN GAP (Korea} b. Andhra Seoul Nat'l Univ. Plant Science (Plant Breeding Doctorat. 1 9 4 3 . Univ. B . . in MinLACEBAL. S . Univ. S . Appointed Biochemistry — Proteins from Seoul Nat*I Univ. MARKUS. S . S . 1 9 4 8 .1 9 5 5 . Place of Study: U .Sc. of Cambridge. Far Eastern trict Hosp.. S . Place of Study: U . A . Appointed 1952. B. Place of Study: Univ. of Study: Australia. of Copenhagen.ApLEMOS. of Cambridge 1 9 5 5 . . 1 9 4 9 . Place Place of Study: U . of Study: U . Science ( D N S A ) . Ecopines. HAS YOUNG (Korea) b. Appointed from tofte. A . LAVORBL. GEORGE Louis (EngEng. D . Appointed from Univ. A . Agr. A . 1 9 2 $ . Univ. U . . 1955-. U . Quezon City. Univ. Place of Study: Univ. S . in Nursing. MELITA (India) b. Place of Study: ( D M P H ) . Appointed from French Coal Industry. M . . 1 9 2 9 . Ls BOUVIER. Seoul Nat1! Univ. Appointed Biochemistry — Photosynthesis from John Innes Horticultural (BMR). Univ. A . .Sc. 1955-.1 9 5 5 . . LBSOURNE. 1955-.. S . Appointed from Lab. JYTTE FUNDBR ( D e n 1 9 3 1 . 1 9 2 1 . Appointed from CenInst. Rio de JaKURATA. Mental Hosp. 1955-. mark) b.

Midwifery Cert. Appointed from Bacteriological NARVAES) CARMEN 2O3 Town. MENDBS. Place of Study: England. . Grey's Hosp. of Cape Glasgow 1 9 3 7 . 1 9 2 7 . J'*£W. USA 1 9 5 5 Belem. A . Place of Study: U .. S . 1 9 5 2 . 1955-. Univ. Med. of Study: U . . Literature ( H ) . of Med. . Univ. and Surgery of Para. A . Nursing Education and Administration ( D M P H ) . Place of Study : U .* S " V™' of Chicago MlMAROGLU. 1944. 1 9 1 5 .. Mowbray. PATERSON. PRABODH BECHARDAS 1955-. of Ankara 1 9 4 9 . Delhi. of Cambridge 1 9 4 6 .1 9 5 5 . AILBEN DUNBAR (Union (India) b. PANDIT. Vellore. Place of Study: from World Health OrganizaU . A . South Asian Lan- of South Africa) b. Nat'l Univ. Santiago. and Surgery of Para.FELLOWSHIPS Delhi 1951. Agriculture— Veterinary Science ( D N S A ) . Public Health Nursing ( D M P H ) . land) b. M . M. Appointed from Univ. MOORE. Univ. Univ. S A . Faculty m ? . Univ. Appointed from Univ. Appointed Silliman Univ. ANNAMMA NATTACHERIL (India} b. Nursing Cert. M . Coll. S A ..M . AGATON P. 1 9 4 8 . S . P h . Dumaguete. of Medical Social Work ( D M P H ) . of Colombia. MOCHI. S . D . D . 1 9 5 4 . Cali. A . Anesthesiology ( M E P H ) . Univ. 1 9 4 4 . . Bogota. 1 9 5 0 . Appointed from The J 0 * * ^ " 6 'f T n ^ 1 0 " ' Sttt^1f u-s-A-» 1955-° f Health Organization') b. 1 9 5 5 . I n s t . 1 9 5 2 . \ 9 * ° ' TT^U™mf ~?ducajl°n t P M P H ) . M . 1 9 2 2 . MORA. 1 9 S S . in Law. Santiago. Place of Study: U . INES (Colombia) b. Place of °™™> ViR°IN^ ^AE ( t / ^ . of Kansas. Pubology ( D S S ) . of London 1950. 1 9 2 1 . S c . . vFVace Schuur Hosp. . S A . of Sao Paulo 1 9 5 2 . Luis (Chile) b. Place of Study: U . 1 9 2 6 . (Philippines) b. ALESSANDRO M. Place of Study . Public Health Nursing ( M E P H ) . S . Anatomy ( M E P H ) . S A . Appointed from Christian Med. Appointed from Turkish Press. Appointed 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Medical Social Work ( M E P H ) . Cape Town. (WorU PAL. 1 9 2 2 . Univ. MATHBWS. JOAO PAULO DO VALLB ( B r a z i l ) b. . Nursing degree. 1 9 2 0 . Place of Study: U . Music Criticism ( H ) . V . 1 9 5 5 . Wayne Univ. Appointed from Univ. 1 9 3 0 .. . Ankara. Appointed from & Surg. 1 9 1 3 . I 9 5 S . (Brazil) b. D . 1955-. . Groote Gujarat Univ. B A. Natal. '*" Appointed from Faculty of Med. Appointed from lie Health ( M E P H ) . Place of Study: U . . S A . A . 1 9 2 3 .. . GEOFFREY HERBERT ( E n g land) b. of Nursing. guages ( D H ) . of Valle. JANE ELIZABETH (ScotPietermaritzburg.. B . 1 9 5 5 . Ahmedabad. MELENDEZ VARGAS. of Rome 1946. . Appointed from Hosp. tion. Rural SociM . MOODIE. U . ) Study: Brazil. 1 9 5 5 .AM Silliman Univ. 1 9 2 0 . ILHAN KBMALBTTIN (Turkey) b. 1955-. of Chile. D . das ClinicaS( SSo Paul0t Placg of Study. Appointed from Coll.. Dipl. P .

. Sao Paulo. A . Eng. Bacteriology ( D M P H ) . Appointed from Patna Univ. Literature ( D H ) . 1 9 5 5 . Agr. Experimental Biology — Biochemistry ( D N S A ) . Univ. D . GENARO O . Nursing Education ( D M P H ) . . Place of Study: U . 1955-. S A . S . of Istanbul 1 9 4 0 . 1 9 4 6 . Appointed from Univ. Salvador. Agriculture —Animal Science (Animal Husbandry) ( A ) . 1917. of Edinburgh.. Place of Study: U . 1 9 4 7 . 1 9 2 2 . 1 9 5 5 . PRASAD. M . 1 9 5 3 . Appointed from Govt. S A .. Appointed from Escola Paulista de Medicina. St. D . Cornell Univ. Agriculture —Soil Science ( A ) . . Place of Study: U .1 9 5 5 . Appointed from lea Health Dept. . . 1 9 1 8 . Belo Horizonte. 1 9 1 8 . PAZ CARIAT. State of Rio de Janeiro. M . Agriculture— Soil Science ( D N S A ) . B . 1 9 2 1 . M . Place of Study: U . S . Lima. 1 9 2 3 . 1 9 5 5 . RAO. Niteroi. 1 9 4 8 . Place of Study: U . 1955-. A . Mexico. 1955-. 1 9 4 0 . Dipl. REYNAFARJB. RASTOIL (Uruguay) b. Appointed from The Rockefeller Foundation. 1 9 1 5 . of Florida 1 9 4 3 . Nursing School.1 9 5 5 .M . H . Univ. Sholapur. 1916. 1941. Hamilton. of Minas Gerais.204 THB ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION pointed from Eliseu Maciel School of Agron. NARAYANA (India] b. of Bahia. S . (Philippines) b. Nat'l Univ. PAYZIN. . S A . Appointed from Secretariat of Agric. S . PAVAGKAU. France.M . S A .. S A . of Mexico 1 9 5 0 . of Bahia. . Appointed from Univ. D . Appointed from Bombay Municipal Utilities. Calcutta. D . Physiology (MEPH).1 9 5 5 . 1 9 2 6 . Place of Study: U .1 9 5 5 . Appointed from Rocky Mountain Lab. S . 1935. Univ. Places of Study. . Intercultural Understanding ( D H ) . 1931. Patna Univ. of the Republic. 1 9 4 0 . Agriculture— Veterinary Science— Pharmacology ( D N S A ) . BALTAZAR (Peru) b. LICIA MARIA (Brazil) b. . .1 England. 1 9 5 5 . V . Place of Study: U . S A . PENDSE. JOAQUIN (Mexico) b. Place of Study: U . 1 9 1 3 . SIMLA ( I n d i a ) b. Montana. Bombay. D . POETSCH. P .1 9 5 5 . RAM£REZ GENEL. MA. A . of the Philippines 1 9 5 0 . Place of Study: U . S A . . Appointed from Univ. Eliseu Maciel School of Agron. Univ. ERNST (Brazil) b. 1 9 5 5 . ADA (Peru) b. M . M . Appointed from Nat'l Inst. Jos6 LEAL (Brazil) b. Univ. Mexico City. S A . Place of Study: U . Place of Study: U . Univ. 1 9 5 2 . Ap- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .. Medlcal Nursing ( M E P H ) . All India Inst. Pelotas. SABAHATTINT (Turkey) b. Agriculture — Plant Science (Plant Parasitology) ( A ) . of the Philippines. PRADO DE CARVALHO. .. 1 9 5 5 . UmV. V. of San Mar- from Univ. PINHO DE ALMEIDA. MOACYR ( B r a z i l ) b* 1 9 0 9 . 1 9 2 7 . Xavier's Coll.. of Hygiene and Public Health. PBRDOMO. of Bombay. Place of Study: France. Epidemiology ( M E P H ) . REMOLINA LOPEZ. Nursing grad. B. Place of Study : U . Archbishop Loayza Hosp. S A .. SHRIPAD NARAYAN (India) b.. MARCOS (Mexico) b. S . 1 9 2 5 . M . of Cardiology. Montevideo.Sc. of the RepubHe. RANIT. A .

. 1 9 4 8 . Appointed pointed from Hokkaido Univ. of Coof Andean Biology. Univ. (Mexico) b. Peration. Tissue Chemof Colombia. D . . 1 9 2 2 . Drama ( D H ) . Place of U. Nat'l Univ. of Ceylon. ( D M P H ) . Near EastU .. of Colombia.SHAYAL. 1 9 2 5 . 1955-. 1 9 1 7 . P h . U. American Univ.. Oslo. of JW7. ApUniv.1 9 5 5 . KIYOHIDE (Japan} b. 1 9 1 8 . . S A . Place of Study: 1955-. A . S A . 1940. Place tion and Education ( D M P H ) . Medical Nursing Beirut 1 9 4 2 . of Sao b. American Univ. A . 1 9 5 2 . . of Sapporo. 1 9 2 3 . (Colombia) RORSTAD.. Place RILEY. ish Nurses' Assn. Lima. fairs. VEDITANTIRIGB Florida 1 9 5 3 . SwedSABRA. ROCHA. S A .M . 1955-. London. 1951. Place of Study: of Alexandria 1948. S A . 1955-.1 9 4 7 4 8 . ) of Study: U . D. Appointed from Royal Nor. of San Marcos and Inst. 1955-. S . B . GUNNVOR (Norwnv) b. ern Studies ( H ) . Place lombia. CARLOS V.SA. Neurology School of Nursing. Univ. LlSBETH EtSB SONJA (Sweden) b. . Appointed from State docrinology ( M S ) . D . Appointed from The Rockefeller Foundafrom Univ. M. FUAD AMIN (Lebanon) b. 1 9 1 4 . Univ. ROJAS GARCIDUENAS.SA. Nursing AdministraNat'l Univ. Agriculture— EDIRIWEERA RANJITA (Ceylon) Plant Science [Plant Parasitology b. Agr. Appointed from 1947-1948. of Beirut. DipL. Colombia. Tokyo Imperial Nat'l Univ. 1955-. Place of Study: India. Goteborg. Appointed 1 9 4 9 . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Physiology and En( M E P H ) .D . Study: U . S A . . Monterrey. Agr. Bogota. D . Agriculerinary Science — Parasitology ture — Plant Science (Plant ( D N S A ) . SERRANO. M . . U . S . RlCHTBR.Litt. Mexico. 1931. Biologist. V . AgUniv. b. 1 9 3 1 . Appointed from Univ. Lima.. FERNANDO (ColomUniv. Appointed from of Sao Paulo.FELLOWSHIPS 2O5 cos. Appointed twice from Place of Study: U . of 1951. 1955-. 1955-. Stockholm. . Place of Study: Nat'l School of Agric. Appointed from Neurophysiology ( M E P H ) . of London (Entomology)] ( A ) . Bungakushi. b. Univ. Univ. Place of Study: deniya. M . L L . ology ( M E P H ) . Ing. MANUEL SEKI. Genetics) ( A ) . Nat'l Univ. Place of Study: U . 1 9 5 5 . URIEL FRANCO (Brazil) SCHEUCH H . of Study: Colombia. FRIEDRICH (Peru) b. Place of Study: U .1 9 5 5 . A . . pointed from Nat'l Univ.. . PhysiRoyal Coll. Nat'l School Paulo 1 9 4 2 . of Nursing. 1 9 1 8 . of SARATHCHANDRA. Study: U . ApBreecling) (DNSA). S A . Appointed from ROSAS PENA. Bogota. 1 9 2 6 . from Technological Inst. D . Agriculture — Vetof Agric. 1955-. Population and Comricnlture — Plant Science (Plant munity Organization ( S S ) . Lima. GAMAL ELDIN EL wegian Ministry of Social Af(Egypt) b. of Alexandria. GEORGE BERNARD ( U £ J . 1 9 1 1 . of Mexico 1952. of Oslo 1946. of Study: U . M . Place of bia) b. S . 1955.. istry ( M E P H ) . 1955-.

Place of Study: Study: U . D . (Brazil) b. Univ. JOHN (England) b..M . U . Appointed from Univ. T . . 1951. 1955-. of Tokyo pointed from Med. Place of Study: pointed from Univ. ». Appointed Trinidad Regional Virus Lab. of Camof Stu^y: Great Bntam' 19SS-' bridge 1 9 4 8 .M rir.TIRTHAPURA NAN1 9 2 5 . A . . SREBKANTAIYA. T o k y o . . 1 9 2 1 . of SOMOZA. cleic Acids (BMR).A.South Asian Languages of Study: U .J^ t leum C o . Appointed from Inst. /TT\A • it ^ -n . of Cambridge. D . Baghdad. Tokyo Univ. Appointed from Karnatak Univ.. 1 9 4 9 . BiochemSHIRAKI. Annamalai Univ. Univ. Josfi West Indies) b. Place of Study: M . D . B . of Oxford 1 9 4 9 . N K( f n g ™ d \ b ' from Royal Infirmary Edin™ ' A ' ' U«lv« of Oxford u VAi.206 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION SHINOHARA. D . . D . PiaceflfStudy:V. S . . 1955-. .ApStockholm. bashi Univ. 1955-. Physiology and ( D M P H ) . from Postgraduate Med.Ap: {n Englishj MA Jn Kannada> pointed from Ministry of FiUniv> of Mysore 1929> mL In_ n?CA ?QS« ' terculturalUnderstanding(DH). ° /5 ' « ^ . Appointed 1 9 5 S . . 1 9 1 5 . del Riego. M . . 1919. JOHN DEREK (England) b. S . A . Bo HILDING (Sweden) b. Appointed from Iraq retroC... *. A . I. M . U-S. V... Agr. ( D H ) . Nobel Inst. . IN HYUN (Korea) b. U . Ltd. S . 1946. . S . Ing. 1955-. M . M . TOSH (England) b. Place tlna) b. Virology dor. Univ. Appointed from Chonnam Univ. of Bahia. B . SMITH. ( S S ) . Biochemistry—NuSUBRAMONIAN. Place of 1 9 2 6 . of Bahia. pL. School SONG. Cand. A . ./ c#»^. . France. S . Place of Study: U . P/oc? SMITH. S . from Univ. HBRMOD (Norway) b. Univ. 0 ' ' b . 1 9 2 2 . C h .. of Tokyo. Medicine ( B M R C ) . TT Q A Modern Near Eastern History burgh. Ap1 9 1 7 .. .SA. Appointed ^ ^ M. A . b . P h . (India) b. Univ. Karolinska Study: U . of Edinburgh 1950. Kwangju. Place of Port-of-Spain.1 9 5 S . Epidemiology ( M E P H ) . Appointed from HitotsuSORBO. U . Snogakushi. & H . ALAN WILLIAM MclNDharwar. M . Place of Study : U . Appointed S T ? } K f• ^ A .nr-T^ / c1 . 1 9 5 5 . 1 9 4 9 . Economics Place of Study: U . Chonnam Univ. Appointed from Nutrition ( D M P H ) . 1941. SKANLAND. Univ.T^« VrtT.. Medicine ( B M R C ) . Inst. D . . thesis. 1955-. S A . . 1955-. A. M .. c ' . Ecpn. LESLIE PERCIVAL (British SIMOES B SILVA JUNIOR. Agricul. of Commerce 1 9 4 2 .^ . 1 9 2 6 . .SUMMERSKILL. Stockholm. from Univ. B . A . S . rlace of otuay: U . D . qef ( H ) . 1951.. Economics (DSS).p . ARTURO Lucio (drgenTravancorc. C h . SPENCB. 1 9 2 3 . London School of Hygiene D . 1 9 2 5 . Univ of Oslo JUNDAIYA ( ! n d i a ) bt i m . 1ftcc 7 0 2 4 .. Place l946. A . . HIROTSUGU (Japan) b. MIYOHBI (Japan) b. Psychiatry (DMPH).1 9 5 5 . 1953. Trivandrum. .1 9 S S . ] 9 5 5 ' C h . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . istry—Enzymes ( D N S A ) . . A . of Buenos Aires 1939. Salva& Tropical Med. A .. B . WILLIAM HBDLEY ture —Soil Science (DNSA). Mendoza. . S . A . of London.

FELLOWSHIPS

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TAKBYA, KBNJI (Japan} b. 1 9 2 2 . Health, Taipei, Place of Study: M . D . , Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka, U . S . A . , 19551 9 4 4 . Microbiology ( M E P H ) . TUOADB, RODRIGO ROSARIO (PhilipAppointed from Kyushu Univ. pines) b. 1 9 0 6 . L L . B . , Univ. of Place of Study: MS J L . ,1 9 5 5 . Kansas 1 9 3 1 . Political Science TEIXEIRA, ALAOR ( B r a z i l ) b. 1 9 2 8 , ( D S S ) . Appointed from Silliman M . D . , Univ. of Rio Grande do Univ., Dumaguete. Place of Sul, Porto Alegre, 1 9 5 3 . Anatomy Study: U . S . A . , 1955-. (DMPH).Appointed fromUniv, of Rio Grande do Sul. Place of VALLANCB-OWEN, JOHN ( E n g Study: Brazil, 1955-. land) b. 1 9 2 0 . M . D . , Univ. of TBSSI, JUAN LORENZO (Argentina) Cambridge 1951, Medicine b. 1 9 2 3 . Ing. Agr., Univ. of ( B M R C ) . Appointed from PostBuenos Aires 1 9 4 7 . Agriculture graduate Med. School of Lon— Plant Science — Plant Breeddon. Place of Study: U . S . A . ing ( D N S A ) . Appointed from I955-. Ministry of Agric., Castelar. VARBLA, HBLVECIA (Uruguay) b. Place of Study: U . S . A . , 19551 9 3 0 . Grad., Univ. of the RepubTHIEMANN, JOSEF ERNST (Brazil) lie, Montevideo, 1953. Nursing b. 1 9 3 1 . Grad., Escola Superior Education ( D M P H ) . Appointed de Agric, e Veterinaria do Parfrom Univ. of the Republic. ana, Curitiba, 1953. Experimental Place of Study: U . S . A . ,1 9 5 5 . Biology—Microbiology (BMR). VERGHESB, ALEYAMMA (India) b. Appointed from Inst. de Biolog1 9 2 6 . B . S c . in Nursing, Christian ico e Pesquisas Tecnologicas, Med. C o l l . , Vellore, 1951. Public Curitiba. Place of Study: U . S . A . , Health Nursing ( M E P H ) . Ap1 9 5 5 . pointed from School of Nursing, TOMABBCHI, KONOSUKE (Japan) Trivandrum. Place of Study: b. 1 9 2 4 . M . D . , Kyoto Univ, 1948. U . S . A . , 19S5-. Public Health — Nutrition VERONESI, RICARDO (Brazil) b. ( M E P H ) . Appointed from Inst. 1 9 1 9 .M . D . , Univ. of Sao Paulo of Public Health, Tokyo. Place 1 9 4 6 . Virology ( M E P H ) . Apof Study: U . S . A . , 1955-. pointed from Univ. of Sao Paulo. TORRBALBA LABORDA., DOMINGO Place of Study: U . S . A . , 1 9 5 5 . ANTONIO (Chile) b. 1 9 2 7 . Ing. VILLAS-BOAS, THEREZA MARIA Agr., Univ. of Chile, Santiago, CALMON (Brazil) b. 1 9 2 6 . Nurs1951. Agriculture—Plant Science ing Dipl., Univ. of Bahia, Salva(Forestry) ( D N S A ) . Appointed dor, 1 9 5 3 . Nursing Education from Corp. de Fomento de la and Administration ( D M P H ) . Production, Santiago. Place of Appointed from Univ. of Rio Study: U . S . A . ,1 9 5 5 . Grande do Sul, Porto Alcgre. TUAN, CHI-HSIBK (National RePlace of Study: U . S . A . , 1 9 5 5 . public of China) b. 1 9 2 7 . Nat'l Univ. of Taiwan, Taipei, 1946WBROELAND, HJALMAR KIELLAND 1 9 4 9 . Demography ( S S ) . Ap(Norway) b. 1 9 0 9 . Med. Lie., pointed from Nat'l Inst, of Univ. of Oslo 1 9 3 7 . Pediatrics

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

2O8

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION School of Nursing, Geneva. Place of Study: U . S . A . , 19S5-. . XIRAU, RAMON (Mexico) b. 1 9 2 4 . M . A . , Natl Univ. of Mexico * 9 4 6 ' . Literature ( D H ) ; ( H ) . Appointed twice from Mexico 9 l ^ ] \ ^ % ° f5 ^ ' M e * ICO> 1951-1952; France, 1955-. yOSHIDA) TOKIKO (Japan) b. 1 9 2 2 .

( M S ) ; Psychiatry ( D M P H ) . Appointed twice from Univ. of Oslo. Place of Study: U . S . A . , 1950 1951- 1955WIOHTMAN,' DAVID R. ( £ « ^ ^ ) b. 1 9 2 5 .B . S c . , London School of Economics and Political Science 1 9 4 6 . Economic History ( D S S ) , Appointed from Univ. of Birmingham. Place of Study: U . S . A . ,

J 9 5 5 " ^ n ,rrc^ St' Luke's Co11 of Nurslng> WOOD, HARLAND GOFF ( U . S . J . ) Tokyo, 1940-1943. Nursing Edub. 1 9 0 7 . P h . D . t Iowa State Coll. cation and Administration 1935. Biochemistry ( D M P H ) . ( M E P H ) . Appointed from St. Appointed from Western Reserve Luke's Coll< of Nursing. Place Univ. Place of Study: Denmark, of Study: U . S . A . , 1955-. 1955-. WUTHRICH, MAGDALEN A VERENA Zo, KI-ZUN (Korea) b. 1 9 1 7 . (Switzerland) b. 1 9 1 3 . DipL, B . A . , Sophia Univ., Tokyo, 1 9 4 2 . Pflegerinschule, Zurich, 1 9 3 7 . Economic History ( H ) . ApNursing Education ( M E P H ) . pointed from Korea Univ., Seoul. Appointed from Le Bon Secours Place of Study: U . S . A . , 1955-.

OTHER STUDY AWARDS In addition to its regular fellowship appointments in 1955, the Foundation made a limited number of special study awards in connection with its programs in Latin

America and the Far East. Twenty-five persons from seven countries received these awards: ACHJAD, MOHAMAD (Indonesia) b. COBLHO, ANTONIO S . R, (Brazil) 1 9 2 3 . Labor Relations. Places of b. 1 9 3 1 . Eng. Agr., Luiz de Study: Japan, Philippines, HaQueiroz Coll. of Agric., Pirawaii, U . S . A . ,1 9 5 5 . cicaba, 1 9 5 4 . Agronomy. Place ARDJ, ASEP (Indonesia) b. 1 9 1 8 . of Study: Mexico, 1955-. Labor Relations. Places of Study: COBLHO, JOSH CLAUDIO MEIRA Japan, Philippines, Hawaii, (Brazil) b. 1 9 2 4 . Eng. Agr., U . S . A . , 1955-. Eliseu Maciel School of Agron., CANALES L6PEZ, HORACIO (MexPelotas, 1955. Soil Science. Place ico) b. 1 9 2 8 , Ing. Agr., Antonio of Study: Mexico, 1955-. Narro School of Agric., Saltillo, CORDERO VILLALBA, ANGEL ( B o 1954. Plant Science (Plant Breedlivia) b. 1 9 2 8 . Ing. Agr., Univ. of ing). P/.o/Sr«^.-U,S.A., 1955-. San Simon, Cochabamba, 1 9 S 4 .

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

FELLOWSHIPS Plant Science (Plant Breeding). Place of Study: Mexico, 1 9 5 5 . DE MORABS, CARMINO MATHBUS ( B r a z i l ) b . 1 9 3 1 . Eng. A g r . , Univ. of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, 1 9 5 4 . Plant Science ( P l a n t Breeding). Place of Study: Mexico, 1 9 5 5 . DIRDJOSEWOJO, R. (Indonesia) b. 1 9 1 9 . Labor Relations, Places of Study: U . S A , Japan, Philippines, Hawaii, I 9 5 5 . FERNANDEZ OREAMUNO, JOAQUIN E . (Costa Rica) b . 1 9 3 3 . Ing. Agr., Univ. of Costa Rica 1 9 5 4 . Plant Science (Plant Parasit- Entomology). Place of ; Mexico, 1955-. _ . _ . . . , GARCI A SANCHEZ, ALFREDO (Mexico) b. 1 9 2 8 . Ing. Agr., Antonio Narro School of Agnc., Saltillo, 1951. Plant Science (Plant Breeding). Place Canada, 1 9 5 5 . of Study:

209

cation. Place of Study: U . S . A . , 1 9 5 5 . LATINO Ruiz, MARIO (Nicaragua) * •1 9 3 4 . Grad., Nat'l School o f * & ^ Managua, 1 9 5 5 . Plant Science (Plant Breeding). Place of Stady: Mexico, 1 9 5 5 . LAZO DB " VBQA> J°SB Luis (Mexico) b. 1 9 2 9 . B , S , , Louisi™* State Umv- 1 9 5 2 ' Plant Scfenca (Plant Breeding). Place ° /8 * * * y i U . S . A . , 1 9 5 5 . MARTINS DBSouzA UBIRAJARA R. <*™?rf> *• " f' E n | ; ^ £?ral ^mv' . of ^ e Stat ° * f Da8 Gera£> Vl^a "™"***™ 0/

PINEDA LACAYO, LA UREANO ( Ntcaragua^ b> 1 9 3 4 t Gradff Nafl School of AgrjCi( Managua) 1 9 5 5 . plant Scleace (plant Breeding), ?lace of Sttldy. Mexic0) j 9 5 5 . . PRADJASASMJTA, MUDAKIR (Indonesia) bt m3f Labor Relations. Plac^ *t Study: Japan, Philipj Hawaii, U . S . A . , 1955-, RANGKUTY, NURMAN (Indonesia)

GfrtT^ADALBERT° ( ~l\ 1 9 3 1 . Eng. Agr., Luiz de Queiroz Coll. of Agric., Piracicaba, 1954. Agronomy. Place of Study: Mex-

ico, 1955-. b. 1 9 1 8 . Labor Relations. Places GASTAUD, CLAUDIO SICA (Brazil) Of Study: Japan, Philippines, b. 1 9 2 9 . Eng. Agr., Eliseu Maciel Hawaii, U . S . A . , I 9 5 5 . School of Agron., Pelotas, 1951. RASJID^ A. MANNAN (Indonesia) Plant Science (Plant Breeding). b. 1 9 2 0 . Labor Relations. Places Place of Study: Mexico, 1955-. of Study; Japan, Philippines, GONZALEZ AtANis, MART!N (MexHawaii, U . S . A . , 1955-. ico) b. 1 9 3 0 . Ing. Agr., Technological Inst. & School of HighSANCHEZ Pico, JUAN LEON (Ecuaer Studies of Monterrey, 1954. dor) b, 1927, Ing, Agr., Luiz Plant Science. Place of Study: de Queiroz Coll. of Agric., PiraU . S . A . ,1 9 5 5 . cicaba, 1951, Plant Science (Plant Breeding). Place of HAMW, ABDUL (Indonesia) b. Study: Mexico, 1 9 5 5 . 1 9 0 9 . English Language and EduSUKOTJO, SADBN (Indonesia) b.

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

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THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ing). Place of Study: Mexico, 1 9 5 5 . WBTZBL, CLOVIS TERRA (Brazil)

1 9 2 0 . Labor Relations. Places of Study: Japan, Philippines, Hawaii, U . S . A . ,1 9 5 5 .

VILLBNA DUCHEN, GuiLtBRMO ft. 1 9 2 9 . Eng. A g r . , EHseu Maciel (Bolivia) b, 1 9 3 1 . Ing. Agr., School of Agron., Pelotas, 1 9 5 S . Univ.of San Simon,Cochabamba, Plant Science (Plant Breeding). 1 9 5 4 . Plant Science (Plant BreedPlace of Study: Mexico, 1 9 5 5 .

© 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

Report of the Treasurer

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

REPORT

OF

THE

TREASURER

' N THE

FOLLOWING PAGES is submitted a report of the Rockefeller Foundation

financial transactions of The

for the year ended December 31, 1955.

Accountants' Certificate Balance Sheet Principal Fund Appropriations and Payments Unappropriated Authorizations Income Available for Commitment Appropriations and Unappropriated Authorizations Office and Equipment Fund Appropriations during 1955, Unpaid Balances of Prior Year Appropriations, and Payments thereon in 1955 Refunds on Prior Year Closed Appropriations Finance Committee's Statement of Transactions Relating to Invested Funds Schedule of Securities on December 31, 1955

215 216 217 217 218 218 219 219

220 289

291 296

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

the accompanying balance sheet and statements of unappropriated and appropriated funds present fairly the financial position of The Rockefeller Foundation as of December 31. NEW YORK 17 February 2ot 2 9 5 6 ACCOUNTANTS' CERTIFICATE To the Board of Trustees of The Rockefeller Foundation: We have examined the balance sheet of The Rocke- feller Foundation as of December 31. and the results of itsfinancialactivities during the year then ended. 1955. In our opinion. accordingly. with the foregoing explanation. and the related statements of its unappropriated and appropriated funds for the year then ended. no effect has been given in the accompanying statements to income accrued but not received at December 31* *955» nor to expenditures made from advances for which reports had not been received at the time the books were closed for the year.SQUIRES & COMPANY CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 101 PARK AVENUE. (Signed) Squires & Company 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 1955. Our examination was made in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards. and accordingly included such tests of the accounting records and such other auditing procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. The accounting records are kept on a cash basis and. in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles applied on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year.

5 9 1 1 3 . 3 9 5 . 6 2 0 .216 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION BALANCE SHEET—DECEMBER 31.93 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 8 0 127. 1 2 3 . 7 4 4 . 8 8 4 0 . 1 1 1 . 9 3 6 . 2 0 $ 3 7 9 . 1 7 4 . 9 0 5 . 5 0 6 . 9 3 4 . 5 2 4 . 7 9 1 . 4 3 4 .111. 4 1 4 2 0 . 4 3 0 . 0 1 INCOME AVAILABLE FOR COMMITMENT CURRENT LIABILITIES: Accounts payable and deferred credit OFFICE AND EQUIPMENT FUND 6 . 1955 ASSETS SECURITIES (Ledger value) (Market value $ 5 8 1 . 0 0 ) CURRENT ASSETS: Cash on deposit Advances and deferred charges Sundry accounts receivable OFFICE AND EQUIPMENT: In New York and Paris 1 2 7 . 0 0 3 1 . 8 7 0 . 6 9 2 . 9 6 7 . 1 4 8 . 7 9 $ 1 6 2 . 4 7 5 . 1 4 5 . 2 8 9 . 7 0 FUNDS 4 N D OBLIGATIONS PRINCIPAL FUND COMMITMENTS: Unpaid appropriations Unappropriated authorizations $ 2 9 . 2 1 0 . 8 0 8 . 2 9 $ 1 9 6 . 8 0 0 . 9 3 $ 2 0 0 . 8 7 3 .

131. 7 5 3 . 6 5 5 .PRINCIPAL FUND Balance.353. 0 0 0 . 1955 $ 1 5 6 . 0 8 Anonymous 1 2 . 4 1 1 . 6 7 2 . 8 0 4 . 4 7 Administration 1. 5 8 8 . 2 1 0 . December 31.98 Social Sciences 2 . 0 0 g Biological and Medical Research 2 . 8 0 8 . 0 0 v Social Sciences 3 . 4 7 0 .154. 4 5 G $ 4 5 .073.700. 0 1 APPROPRIATIONS AND PAYMENTS = = = = = ^ Unpaid appropriations.057.93 Biological and Medical Research 3. 4 7 6 . 0 0 0 . 1 2 0 . 8 6 0 . 1 5 5 . 2 2 3 . 0 0 Balance. 3 3 2 . Hutchbs $ 7 . 0 9 4 . 5 9 7 . 9 5 7 .55 1 8 . December 31. 6 2 9 . 0 0 M Administration 2 .550. 1 7 1 9 .23 Agriculture 1.330.736. 0 4 Former Program 950.52 $ 2 9 . 7 9 ** 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .04 Unpaid appropriations.320. 0 8 6 . 7 6 $ 6 .761. 0 0 ^ Humanities 3.00 £ Unused balances of appropriations allowed to lapse 1. 6 0 Humanities 3 . 5 0 9 . 7 8 9 .578.697. 8 5 3 . 0 9 0 .311. 9 5 7 .712.929. 1954 Add: Amount by which the proceeds of securities sold during the year exceeded their ledger value Gifts received: Estate of Frank D.00 S General 4 3 5 .23 General 4 4 3 . 8 6 w Appropriations during the year ( For detail see pages 220 to 288) : o Medical Education and Public Health $ 3 . 4 6 3 . 9 5 0 . December 31. 1954 $ 2 7 . 19S5 * M 16.152. 2 5 $ 3 6 2 . 3 1 Payments on 1955 and prior years' appropriations (For detail see pages 220 to 288) : Medical Education and Public Health $2. December 31. 3 1 6 . 8 0 0 . 4 3 4 . 0 0 o Agriculture 3 . 3 1 4 . 6 0 1 . 0 0 $ w $19. 6 9 4 . 4 8 3 .

.

0 4 .. 9 3 6 ..52 ^ __-. 6 3 1 .810. 7 9 > = = = = = ^ S BALANCE DEC.34 $2.. 9 7 0 . 8 13. December 31. 0 7 9 .. December 31.. 9 0 1 4 .057.. 31.. 1954 ADDITIONS DEPRECIATION $ 9 .072. 6 5 6 . 31. 1955: Unpaid appropriations Unappropriated authorizations $19..34 8 3 . 6 2 6 .152. 6 7 .55 $ 2 9 . Hi $ 2 9 .810. 2 6 9 ..920. 6 9 4 . 7 9 £ 1 .00 93. 8 5 3 .00 1. 0 0 $2.121. 4 4 1 . 8 0 8 . 9 2 6 . $ 7 .86 1 8 .. 1 4 5 .700.024. 9 0 23. 4 5 $ 4 7 .93 H Library Equipment Paris Office: Part interest in Paris office building OFFICE AND EQUIPMENT FUND BALANCE CHANGES DURING 1955 DEC..721..353... 7 2 4 .1955 $9.27 23..578. 0 0 Add: Appropriations Less: Appropriations lapsed during the year Decrease in authorizations during the year Deduct: Payments on 1955 and prior years' appropriations Commitments.66 $127.. 0 4 5 .111. 9 3 4 . 0 1 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .APPROPRIATIONS AND UNAPPROPRIATED AUTHORIZATIONS Commitments. 3 1 w 2 * § ^ 16. $ 9 3 .381. 7 4 4 .. 9 4 9 .171.55 15. 8 6 Unappropriated authorizations 1 . 2 1 0 . 9 9 4 . 0 0 $ 3 1 .00 $1.66 $ 4 0 . 4 4 5 .697. 1954: Unpaid appropriations $ 2 7 . 9 6 0 .. 6 4 4 .

9 3 7 . 55059) CANADA University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine and the School of Hygiene. 0 0 1 9 . 0 0 8 0 . Chapel Hill Division of Health Affairs. 6 9 5 . 0 0 0 . 6 9 5 . UNPAID BALANCES OF PRIOR YEAR APPROPRIATIONS. 5 5 9 . 1950-1953 ( I H 50126) YELLOW FEVER Africa Uganda. C . Teaching in medical care (RF 54065) 1955 PAYMENTS g O $ 2 .APPROPRIATIONS DURING 1955. 5 0 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . D . 0 0 4 9 . Support of Subcommittee on Medical Care (RF 52055) University of North Carolina. 9 3 5 . 3 4 4 0 . 4 0 $ $ 1 . AND PAYMENTS THEREON IN 1955 APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH Control and Investigation of Specific Diseases and Deficiencies MALARIA Europe Italy Sardinia Anopheles Eradication Program. 9 6 2 . 0 0 0 . 1949 (IH 48016) Medical Care UNITED STATES American Public Health Association. Washington. 0 8 0 . Study of general medical practice (RF 53050. 0 0 2 0 . 54186. 6 0 0 . 0 0 H W W # O ^ » w £ g " *4 o <3 Q % 5 3 2 0 .

654. 0 0 36. 4 1 23. 4 9 7 . Ithaca. 8 0 5 .29 4 1 . 0 0 0 .33 11.750.00 7 .210. 0 0 29. goissons Support of Soissons Center of Public Health 53090) (RF 8 8 . Cambridge.915. New York Medical College. Puerto Rico Survey of the medical and public health facilities in the Bayamon region (RF 54102) Professional Education UNITED STATES Cornell University.33 3 1 . Massachusetts Support of School of Public Health (RF 45109) Development of legal medicine (RF 52075) Development of the Department of Dermatology of Harvard Medical School (RF 4 8 0 3 9 ) 41. 2 2 2 .90 Great Britain Victoria University of Manchester Development of an experimental Health Center (IH 5 0 1 0 ! ) WEST INDIES Department of Health. 0 0 0 . 8 8 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 1 0 0 .23 £ 2 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 31.371.118. 0 7 2 . 0 3 jo « o g o ^ * W M $ £ w S g 7* 9 5 .EUROPE France Social Hygiene Association of the Aisne. New York Statistical consultant in the Department of Preventive Medicine (RF SI 119) Application of electron microscopy to teaching and research in the Department of Pathology (RF 55073) (Joint Project with Biological and Medical Research) Harvard University. 4 2 1 0 0 . 7 5 0 .

.

0 0 15. 3 9 3 1 4 . 0 0 2 . 0 0 1 0 . Mexico City Equipment (RF 52082) Children's Hospital. 0 0 1 5 . Tennessee For use by the Department of Pediatrics of the School of Medicine in the exchange of senior assistants (RF 53157) Washington University. 1 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 1. Teaching of preventive medicine (RF 52111) Yale University. 0 0 2 9 9 . 0 0 0 . Mexico City Toward development of a research and training program (RF 54180) WEST INDIES Jamaica University College of the West Indies Field training and research in Faculty of Medicine and research in Department of Chemistry (RF 55094) (Joint Project with Biological and Medical Research) Puerto Rico University of Puerto Rico. 0 0 5 0 0 . San Juan Development of the Medical School Library (RF 54-021) 3 8 . 5 0 0 . Louis. Nashville. 0 0 1 9 .00 3 . 0 5 0 . 4 0 0 . 0 0 0 .600. Illinois Department of Sociology. 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 4 6 4 3 . 0 0 J§ u 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Missouri School of Medicine. Study of integration of Negroes in medicine (RF 55124) Vanderbilt University. 0 0 fa w 2 H o * IJ hj H g w > C g w 3 2 . St. Connecticut Work in the history of medicine (RF 51065) MEXICO National Institute of Cardiology.718. 0 0 0 .64 1 5 0 . 0 0 3 . New Haven.University of Chicago. 6 3 7 .

0 0 0 . 0 9 4 . 0 0 23.08 9 0 0 . and Physiopathology of the Medical School (RF 51131) Department of Neurosurgery. 0 0 532. 0 0 0 . 0 0 2 7 8 . 0 0 3 . 0 0 0 .61 5 . Belo Horizonte Faculty of Medicine. 5 8 0 . Neurophysiology. 0 0 5 7 . 6 1 0 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR TEARS 1955 MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH — continued Professional Education — continued SOUTH AMERICA Brazil Araraquara Health Training Center. 1953-1955 ( R F 53155) Campaign for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (Capes). 4 8 9 0 0 . 0 7 1 . Rio de Janeiro Support of program to train teachers for medical schools (RF 55139) Santa Casa de Misericordia. 1 2 0 . Salary and equipment ( R F 53013) 1935 PAYMENTS 13 j j $ 6 . 8 1 4 7 .758. 5 0 0 . Rio de Janeiro Graduate training of physicians (RF 55114) University of Minas Gerais. 0 0 1 1 . 1 2 7 . 0 0 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 3 3 9 . General development (RF 55177) (Joint Project with Biological and Medical Research) University of Sao Paulo Improvement of teaching facilities (RF 55053) Development of Faculty of Medicine at RibeirSo Preto (RF 55100) Chile Catholic University of Chile. 3 6 H £ o G £ l_j w £ 59 M ° Z g w § 1 2 4 . 0 0 3 5 . 3 6 $ $ 1 . Santiago Apparatus and research expenses of Departments of Physiology.

3 4 2 4 . 1 4 4 .193. 6 6 4 . 0 0 0 . 8 4 9 . 0 5 0 . 5 0 0 . 8 0 £ 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 9 5 6 0 . Montevideo General budget (IH 47054) University of the Republic. 0 0 *" ™ 7> ** 2 4 6 .923. 0 0 4 6 .60 s « ja 5 19. 0 0 0 .18 1 1 . 0 0 3 7 9 . 0 0 9 0 . 6 2 6 .92 2 4 . 1 0 7 . 3 2 jj 9. 0 0 53. Courses for sanitary engineers (GA 51121) Colombia National University of Colombia. 2 1 0 .Preclinical teaching and research in Faculty of Medicine (RF 55052) University of Chile. Cali Faculty of Medicine. Santiago Faculty of Medicine. 1 7 2 . 2 0 0 .35 | » & 3. Equipment (RF 5 4 0 4 4 ) University of Valle. 0 0 0 . 2 9 4 . General development (RF 55064) School of Public Health. 4 7 3 2 . Bogota Faculty of Medicine. 0 0 0 . Teaching and research (RF 55028) Uruguay University Nursing School. Montevideo Improvement of teaching facilities (RF 55054) EUROPE Austria University of Vienna Local fellowships for training in child psychiatry (RF 52162) 1 2 3 . Development of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health and assodated activities (RF 54179) School of Nursing (RF 55034) Peru ^ University of San Marcos Department of Pathological Physiology.135. 0 0 1 0 . 6 0 0 . 4 4 JJJ 6 . 0 0 5 0 4 . 8 7 4 .

0 0 *a t* £J 1 2 . Paris Development of child mental health teaching and research ( R F 52158) 6 4 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH — continued Professional Education — continued EUROPE — continued Belgium University of Brussels Support of the Department of Social Medicine (RF 52034) $15. 7 3 8 .31 | g % 6.31 Finland University of Helsinki Medical School. 4 1 2 . 4 5 0 .11 Technical Institute. 0 8 University of Heidelberg School of Nursing. 0 0 France Association for the Mental Health of Children. Stuttgart Education and research in sanitary engineering (RF 53094) 3 0 . 5 4 4 . 1 6 0 .308. 2 5 * § g 5 16.32 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Helsinki Support of training program of the Uusimaa field demonstration and teaching area (RF 5 4 0 0 9 ) 1 9 .176. Teaching material and equipment and for travel of staff ( R F 52123) 9 9 7 . Teaching program (RF 53147) 23. 3 4 Germany Health Authority of The Free Hanseatic City of Hamburg. 3 7 1955 PAYMENTS » §S $ $ 3 . 9 5 . 3 4 0 .30 2 6 . Research and teaching positions for assistants in basic science institutes (RF 5 3 0 5 4 ) 5 6 . 9 8 8 . 7 5 2 g w o £j 5 .230. 0 0 State Medical Board of Finland. 0 4 3 .363.

7 0 4 5 . 9 5 156.681.352. 9 2 6 . 0 0 535. Study of medical student selection (RF 52160) London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Public Health practice experiments (RF 53026) Establishment of Department of Occupational Health (RF 55008) University of Oxford School of Medicine. 0 0 1 8 . 0 0 4. Toward program in public health engineering (RF 5 4 1 0 4 ) University of Edinburgh.95 1 0 . Scotland Faculty of Medicine Teaching of family practice (RF 52140) Nursing Teaching Unit (RF 55102) University of London University College. 0 2 9 0 . 0 0 5 . 3 9 3 . 7 7 4 5 .00 117. Newcastle-upon-Tyne.285. Laboratory facilities and equipment (RF 55106) 6 2 6 .54181) Royal Technical College. 5 0 0 .23 2 0 . 2 1 6 .50 JS -S 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 4 2 * g ^ H § ^ K " pa g % g & 3.63 8. 6 7 8 . London Bursaries for graduate training and research in public health engineering in universities in the United Kingdom (RF 52086.559. 0 0 0 . Glasgow.85 2 . 0 0 0 . 8 4 7 .85 37.127. 0 0 0 . Scotland Support of postgraduate training and research facilities (RF 54124) University of Durham King's College.362. 4 4 2 4 .Physiological Institute Teaching and research (RF 52097) Teaching program (RF 55084) Great Britain Institution of Civil Engineers. 0 0 50.000. 8 8 7 .13 8 2 . 3 7 7 . 9 8 6 .

0 0 1 2 . 7 9 $ $10. 0 8 9 . 6 0 0 . Leiden Development of Institute (IH 49035) Sweden Karolinska Institute. 6 6 1 .336. 6 8 5 1 . 3 4 8 .22 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 6 9 H ft w o o £j g t-< » *j ° § ^ g 2! 6 . 6 5 2 . Geneva Development of graduate and undergraduate nursing education programs (RF 52187) Yugoslavia Institute of Hygiene and School of Engineering. 0 7 5. Zagreb Development of School of Public Health Engineering ( I H 50127) Miscellaneous European symposia on medical education (RF 52024) 1955 PAYMENTS ° ° $ 3 9 .11 1 5 .61 1 . Stockholm Construction of a laboratory for the department of experimental surgery (RF 5 2 0 0 4 ) Switzerland Le Bon Secours School of Nursing. 2 2 51.853.APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS PRIO IQ55 MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH — continued Professional Education — continued EUROPE—continued Italy University of Naples t Education and research in sanitary engineering (RF 53095) Netherlands Institute of Preventive Medicine.

2 0 0 . 0 0 1 0 0 . 7 4 7 .41 6 .32 3 0 0 .55174) NEAR EAST Lebanon American University 01 Beirut For development and operation of its medical division (RF 53001) 3 4 . Tokyo < For equipment. 0 2 3 . 0 0 t° vo 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 4 3 7 .152. 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . and field training facilities (RF 53098) Philippine Islands University of the Philippines. 2 4 2 . 4 2 1 2 . Jaipur Research equipment (RF 53115) State Medical College Hospital. teaching. New Delhi Fellowships (RF 5 3 0 4 4 ) Sawai Man Singh Medical College. Operation (RF 55115) Indian Council of Medical Research.736. 2 2 12. 4 5 6 . Manila To provide housing allowances and travel expenses for visiting staff of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health (RF 53067. 0 0 2 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 8 3 . 1 0 0 . Vellore Department of Preventive and Social Medicine. Trivandrum Development of improved clinical teaching facilities in medicine and nursing (RF 55182) Japan Institute of Public Health.FAR BAST India Christian Medical College. 7 7 8 . 5 4 8 . 8 3 M n o ^ o 4 *$ £j £ w > « V) ^ 3 5 . 5 0 1 2 . 0 1 7 . 0 0 5.

4 0 ._. 55190) Field Service FIELD OFFICES (RF 53160. 55132. 6 2 6 . 0 0 4 9 0 . 54161. g M f. 2 0 0 . 6 1 7 . 4 1 1 . 0 0 3 0 5 . 8 8 1 2 7 .55167) Africa and Asia Minor Egypt. 0 0 1 3 1 . Cairo. 8 4 4 . 0 0 0 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS IQSS MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH — continued Professional Education — continued AUSTRALIA University of Melbourne Equipment and supplies for the department of physiology (RFS1162) AFRICA South Africa University of Natal. 9 8 0 . 1955 1955 <2 PAYMENTS O $ 4 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 1 4 6 . 0 4 3 . 55130. 0 0 0 . 7 5 5 . 6 7 4 . 0 0 0 . 6 4 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 2 $ $ 3 . 55189) GRANTS IN AID Allocations by The Rockefeller Foundation (RF 54163. Durban ^ For the development of a department of family practice (RF 54121) Fellowships and Grants in Aid FELLOWSHIPS Administered by The Rockefeller Foundation (RF 54162. g gj v $ t* a * O g § [j 2 2 0 5 . 0 0 3 2 0 .

1 4 **i 4 « * g w £ w * 7 .301.300. 0 0 32. 6 0 0 .120. Cmdad Trujillo. Tokyo 1955 1956 South America Brazil.40 7 .84 £ M 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 9 3 3 . 9 2 4 . 0 0 2 5 0 . Travel and Other Expenses 3. Rio de Janeiro 1955 1956 Chile. Santiago.57 2 . 54167. 6 7 5 0 .80 32. Delhi 1955 1956 Japan. 3 0 0 .00 2 6 . 5 0 10. 8 0 7 . 0 0 0 . 55167) Salary. 1955 Mexico. 0 0 2 9 7 . 0 0 7 .63 1. 0 2 9 .Caribbean Region Dominican Republic. 0 0 0 . Mexico City 1955 1956 Miscellaneous 1955 1956 FIELD STAFF 1955-1956 (RF 54164. 1955 Far East India. 0 0 291. 9 5 8 . 4 2 1 . 0 0 3 . 5 7 8 . 0 9 4 .150. 6 7 5 . 0 0 3 4 6 . 0 0 20.8 2 6 .710. 0 0 0 . 4 1 H 5 0 0 . 5 0 0 .107.

5 2 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation ... 8 3 $ 3 ........ 4 7 0 ... 0 0 0 ... 0 0 47... 9 0 0 ... 0 0 0 ......APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH — continued Special Projects Department of Public Health. 6 7 0 .....154. Massachusetts Research in biology (RF 51 110) California Institute of Technology.. 0 0 $ .... 53176) § $ 9 ....... 0 0 .. 5 0 0 . Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. 6 6 Indian Council of Medical Research. Sacramento.93 ° BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH Experimental Biology and Medicine UNITED STATES Amherst College. 8 0 0 .. 5 9 7 ...$ 4 .... California Toward support of a chronic disease epidemiology center (RF 54152) $ 1 5 0 . .....1 15.. 0 0 K J o g M £ g '-' ... 0 0 1 0 . New York General expense of administration and operation (RF 54166) 5 0 .. 2 7 1 ...... 0 0 6 7 1 . 1 6 1 .... 6 5 7 ..... 0 0 1 . 5 0 ..131.. 6 0 4 . 0 0 $2..... 0 0 TOTALS — MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 1955 PAYMENTS ( 2 N $ .. $ 4 9 .00 . 0 0 0 ... 0 0 Contingent—Field Service (RF 55167) . 2 8 3 .. $ 7 . 4 9 . 0 0 0 .. New Delhi Office building <RF 55097) ........ . Exchange Fund ( I H 33077) 1 4 . Pasadena Research programs in biology and chemistry (RF 4 8 0 3 0 .. 3 0 0 .

54113) Research in genetics and experimental zoology (RF 51069. 0 0 0 . Milledgeville Research in medical genetics (RF 5 2 0 4 2 ) Gordon Research Conferences of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Expenses of foreign scientists at Conferences (RF 52018. 0 0 w ^ 61. 1 6 g w 9 . 0 0 0 . 5 0 0 . Detroit Genetics of sickle cell anemia and allied disorders ( R F 54185) Child Research Council of Denver. Cambridge. 5 2 5 . New York Research in biochemistry (RF 53178) Dartmouth College. 5! 154) Columbia University. Ithaca. 0 0 69. 0 0 3 7 .54063) Research in marine biology (RF 5 4 0 8 7 ) Research in the Department of Biochemistryi College of Physicians and Surgeons (RF 51006. 0 0 7 . 9 9 4 .123. 0 5 5 . 0 0 & 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .57 gj 3 1 . 2 5 2 . 0 0 » 3 . 0 0 5 0 . 0 0 9 . 54132) Harvard University.Child Research Center of Michigan.16 2 5 . 5 0 0 . Colorado Studies in child growth and development (RF 5 0 0 6 8 . 0 0 3 5 . 0 0 £ w 2 2 7 . 3 8 9 . 0 0 0 . 4 8 7 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 363. 6 1 1 . 9 4 •* w 1 2 . 4 5 0 . New York Enzyme research (RF 55029) Research in immunochemistry (RF 51018. 0 9 2 7 . 0 0 53. 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . Hanover. 0 0 0 . 0 5 3 . 0 0 0 . 51186. 0 0 9 . 4 4 * 5 0 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 2 2 . 0 0 7 . 5 0 0 . New Hampshire Research in cellular biology (RF 5 5 0 7 4 ) Georgia State College for Women.06 8 8 . Massachusetts Research in the Medical School on problemp of tissue structure (RF 51052) Research in enzyme chemistry (RF 5 0 0 2 0 ) 6 6 .52104) Cornell University. 4 0 0 .35 1 4 0 .239. 8 6 5 . 6 0 3 . 0 0 £ "* 1 7 .

0 5 2 . 0 0 8 . 8 . 0 3 1 0 . 9 2 ^ K « o ^ » w ? * 4 § 5$ £ 2 § 1 8 . Massachusetts General budget (RF 5 4 0 9 9 ) Massachusetts General Hospital. 7 7 1 . 0 0 0 . Boston Research in enzyme chemistry ( R F 52003) Research in endocrinology and metabolism (RF 52129) Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 0 0 6 9 . 0 0 4 4 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 2 4 . 0 0 6 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 2 5 . 0 0 8 0 . 0 0 4 . 9 7 3 2 . 0 0 5 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1 9 5 5 BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH — continued Experimental Biology and Medicine — continued UNITED STATES'—continued Research on the biochemistry of vision ( R F5 2 0 6 8 ) Research on physiological aspects of the development of behavior patterns at the Laboratory of Social Relatioas (RF SH79) Field study of population problems in India (RF 53173) Haskfos Laboratories. 0 0 4 9 . 6 4 5 . 0 2 5 . 5 3 6 . 0 0 1 1 . 4 5 0 . 0 4 7 . New York Research in microbiology (RF 5 5 0 0 6 ) Indiana University. 0 0 0 . 7 6 2 0 . 7 2 5 . 6 5 7 . 6 9 2 7 . 6 5 0 . 7 7 1 . 0 0 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 9 3 Cr. 0 6 2 . 8 8 2 . 0 0 0 .55081) Marine Biological Laboratory. 55082) 19SS PAYMENTS c2 4k $ 5 . 0 0 0 . 0 4 2 . Baltimore. 0 0 0 . 0 7 1 . 4 3 4 2 7 9 1 . 7 1 5 . Woods Hole. Cambridge Research in physical chemistry of protein solutions (RF 52157) Research in X-ray crystallography (RF 53081. 2 2 5 . 0 0 0 . Maryland Biochemical research (RF 53022. 2 6 9 . 0 0 2 7 . Ames Research in protein chemistry (RF 51028) Johns Hopkins University. Bloomington Research in genetics ( R F 51051) Research in psychotherapy (RF 52113) Iowa State College. 3 5 0 . 0 0 4 5 . 0 0 1 2 . 9 8 5 . 0 0 0 . 9 6 $ $ 5 .

53063. California Biochemical research (RF 51076) Research in biochemistry of nucleic acids (RF 51077) Research in biology (RF 53020) 1 0 2 .30 g S » 'j o •*> ^ § ^ H > G w ** 4. Jackson Memorial Laboratory. Committee for Research in Problems of Sex ( R F 51063. Bar Harbor. Evanston. 5 3 3 . 0 0 3 5 . Maine ( Studies of genetic factors of intelligence and emotional variation in mammals (RF 5 3 0 7 4 ) Smith College. 0 0 11. 4 7 w 1 5 0 . 0 4 1 6 . Illinois Research in the physical chemistry of proteins (RF 52066) Pennsylvania State University.571. 0 0 £ 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . New York Research in basic plant biochemistry (RF 5 4 0 6 6 ) New York University. 0 1 0 . 2 0 0 . 5 0 0 . 1 2 2 . 9 2 6 . 7 9 4 6 .423.010. 8 4 1 . 0 0 6 5 . 4 0 1 0 . 0 7 9 7 . 0 0 0 . 5 0 0 .47 1 5 0 .59 4 8 .00 2 0 . 6 2 4 . New York Research on protein structure (RF 52083. 5 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 55103) Roscoe B.03 4 . 1 . Palo Alto. 0 0 0 . Northampton.402. D . Washington. 0 0 0 . 5 4 0 3 6 ) New England Medical Center.National Research Council. 0 0 5 0 . 3 4 3 . 0 0 52.54155.762. 2 6 1.17 Cr. Massachusetts Research in endocrinology (RF 50076) New York Botanical Garden. Massachusetts Work in genetics (RF 53120. 0 0 0 .50 11. 0 0 12. 0 0 0 . 9 9 3 2 .875. 0 0 0 . New York Research in enzyme chemistry (RF 54150) Interdepartmental project on the rehabilitation of neurological patients ( R F 51169) Northwestern University. 0 0 5 0 . University Park Biophysical research (RF 51124) Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. Boston. 9 1 5 . 0 0 4 . C . 0 0 4 .55083) Stanford University. 0 0 12.177.

Minneapolis Research in human genetics at The Dight Institute of Human Genetics (RF 5 4 0 7 6 ) IQ55 PAYMENTS » ON $ 8 .251. 0 0 1 . 0 0 0 . 5 0 2 3 . 0 0 3 5 . 7 0 0 . 0 0 1 5 . 4 0 0 . General support (RF 55036) University of Chicago. 1 3 3 . 8 0 3 g Cr. 6 1 8 4 . 1 3 3 . 0 0 9 . 0 0 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 5 2 £ 2 Cr. 0 0 0 . 0 0 1 9 . Florida Support of research in marine biology (RF 5 3 0 8 9 ) University of Minnesota. 0 0 § ^ 3 . 1 5 0 . 7 0 2 . 0 0 0 . Illinois Research in experimental ecology (RF 53015) University of Illinois. 5 8 9 . 3 3 1 . Berkeley Research in biochemistry (RF 51078. 2 9 7 . 0 6 6 . 9 4 2 . 0 0 g w 1 6 . 3 7 . 7 9 1 9 .67 1 1 . 2 4 . Urbana Program of research and advanced training in microbiology in the Department of Bacteriology (RF 53096) University of Miami. 0 0 0 . 4 2 « S x Cr. 0 0 3 . 4 4 6. 5 0 0 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS I9SS BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH — continued Experimental Biology and Medicine'—continued UNITED STATES — continued State University of Iowa.52044) Research on the biochemistry of marine microorganisms (RF 52059) Research in photosynthesis (RF 54001) Research in the Virus Laboratory (RF 54095) (Joint Project with Medical Education and Public Health) Establishment of an Institute for Personality Assessment and Research (RF 53092) White Mountain Research Station. 2 5 3 . 2 7 ^ 2 7 . 4 2 1 6 8 . 0 0 1 7 0 . Iowa City Research in genetics ( R F 53071) University of California. 3 6 $ $ 8 . 4 0 0 .

Portland For work in constitutional medicine (RF 51004) University of Pennsylvania. 1 9 5 5 . 0 0 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 8 5 9 .951. 0 0 W 2 0 . 0 0 43. 7 8 * 8 . 3 9 1 1 .16 1 0 3 . Detroit. Salt Lake City Research in enzyme chemistry (RF 5 2 0 9 0 ) University of Washington. 6 6 1 4 . Pennsylvania Research on the chemistry of fats and proteins (RF 52065) University of Texas.Salary of a physiologist in the Department: of Physiology (RF 54106) University of Oregon Medical School. 6 8 0 . St. 0 0 0 . 4 7 Jj 3 . 4 0 3 . 0 2 3 . Austin Research in genetics (RF 54045) University of Utah. 0 0 1 0 . 6 0 0 . 0 0 M *0 o 1 9 . 9 9 5 . 0 0 11.81 3 . 0 0 3 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 3 6 7 .373. Madison Research in biochemistry (RF 51171) Research in genetics (RF 53108) Research in metabolism of plant tissues (RF 51009) Research in enzyme chemistry (RF 52064) Washington University.33 1 8 .00 3 0 . Michigan Research on natural plant products (RF 54023) 1 3 .55 £ w 4 . 0 0 13.08 10. 0 0 0 . 2 5 0 . 6 2 » 1 1 . Louis. 7 0 * 3 . 2 8 4 .188. Philadelphia Research in zoology (RF 53053) University of Pittsburgh. 5 4 0 .746.93 83. 8 9 3 . 5 8 7 . 3 6 % o 6 . 7 5 5 . Seattle Research in physical biochemistry of proteins (RF 51091. 53062) University of Wisconsin. 0 1 * K M 10.634.216. 0 0 45. 9 1 3 . 0 4 9 . 5 0 0 . Missouri Research in plant physiology and plant biochemistry (RF 5 4 0 4 6 ) Research in enzyme chemistry (RF 54149) Wayne University. 0 3 9 .113. 1 2 4 . 6 6 8 0 . 4 4 1 7 .

0 0 8 1 . 8 4 1 . Connecticut Biochemical research (RF 51168) Research in the physical chemistry of proteins (RF 52029) Yerkes Laboratories of Primate Biology. 7 2 6 0 . 7 6 1 . 0 0 1 0 . 1 2 4 . 0 0 6 . 2 3 1 7 . Saskatoon Studies of schizophrenia (RF 54100) 1955 £ PAYMENTS oo $39. Orange Park. 5 3 8 . 9 8 2 . 6 4 7 . Montreal Maintenance of Department of Psychiatry (RF 54043) Research on physiological basis of behavior (RF 51172. 8 3 2 8 . Halifax Joint study by the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and by the Department of Psychiatry of psychological factors in pregnancy and childbirth (RF 51007) McGill University. Florida General support (RF 55077) CANADA Dalhousie University.16 3 2 . 2 2 5 . Massachusetts Support of two major appointments in marine biology (RF 5 2 0 7 8 ) Yale University. 9 9 8 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH — continued Experimental Biology and Medicine — continued UNITED STATES — continued Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. 7 0 1 . 0 0 0 . 2 2 3 . 3 0 1 1 . 0 0 3 2 . 0 0 0 . 4 9 $ $ 5 . g *i £ g 50 ^ 2 3 Q £3 g ^ © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 6 7 7 . 2 0 4 . 3 2 7 . 5 5 8 . 3 9 5 . 5 4 0 5 8 ) Montreal General Hospital Biochemical research (RF 53076) University of Saskatchewan. 8 4 5 5 .111. 3 5 1 9 . 6 7 2 . New Haven. 8 7 g w * 2. 9 8 2 . 9 7 5 0 .

Mexico City Research in neurophysiology and pharmacology 49036) National University of Mexico Institute of Chemistry.MEXICO National Institute of Cardiology. 0 0 0 . 3 4 6 . 0 0 1 7 .82 3.971. 2 0 6 .29 1 5 . 0 0 2.46 £ *3 » ^ js 5 « 1» g 2 .021. 5 0 0 . 6 8 9 . 5 1 0 .63 3 0 . 9 6 (RF 11. Rio de Janeiro Research in Institute of Biophysics (RF 52012. 4 3 4 0 . Faculty of Philosophy (RF 53122) University of Sao Paulo Faculty of Medicine Work with radioactive isotopes in Radiocliemistry Laboratory (RF 50146) Research expenses in the Isotope Laboratory (RF 55192) Research in Laboratory of Histology and Embryology (RF 53119) Research expenses of Faculty of Medicine at Ribeirao Preto (RF 53145) Research in Laboratory of Cell Physiology (RF 55068) International cooperative research on population genetics (RF 55004) » j*j ° jj 1 .571. 55018) Research expenses in the Center of Genetics Research. Equipment and supplies 52189. 0 0 0 .09 3. 4 6 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 3 6 1 2 . 0 0 3 . 6 4 7 . 4 3 7 . 0 9 7 .333. 0 0 2 8 . 7 8 2 9 . 4 6 6 . 55002) (RF 3 . 0 0 0 . 9 5 1 . 7 3 2 . 3 0 1 2 . 0 2 SOUTH AMERICA Brazil University of Brazil. 0 0 3. 9 5 » 5o 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 8 .115.

10 1 1 . 2 4 4 . 8 3 1 . 4 9 8 . 1 9 g 3 E 5 8 2 . 8 3 8 w g o 3 . 4 4 8 1 3 . 0 0 1 3 . 4 0 4 6 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH — continued Experimental Biology and Medicine — continued SOUTH AMERICA — continued Chile Local Health Work. 52011) EUROPE Belgium University of Brussels Research in neurophysiology (RF 50088. 8 5 8 . 0 4 9 .195. 7 6 3 . 6 6 3 . 6 3 g > 3 g 3 0 . 1954 (GA 53128) National Department of Sanitary Engineering. 0 9 9. Montevideo Equipment and expenses of the Institute of Biological Research (RF 4 9 0 0 8 . 1953 ( R F 52190) University of Chile. 7 8 H „. 1 8 $ $ 2 9 . 55126) University of Louvain Research in biochemistry (RF 54154) Denmark Carlsberg Foundation. 0 0 0 . 5 9 7 . ° 2 1 0 . Santiago Research in experimental cytology in the Juan Noe Institute of Biology (RF 53016) Peru Division of Development of Program of Ministry of Health. 4 3 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 5 9 1 5 3 . 1 3 7 . 4 8 8 . Copenhagen Research in biochemistry (RF 51157) 1955 PAYMENTS » 7$ $ 8 1 . 6 4 7 . 0 0 7 . 2 0 0 . 1948-1953 ( I H5 0 1 7 0 ) Uruguay Ministry of Public Health.

13 g 3 . 0 5 7 . 1 8 1 9 .National Health Department. 2 8 G ta 2 7 . 0 0 1 . 1 . 8 2 7 . 0 0 Cr. 4 4 4 9 . 6 1 § >-3 IS M ^ 7) g 5 . 8 2 4 . 55042) Researcli in the Laboratory of Physical Chemistry (RF 53140) 1 . 5 0 6 . 4 9 6 . 3 8 6 . 4 2 H 2 . 3 5 2 .756. 1 4 6 . 0 9 9 . 1952-1954 ( R F 52017) University of Aarhus Research in biochemistry (RF 52148) Development of research and teaching in psychiatry ( R F4 9 0 0 4 ) University of Copenhagen Research on the biological uses of isotopes (RF 51158) Research in biochemistry (RF 52045) Research in physiology in the Institute of Neurophysiology (RF 52333) Establishment of a Child Guidance Clinic (RF 50009) Research in genetics of mental defect (RF 54105) France College de France. 4 6 6 . Paris Equipment for an experimental monkey station in Algeria (RF 49001) Research in biochemistry (RF 53154) Pasteur Institute. 2 8 9 . 0 9 » 4 . 1 9 t 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 8 4 6 . 7 0 w 1 4 . 6 7 50 -0 5. 1 7 3 . 3 4 2 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 6 . 2 0 4 . 3 6 7 . Paris Research in microbial chemistry (RF 54126) University of Aix-Marseille Equipment for research in neurophysiology (RF 54010) University of Paris Research in biochemistry in die Laboratory of Biological Chemistry (RF 51187. 1 8 1 . 4 8 5 . 2 1 2 . 0 2 2 . 2 7 9 . 8 0 3 . 9 1 4 . 2 8 6 . 2 7 6 . 5 0 5 . 7 8 6 . 1 9 0 . 0 0 3 . 0 1 7 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 8 7 7 . 5 7 5 . 6 5 1 2 .

8 6 4 . London Toward expenses of research on the structure of proteins (RF 54136. 0 0 0 . Plymouth .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH — continued Experimental Biology and Medicine — continued BUROPB—continued Germany Philip University. 0 0 •1 6 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 7 . 2 2 2 . 8 2 5 . 0 0 $ 1 9 . Thomas' Hospital Medical School. 2 3 8 . Bristol Research in neurophysiology (RF 52122) Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. 8 6 4 . 5 6 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 4 2 7 . 0 0 2 0 . 7 0 1 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 7 . 55118) St. 1 1 2 . 3 0 0 . 9 1 0 .5 5 0 3 2 ) Great Britain Burden Neurological Institute. . 0 0 1 5 . 6 7 H g a o $ w £ £ Sa m C 3 « ^ 5 * 2 . 0 0 1 5 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 $ 2 2 . 55044) Royal Institution of Great Britain. 4 5 7 . 1 3 3 . 1 5 5 . 2 1 7 . London Research on relationship between physical form and physiological function in man and their development during growth (RF 5 2 0 9 6 ) 1955 PAYMENTS £ N $ 9 . . Northern Ireland Equipment for Department of Chemistry (RF 55015. 0 0 0 . 6 9 2 6 . 5 0 0 . 8 1 8 . Marburg Research in biochemistry (RF 5 5 0 9 8 ) University of Heidelberg Institute of Psychosomatic Medicine. Establishment and support (RF 53099) University of Munich Research in experimental zoology (RF 5 2 0 6 2 . 0 0 3 0 . Development and continuation of special projects in marine biology and oceanography (RF 54122) Queen's University of Belfast. 2 5 0 . 7 3 8 . 0 0 7 .

Dublin. 5 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 2 3 1 6 . Equipment for research (RF 54157) Equipment for research in biochemistry (RF 53127) Research on biologically important materials (RF 51112) Research in X-ray crystallography (RF 55119) Purchase of an ultracentrifuge for research on molecules (RF 55120) 5 . 9 6 7 . 5 5 9 . 1 2 6 . 5 1 4 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 9 2 . 0 0 2 . 0 0 0 .55145) Molteno Institute of Biology and Parasitology. 0 0 1. 7 6 7 . 0 0 4 6 .741. London Expenses of American delegates to annual conferences on biological subjects (RF 52043) Strangeways Research Laboratory.69 w § g H r> * « w $ g w g SB 8 . 4 0 2 5 . 3 6 9 . London General support (RF 52001) University College.14 2 0 .Society for Experimental Biology. 7 6 7 . 0 0 3 0 . 0 0 1 8 . 9 9 6 . 0 0 0 . 7 4 1 . 4 4 1 . 4 9 3 . 5 8 4 . 5 0 0 . 54137) Research in psychiatry and in the biochemistry and pharmacology of the nervous system (RF 53104) Equipment for research in protein chemistry and mefcaholism (RF 55125) University of Cambridge. 4 5 1 6 . England Biophysical research (RF 50024. 3 0 8 .514. 6 2 19. 0 0 0 . 0 0 4 . 3 1 1 . 0 0 2 5 . 4 2 8 . 3 2 3 . Ireland Research in biochemistry in the Department of Biochemistry and Pharmacology (RF 5 4 0 2 7 ) University of Birmingham Research in biochemistry (RF 51137. 8 8 1 . Cambridge For the purchase of an electron microscope for research in experimental biology (RF 54128) Tavistock Institute of Human Relations. 5 6 2 . 7 7 ** S 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 4 5 3 . 5 0 1 . 5 4 6 7 . 0 6 6 .

3 1 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . 6 0 g W £j $ £ & •« 5 . 0 0 0 .211. Scotland Toward expenses of conferences of European scientists interested in genetic problems (RF 54138) University of London. 8 9 6 . 4 5 g •% 8 . 5 4 1 . 2 5 6 . 6 4 0 . 3 6 7 . Research in biology (RF 55016) University of Glasgow. 0 0 1 2 . 54130) Purchase of an electron microscope for research in biophysics (RF 54006. 5 7 8 . Scotland Department of Chemistry. 0 0 6 . Research on the organic chemistry of biologically important molecules (RF 5 2 0 4 6 ) King's College Research in biophysics (RF 50065.APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1935 BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH — continued Experimental Biology and Medicine — continued EUROPE — continued University of Edinburgh. 0 0 0 . 8 9 13. 0 0 $ 1 2 .67 7 . 9 4 2 0 . 9 1 3 . 0 0 0 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 3 5 .54112) Research on structure of nucleic acid (RF 55009) Maudsley Hospital. 0 0 0 . 6 2 0 . 2 2 4 . 0 0 $ 1 3 . 9 9 jj| g p 9 . Toward expenses of structural investigations in the field of natural high polymers ( R F 54125) Department of Zoology. 0 0 3 0 . 3 6 3 3 . 1 7 0 . 1 6 4 . 4 1 3 0 . 0 0 0 . Psychological effects of frontallobe operations in the Institute of Psychiatry (RF 53131) I $55 » PAYMENTS S $ 4 5 . 4 3 1 . 7 7 § § > 3 . 8 4 7 . England Galton Laboratory Research in human genetics (RF 55078) Research in problems of human heredity (RF 50085) Imperial College of Science and Technology.

.University College...... 1 5 Research in biochemistry (RF 55010) ... Mary's Hospital.. 0 0 . H 8 0 .. Neurohistological research in the Department of Human Anatomy (RF 53105) 2 9 .. 0 0 4 ..... 7 2 7 . 4 5 6 .. 9 7 2 . Equipment for research on protein metabolism and enzymology (RF 55133) . 6 2 .... 6 1 Sir William Dunn School of Pathology. 55134) 3 5 2 . 6 7 £ 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation ..50 ..573.31 Dyson Perrins Laboratory of Organic Chemistry.. 0 0 21.......... 3 . . Wales (RF 53027) 17.... 8 4 St.. ..... 4 5 * ...61 ffi .31 Research on the chemistry of biologically important materials (RF 53132) ' 3 7 ... England Research in biochemistry (RF 51 1 14......158. 0 0 0 .... . 5 0 ^* S ... 1 0 . g £ .. Research in mammalian genetics in the Department of Eugenics.. Equipment for research (RF 53141) 1 . 0 7 Chemical Crystallography Laboratory... 0 4 9 .. 8 7 University of Sheffield.... 1 2 . 2 7 Victoria University of Manchester..... 4 4 jo H ° .. Research in organic chemistry (RF 51155) 5 .... Research in X-ray crystallography (RF 52149........ ....... Biometry and Genetics ( R F 53107) 1 7 . England Equipment for Department of Organic Chemistry (RF 50058) 338. 3 H ........906..... 7 9 8 .. Cardiff. 0 0 0 .. 5 6 3 . .... 3 9 8 .........158...... Cardiff Support of the Neuropsychiatric Research Centre at Whitclmrch Hospital. 9 0 $ > 9 ... 2 6 8 .. 2... England Department of Human Anatomy. Development of new methods in microscopy and microspectroscopy and their application to biological problems (RF 52167) 2.. 0 0 0 . 1 3 ............ 8 8 1 . 1 0 Welsh Regional Hospital Board.31 3 .... 54050) 7 9 . 2 1 6 ..... University of Oxford....

1 9 9 . 0 1 6 . 9 4 2 . Rome Research on the biology of the housefly (RF 52144) University of Naples Institute of Genetics Research (RF 5 4 0 7 2 ) (Joint Project with Medical Education and Public Health) Research in the genetics of microcythemia (RF 55150) University of Pavia < Institute of Zoology. 8 8 2 . RF 52147. 5 0 $ 4 2 . 3 8 w g 6 . 7 8 o H g 5 . 0 0 O C § J: g % 2 3 . 2 5 rw 3 . Research on the cytogenetics of anopheline mosquitoes ( G A 5010. 2 6 3 . 7 9 2 5 . 0 0 1 9 . 2 1 6 . 0 0 ^ w $ 2 . 6 6 2 3 . 4 8 3 . 5 4 S . 7 8 2 . 5 0 5 . 2 8 3 . 0 0 0 . I S 1 0 . 1 8 8 . 0 0 0 .54108) Zoological Station of Naples General expenses and equipment (RF 51059) Netherlands University of Amsterdam Support of the Psychosomatic Unit at the Wilhelmina Hospital (RF 51153) Research in experimental embryology at the Laboratory of Anatomy and Embryology (RF 53139) 1955 PAYMENTS j£ ( ^ $ 4 . 2 3 7 . 3 2 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . 5 0 0 . 2 9 7 . 5 8 9 8 0 . 4 9 9 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH — continued Experimental Biology and Medicine — continued EUROPE — continued Italy Institute of Experimental Psychology. 8 1 1 2 . Florence Research on the psychological aspects of school child health and development (RF 52163) Superior Institute of Public Health. 54133) University of Pisa Support of teaching and research in the Department of Physiology (RF 51100. 6 7 5 . 5 6 2 .

0 4 4 . 5 8 6 . 8 7 2 0 . 9 7 6 . 0 0 1 . 6 0 4 . Equipment for biophysics research (RF 54153) Institute for Cell Research. 0 0 0 . 0 2 9 . 0 0 9. 0 0 2 3 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 9 . 0 0 1 . 0 0 0 .737. 9 1 7 .83 4 . 0 0 1 . 3 0 7 . 8 6 7 . 4 4 9 . 0 0 0 . 0 5 2 9 . 5 0 1 2 . 3 8 j* 3t © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Research in biophysics ( R F 54022) Medical Nobel Institute. 2 6 0 . S5020) 8 . 9 3 4 5 . 4 0 4 1 2 . 0 0 2 9 . 8 7 5 .517. 0 0 2 0 . 8 6 3 . 0 0 1 3 2 . 6 8 5 . 0 1 1 0 . 54134) Institute of Chemistry Research in biochemistry (RF 47100) Equipment and research (RF 55011) Department of Physical Cell Research. Stockholm Anatomical Institute. Research in electron microscopy (RF 53135. 9 3 3 .55012) Research in brain physiology (RF 55061) University of Lund Research in endocrinology (RF 53032. 3 0 0 . 0 0 1 3 . 0 0 0 .University of Utrecht Support of teaching and research at the Institute of Clinical and Industrial Psychology (RF 54109} Research in biophysics and biochemistry (RF 49113) Norway University of Oslo Institute of Respiratory Physiology. 2 4 2 1 . 5 0 3.30 „ S g H ij ** S * g > cj w * 2 9 . 6 6 1 . 2 0 5 . Research (RF 50017. Research (RF 54007) Research in the epidemiology of mental disease (RF 54107) X-ray crystallography (RF 55041) Sweden Karolinska Institute. 0 0 0 . 9 4 1 2 . 4 0 0 . 7 2 9 . 0 0 3 0 . 0 0 0 . Department of Biochemistry. 2 6 3 .

0 0 8 . 9 7 1 . 0 0 6 . 7 6 2 7 . 0 0 $ 1 . 0 0 0 . 3 0 8 . 7 7 2 5 .55 2 2 . 55144) Research on chemistry of biologically active molecules (RF 55043) Research in biochemistry (RF 52141. 2 8 8 . 0 9 4 . 0 9 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 1 4 7 . 0 0 6 . 0 0 1 5 . 1 8 8 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 5 . 0 0 9 . 3 7 314. 0 0 6 0 . 3 2 4 . 55187) Switzerland Federal Technical Institute. 9 5 5 . 0 0 1 9 . 0 0 0 . 0 6 6 . 0 0 0 . 5 0 0 . 55037) University of Basel Research in organic chemistry (RF 54151) University of Bern Theodor Kocher Institute. 1 8 6 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH — continued Experimental Biology and Medicine— continued EUROPE — continued University of Stockholm Research to radiobiology (RF 53036) Research in biochemistry (RF 55135) University of Uppsala Researches in Institute of Physical Chemistry (RF 53126) Researches in Institute of Physiology (RF 49126. 3 3 4 . 9 5 5 . 3 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 2 6 6 . 0 0 2 . 2 0 8 . 0 0 0 . 6 5 0 . 4 3 2 0 . Zurich Research on chemistry of physiologically important compounds (RF 51058. Equipment and assistance to foreign guests (RF 54075) University of Geneva Support of an Institute of Human Genetics (RF 54017) 1955 PAYMENTS £ oo $ 1 . 2 4 0 . 7 4 £ w % o H g £ w J cj § > g 3 2 . 4 3 2 1 . 5 9 $ 1 2 . 0 0 0 .

00 5 0 8 . 55013. 1 0 9 . 0 0 1 6 3 . 55166) Brazil 3 .85 1 7 8 . Bombay Operation of a laboratory for studies on human variation (RF 52192. 0 2 23. 0 0 0 .35 K> 11.95 $ 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 8 . 55013. Melbourne Equipment for research on virus diseases (RF 51064) VAR EAST India Indian Cancer Research Centre. 0 0 0 . 2 3 0 . 5 0 0 .000.000. 7 9 1 . 0 0 15. 0 0 3. 55108) Mysore State Department of Public Health Improvement of laboratory services. 7 1 0 .35 1 4 . 6 3 3 .71 £ o » O ^ ^ jjjj g > 2 g w *"* 10.04 5 0 . 4 2 37. Cairo 1954-1956 (RF 54165. 1953-1954 (GA 52138) Virus Program Central Laboratory in New York City Maintenance. 55013) Egypt. 1954-1956 (RF 54165. 3 6 15. 55166) Field Laboratories 1954-1955 (RF 54165.University of Zurich Psychiatric research (RF 50144) AFRICA University of Pretoria Plant biochemistry (RF S5110) AUSTRALIA University of Adelaide Equipment for research in biochemistry (RF 55014) Walter and Eliza Hall Institute.325.65 453. 4 0 1 .491. 5 0 0 .514. 4 0 7 3 7 . 9 5 2 2 0 . 8 0 7 .00 68.

. Poona South Africa. 5 0 0 ... 0 0 1 0 .. 0 0 0 . Port of Spain California Miscellaneous . 0 0 33. 6 4 9 0 .. 55130.72 8 5 ... United States Johns Hopkins University Virus Diseases.24 . 0 0 3 0 5 .... 0 0 0 . Field Service Field Staff..73 3 4 . (RF 54162. 21 . 0 0 256. 0 0 3 0 5 ...APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH — continued Virus Program — continued India.90 90. Johannesburg Trinidad. 0 0 0 .. 0 0 4 1 .195. 0 0 1 2 . 55131...02 g o z 2 0 0 .. 0 3 $ 5 1 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 .. and other expenses 1955-1956 (RF 54167... 4 9 2 .668.. 0 5 4 .. 2 9 1 . 55166) Europe Great Britain Queen's University of Belfast Department of Microbiology.. 0 0 6 6 .. (RF 54163... 8 3 6 . 0 0 0 . Salary.. travel.559. 0 0 2 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 1955-1956 (RF 55065) Fellowships and Grants in did FELLOWSHIPS Administered by The Rockefeller Foundation. 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 .250. 4 0 7 ..221. 9 0 4 9 . (RF 54165.. 5 5 . 1955-1960 (RF 55092) 1955 £ PAYMENTS O $ 3 2 . n g g o g g f g * o 5- ... 0 0 0 . 0 0 15.00 $10... 0 0 3 8 .. 0 0 0 . 3 4 6 ...318. 8 1 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation ... 0 0 0 . 0 0 3 0 9 .. 0 0 1 5 0 . 55189) GRANTS IN AID Allocations by The Rockefeller Foundation. 0 0 2 2 . 55190) . 9 5 3 .356.. 0 0 2 5 . 0 5 0 .82 16... 55166) Contingent. 0 0 0 . 6 9 31....

2 3 2 1 . 4 0 0 . Berkeley White Mountain Research Station. Paris. 7 7 3 . Equipment for a new biological laboratory building (RF 52009) National Research Council. 0 0 0 . 0 0 9 . 0 0 0 . 0 7 1 7 . 6 8 5 .11 40.361. Division of Biology and Agriculture. 0 0 2 . 0 1 4 . 0 0 2 3 . 7 6 1 2 . 7 6 3 . France Travel of non-French delegates to conferences of scientists (RF 52058) Congress for Cultural Freedom. D. 0 0 2 3 . Brazil For research expenses in the Faculty of Philosophy (RF 53148) 2 3 . 6 8 5 . 0 6 £ 3 3 . . . Paris Support of Science and Freedom Committee (RF 55022) Conservation Foundation. 9 2 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . C. 0 0 w « r> H § * j£ pa « c! g CV. 0 0 0 . Curitiba. 2 3 8 . 5 6 5 0 . Support of the activities of the Committee on Educational Policies (RF 54059) University of Brazil Research Center of Brazilian Geography (RF 55109) University of California. 1 9 2 9 .Special Projects National Center for Scientific Research. Washington. New York Research and general administrative expenses (RF 53091) Institute of Biology and Technological Research. Support (RF 52117) University of Chicago. 1 2 5 .312. 8 7 15. 0 0 0 . 254. Illinois Advanced training in applied statistics (RF 51087) (Joint Project with Social Sciences) University of Rio Grande Do Sul. Brazil .74 2 5 . 4 0 0 .66 M 1 0 . 8 1 9 .

54172. 7 6 $ 3 . State of Mexico (RF 51210. $ 1 7 . 4 8 1 . 54168. equipment and supplies for science departments ( R F 50145.53143) TOTALS —BIOLOGICAL AND RESEARCH AGRICULTURE Operating Programs CENTRAL AMERICA AND MEXICO Central America Establishment of a corn improvement project (RF 53170. 3 0 1 5 0 . demonstration and extension program. 0 0 1 9 4 . 1953-1956 (RF 51205. 7 6 1 . 4 2 1 8 6 . 3 0 $ 2 . 3 3 6 . 0 0 1955 £ PAYMENTS K> $ 3 0 . 6 0 1 . 3 7 4 9 . 55165) Mexico Regular Program. 55165) For basic poultry research and training centers Agricultural Research Centers For establishment of centers in the States of Sonora and Vera Cruz (RF 54169) Research. 0 0 $ 3 4 . 0 6 2 . 6 7 7 . 53166. 0 8 4 . 8 6 0 .54141) MEDICAL $ 6 . 0 0 3 8 . 4 1 5 . 4 4 1 4 . 2 3 H w g o X g f w * g S g $ 2 $ 6 3 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH — continued Special Projects — continued University of Sao Paulo. 3 2 0 . 6 9 $ . 3 9 $ 4 2 . 0 0 0 . 9 4 4 . 9 0 3 0 0 . 8 8 0 . 8 5 0 . 0 0 0 . 3 0 0 . 0 0 4 0 . 8 6 0 . Brazil Research expenses. 52179. 55090. 3 2 8 . 0 0 0 . 6 7 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

6 6 2 . 0 0 457. 1955-1956 (RF Toward greenhouse construction 63.133. 4 2 2 . 0 0 3 5 . 8 9 1 2 9 . 53171.55 7 5 .53 to S3 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 6 3 3 . 3 0 9 . 0 0 0 .18 1 . 55165) CONTINGENT (RF 55165) 15. 0 0 9 3 . Monteria and Palmira (RF 54171) Ministry of Agriculture Experimental greenhouse (RF 53169) Regular Program 1953-1956 (RF 52175.333. 537. 0 0 7 3 . 55165} 6 0 . El Rubi Furnishing expert advice and service in connection with its development (RF 52126) Agricultural Research Centers To strengthen centers at Mcdellin. 9 9 4 0 . 0 0 0 .Mexican Ministry of Agriculture Toward costs of an agricultural education and extension service (RF 53045. 53162. 0 0 0 . 7 1 52182. 0 0 2 5 . 2 5 0 .51 5 6 6 . 54170. 1953-1955 Salary. 0 0 1 0 . 4 8 6 . 0 0 0 . 0 8 38.55165) SOUTH AMERICA Chile Operating Program. 53168. 0 0 9 . 0 0 0 .233.39 1 3 9 . Armero. 2 8 54173.03 21. 0 0 0 . and other expenses (RF 54167. 0 0 2 5 . travel.53167. 55165) Establishment of an animal husbandry research center FIELD SERVICE Field Staff. 0 0 0 . 7 8 5 . 52181.198.397. 6 4 ?> w g % 0 S £i w H & w £ £* yt « Colombia Agricultural Experiment Station. 0 0 2 2 . 0 0 0 .895.

0 0 2 6 . 0 0 7 . 1 1 3 . 1 5 2 8 . 4 0 2 2 . Turrialba Development of library resources and a scientific communication program (RF 4 9 0 7 7 ) Latin American Agricultural Information Center. 9 0 1 . 0 0 7 3 . 0 0 6 . 5 8 5 . Turrialba Establishment and support (RF 52109) Honduras Pan American Agricultural School. 3 5 0 . 5 2 2 4 . 8 4 0 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 6 . 3 6 H § „ o £ j* w £ 5=> "5 § § % g * © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 1 1 2 0 . Saltillo. 3 8 4 . Tegucigalpa Scholarships (RF 5 4 0 7 0 ) Mexico Mexico Agricultural Education To improve agricultural education in Mexico (RF 52108) Technological Institute and School of Advanced Studies of Monterrey. Chapingo. 0 3 9 . 54140) Antonio Narro College of Agriculture. 0 4 4 0 . 1 6 8 . Coahuila National College of Agriculture.APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 AGRICULTURE — continued Grants to Institution! CENTRAL AMERICA AMD MEXICO Central America Costa Rica Inter-American Institute of Agricultural Sciences. 5 0 4 . 6 8 5 . 0 0 $ $ 3 . 0 0 0 . Nuevo Leon (RF 52108. State of Mexico I9SS *» PAYMENTS S $ 4 .

0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . Campinas (RF 50148) Superior School of Agriculture. Piracicabti (RF 50147. Teaching and laboratory facilities and development of the College Farm (RF 53110. 0 0 0 .432. 55148} Institute of Agronomy. 0 0 6.72 H g & ^ "fl H » ri £ > £ g !« 3 0 . . 1 8 2 .311. 0 0 0 .80 3 8 4 . 0 7 0 . 0 1 6 0 . Campinas Equipment for climatological research (RF S3010) Purchase oi greenhouses and ultracentrifuge for plant virus research (RF 55141) Rural University of the State of Mmas Gerais Equipment and supplies for the Schools of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine (RF 52016) Laboratory equipment and supplies for the School of Veterinary Medicine (RF 55149) Equipment for the Department of Domestic Science and materials for the library of the College of Agriculture (RF 54011) University of Rio Grande Do Sul. 7 2 3 . Porto Alegre Equipment.81 1 2 0 . 0 0 . Minas Gerais College of Agriculture. 4 1 » S © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Lavras. 55067) Biological Institute.34 6. Pelotas Research in cereal improvement (RF 55140) Gammon Institute. 4 2 5 0 . 0 0 8 . 7 0 647.15 9 . 9 2 9 . 7 7 15. 53144. 4 . 0 0 9 .544.210. 0 0 2 .18 4 7 2 . 8 0 1 . 8 9 952. 0 0 0 . supplies and library materials (RF 53149) University of Sao Paulo Equipment and supplies for work in the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (RF 51163. 0 0 0 .93 38. 0 3 7 .SOUTH AMERICA Brazil Agronomy Institute of The South. 7 8 5 5 2 . 0 0 16.11 Cr. Sao Paulo (RF 50149) 6 0 . 54114) Institute of Agronomy.

4 0 4 . 5 5 0 1 9 ) Equipment and supplies for the Institute farm and animal colonies (RF 54013) Colombia Inter-American Society of Plant Breeders. 9 3 2 . study trips of stafi members. and Entomologists Expenses of conference held in 1955 (RF 5 3 0 0 7 ) National University of Colombia Faculty of Agronomy. 7 0 18. Palmira Teaching and research facilities.755. 0 0 $ 3 4 . Santiago Studies on animal viruses ( R F5 2 0 0 7 . and to assist in bringing foreign visiting professors to the Faculty (RF 49031) Faculties of Agronomy at Palmira and Medellin Toward cost of student dormitory at each of these agricultural colleges (RF 50102) Faculty of Agronomy. Lima Equipment. 0 0 3 . 3 5 9 3 8 « 1 0 . 8 5 $ 4 . 7 7 6 . 7 5 9 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 AGRICULTURE — continued Grants to Institutions — continued SOUTH AMERICA — continued Chile Bacteriological Institute of Chile. 0 3 6 . 2 2 o C 4 0 . 4 0 7 . supplies. La Molina. Medellin Teaching and research facilities. and library materials for a col- 1955 PAYMENTS £ O\ $ 3 .51 g w g £ w 2 £ gj 2 0 0 . 0 0 g £j g 1 . 8 4 5 . Plant Pathologists. and to assist in bringing foreign prolessors to the Faculty (RF 51085) Peru National School of Agriculture. study trips of stafi members. 6 8 5 . 6 9 3 . 2 9 1 . 6 0 0 . 3 6 2 1 . 2 4 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

0 0 . 0 0 6 . 2 15 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . P . 0 0 0 . Research in genetics and plant breeding (RF 52142.233. 0 0 0 . 6 8 16. Saharanpur. Montevideo _ Faculty of Veterinary Medicine.Icere of advanced and postgraduate studies ( R F 52139) Cereal research (RF 55058) University of San Marcos. 0 3 4 5 . 0 0 6 9 . 0 0 11. 4 0 0 . 0 0 53 2 o q O * « £ >-3 S > y) W & 3 5 . 5 1 4 . Equipment and supplies (RF 50150) Uruguay University of the Republic.37 3 0 . Uppsala Purchase of an infrared spectrophotometer (RF 55122) University of Lund Institute of Genetics. 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 8 0 8 . 9 8 3 5 . 55121) FAR BAST India Government of Uttar Pradesh Physical Plant (RF 53180) Pilot development project at Etawah (RF 52053) Uttar Pradesh Government Horticultural Research Station. 0 0 9 0 . Purchase of library materialb and laboratory equipment for research on horticultural fruits (RF 55183) 2 . Equipment and supplies (RF 55003) EUROPE Sweden Royal Agricultural College of Sweden. U .246. 0 0 0 . 6 0 4 0 . 2 5 3 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 4 3 . 3 4 3 . 9 3 5 8 0 . 0 0 0 . Lima Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. 9 0 4 7 . 0 0 1 3 . 0 0 0 .25 2 5 .

0 0 2 5 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . $ $ 5 0 . 0 0 $ 1 2 0 . Bangkok Supplies and equipment. 0 0 0 . 0 0 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 . Auburn Training and research in the field of nematology (RF 54142) 1955 PAYMENTS *» «. and library materials for the Department of Home Economics (RF 55184) SOUTH PACIFIC New Caledonia South Pacific Commission. Noumea Survey of infectious diseases of the Rhinoceros beetle ( R F 55093) UNITED STATES Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 0 0 4 5 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 3 £ g o g m » E » g Q £j > g 3 4 7 . Laguna Costs of scholarship program for Indonesian high school graduates (RF 55172) Purchase of laboratory equipment and teaching materials ( R F 55173) Thailand Kasetsart University.APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 AGRICULTURE — continued Grants to Institutions — continued FAR EAST — continued Japan National Institute of Agricultural Sciences Purchase of laboratory equipment to improve its research program (RF 5518S) Philippines University of The Philippines College of Agriculture. 0 0 0 . 0 0 2 0 . 0 0 4 0 . 0 0 0 .

27 8 4 . . 0 0 1 5 9 .988. . 4 6 1 .California Institute of Technology. 6 1 2 . . 0 0 0 . 8 4 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 4 1 0 .111. . Indiana Research in genetics (RF 52038. Research on the mode of action of insecticides (RF 54111. 1 4 0 . 5 0 0 . Pasadena Earhart Plant Research Laboratory. 7 1 0 . 4 0 8 .52 61. .00 3 . 5 8 5 . 0 6 pu $g ° H 1 0 . 3 4 0 . 0 0 2 5 . 3 0 0 . 5 0 4 2 . Riverside. 0 0 0 .193. 9 7 2 . 55080) University of California. . 4 8 7 .54074) Cornell University. 0 0 2 2 . New York Research in the Department of Agronomy of the New York State College of Agriculture (RF 53042) Louisiana State University. New Haven Research in genetics (RF 48018. 6 9 » jjj 8 . 0 0 0 . Baton Rouge Center ior training in research on rice (RF 55057) Ohio State University Department of Agricultural Biochemistry. 2 3 $ 0 . Urbana Research in experimental biology (RF 54037) _ Research on the mode of action of insecticides (RF 52032) Research on the biochemistry of insects (RF 54038) Program of research in entomolopy (RF 53070) University of Minnesota. 5 0 0 . 0 0 7 . Gainesville Expenses of a counselor to Latin American students enrolled in agricultural courses (RF 52035) University of Illinois. 4 4 9 . 9 6 4 . 0 0 15. Lafayette. Research on the water relations of plants (RF 53051) Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. 55017) University of Florida. Ithaca. 5 5 0 . 4 4 4 . . 3 6 8 . 7 4 1 5 . Minneapolis Research in the Departments of Plant Pathology and Botany and of Agronomy and Plant Genetics (RF 53043) 1 8 . Berkeley Citrus Experiment Station. 9 3 S .00 1 6 . 4 4 3 . 0 0 0 . Research on the biochemistry of seed germination (RF 55128) Purdue University. 9 5 2 2 . 0 0 g > J2 4 . 0 0 1 4 . 2 9 g « j 1 8 . . 4 5 0 . . 0 0 .611. 9 3 £ vS 2 4 . 0 0 o ** 7 . 0 0 6. 0 0 1. 3 6 2 5 .

3 6 4 . 0 0 Fellowships. Program of fundamental studies within plants and tissue cultures (RF 55151) 1955 PAYMENTS *» Q ij ' ' $ 1 0 2 . 0 0 1 3 5 . 0 0 3 0 0 . Chapel Hill _ Research in mathematical and experimental genetics under the auspices of the Institute of Statistics (RF 52186) University of Texas Research in biochemistry and physiology of algae (RF 55007) University of Wisconsin Department of Plant Pathology. 0 0 0 . 55131. 0 0 $ 3 4 . 55190) 2 0 0 . 0 0 ^ g » 8 M ^ £5 £ S M o <3 ^ ^ 3 * 4 8 . 55107. 0 0 0 . 3 7 2 5 0 . 9 2 9 7 . 2 8 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 1 4 4 . 7 9 4 8 . 4 6 3 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 AGRICULTURE — continued Grants to Institutions — continued UNITED STATBS—continued University of North Carolina. Scholarships. 0 0 7 7 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 54103. 6 8 6 . 0 0 1 0 . 51120. 55130. and Grants in Aid FELLOWSHIPS Administered by The Rockefeller Foundation (RF 54162. 0 0 3 5 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 55165) GRANTS IN AID Allocations by The Rockefeller Foundation (RF 54163. 55189) SCHOLARSHIPS Latin American Scholarships (RF 50151. 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 3 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 $ 3 0 .

21 g > C g ?° 5 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 2 6 . 7 3 6 . 1 4 9 .31 $ 1 . Berkeley Research in mass culture and physiology of algae (RF 55049) University of Maryland. 0 0 3 5 . 0 0 B g j^ 15. Research program on the physical and chemical properties of water (RF 54057) FAR BAST Japan Tokugawa Institute for Biological Research. 9 5 0 . 0 0 6 0 . 0 0 3 3 . Madison Research in utilization of solar energy (RF 55048) EUROPE University of London. 0 0 0 .010. 9 8 » © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . College Park Algal research (RF 55072) University of Wisconsin. 0 0 2 6 . 0 0 gj ^ 49. 0 0 0 . 0 0 2 5 0 . 0 0 0 . 5 8 0 .180. 7 2 $ 3 . 0 0 5. 4 1 1 . 5 7 1 . 7 1 $ 2 .62 ° H 1 0 . 1 6 7 . 6 3 2 0 . Palo Alto. 0 0 0 . England Imperial College of Science and Technology. 0 0 0 . California 1955 World Symposium on Applied Solar Energy in Phoenix (RF 55076) University of California.716. 0 7 3 . 0 0 0 . Tokyo Equipment and research expenses (RF 53174) TOTALS —AGRICULTURE 5 0 .Special Projects UNITED STATES Boy Scouts of America Support of a program of conservation of natural resources (RF 55146) N unconventional Agriculture UNITED STATES Stanford Research Institute. 0 0 0 . 0 0 5 . 9 3 3 .

9 2 9 .55086) Department of Public Law and Government. New York Development of a program of Far Eastern Studies through the various social sciences departments (RF 54073. 0 0 0 . General support of the Russian Institute (RF 50133) Study of British-Soviet-American relations from 1940 to 1947 ( R F 54145. Washington. Pennsylvania Preparation of model criminal code with commentaries (RF 51213. 2 2 6 0 . 6 4 2 5 6 . 9 9 8 . Philadelphia. 0 0 8 . 0 0 1 0 . 9 2 9 . 6 4 5 . 0 0 1 2 . 0 7 0 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS I95S SOCIAL SCIENCES American Law Institute. 0 0 0 . 1 8 2. D . 8 8 2 . 0 0 1 8 . 1 9 0 . Research in international law (RF 55030) 1955 PAYMENTS » 5s N $ 1 3 5 . 0 0 0 . C. 2 2 6 0 . Vermont Study of interest-group interaction in the political process (RF 51083) Brookings Institution. 9 3 0 .55 *3 « p o g " w P 8 "3 2 * > 3 2 * 7 3 . 0 0 7 5 . 55069) School of International Affairs. Sir Henry For assistance and compensation in a program of study and writing (RF 5 4 0 7 9 ) Columbia University. 0 0 0 . 4 1 1 . 2 8 1 2 . 6 1 6 . 0 0 $ $ 4 9 . 4 4 1 5 . 0 0 6 .616. 5 3 0 6 6 ) American Museum of Natural History. Preparation of a history of the Federal Reserve System (RF 5 4 0 6 1 ) Research and education (RF 52185) Clay. 0 0 0 . 0 0 2 4 . 0 0 0 . New York Study of social change in the Admiralty Islands (RF 52143) Bennington College. 0 0 9 5 . 5 5 8 . 6 7 5 . 1 5 8 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 © 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation .

0 0 1 1 .415. 4 1 0 . 0 0 g © jj| § ..635. 8 6 3 . 0 7 1 0 . 0 0 11. 2 8 2 0 . Paris. Ithaca. 6 9 2 . 0 7 5 0 0 . 6 0 0 .87 3 3 2 . 6 9 2 .54162. France Research and training program of the Econometric Laboratory (RF 53133) Fellowships Administered by The Rockefeller Foundation (RF 51222. 0 2 6 . North Carolina Studies of differences in state per capita incomes (RF 51072) Research on the history of socio-economic thought (RF 54071) Polytechnic Institute. 0 0 5 .25 1 0 . 0 0 0 .-3 W w ^ w £ ^ w * 4 . New Hampshire Pilot study of the relation of overseas transport to the development of underdeveloped areas (RF 53152) German School for Political Science. 0 0 0 . 8 5 5 . Hanover. 0 0 0 . New York Development and testing of improved research methods for studies in underdeveloped areas (RF 53002) Program of research on community action and intergroup relations (RF 50104) Council on Foreign Relations. Inc. 0 0 0 . 0 0 5 0 0 . 1 2 0 .312. 52196. 9 6 1 5 0 . New York Two research and publication projects in the field of international relations (RF 52092) Program in international relations (RF 55047) Crete Survey Expenses of a survey in Crete as a means of exploring ways of raising the standard of living in underdeveloped countries (RF 48102) Dartmouth College. Berlin Preparation of source books and outline manuals in political science (RF 53114) Duke University. 0 0 9 .55130. 0 0 6 .Cornell University.93 3 3 . 0 0 19.53182.55189) 1 7 .67 1 0 2 . 6 6 2 . 3 0 7 . 0 4 2 0 . 0 0 0 . 7 0 20. 6 9 3. 0 0 0 . 7 5 9 .935. 6 3 £ c* 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . Durham.

51183. 0 0 1 3 . 0 0 $ 2 . 0 0 4 8 5 . 55131. 2 5 2 9 . 2 8 9 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR TEARS 1955 SOCIAL SCIENCES — continued Australia-New Zealand Fellowship Committee Administrative expenses (RF 52168. 0 0 PAYMENTS $514. 7 5 0 . 54163. 53181. 7 3 1 . 55190) Grant in Aid Fund for visiting scholars at Harvard Research Center in Entrepreneurial History (RF 51127) Hague Academy of International Law. 0 0 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 1 5 . 0 0 1 2 2 . 0 0 0 . New York (RF 53023. 52164. India Economic and demographic research program (RF 51094) General purposes (RF 55170) Grants in Aid Allocations by The Rockefeller Foundation (RF 48144. Medford. 4 7 0 . 0 8 8 . 0 4 2 .68 5 2 .68 1 7 . 7 6 2 . 0 0 4 3 0 . 0 0 0 . 2 5 0 . 2 5 1 5 0 . 7 4 3 .55155) Canadian Social Science Research Council. 1 0 1 3 . 2 8 9 . 0 6 1 1 6 . 55188) Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. 0 6 3 2 1 . 6 3 1 . 0 0 6 . 53183. 7 6 0 . Massachusetts Case study of United States commercial policy ( 1 9 3 3 1 9 5 4 ) (RF 53128) Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics. 5 2 2 0 0 . *•? W w o g bd J3 r £ * o C a S 2 2 9 0 . 0 8 2 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 . 51226. 7 4 3 . 2 5 0 . 9 4 4 . 0 0 0 . Montreal For special fellowship assistance (RF 5 3 0 8 7 ) Program of research and publication and for awards of fellowships and professorial leaves (RF 52112) Social Science Research Council. 8 0 7 . 5 0 2 9 . 50109. 53153. Poona. 1 6 6 2 0 . Netherlands For use by its Center for Study and Research in International Law and International Relations (RF 55138) $514.

7 4 4 . 5 0 0 .552. 3 1 7 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 7 .15 33. 0 0 0 . 4 6 1 2 . New York Comparative study of union-management relations in the United States and Germany (RF 53073) IFO-Institute for Economic Research. New York (RF 54089) Institute for Political Science. 0 0 1 2 . Paris. 9 4 3 .15 9 . 0 0 15. 0 0 0 .478. 0 0 0 . For research (RF 52081) Graduate School of Business Administration. 1 0 1 4 . 55176) Hunter College. 7 8 2 4 0 . 0 0 2 2 . 6 3 7 . 0 0 0 . 8 9 2 . 4 6 u OT 1 1 . 0 0 » ™ ^ ^ 2 g M ^ 1 2 . Berlin. 0 0 1 2 . 4 0 2 2 . Support of research on profits and the functioning of the economy (RF 52063) Laboratory of Social Relations Research on the structure and functioning of working committees (RF 53048) Study of conflicts within occupational roles (RF 53049) Study of comparative values infivecultures (RF 51175) Studies of state election statistics (RF 51082) The Law School. 5 2 8 . 4 9 2 . 4 9 5 . 0 0 1 0 . 0 4 0 . Germany Research program in economics (RF 53146) Indian Council of World Affairs. 9 2 g w v 3 . 5 0 0 . 3 0 4 . Massachusetts Research Center in Entrepreneurial History. 5 2 2 0 . France Research and analysis of national income and wealth (RF 54144) 6 0 . 0 0 2 0 . 0 0 1 2 . 7 0 1 . Cambridge. 7 4 4 . 7 7 14. 0 0 6 . 5 0 0 . Delhi Support of studies of Indian-United States relations in cooperation with the Council on Foreign Relations.Harvard University. 0 0 1 5 .49 2 2 . 0 8 6 . 5 3 0 . Germany Study of the consolidation of the Nazi totalitarian system (RF 53113) Institute of Applied Economics. 3 1 1 7 . 6 3 w «? 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 7 7 8 . Munich. For the advancement of the status of legal and political philosophy (RF 54051) Program of economic research (RF 51071. 6 4 2 1 . 1 7 4 .

0 0 |-j 3 JJ ° y$ H 3 r* 5 * § 3 jjj 2 § 5 5 . Cambridge Study of non-economic factors in economic development (RF 55180) $ 7 . England Fellowships and studentships in international relations (RF 55096) Purchase of land for expansion of school plant (RF 31028) Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1 2 5 . 9 3 8 5 . 7 6 1 . 0 4 7 . 2 7 3 . 0 0 i£ 1 . 1 . Washington. 0 0 1 . 0 0 1 3 . 1 5 3 . C. 3 2 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 4 3 3 3 . 0 0 Cr. 1 5 3 . 0 0 5 0 5 . London. 2 0 0 . Princeton. Establishing and operating an Economic Development Institute (RF 54182) Japan Sociological Society. 3 7 5 . 0 0 3 8 . 0 0 3 . 2 5 0 . 6 7 9 . 54116) For assistance and compensation in a program of study and writing (RF 4 9 0 6 4 ) International African Institute. Baltimore. D . England Field studies of the Fulani-speaking peoples of West Africa (RF 51034) International Bank for Reconstruction and Development. 0 0 2 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 SOCIAL SCIENCES — continued Institute for Advanced Study. 0 0 0 . 0 7 1 3 . 0 0 1 0 . 9 7 5 . 0 0 8 . Maryland Salaries and travel expenses of European visiting professors in the Department of Political Economy (RF 51111) Research guidance program by the Department of Politicat Economy (RF 5 4 0 6 9 ) London School of Economics and Political Science. 9 6 2 . 8 3 8 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 7 0 $ 1955 PAYMENTS $ 7 . 4 0 0 . 5 0 0 . Tokyo Study of social stratification and mobility in Japan (RF 55040) Johns Hopkins University. 4 7 5 . 3 2 1 5 0 . 5 9 0 . New Jersey Research in history and government (RF 53118.

0 0 7 . 0 0 1 3 0 . 9 3 2 0 0 . 0 0 0 . New York Studies by its Department of The Church and Economic Life (RF 52054) National Foundation of Political Science. Evanston.567. 5 0 0 .255. 0 0 1 5 9 .Miami University. 8 8 3.887. 7 4 M § £3 o * j^ w ^ g w g p 7 . London Expenses of the International Association for Research in Income and Wealth (RF 50006) Study of the economic experience of the United Kingdom (RF 5 4 0 2 4 ) New School for Social Research.539. 6 4 3 .38 2 0 . Ohio Studies of population redistribution (RF 52028) National Bureau of Economic Research. 6 1 3 . Oxford. 0 0 1 5 . New York Institute of World Affairs. New York Study of the effects of an orientation program for foreign students (RF 55154) Northwestern University. 0 3 6 . 5 9 3 . 5 0 0 . New York General programs and special programs of research in finance and fiscal policy (RF 49141.50134) Study of Soviet economic growth (RF 53125) National Council of The Churches of Christ in the United States o{ America. Illinois Costs of the study of the structure and functioning of industrial markets (RF 54101) 30. 0 0 12.19 2 8 . 0 3 23. 8 8 7 . 0 0 N> -j 5 9 .81 6 0 0 .291. France Study of changes in the structure of the French economy (RF 53025) National Institute of Economic and Social Research of Great Britain. 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 3 8 9 . 0 0 0 . 8 4 2 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 7 .08 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 . 0 0 60. 0 1 1 9 . Research on The Written and The Living Charter of the United Nations (RF 54053) New York University. 5 4 7 . Paris.38 4 5 . 9 4 1 .

Research on the origin of modern legal institutions. New Jersey Office of Population Research of the School of Public and International Affairs (RF 48105. 2 4 1 0 . 4 5 2 6 .53077.59 6 4 4 .515. 0 0 9 . 5 0 1. 5 0 0 . of The Theory of International Economic Policy (RF 53047) Support of a study of race relations in Central Africa (RF 54025) Royal Statistical Society. 0 0 $ 5 0 . 0 0 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . England Library facilities and additional secretarial and editorial assistance (RF 5 0 0 8 7 ) Social Science Research Council. 0 0 4 0 . Canada Program of advanced training and research infiscal. 0 0 4 0 .188. 0 0 $ 5 0 0 . 0 7 6 4 4 .34 2 7 .123. the Middle East. Kingston. 0 0 3 . London. 1 0 0 .17 H £ „ £j X « *2 r g hj O 2 o H 5 ^ 2 2 . 2 8 9 . 0 0 0 . 5 4 20. 0 0 7. 0 0 0 . 0 5 2 . 4 1 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 1 0 . 2 4 5 . 8 4 5 .12 21.monetary and economic policy (RF 53055) Royal Institute of International Affairs. 1 4 1 6 . and Southeast and East Asia (RF 53046) Study. England History of the war and peace settlement (RF 52002) Research on Europe. General support (RF 51017) . 0 0 0 . 0 0 1 6 . 8 8 9 . 0 0 0 . London. 3 0 0 . New York Preparation of a series of monographs based on the 1950 census (RF 52118) 1955 PAYMENTS £ §0 $ 4 9 6 . 0 0 0 .718.APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 SOCIAL SCIENCES — continued Princeton University. 55050) Study of the relationship between the disciplines of geography and political science (RF 5 4 0 4 0 ) Institute of International Studies. representative government and social philosophy in the West (RF 54078) Queen's University.

00 » -o „ w o g o * g w ^ g > cj g f 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .500. California Research program (RF 51060) Food Research Institute. 0 0 4 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 1 7 0 . 0 6 3 . 4 8 9 . Program of predoctoral training in agricultural economics research (RF 50086) State Historical Society of Colorado. 8 5 5.551.41 3 4 . 0 0 0 . 5 6 27. 0 0 3 2 . 0 0 5 0 . 2 7 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 .49 4. Denver Study of the western range cattle industry (1865-1895) (RF 52099) University of Basel. 6 0 2 5 . England Department of Applied Economics. Switzerland Development of research and training in monetary and credit economics (RF 5 2 0 6 0 ) University of Cambridge.116.619. 0 0 7 3 .263. 0 9 9 . 0 0 1 7 .19 4 3 . Illinois Toward the costs of the fourth volume of History of Public Administration in the United States (RF 52039) Toward the costs of establishing a Workshop in Money and Banking (RF 53179) Research on low productivity in American agriculture (RF 51088) Research in thefieldof public finance (RF 54052) 1 0 3 .54067) (Joint project with Humanities) Conferences and planning (RF 51204) Grants in aid of research (RF 5 4 0 3 9 ) Program of inter-university summer seminars (RF 53175) Study of Economic Growths The Problem and Its Setting (RF 52105) Stanford University. 4 8 2 5 . 1 7 7 . 4 7 7. 0 0 9 . Palo Alto. 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 .Support of the Current Digest of the Soviet Press (RF 51218. 0 0 4 . 6 3 8 . 9 1 2 . 2 9 12.68 8 5 . 9 8 2 . 0 0 2 8 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 1. 9 0 6 . 4 6 3 .68 2 0 .147. 4 0 7 . 2 6 7 .01 6 .49 9 . 9 5 16. 5 9 5 . 0 0 0 . Study of the Social Accounts of Cambridgeshire (RF 51177) History of English criminal law (RF 51096) University of Chicago. 9 8 4. 8 5 6 .185.116.

0 0 1 1 0 . 0 0 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 2 0 0 . 5 0 0 . 9 5 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 7 9 . 0 0 0 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 5 . 4 9 0 . 5 1 6 . Ann Arbor Program of methodological research in the field of human relations (RF 53093) Study of behavior in a small group (RF 53111) Survey Research Center Study of population trends in the United States (RF 5 4 0 6 4 ) Study of voting behavior in the 1956 presidential election (RF 55143) University of Minnesota. 0 0 2 0 . 0 0 £ % „ 3 . 4 5 2 . 7 3 3 3 . 5 5 5 . 0 0 $ $ 7 . Germany Alfred Weber Institute for Social and Political Sciences. Italy Research program (RF 5 4 0 4 7 ) University of Heidelberg. 4 6 0 . 0 9 3 7 . 5 5 5 . 0 0 1 8 . 1 5 0 . 0 0 5 . 0 0 0 . Minneapolis Studies of social disorganization (RF 53112) 1955 ^ PAYMENTS O $ 7 . 0 0 * 3 . 7 0 § 5-J j-j 1 3 . 0 0 8 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 H g „ 4 . 6 1 2 0 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 1 3 5 . 0 0 0 . 7 7 5 . 5 2 6 . 0 0 7 . 0 0 3 9 . 0 0 o * 2 . 0 0 7 . 0 0 « w 2 4 . 0 0 0 . 3 4 3 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 SOCIAL SCIENCES — continued Research into the relationship hetween large-scale industrial enterprise and the development and use of inventions (RF 54080) Research in mathematical statistics (RF 53061) Research on John Law's system of managed currency (RF 5 4 0 8 6 ) Field research under the Philippine Studies Program (RF 55116) Study of genesis and development of industrial civilization (RF 54117) University of Genoa. 0 0 8 . 1 5 0 . 8 9 6 . 0 0 4 . 9 5 0 . 6 5 0 . 0 3 2 . Research program on political parties (RF 53056) Research and teaching in political science (RF 55101) University of Michigan. 8 7 0 . 9 0 o 7 .

2 0 1 4 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 0 .050.131.90 4 . 3 5 0 . Madison Study of tax administration in Wisconsin (RF 5500!) 10. 0 0 g JS g Q § 3 M ^ g OT 2 3 %& 1 . Manila Institute of Public Administration. South Bend. 0 0 1 0 0 .65 10. 8 4 3 2 .03 4 0 . 1 2 5. Austria Study of the economic situation of Austrian peasants on small farms (RF 53084) University of Wisconsin.193.332. 2 0 9 . 0 0 0 . 6 1 9 . Canada Research on problems of Canadian development (RF 53086) University of Vienna. 0 0 9 2 . 2 5 0 . 0 0 9 . Indiana Research in international relations (RF 55025) University of Oxford. 0 0 8 1 . 0 4 8 . England Nuffield College Completion of volume of Reflections on International Administration (RF 54085) Costs of a program of research and training in African studies (RF 54048) Additional research faculty in the social sciences (RF 46132) University of Pennsylvania. 0 0 9 0 0 .591. 0 0 5.00 *^ 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .25 31. Research and training program (RF 55117) University of Toronto. Philadelphia Studies on redistribution of population and economic growth in the United States (RF 52106) Studies in labor mobility (RF 54131) University of The Philippines.00 6 8 .University of Missouri.55137} University of Notre Dame.12 9 .500. 0 0 3 6 . 2 4 5 . 0 0 169. 0 2 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 8 5 .977. 5 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 » 17. 0 0 7 . Columbia Study of the rural church as a social institution in Missouri ( R F 51216.

1 2 0 . D. 7 7 $ 5 . New Haven. 8 0 0 . 0 0 0 . Poughkeepsie. 0 0 2 8 2 . 0 0 0 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 SOCIAL SCIENCES—continued Study of the law and lumber industry in Wisconsin ( R F 48051) Research in the field of legal history (RF 53052) Vanderbilt University. Nashville. 0 0 $ 2 . 4 3 1 5 . 1 0 1 4 . 0 0 1 6 4 . 2 1 9 . 0 0 3 4 . 7 5 3 . Lebanon Interpretive studies of the modern Arab Middle East (RF 5 4 0 0 4 ) 1955 PAYMENTS ^ W $ . C . 8 3 9 . 3 2 $ 3 . 0 0 0 . New York Foreign policy making in Ceylon (RF 55085) Victoria University of Manchester. 0 0 1 . 7 9 5 . 7 6 6 . 0 4 2 . 9 0 3 2 . Tennessee Institute of Research and Training in the Social Sciences. Connecticut Studies of communication and attitude change (RF 51174) TOTALS —SOCIAL SCIENCES HUMANITIES Intercultural Studies American Council of Learned Societies. England Faculty of Economic and Social Studies. 3 4 9 . 9 0 0 . 4 9 3 . 1 5 5 . 1 9 0 . 8 0 0 . 1 2 ji H * ° K § ^ t* g ^ ® § jj» S % 5 9 . Preparation of a revised edition of Encyclopedia of Islam under auspices of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences (RF 52022) American University of Beirut. Research in agricultural economics and in the organization of industry (RF 5 2 0 7 7 ) Vassar College. 7 5 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 6 0 __ . 0 0 $ $ 3 . 0 5 6 8 . Washington. 0 0 4 8 . — . 0 4 4 . $ 2 . $ 3 . Support of research in economics and government and in social anthropology (RF 51097) Yale University. 0 0 $ C r . 0 0 1 1 . 7 5 9 . 3 3 2 . 9 4 9 .

117.Austrian College Society. 6 0 1 9 . 6 8 9 . Vienna Institute for Current European Cultural Research. 0 0 15. 3 0 92. 0 0 0 . 3 5 0 . 0 0 1 3 . 3 8 4 . 6 8 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . India Postgraduate and Research Institute. California Program of regional studies (RF 5 0 0 0 2 ) 1 3 . 3 4 0 . 0 0 g *5 1 0 .657. San Marino. 4 8 9 . 7 8 45 S 6 . Huntington Library and Art Gallery.. 0 0 § ^ Cr. thought. 7 4 8 .00 5 .00 7 1 . and outlook. 5 8 6 . 3 3 0 . 6 1 2 . 0 0 > £j w 45. For studies of the principal languages of India (RF 54088) Egyptian Society for Historical Studies. Paris. 0 0 3 0 . 4 5 8 . Ithaca. Cairo. New York Southeast Asian studies (RF 50139) Study of the contemporary role of the arts in Indonesia (RF 54056) Study of the cultural and literary history of Thailand (RF 55127) Deccan College. 0 1 9 . 3 8 6 . 0 0 8 . to be held in the Near East (RF 51005) Cornell University. Egypt Study of the modernization of the Arab world (RF 55035) German Association for American Studies. 1 5 7 .31 1 6 . Advanced study in the United States for leading foreign editors (RF 55099) Conference on interpretation of Arab tradition. 0 0 0 . Poona. Research program (RF 52188) Bibliotheque Nationale. Marburg Support of American studies program (RF 5 5 0 7 9 ) Henry E. 2 . New York Preparation of a new interpretive history of Japan (RF 54015) American Press Institute. 6 9 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 5 8 .130. 0 0 15. 0 0 0 .333. 8 1 g M 10. 5 6 O .31 g w 4 .56 * 4 .538. France For completion of a union catalogue of the Slavic collections in the libraries of Paris (RF 5 4 0 7 7 ) Columbia University. 0 0 9 4 . 0 0 1 1 . 0 0 0 .

93 45.00 $32.00 33. 10.572.20 2..500.15 c 0 5...371..... Montreal.. Los Angeles.00 .° .. Japan Kyoto University-Doshisha University Committeeon AmericanStudies (RF 53129.°°°° °.30 .O0 . 55169) ModernLanguage Association of America.00 Philadelphia Museum of Art..997.00 46.63 IO.HUMAN/TIES -...oo...00 .00 544.co..conti.... Zurich. Canada Expenses o~anInstitute o~ Islamic Studies (RF51108..500...tlued Intercu#ural Studies-.500.ued International Press Institute.00 135.. 54143) OccidentalCollege. 54146. Pennsylvania For interpretive studies of the arts of India (RF 54119) © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .000.. 0 0 16..... 55104) (Joint project with Social Sciences) Organization and reproduction of mater/als on the archaeologyof Korea (RF 53082) MeGI/IUniversity..500.°... NewYork Inquiry into role whichforeign languagesand literatures should play in American life (RF 52116.00 14.. Switzerland Programof internatlons/ conferences and exchanges of personnel (RF 55062) KoreanLanguage Research Society. O00.17 3...000..03 510.482..200. Seou! Publication of its dictionary ot the Koreanlanguage(RF 52191 ) KyotoUniversity.082. $I 00..California Developinghumanisticstudies on the Southwestarea of the United States and on Northern Mexico (RF APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YRAI~ 1955 I955 PAYMEN’TS $ . I 12.227...001..440. 53021) 30.000....

Tokyo. 0 0 0 . Slavic and Islamic studies (RF 55181) Tokyo University. 0 9 6 . 0 0 5. 0 0 0 . 0 0 1 2 3 .Princeton University. 0 0 2 3 . 7 4 3 . 5 9 8 . 0 0 0 .341.529. England Toward development of a program of European studies (RF 54184) Salzburg Seminar in American Studies. Japan Seminars in American studies sponsored jointly by Tokyo University and Stanford University (RF 51211) (Joint project with Social Sciences) Toyo Bunko. Inc.053.60 5. 7 7 2 1 . Australia Program in American studies (RF 55147) University of Ankara. 54135) University of Cologne. 9 8 11. 7 8 1 . France Development of Asiatic. 4 3 2 5 .06 6 0 6 .00 2 0 . Austria General budget (RF 55060) Sixth Section. 0 0 6 7 . 8 8 5 . Turkey To enable its Faculty of Letters to appoint a professor of American literature and a professor of American history (RF 53072) University of British Columbia.000. Germany Development of a program of American studies (RF 51037) 4 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 125. 0 0 0 . 0 0 ^ g » H § 3 4 . 0 0 3 £ «-3 g w C w 6 0 . 7 0 4 . 8 3 2 9 . Oxford. Paris.13 141. Antony's College. 0 0 0 . Canada Development of a program of Slavic studies (RF 4 9 0 8 0 .. 6 7 2 4 . Vancouver. New Jersey Development of Near Eastern studies (RF 52005) (Joint project with Social Sciences) St. Ecole Pratique Des Hautes Etudes.24 J^ C£ 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 . Japan For research on modem China (RF 54120) University of Adelaide.

0 0 $ 3 .... 1 0 0 ...00 University of Michigan. 0 0 8 4 . 9 5 ^ University of Rochester.APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 1955 PAYMENTS HUMANITIES — continued Intercultural Studies — continued University of Delhi. 1 2 .... England 2 Research in American history and institutions (RF O 53123) 3 9 4 .. 5 0 0 ........... 0 0 University of Toronto. 0 0 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 ....931.. 2 5 0 . 0 0 § University College. 7 9 3 . 0 0 0 . University of London...... University of Washington... Canada Toward the budget of the department of Slavic studies (RF 54083 ) (Joint project with Social Sciences) 199...... Expenses of a conference and fellowS ships in American studies ( RF 55021 ) ... 0 0 7 .. 0 0 0 ...16 ... England Study of materials available for an understanding of modern Near Eastern cultures (RF 51 176) 1... Conference on historical writing on Southern Asia (RF 55071) .. 9 2 § University of Oxford. 2 3 ... New York Program in Canadian history ( RF 55027 ) . 0 0 2 5 0 ..... 5 0 0 ....... 0 0 0 . and Japanese r* studies in Ann Arbor (RF 54147..... 55105) 2 8 . 0 0 16.. 0 0 0 .... $ 2 1 .. 0 0 9 .. Germany ^ Toward support of the American Institute (RF 5 4 0 6 8 ) 2 8 .. 4 ..... 7 2 University of Durham.. 2 9 0 . India Research and training in modern Indian history (RF 55070) $ .. 3 7 ...69 .. 0 0 2 8 ........ 5 0 0 ..... 9 0 0 .... Ann Arbor w Program of American studies in Kyoto.....815. 9 8 . England School of Oriental and African Studies... 5 0 0 .... Seattle Research on Northeast Asia (RF 55168) . 0 0 0 . 2 5 . 0 8 6 .. 0 0 g University of Munich.

00 7 . 0 0 1 3 .55 30. C. 0 0 7 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 10. 0 0 0 . Mexico City Research and a training seminar on contemporary Mexican history (RF 54028.66 40.833. Bethlehem. New York Development of materials for courses of study at the graduate level (RF 54002) ' Colegio de Mexico. C . Pennsylvania Research on the British empire before the American revolution (RF 55033) McGill University. Delhi < _ Preparation of a history of India's attainment of independence (RF 53069) Italian Institute of Historical Studies. 8 8 0 .64 11. 3 2 4 . Washington. 3 2 4 . 0 0 7 0 .50 83.186.36 7. 8 5 0 . Preparation of a history of the city of Washington (RF 54062) City College.26 5. 0 0 2 1 . 0 0 0 .196.00 25. 6 4 1 7 . 6 4 ** £j J2 g v> "* ° ^ JU w ^ w £ Cj w * 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .500.416. Preparation of the supplementary volumes of the Dictionary of American Biography (RF 53134) American University. 0 0 0 .192. fellowships.289. 55191) 16.500.00 4. D.015. 0 0 6. Washington. Mexico City History of the Americas (RF 55039) Indian Council of World Affairs. New York Toward cost of preparation for publication of the writings of Alexander Hamilton (RF 54097) Commission on History of the Pan American Institute of Geography and History. 0 0 13. 0 0 0 .397. Naples Library materials. D .196.History American Council of Learned Societies. Canada Biographical study (RF 53058.84 2 0 .55038) Columbia University.597. and general support (RF 55005) Lehigh University.34 4 0 . Montreal.61 5 5 .

0 5 0 . 0 0 4. London. 0 0 6 4 . 1 4 5 . England Editorial work on edition of complete works of Alexis de Tocqueville ( R F 53136) New School for Social Research. Oxford. 1 4 5 . 9 8 11.OO 1 5 .525.SOO.878. England Travel preliminary to a revision of A Study of History (RF 53031) St. 0 0 9 . 0 0 0 . Illinois Toward support of Lafayette studies (RF 54098) Committee on Human Development Study of Kansas City. Western Division. 2 7 5 . 5 0 0 .088. 0 0 g w >a 2 2 .00 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Gambier. 55158) 1955 PAYMENTS « e» $11. England Research on the history of the Reformation in Poland and Lithuania (RF 55156) University of Chicago. Antony's College. 54129) Royal Institute of International Affairs. 0 0 1 0 . 0 6 4 0 . London. 0 7 1 5 . 4 4 8 . 7 5 0 . 5 0 0 . New York Continuation of its study of religion in Germany since the end of World War II (RF 53024.50 3 o 3 $ 4 . Ohio Program of individual grants for original philosophical work (RF 5 4 0 5 4 ) Exploring the possibilities of original work on political and social philosophy (RF 54OS5. 7 9 2 . 5 3 7 . 0 0 1 5 .38 $ 2 2 . 0 0 ° gj ^ $ £ V 3 .APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YBARS 1955 HUMANITIES — continued History — continued National Institute of Economic and Social Research. 0 0 * cj 7 . Missouri (RF 55075) Philosophy American Philosophical Association. 0 0 2 > 11. 0 0 0 .

. 0 0 1 1. logic.412.. Fukuoka... Japan For comparative studies in the philosophy of education (RF 54090) 5 5 . Logic.... Japan For a program of research and study in the philosophy of education (RF 54091) 6 6 ..43 3 .. England Translation and editing of Ludwig Wittgenstein's manuscripts for publication (RF 551 11 ) ..... Pennsylvania Development of reading courses and a senior seminar (RF 53102) . Cambridge......20 v H M td H 2 3 0 .... 0 0 *J 1 . 7 0 0 .......... 55031) University of Michigan. 0 0 Somerville College.82 ..... Massachusetts Graduate School of Education.. 6 5 0 . 0 0 0 . Illinois Work in philosophy (RF 53029) 7. 0 2 9 ..26 University of Geneva.. 6 5 0 .... Massachusetts Preparation of a descriptive analysis of the contemporary Russian language (RF 5 0 0 4 0 . 11. 8. 0 0 14.. * 8 .. Cambridge.. 6 5 0 . 7 .. ..172...50 .International Christian University... 0 2 » O 6 9 ....... .47 5.. 9 1 0 . 0 0 13.663...203........ 0 0 Kyushu University.. 1 6 g o ..... University of Chicago.53 > C § .... 0 6 ^ 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 8 2 6 . Oxford.. Support of program in history and philosophy (RF 52087) Haverford College. Language......703. 7 . 1 2 0 . Switzerland Research in philosophy. 0 0 ..... and Symbolism Harvard University.655. 1 0 0 .. 6 .. and psychology (RF 55026) .. Ann Arbor Cross-disciplinary studies in the theory of language and symbolism (RF 50140) General Education Harvard University..352.... Tokyo.

. 0 0 0 .. 2 5 0 . 8 3 0 ... 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 . 2 0 0 ... 0 0 ..... 0 0 g Q Z 5 ..... Kenyon College. 0 0 | g 1 9 . 0 0 0 ... 0 0 5 2 . 6 7 Literature Educational Television and Radio Center.. 0 0 Mexican-American Cultural Institute.. Ann Arbor.. r1 w *° 8 ......... 7 1 0 ..... England Downing College. 0 0 0 ... 7 6 Support of new major programs in the humanities and social sciences (RF 5505 1 ) ... 3 0 0 .. 0 0 $ 5 . 0 0 1 0 .. 9 3 9 .. ......... New Jersey Support of seminars in criticism (RF 52056) 5 0 .. 4 6 1955 PAYMENTS » Q $ . Gamlner.... 0 0 | j g & ° R w .... University of Wisconsin... Madison Evaluation and future planning of its community cultural arts program (RF 53080) 2 6 2 ... Cambridge Experiment in the use of French as a language of instruction in basic humanities courses (RF 5 3 0 7 8 ) $ 6 .. Iowa City For fellowships in creative writing (RF 53005) 1 3 .. 0 0 University of Cambridge.. 2 5 0 ... 0 0 0 .. ..APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 HUMANITIES — continued General Education — continued Massachusetts Institute of Technology.. 2 3 9 .... 0 0 0 ..... Michigan Radio presentation of poetry (RF 55159) .. .. 0 0 § 2 0 . Ohio > t Fellowships in creative writing and criticism awarded by editors of The Kenyon Review (RF 52119.. Salary of an assi3tant for director of English studies (RF 51166) 2 ..... 0 0 0 . 0 0 State University of Iowa.. 0 0 0 ... Mexico City For work of the Mexican Writing Center (RF 5 4 0 4 2 ) 9 7 ....... 9 9 8 . 8 .. 55178) 5 .. 2 3 3 0 0 . 0 2 . 0 0 Princeton University..

.... 0 0 1 4 .91 1..... Charleston.. 0 0 2 0 0 . Music American Symphony Orchestra League.. 0 0 0 . 0 0 83. 0 0 0 ..... Boston Symphony Orchestra.. 0 0 ...08 ... 0 0 1 0 . 5 0 0 .34 *" w .... 0 0 0 ... Massachusetts Tanglewood Revolving Scholarship Fund (RF 55056) City Center of Music and Drama. Richmond Development of the Museum's program in drama (RF 55055) .... SS179) Drama American Shakespeare Festival Theatre and Academy of Connecticut....... and studies of the organization and support of the arts in American communities ( RF 54093 ) Training for American and Canadian orchestra conductors (RF 55095) ... 0 0 4 1 . 0 0 0 .... Inc. 0 0 5 2 . 5 0 0 ... West Virginia _ ( Workshops for conductors and music critics. 8 7 9 ..00 15.. equipping and initiating the operations of a theatre ( RF 54008 ) Union Theological Seminary.University of the South.. 0 0 2 3 .78 1 2 5 . Stratford Costs of building. 0 0 0 ..... Sewanee. 2 2 6 ..... 1 ..... England Development of program in drama (RF 49119. University of Bristol. Tennessee For fellowships in creative writing (RF 53004..... 5 5 5 . New York Creating new productions in opera and ballet (RF 53064) 1 5 ...300. New York Development of an experimental program in religious drama (RF 55186) . 0 0 . 5 5 .... 8 0 150..... 0 0 2 0 0 . 4 9 . 85.. 0 0 6 7 ....... 0 0 .. 0 0 0 .. 0 0 tu 2 » § H 5 * > cj § 7> .. Inc. 0 0 0 .279. 5 4 0 9 4 ) Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. 5 0 0 . 1 5 0 ..... 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation ..000. 2 0 0 .

0 0 214. Philadelphia. 5 5 7 . 0 0 6 7 . 5 0 0 . Inc. Dumaguete.55113) Silliman University.850. recording. 0 0 21. 0 0 152. Cleveland. Pennsylvania Analysis of the production problems of modern opera (RF 55157) Karamu House. 7 6 0 .. 0 0 $ H £ ™ o ^ " g P 9» *j § S3 ? H o | g 2 1 . and performance of Philippine music (RF 55136) Young Audiences. Kentucky Composition. Ohio Construction and equipping of a music building (RF 54041) Little Symphony Society of Berkeley.. 9 0 0 . 0 0 0 . Cambridge Study of the aesthetic aspects of city planning (RF 54034) National Museum of Korea.350. New York Expansion of its program for organizing concerts by chamber music ensembles (RF 55142) Visual Arts Massachusetts Institute of Technology. performance and recording of new works by living composers (RF 53041.75 1 0 0 . 0 0 9 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 1 3 . Seoul For the encouragement of contemporary work in the arts (RF S4118) 1955 PAYMENTS ** Jj $ 1 0 0 . Philippine Islands Study. 0 0 0 . 0 0 $ 1 2 . Inc. 0 0 7 5 . 4 4 6 . arranging. 0 0 0 .68 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . California Administrative and directing expenses (RF 5 5 0 2 4 ) Louisville Philharmonic Society.APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 HUMANITIES — continued Music — continued Curtis Institute of Music.75 3 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 1 0 .703. 0 0 0 .

subscriptions to the new edition of Its Catuloguc of Printed Books (RF 2 9 0 8 6 . 50089.503.Dan\ce Connecticut College.53182. London. 5 0 0 . 0 0 16.54162. 0 0 Special Projects American Council on Education. 8 0 6 . 50161.53138. 0 0 1 4 9 . 0 0 4 2 0 . 7 8 7 . 51227. 0 0 0 . New London Expenses of its summer School and Festival of the Dance ( R F 55023) 3 3 . 5 9 £1 w 4 4 . 4 0 0 . Washington. 4 0 2 6 5 . 4 7 639.55131.55189) Grants in Aid Allocations by The Rockefeller Foundation {RF 48145. at a discount.62 1 7 .55123) Earlier Interest Association of Special Libraries and Information Bureaux. England Completion of British Union Catalogue of Periodicals (RF 44004. 0 0 0 . 1 0 536. 52197.3 0 0 7 6 ) 1 9 . 4 0 2 9 8 . D. and conferences (RF 48083) Humanities Research Council of Canada. 0 0 ~ w o * o * 3 gj H M £ cj ft M * 8 .61 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 3 6 0 . 4 0 0 . London. 0 0 1 9 . 0 0 2 6 7 . England To enable the Museum to offer to American libraries. 9 6 6 . 1 5 2 5 0 . 3 8 6 . C.472.72 1. studies.53183. 0 0 1 3 .53011) British Museum.55190) Surveys.91 5 2 . 3 0 0 . Toronto Support of activities in planning and development of Canadian personnel (RF 53088. 4 6 4 . Program of training student personnel workers (RF 54148) Fellowships Administered by The Rockefeller Foundation (RF 51223.55130.377. 8 0 6 .

Tokyo. 0 4 7 ... 3 1 $ ... 0 4 £ .. . 5 8 $3.... New Haven. 5 5 0 ...325. $ 2 2 6 . 7 4 ..... 4 2 5 .... .713....00 122.. 5 3 7 . 0 0 1 ...133. 0 0 $ 3 ... Connecticut Fellowships (RF 54081) Medical Research Council of Great Britain Fellowships (RF 54003) 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation ... $ 3 1 . w » g c | o ^ $313.APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 HUMANITIES — continued Earlier Interest — continued Keio University. 1.. 53182) Medical Library Association. Japan Establishment of a microfilm laboratory (RF 52156) TOTAL — HUMANITIES 1 955 PAYMENTS gL 4*... Tokyo... 3 1 4 . 0 0 0 .00 2 4 ..... $ 2 4 .31 15. 2 4 7 .03 $ .. (RF 52146... 3 3 0 .. 52194. 3 9 ..800..-. Japan Support of the Japan Library School ( R F 52107) Museum of Modern Art.54 $ 3 . 4 5 4 .. 0 0 2 2 2 ..474. 0 0 0 .... 5 .. 4 6 FORMER PROGRAM MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH Fellowships and Grants in Aid FELLOWSHIPS Administered by The Rockefeller Foundation.. 0 9 0 . 5 0 5 H » n 2 5 .. New York Toward the cost of the transfer of the most important motion picture films to a more permanent stock (RF 5 4 0 2 6 ) National Diet Library....350..

4 5 6 4 .49149.53183) TOTALS —FORMER PROGRAM (RF 453.82 2 4 9 .55 57. 53106. 517. (RF 47089.31 ^ H gj "-3 g > w » g t» 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 6 8 8 .94 5 3 0 . 51159. 0 0 0 . 52195. 54035) GRANTS IN AID Allocations by The Rockefeller Foundation. 4 4 5 .375. 0 0 Cr. 53183) Special Emergency Granl-in-Aid Fund.272.81 » w g * NATURAL SCIENCES AND AGRICULTURE Fellowships and Grants in Aid FELLOWSHIPS Administered by The Rockefeller Foundation (RF 51221. 3 8 $ 9 5 0 . 7 7 6 . 0 0 29. 0 8 1 .54164) 4 . Netherlands Scientific equipment (RF 45089) Field Service Expenses —1954 DMPH Field Staff (RF 53163. 51224. 5 3 1 5 9 .27 186.52199.037.50159. 48143. 7 2 173. 3 8 2 .154.National Research Council Welch Fellowships (RF 41028) Fellowships (RF 51151. 5 0 0 9 0 . 2 3 241.71 2. 48142. 7 4 6 .705. 47138.283.951.682.53182) National Research Council Fellowships (RF 51150) GRANTS IN AID Administered by The Rockefeller Foundation.877.90 5.114.51225.84 $1.43 2 9 5 . 7 1 2 .

Germany Work in the social sciences and the humanities (RF 5 0 0 6 3 ) Grants in Aid allocated by The Rockefeller Foundation For allocation by the officers within categories described by Trustee action and within specified limitations of amount and duration (RF 53183. Inc. New York Toward its expenses (RF 52073) International House of Japan. 4 3 0 .. New York International student exchange (RF 53059) Institute of Judicial Administration. 0 0 0 . Canberra. 5 0 0 . 0 0 4 5 . 2 1 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation ..19 9 0 . Chicago. 4 3 4 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 52183) 1955 PAYMENTS » o\ $ 2 0 . Illinois Expenses of director of the International Youth Library.144. Germany ( R F5 4 0 1 9 ) Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization.385. 2 3 5 . 0 0 9 0 . 2 2 5 0 . 0 0 110. 55133. 0 0 0 . 0 0 55. 0 0 0 . 8 7 5 . 0 0 7 . Inc. 0 0 0 . 8 4 5 . 2 6 4 4 . 54163.99 5 0 . Munich. 2 5 0 . 0 0 17. 0 0 0 . Australia Toward construction of a radio telescope and associated equipment (RF 55171) Conservation Foundation General administrative expenses (RF 5 5 0 6 6 ) Exchange Fund (RF 46123) Field Service Expenses — Unallocated Funds (RF 54167) Free University of Berlin.APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1055 GENERAL American Library Association. 7 4 3 9 7 .499.78 2 0 6 . 4 7 8 . 0 0 >-j jjj JJ o 2 w w P g ^ o S § % g * 2 5 0 . 0 0 1 0 7 . Tokyo Toward establishment and support of an international cultural center in Tokyo (RF 52102. 0 0 $ $ 1 0 . 0 0 0 . 55190) Unallocated—1956 History of the International Health Division For completion and publication (RF 52125) Institute of International Education. 4 6 5 . 0 0 2 .

7 6 7 . 0 0 0 .5S088.877. 0 0 1 5 .555. C. 2 5 0 . 0 0 $ 5 1 . 9 5 3 .19 $1. 0 0 2. 5 0 0 . Development of plans for a study of the effects of atomic radiation on living organisms (RF 55153) New York Community Trust. mission to study university practice and administration in the West ( R F 53075) National Academy of Sciences. Washington. TOTAL— GENERAL 3 5 . 7 3 4 .Mexican-American Cultural Institute.55045. D . 0 0 0 .93 ________ $ 4 3 5 . New Haven. 0 0 ___________ $ 4 4 3 . 0 0 8 8 .53158. Connecticut Establishment and general support of a Carbon 14 dating laboratory (RF 50132) . Mexico City Toward land and building (RF 55129) Ministry of Education. 4 7 6 . 0 0 0 .55152) 1956 (RF 55161) $107.54029. 0 0 0 . Egypt Expenses of a.55046. 0 0 * g ^ o -a ^ w H ^ £ cj & * 7 5 . 0 0 1 7 . 5 5 0 . 0 0 0 . 4 7 ADMINISTRATION Home Office 1954 (RF 2824. 0 0 0 . 9 0 0 .232. 0 0 169. 0 0 8 . 6 5 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 .43 1 . 0 0 1 .230. 5 0 0 .11 5 2 5 . 0 0 3 5 .18 1 . 2 5 0 . 0 0 1 2 5 . 0 0 $57.644. 0 0 1 7 . New York Establishment and support of a program of advanced religious studies (RF 54033) Yale University. New York Operating expenses (RF 54123) Temporary Indonesian Training Program Temporary program of study and travel grants for Indonesians (RF 54183) Union Theological Seminary.54139) 1955 (RF 54159. Cairo. 0 1 8 .54030. 0 0 0 .

5 2 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 . $ 1 9 ... 6 4 4 2 .... .. 9 2 9 . 7 0 0 . .353. 6 3 7 ...... 2 2 £j g to 8 g 2 * C * 3 § 3 g o 3 . 0 0 .... 1 6 6 7 . 6 4 7 .... 0 0 2 8 .. 9 5 0 . 1 1 8 . 0 0 . 55132. 4 0 .. ...... 8 3 0 .... 3 5 3 . 5 7 8 . 9 3 0 . 55160. 7 5 9 .. 55089) 1956 ( R F 55162) ... 2 2 3 .. . 0 4 TOTALS $ 2 7 . 6 6 6 . London 1954 1955 1956 .... 1 1 0 . .... . ... 5 0 0 . 6 .. 3 1 $19.. ... 1 0 5 .. 0 0 0 .00 $ 1 6 ... 0 4 7 .. 0 0 $ 1 6 . 0 5 7 . . 7 6 6 7 .. .. 7 2 2 ... 1 3 5 .. 0 0 0 .152. TOTALS — ADMINISTRATION 1955 PAYMENTS » oo $ 2 0 .. 7 4 2 8 .. 3 1 1 . 5 2 . 5 7 8 . 6 9 7 . .55112) . 8 3 5 . 1 5 6 .. 0 0 $ 1 .. 5 8 8 . 8 6 LESS: Unused balances of appropriations allowed to lapse 1 ........ 0 0 $ ..... 9 0 .. 7 5 6 .... Alterations and renovation of the New York offices (RF 55091. 5 5 GRAND TOTALS $ 2 6 . 1 5 0 .. 55163.APPROPRIATIONS PRIOR YEARS 1955 ADMINISTRATION — continued Treasurer's Office 1954 (RF 53159) 1955 ( R F 54160.. ... 7 0 0 . .. $ 2 . . 1 7 9 . 55164) Europe England. . France. 0 0 4 9 ... 3 .. 8 9 5 . 7 3 2 5 8 . 0 0 2 2 .. . 1 5 2 ... 6 5 5 . 54161. 0 0 $ 2 . 0 0 4 0 . ... 0 0 .. ... Paris 1954 1955 1956 ... Field Offices (RF 53160. 6 9 4 ........ $ 1 3 . 7 0 3 .. 8 5 3 . 6 5 7 . ....

Board of Founders. 0 4 g 3 0 0 . Washington. D . C .54 * 1 5 2 . 5 0 1 .65 o 39. 0 0 0 . Cambridge. D.14 4 4 4 .190. 5 0 0 . 0 0 » 1. Peru —1953 Paris— Building Harvard University. 6 6 3 9 5 . Washington. New York Columbia University.94 > 6 4 .. 8 5 to 7 6 9 . Study to Ascertain Type of Worker Required for Basic Health and Social Welfare Needs Within the Family (RF (RF (RF (RF (RF 54014) 52069) 52040) 53009) 32114) $1.30 6 . Norway National Research Council. Public Health Nursing. New York Field Offices Bangalore. Netherlands Institute of International Affairs New York University.79 w 264.134.00 g 1 6 . India —1952 Canada —1947 Lima. 8 0 g 4. 9 4 >§* (RF 52154) (IH 46057) (RF 52172) (RF 21151) (RF 52093) (IH 47013) (RF 46131) (RF 43095) (RF 5 2 0 4 7 ) ( H C 46015) (RF 4 9 0 7 4 ) (RF 4 7 0 0 4 ) (RF 54082) ( H C4 6 0 1 4 ) (RF 51054) (RF 53003) (RF S1152) 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Inc. New York Health Insurance Plan of Greater New York.675. 0 0 w 2 2 .73 g 11.81 2 3 0 . New York Library of Congress. 6 0 8 .REFUNDS ON PRIOR YEAR CLOSED APPROPRIATIONS Allahabad Agricultural Institute. 0 0 % 113. McGill University. Washington. 7 2 1.915. C . D . 0 0 5 3 4 . Montreal Ministry of Health. 6 0 2 . India California Institute of Technology.712. New York Norwegian Ministry of Social Welfare Social Science Research Council. 8 9 ffi 1 3 8 . New York Society of American Foresters. Massachusetts Health Insurance Plan of Greater New York. 2 4 1. New York Encyclopaedia of the Social Sciences.975. Pasadena Columbia University. C.

Illinois University of Florida. Austin University of Utrecht. 3 8 g w g £ w M g to * a a 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 6 2 . Norman University of Sheffield. 7 2 9 4 . 2 4 1 .to O REFUNDS ON PRIOR YEAR CLOSED APPROPRIATIONS — continued Tufts College. 0 7 6 . Medford. 3 7 4 4 5 . 3 4 1 9 1 . Netherlands (RF 54018) (RF 53156) (RF 53079) (RF 53035) (RF 53014) (RF 52115) (RF 5 4 0 5 0 ) (RF 51089) (RF 51132) 2 0 . England University of Chicago. England University of Texas. $ 2 2 4 . Gainesville University of Leiden.89 4 9 . 6 8 8 . Netherlands University of Oklahoma. 0 9 . 4 2 3 . Massachusetts University of Cambridge. 7 1 191.

0 0 0 23.98541 USA Treasury Bonds: 2y2$ due 8/15/63 @ 97.55366 United States Steel Corporation Common (No par) @ $ 8 2 . 0 0 7 4 9 . 5 0 g 2 4 0 . Capital (Par $10) @ $ 1 6 9 . Capital (Par $10) @ $31 plus the surrender of 266. 5/1/80 @ 112. 8 6 5 . 5 0 11.200.562. 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 3 0 0 . 0 0 $ 2 . 3 1 2 . 0 0 0 rights @ $3. 0 0 915.000 rights Union Carbide & Carbon Corporation Capital (No par) @ $91. 2 5 6 2 9 7 rights Consolidated Natural Gas Co.50 ^ 2 . 0 0 0 .287.000 2 26. Common (Par $10) @ $ 8 0 Hartford Fire Insurance Co. 9 2 0 . 3 0 2 9 " Freeport Sulphur Co. 2 2 $53. Capital (Par $10) @ $ 3 4 . 0 0 0 5 . Common (No par) @ $ 7 4 . 0 0 0 3 . 5 0 H 4 .635 7.375. 5 0 7 . 5 0 g 2 2 . 7 0 3 .510416 USA iy2% Treasury Notes due 4/1/60 @ 9 5 . 1955 PURCHASED $ 2 5 0 . 0 0 w 1 0 . 6 8 7 5 USA 2%% Treasury Notes due 6/15/58 @ 100. 7 3 8 9 5 2j4s " 12/15/64-69 @ 9 6 .25 » o 2 . 0 0 0 700 10. 4 6 $ . 6 0 0 . 2 9 3 . 1 0 / 1 3 / 6 7 at par and the surrender of 2 0 . 7 5 0 .000 1 0 .60 8 2 2 . Convertible Debenture 3%s. 8 4 4 . 0 0 0 2 . 9 0 7 . 7 8 4 . 4 3 7 .017 20. 0 0 0 . 5 9 3 . @ 25# each shares Consolidated Natural Gas Co. 9 3 7 .FINANCE COMMITTEE'S STATEMENT OF TRANSACTIONS RELATING TO INVESTED FUNDS FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31. 0 0 0 15.1875 shares Canadian Industries Limited Common (No par) @ $ 2 2 .556.870. 2 2 9 3 2 $314. 6 8 5 . 4 8 8 Inland Steel Co. 0 0 0 .21875 resulting in a ledger price of 125. 3 0 4 6 9 2j^s " 6/15/67-72 @ 95.536. 0 0 0 3 .000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co.81 to SO 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 w 3 3 3 . Common (Par $100) @ $140 plus the surrender of 7. 4 5 w 1 .50 w w 8 2 5 . 0 0 0 .000 1 2 .36458 2y2s " 6/15/62-67 @ 9 8 . 3 7 5 .75 Bethlehem Steel Corporation Convertible Debenture 3%s. 0 0 0 .350 rights " Consolidated Natural Gas Co.000 10. 0 0 3 . 9 5 0 7 8 3 Peoples Gas Light & Coke Co. 8 3 9 8 .956. 0 0 0 .00 338.

0 0 0 shares of stock (Par $100) held of record 6 / 2 / 5 5 —0— » » g w „ g ^ S3 w £ w 3 <3 | > 3 2 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 2 1 8 7 5 6 4 . 3 4 8 rights Consolidated Natural Gas Co.FINANCE COMMITTEE'S STATEMENT OF TRANSACTIONS RELATING TO INVESTED FUNDS — continued OTHERWISE ACQUIRED $ 4 . 0 0 2 6 6 . 5 0 ) received as a dividend on 6 3 . 0 0 0 shares of stock held of record 11/21/55 — 0— 2 0 . Common (Par $2) received as a dividend on 3 0 . 0 0 2 0 . 0 0 0 rights American Telephone & Telegraph Co. Common (Par $5) received as a dividend on 2 0 . 3 4 8 shares of stock (Par $10) -07. 0 0 0 shares of stock (Par $ 1 0 0 ) . 0 0 0 USA \Yz% Treasury Notes due 3/15/55 $ 4 . received on 2 6 6 . Common (Par $ 7 . 7 5 0 . 3 6 6 . 0 0 0 " Monsanto Chemical Co. Taken into the books at the opening price 9/9/55 @ $ 3 . (No par) received in a stock split on 1 0 0 . 3 7 5 . 0 0 0 USA 2% Treasury Notes due 8 / 1 5 / 5 7 in exchange for $ 4 . 5 0 0 " Crown Zellerbach Corporation Common (Par $5) received in a stock split on 15. 0 0 0 shares of stock held of record 8 / 2 5 / 5 5 — 0— 25. 4 0 0 .000 shares of stock held of record 8/19/55 — 0— 400 " Dow Chemical Co.000 shares of stock held of record 1/21/55 —0— 7 .500 shares Corning Glass Works Common (Par $5) received in a stock split on 5. Capital (Par $10) received as a dividend on 18. Common (Par $2) received In a stock split on 10. 0 0 0 " The Ohio Oil Co. 0 0 0 rights Peoples Gas Light & Coke Co.000 " B. par of which was changed to $2 —0 — 600 " Monsanto Chemical Co.750 shares of stock held of record 3/25/55 —0 — 3. 0 0 0 shares of stock held of record 11 /2S/55 —0 — 1 0 0 .150 " International Paper Co. F. 0 0 0 shares of stock held of record 12/14/54 — 0— 4 . 0 0 0 shares of stock held of record 5/16/55 —0— 7 .000 shares of stock (Par $5) held of record 7/11/55. received on 7 . received on 2 0 . 4 0 0 . Goodrich Co. 6 8 7 ^ " Hartford Fire Insurance Co. Common (Par $10) received in a stock split on 2 5 .

Capital (Par $7. (Cash in the amount of $99. par of which was changed to $ 7 . (Indiana) Convertible Debenture 3^8. 4 5 0 .430.000 5. (New Jersey) Capital (Par $15) received as a dividend on 1 . Capital (Par $5) received as a dividend on 20. 5 2 9 . 0 0 9 9 0 . 8 5 9 .25 M — 0— — 0— —0— —0— $ 5 . 0 0 0 shares of stock held of record 11/7/55 " Standard Oil Co. which was the value reported by the Standard Oil Co. 6 2 5 .000 shares Standard Oil Co.81468 6 . (New Jersey) Capital (Par $15) ©148.000 shares of no par stock held of record 5/12/55. 0 0 0 . 7 0 0 . 2 5 » w 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .) " Travelers Insurance Co. 7 6 8 . 10/1/82 @ 119. 6 6 6 19.000 shares of stock (Par $100) held of record 7/15/55. of California Capital (No par) received as a dividend on 8 0 .000 (Maturity value) due 1/1/55 $ 2 . 0 0 0 Standard Oil Co. (Indiana) in a notice dated 11/15/55 and credited to income.4 . Capital (Par $5) received in a stock split on 1. par of which was changed to $5 " Travelers Insurance Co. par of which was changed to $16-2/3 " Weyerhaeuser Timber Co. 9 0 0 .000 90. 2 5 § p ** <•> * £ w H * « S * INTEREST INCREMENT ON USA SAVINGS BONDS SERIES F (12 year appreciation bonds) $135. 4 2 1 . 0 0 $58.6479 PROCEEDS $ 6 . 0 0 0 shares Standard Oil Co.000 shares of stock held of record 7/15/55 " United States Steel Corporation (Par $16-2/3) received in a stock split on 10.50) received in a stock split on 3 0 . Taken into the books at $ 1 4 8 . ((Indiana) Capital (Par $25).712. 2 0 LEDGER VALUE $ 5 .734. 4 8 4 . 8 8 7 . 0 0 0 6 .000 10.10 was received in lieu of the 2/3 fractional share and was also credited to income. 3 7 9 9 0 . 6 6 6 shares Standard Oil Co.06 SOLD OR REDEEMED $ 5 . 0 0 0 shares of stock held of record 12/30/1955. 5 0 —0— $990. 7 3 4 .

5 0 LEDGER VALUE REDUCED 2 0 . 8 7 5 6 . 3 6 6 . 3 0 4 6 9 1 1 . 0 0 0 rights American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 9 0 8 . 0 0 0 . 6 3 5 shares of stock (Par $10) $ 4 . 9 S $ 6 4 . Capital (Par $ 1 0 0 ) by the value of 2 0 . 0 0 0 shares Standard Oil Co. 2 0 0 . 5 0 . 3 7 5 . 5 6 2 . 6 6 135. 6 6 " 2 0 0 . 6 7 6 . 0 9 6 . 2 3 g n £ w § C § > $ 2 * $ 6 4 . 1 2 5 . 3 7 5 . 0 0 0 rights $ 6 4 . 5 7 8 1 2 5 9 . 0 0 6 . 4 5 OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF 2 0 . surrendered together with 2 6 6 . 5 6 3 1 8 . 0 0 $ 4 . 3 7 5 . 7 3 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 American Telephone 8c Telegraph Co. 0 0 H 16. 4 1 7 . 8 1 2 . (Indiana) Capital (Par $25) @ $ 4 4 . 0 0 0 2j4s " 6/15/62-67 @ 9 7 . upon subscription to 2 6 . 8 4 8 . 8 7 5 6 .50 4 . 1 3 7 . 5 4 2 7__________. 8 3 6 .000 USA Savings Bonds Series F (12 year appreciation bonds) 1/1/55 @par 1 3 5 . 0 0 $ 6 4 . 0 2 5 . 0 0 $ 4 . 0 0 0 USA 2% Treasury Notes due 8/15/57 $ 4 5 . 0 0 0 USA \Yz% Treasury Notes due 3/15/55 given in exchange for $ 4 .50 4 . 3 2 2 9 4 4 5 0 . 0 0 0 . 4 3 1 . 0 0 7 . 0 3 0 . 0 0 0 . 1 6 9 . 0 0 0 . 4 0 0 .500 shares Du Pont of Canada Securities Limited Common (No par) jj. 1 2 5 . 9 2 1 . 1 3 0 . 9 4 3 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 1 3 5 . 4 0 0 . surrendered upon subscription to $ 2 5 0 . O 9 6 . 3 6 6 . @$ 2 7 . 2 5 0 . 0 0 0 shares American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 3 7 5 . acquired by purchase at 25 cents each. Convertible Debenture 3%s. 3 4 8 rights received on the shares held. 0 0 0 . 5 3 O . 8 1 8 . 4 3 1 . 1 8 1 2 . 7 5 0 . 5 5 o 5 $ 5 1 . 5 6 1 0 . 5 3 9 . 0 0 . 0 0 6 . 0 0 0 .FINANCE COMMITTEE'S STATEMENT OF TRANSACTIONS RELATING TO INVESTED FUNDS—concluded SOLD OR REDEEMED — Continued PROCEEDS LEDGER VALUE \£> USA Treasury Bonds: * 7 . 7 5 0 . 8 5 7 . 0 0 $ 4 9 . 2 1 3 . 0 0 0 2y4s due 6/15/59-62 @ 9 8 . 5 0 1 1 . 0 0 0 USA l^s Treasury Notes 2/15/59 @ 9 8 . 2 5 0 . 0 0 0 2j4s " 12/15/59-62 @ 9 8 . 8 2 8 . 0 0 $ 5 6 . 7 0 2 . 8 . 6 0 1 . 6 3 2 . 6 7 4 . 10/13/67 2 rights Consolidated Natural Gas Co. 6 6 9 . 5 0 1 0 .

5 9 $ 1 4 .560.169.21 ffi w 4 H M w Sold Otherwise disposed of Ledger value reduced Amortization Ledger value of securities. 8 7 0 . 2 8 7 .00 14.15 $ 5 3 . 0 0 0 . December 31. 1955 $45. 0 0 0 2^s due 12/15/59-62 9 . 9 8 3 . 8 1 5.172. 0 0 0 . 7 8 „.421.431.06 $246. 0 0 0 USA l%s Treasury Notes 2 / 1 5 / 5 9 $ 5 0 4 .573. 9 6 0 .459.375. 6 3 2 .51 $196.70 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . December 31.156. 0 0 0 . 3J^s. 5 6 1. 7 0 0 . o RECONCILIATION Ledger value of securities.430. 8 9 0 .125. Deb. 0 0 0 Bethlehem Steel Corporation Conv.23 4.647. 9 7 347.AMORTIZATION OF PREMIUM PAID ON PURCHASE OF SECURITIES $ 3 0 0 . 1954 Purchased Otherwise acquired Interest increment $187. 2 0 0 . 0 0 0 2#s " 8/15/63 6 .16 8 7 1 . 0 0 0 2y2s " 11/15/61 8 .726.595. 0 0 0 2#s " 6/15/67-72 1 8 . 0 0 0 .712.890.859. 0 0 58.52 9 . 5 / 1 / 8 0 USA Treasury Bonds: 6 .78 49.50 64.137.25 2 .524.

3 7 5 .1980 _ 3 0 0 . 0 0 101. 15. 0 0 0 . 0 0 United States of America 2J^% Savings Bonds Series "G" due October 1. 15. 5 0 9 5 . 0 0 3 . 1971 1 . 0 0 0 9 8 . 5 0 g " . 0 0 United States of America \Yz% Treasury Notes due April ]. 0 0 3 j — Nov. 2 4 4 4 . 7 6 6 .750. 0 0 132. May 1. 7 5 97. 0 0 0 . October 15. 0 9 3 7 5 1 0 . 9 4 1 8 . 9 2 0 . 0 6 2 5 9 9 0 .79 $ 9 0 .375 1. 5 0 cj United States of America 2% Treasury o Notes due August 15. 0 0 0 9 6 . 1964-69 1 2 ._. 7 7 0 . 0 0 99. 0 0 95. 9 0 4 . 8 0 0 . 0 0 0 125. 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 .75 $ 3 1 4 . 0 0 0 1 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 6 2 5 1 0 . 3 6 6 . — Dec.00 g . 1962-67 1 1 .750. Deb. 0 0 5 . 0 0 2 . 0 0 0 9 9 . 2 3 1 . 0 0 9 8 . 0 0 0 9 8 . 5 5 8 . 0 0 0 . 7 8 6 . Deb.00 United States of America Treasury Bonds: ffi INT. 0 0 0 . 9 4 3 . 0 0 0 . 0 1 7 . 0 0 9 9 . 15. 0 0 0 .28125 11. 7 5 0 . 0 0 5 . 0 0 $92.50 Bethlehem Steel Corporation Conv. 8 8 9 7 .312. 7 8 4 . 4 0 0 . 0 0 9 8 0 . 4 6 0 1 0 . 0 0 0 . 4 5 1 . 1963 1 1 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 1 . 5 0 0 . 7 3 9 11.188 2 .j — June 15.125 $330. 1957 4 . 3 3 0 1 0 .94 9 6 . 0 0 0 1 0 0 . 0 0 1 . 7 5 0 . 3 1 2 . 0 0 0 9 9 . 9 0 6 . 0 0 97. 0 0 100. 0 0 0 1 0 0 .058. 1958 1 . 0 0 0 1 0 0 .817 3 3 8 .25 4 . 9 4 0 . 6 8 0 . 6 J2. 6 8 8 4 . 8 1 2 5 4 . 1960 5 .5O 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Conv. 0 0 0 1 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . 7 6 2 . 6 2 5 . 2 5 0 . — Sept. 9 0 9 4 9 . 0 0 0 .. 0 0 0 9 8 . 0 9 3 7 5 8 . 0 0 £ . 1967 $ 2 5 0 .875 3 8 3 .50 95. 1958 2 . 5 0 0 . 8 2 2 . 15.433.000. 0 0 0 9 5 . 6 2 5 . 0 0 5 United States of America 2%% Treasury £ Notes Series "A" due June 15. 2 5 0 . 1959 8 . 0 0 0 .556. 2 0 0 . 1961 1 . 9 2 0 . 0 0 International Bank for Reconstruction and Development 3J^%. 3 0 5 11. 0 0 0 . DUB „ -June 15. 2 5 0 . 1961 9 . 0 0 0 100. 1962 1 .SCHEDULE OP SECURITIES ON DECEMBER 31. 2 2 5 8 . 15.3125 1 . 1956-59 11. 0 0 0 . 3%% October 13.013.562. 0 0 0 .762. 6 5 0 . 0 0 £ 2y2%~ Aug. 1955 LEDGER VALUE MARKBT VALUB BONDS PAR PRICE TOTAL PRICB TOTAL American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4 3 7 .684. 9 2 6 .125 2 .125 7 .117. 0 0 § United States of America \%% Treasury t Notes due February 15. 0 0 0 1 0 0 . 15. 0 0 9 8 . 0 5 8 9 .875 1 0 . 9 4 9 7 . 1967-72 9 . 9 7 0 . 0 0 1 . 1958 5 . 0 0 9 4 . 5 5 4 . 0 0 0 . —Dec. 0 0 0 . 7 5 0 . 3 7 5 . 0 0 g . — June 15. 0 0 0 .000 9 9 . 3M%. 2 8 127. 0 0 o . 0 0 0 112. — Sept. 6 2 5 8 . 7 5 0 . 4 4 7 . 8 7 5 4 . 3 4 7 . 0 0 " '. 0 0 0 .

7 5 1 6 0 . Cap. 0 7 1 5 . 0 0 $ 1 . Cap. 8 3 5 2 9 . 8 2 655.500 10. 0 0 8 4 . 9 0 1 . 8 0 0 . B. Co. (Par $100) Canadian Industries Limited (No par) Christiana Securities Co.25 5 7 . 7 0 0 . 0 0 859. 0 4 3 . (Par $10) Hartford Fire Insurance Co. (Par. 2 9 3 . 2 5 6 0 . 2 4 993. 5 0 0 .500 22. 5 0 0 . (Par $5) Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 1 6 9 . 6 0 7 . 0 0 2 . 0 0 0 2 0 .75 1 5 .375.189 65. 0 0 0 10.00 1.274 23. 0 0 3 . 2 3 1 . 0 0 *. (Par $10) Inland Steel Co. (Par $100) Consolidated Natural Gas Co.00 1 .00 68.055 2 2 .STOCKS American Gas & Electric Co.000 150. 0 0 3 0 5 . 6 8 1 . 0 0 0 .611 7 4 . (Par $10) General Electric Co. 0 0 0 .724. (Par $10) Continental Oil Co.15 7 4 9 . 0 0 0 .593 26.50) First National Bank of Chicago (Par $100) Freeport Sulphur Co.000 12.476 52.304. 0 0 0 . 7 3 7 . (No par) International Business Machines Corporatton (No par) SHARES 4 0 .46 35. 9 0 9 .337. 0 0 3 .65 4 4 4 . 0 0 0 .167. 5 0 180.893. 5 8 4 . (Par $2. 1 6 0 . 9 5 2 . 8 5 6 .00 100.200. 5 0 0 . 1 4 1. 9 1 7 .000 6 . Cap. 6 7 4 36. 8 7 7 134. 7 9 593.333. 8 9 5 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 2 .304 174. 8 3 2 . 5 0 0 . 8 7 7 . 6 1 2 . 8 0 6 . 7 5 0 . 0 0 4.000 23.441 $ 1 .234.400 24. Cap.64 4 7 8 .113.255. 9 5 278.169. F.500. (Par $10) Continental Insurance Co. $5) American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4 2 4 .500 20. 7 5 4 0 3 . 0 7 5 . 5 6 8 .839. 5 0 6 6 .00 4 . 0 0 1 0 . 0 0 7 6 5 .900 LEDGER VALUE PRICB TOTAL $ 2 6 . 3 9 6 1 9 . 0 0 9 7 8 . 0 0 35. Cap.32 1.000 1.597 14.56 1 . 7 6 0 . 0 0 0 . 4 6 5 . (Par $5) Corning Glass Works (Par $5) Crown Zellerbach Corporation (Par $5) Dow Chemical Co. 0 0 0 50. 0 0 91. 0 8 4 . 0 0 8 4 7 .600. 0 0 0 . 7 1 MARKET VALUE PRICE TOTAL $ 4 9 .117.37 2.00 1. 0 3 8 . 0 0 1 5 . " g H § H g s M £ g w to ^ © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 5 0 . 1 8 0 .375 105. 7 0 0 30. 0 0 16. 9 8 0 .375 21. 0 0 0 4 5 . 4 7 8 7 4 . (Par $5) Goodrich.00 3 .965. 0 0 0 200 3 0 0 .199.961. 0 0 1 . 5 0 7 .000 6 0 . 0 0 3 .75 5 9 .125. 8 0 1.798 8 3 . 7 5 8 6 . Cap.41 1. 0 0 0 .

015 7 .292 122. 7 9 0 107. 0 0 0 . 0 0 6 .79 MARKET VALUE PRICE TOTAL $ 8 2 .SCHEDULE OF SECURITIES — concluded STOCKS SHARES LEDGER VALUE PRICE TOTAL $41.37 771. 0 0 7 . 2 0 2 . 0 0 0 Standard Oil Co. 5 1 4 . 0 0 0 Peoples Gas Light & Coke Co. 1 0 0 . 5 9 5 14.378 34.125 179. 5 7 3 . 5 0 3 . R. 6 9 9 $ 2 . 7 5 0 . Inc. (No par) 2 0 .93 1. 6 0 1 . 3 6 7 . 9 6 9 . 2 0 0 . 5 2 4 . 0 0 3 0 5 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 9 4 2 . 7 8 7 17. 7 5 6 . (Par $15) 2 . Cap. 4 6 1 . 4 5 8 . 5 0 ) 66. 6 2 5 . 0 0 5 1 . Cap. 7 8 7 58. (Par $5) 1 5 . 3 9 4 . 6 6 1. 0 0 1 . (Par $25) 1 .075. 7 5 0 . 0 0 0 Monsanto Chemical Co. 2 0 6 4 9 . 9 0 4 . 0 0 0 . 7 4 9 . 3 7 5 113. 5 0 91. 0 0 0 .150 Kennecott Copper Corporation (No par) 3 0 . 3 4 6 5 6 . 0 0 0 Travelers Insurance Co.50 3 1 .659.991. (No par) 8 4 . 0 0 0 .125 6 4 . of Canada Ltd. (Indiana) Cap. 0 6 0 . 0 0 2 .30 14.00 58. 9 5 0 . (Par $5) 2 5 . 4 7 8 5 6 . (Par $ 7 . 0 0 0 The Ohio Oil Co.318. 0 0 110. 6 1 637. 0 0 0 International Paper Co. 3 8 5 .65 7 4 6 .625 4 7 . 6 2 5 . 0 0 1 . 0 0 0 Union Pacific R. (Par $ 1 2 . 0 0 0 Socony Mobil Oil Co. 1 6 2 . 0 0 8 4 . (No par) 5 5 .989. 5 6 2 . 0 0 0 Union Carbide & Carbon Corporation (No par) 2 0 . 0 0 1. 5 3 0 . 2 8 9 .636 3 5 . 0 0 0 .255 8 5 . (Par $15) 3 0 0 .000 Union Tank Car Co. 0 0 1 9 . 0 0 1 . 5 2 8 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 .00 51.185 15. 8 2 2 . 3 7 5 3 4 .00 152. 0 0 0 H K * o £ § " g * o g « g o * 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 3 5 8 33. 0 0 $ 4 . 0 0 1 . 8 0 5 .412 2 6 . Co. 0 0 3 . 0 0 7 . 1 3 3 . 0 0 4 . 0 0 1 . 7 5 151.133. Cap. 5 0 0 . 0 0 0 .539 2 5 . 4 1 1. (Par $100) 7 . 7 0 0 .715. 0 0 0 United Fruit Co. 0 0 0 Standard Oil Co. of California Cap. 0 8 7 . 0 6 8 . Cap. 0 0 0 .807.68 3 3 4 . 0 0 2 . 0 0 0 .71 3 0 .565 3 . (No par) 2 0 0 .75 117. 1 0 0 . 0 0 5 3 .180.625 8 4 . 7 9 5 . 2 6 5 . 6 0 0 National Lead Co.184. 0 0 0 Standard Oil Co. 2 5 0 . 2 8 8 . 3 5 0 . 5 0 ) 7 0 . (No par) 1 0 0 . (Par $50) 10.717. (Par $2) 3 0 . 6 4 4 . 0 0 g GO International Nickle Co. 0 0 0 . 7 0 0 Phelps Dodge Corporation Cap. 4 7 3 . 8 4 5 . 4 3 8 . (New Jersey) Cap.756.

52 1.22 1. 0 0 5 . 1 6 0 . 5 2 4 .000 41.50) Weyerhaeuser Timber Co. 4 0 6 . 1 7 4 . 6 8 4 . 0 0 $ 4 9 0 .224. 9 1 0 . (Par $7. 0 0 0 120.541. 9 1 $ 1 9 6 . 5 9 5 . 0 0 0 . 4 7 5 . 6 1 2 .50) 2 0 . 7 2 6 . 8 6 2 . 0 0 1 . 5 0 ^ 5 o q o H K w SUMMARY LEDGER VALUE Bonds Stocks $ 9 2 . 2 0 0 . 9 1 0 . 0 0 4 2 .588.293. 0 0 0 . 5 0 4 9 0 . 0 0 6 0 . $ 1 0 4 . 0 0 1 . 4 0 6 . 4 4 7 .115 61. 0 0 0 . 9 1 5 8 . 0 0 0 2 0 .227 13. 8 6 2 . Cap. 0 0 g W > w g * 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 7 9 1 0 4 .31 . 7 2 6 . 7 0 MARKET VALUE $ 9 0 .3716 822.United States Steel Corporation (Par $16-2/3) Westinghouse Electric Corporation (Par $12.604. 1 1 7 . 0 4 0 . 5 0 $ 5 8 1 .

700 2. B. travel STANFORD RESEARCH INSTIJU1E Applied Solar Energy Symposium: expenses of foreign participants STAWrORP UNIVERSITY Economics: S. Leach. 1 9 5 5 Amount $ page UNITED STATES ALASKA UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station: A.000 182 2 1 . travel THE LITTLE SYMPHONY SOCIETY OF BERKELEY General support THE SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART Public school program for contemporary art: support 3. visiting professorship Medicine: D.400 6. 5 0 0 ARIZONA UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA Cloud Physics Research Conference: expenses of participants CALIFORNIA CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Chemistry: R. J. A. Kallio. travel 5»5°o Potato improvement program. studies Law and political science: N. development 3 . Kaji. Ukai. 0 0 0 121 103 103 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 5 0 0 43 1 0 . visiting professorship Jurisprudence: Law Review staff. G . Rytand. 5 0 0 1.GEOGRAPHICAL D I S T R I B U T I O N O F G R A N T S . 0 0 0 179 2 . 0 0 0 119 2 .350 137 148 137 32 2 6 . Corey.

5 0 0 148 3. N. Beach. 0 0 0 102 102 183 50 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .1:5 5 . W. study VIRUS STUDIES COLORADO UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO Biology: R. study N. Neumann. research Political science: L . 0 0 0 1 5 .GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF GRANTS 3 0 ! Amount $ page UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Berkeley: Algae: research Extension Division: medical care administration. 0 0 0 165 56 146 165 85 S)OOO 147 3 3 ) 4 ° ° 180 500 57 2 . research YALE UNIVERSITY Near Eastern literature: ] . study Virus Laboratory: R. Plant physiology: N. support Newsletter on current South Asian studies in the U. Hagan. M. research C. travel Psychology: F . Wallbank. travel CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT COLLEGE Summer School and Festival of the Dance: support WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY Foreign policy formation: S. Rogat. Palmer. 0 0 0 6 . C. travel Pollen analysis: research Political science: A. Wood. Lipson. M. 0 0 0 25. travel C. 0 0 0 500 7>3oo 4ji75 800 3 . Williams. travel DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA AMERICAN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION German war documents: meetingj expenses 1 . Wolfers. study Political science: R. 5 0 0 5 . 0 0 0 3>Soo 6 . Rick.OOO 167 147 73 6 0 . study Y . 8 0 0 4iSoo 120 41 168 102 148 148 148 84 1 . T. W. 0 0 0 7»5oo 8 . travel Los Angeles: Department of Theatre Arts: appointment of playwrights White Mountain: White Mountain Research Station: support UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA History: T. 0 0 0 1 . S. Yanaga. Berkes. Mirov. A. N. Pennak. travel Davis: Agriculture: R.

0 0 0 182 8. K. B. travel and research ILLINOIS NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Hindu values and way of life: F. 0 0 0 191 4 8 5 . preparation 1. Smith. study HAWAII UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII Music: B. 8. study THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO Public school program for contemporary art: support THE MODERN POETRY ASSOCIATION Special issue of Poetry MagaKwe. research SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL Fellowship program: support UNITED STATES COMMITTEE FOR THE UNITED NATIONS Program of information and education: support FLORIDA UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA Library development: travel Soil science: H . L. Coulborn. 0 0 0 46 2 . Hsu. Glenn. 5 0 0 167 103 1 0 . 0 0 0 166 Conference: support 2 . travel and research YERKES LABORATORIES OF PRIMATE BIOLOGY General budget support GEORGIA ATLANTA UNIVERSITY Religion in history: R. 0 0 0 129 1 0 . 0 0 0 137 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Sato. 0 0 0 182 6 . S.250 171 5 0 . 9 0 0 137 6 . research NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Symposium on Cytodifferentiation: expenses of foreign delegates Effects of Atomic Radiation: study PAN AMERICAN SANITARY BUREAU Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama: food crops.3O2 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Amount $ page AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERNATIONAL LAW International Investment Law GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY Language and communication: £ . Popenoe. 5 0 0 2 . 0 0 0 51 190 6 .150 183 3 . 0 0 0 102 6 . 0 0 0 2 5 .

F. 5 0 0 138 99 1 0 .300 104 1 0 0 . INC. 5 0 0 2 0 . Sprague. JACKSON MEMORIAL LABORATORY Decennial Tissue Culture Conference: expenses of foreign scientists 5 . 0 0 0 83 1. Oppenheimer. studies Kansas City. 4 0 0 6 4 . 0 0 0 102 6 . travel UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS Meeting of agricultural economists INDIANA PURDUE UNIVERSITY Agricultural economics: N.GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF GRANTS 303 Amount $ page UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO American Historiography: 6. Missouri: study of development Marital adjustment: E. Commissioning of contemporary music: support UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY Nutrition of piant-fceding mites: research UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE Higher education in Germany: J. 0 0 0 3 . Ohe. 0 0 0 2 2 .000 102 1 0 0 . McKitrick. 5 0 0 38. 0 0 0 177 2 . W . 5 0 0 8 . study Jurisprudence: Law Review staff. 0 0 0 172 27 148 169 130 31 136 172 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Potter. Burgess. 0 0 0 51 1 4 0 . J. 0 0 0 140 1 . study Genetics: research UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME International relations: research IOWA IOWA STATE COLLEGE Agronomy: G. L . 5 0 0 2 . research Integration of Negroes in medicine.100 1 . travel NATIONAL CATHOLIC RURAL LIFE CONFERENCE Expenses of conference discussion leaders KENTUCKY LOUISVILLE PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY. 9 0 0 123 1.750 iS6 10. Tablante. travel LOUISIANA LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY Rice Research Center: support MAINE ROSCOE B. travel Philippine Studies Program: fieid research Philosophy: S. Elkins and E. B. study Obstetrics and gynecology: E.

Rivlin. A. Joe. 0 0 0 2 . Lefever. research UNITED 8TATE3 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE W. 4 0 0 65 145 145 145 145 145 1 2 . 0 0 0 7. 0 0 0 39 71 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . McCollum. P. support X-ray crystallography: research 3 0 0 . Lav? Review staff. J. V. 0 0 0 5 .S . Purcell. Wolff. 4 0 0 1 0 . W . 0 0 0 70 4>$oo 3 0 . conference U. L. 0 0 0 6 .150 104 5 .. book preparation Sanitary engineering: H.304 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Amount $ page MARYLAND JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY Protein biochemistry: E. 0 0 0 6 . 0 0 0 2 . P. travel University admission policies: W. V. 0 0 0 1 0 . foreign policy. Armstrong. Lefever. Ziff. Jr. 0 0 0 85 4 .Soo 2 4 0 . Armstrong and E. L. visiting professorship Nationalism and Progress in South and Southeast Asia. 0 0 0 4 . 4 0 0 4»5oo 1. J. travel Water Resources Seminar: preparatory study MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Dual major program: support Economic development: study Mechanical translation: journal. visiting professorship K . 0 0 0 135 3 . Das. Harbaugh. studies Philosophy: R. 0 0 0 166 162 172 128 130 147 147 147 166 172 39 191 122 1 . A. Thomas. p. W. research Ethics and foreign policy. A Hart. 0 5 0 9 . appointment Contemporary Russian language: analysis Eastern European studies: R. study Jurisprudence. research School of Advanced International Studies: J. 0 0 0 176 3 3 . 6 0 0 173 1 2 5 . J. 0 0 0 1 5 0 .500 5»5oo 2 . 0 0 0 120 1. Bender. S. Zaumeyer: travel UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Algae: research MASSACHUSETTS BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Tanglewood Revolving Scholarship Fund: support FLETCHER SCHOOL OF LAW AND DIPLOMACY Sir Mark Sykes Papers: J. travel Economics: research Laboratory of Social Relations: research training Law School: H. study School of Hygiene and Public Health: Exchange program with the University of the Philippines Virus diseases. travel P. E. 4 0 0 1 . research Far Eastern history. 0 0 0 183 1 5 0 . study HARVARD UNIVERSITY Center for Middle Eastern Studies: H.

0 0 0 8 4 . 5 0 0 NEW JERSEY BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA Conservation program: support 5 0 . study MINNESOTA UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA Agriculture: J. B. travel NEW HAMPSHIRE DARTMOUTH COLLEGE Cellular biology: research 5 0 . 2 0 0 7»5oo 305 30 56 181 181 158 191 145 29 51 126 103 148 65 *47 103 48 70 122 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 2 .000 8 . 0 0 0 4 . 2 5 0 1 0 . 0 0 0 4 . Lambert. Hill. W. travel and research Medical School: exchange of faculty with University of Antioquia Population studies: research Survey Research Center: voting behavior. travel Jurisprudence: W.050 3 .600 110. Harvey. M.000 8. experimentation UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN American studies in Japan: support .500 3.GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF GRANTS Amount $ MASSACHUSETTS MEDICAL SOCIETY Postgraduate Medical Institute: support SMITH COLLEGE Genetics: research THE POETS' THEATRE. International Center: J. Lifson. Lonnquist. 0 0 0 3. travel Devejopraent of concept of total war: J.050 4i245 3. travel and research MISSOURI UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI Rural Church as a Social Institution: study NEBRASKA UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA Agronomy: J. 5 0 0 10. INC. study Physiology: N. 0 0 0 Summer Research Project on Artificial Intelligence: support 7 . H. Support MICHIGAN EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION AND RADIO CENTER Poetry broadcasting: L . Davis. Bowditch .

500 Thomistic legal and political thought: D. Mangum. translation and publication NEW YORK AMERICAN-KOREAN FOUNDATION Health Consultant: expenses AMERICAN MUSIC CENTER. research 9. Feis. hook preparation DR. N. study 1 0 .850 Potential audience for the arts in New York: study 4 . 5 0 0 191 4>3^4 182 850 183 1 0 . 0 0 0 Comparative linguistics: U. Luening and V. 0 0 0 International politics seminar: support 9>5o° Jurisprudence: Law Review staff. study 9 5 . support 9 4 .130 25 165 4 5 . 0 0 0 1 . £ . 0 0 0 American Press Institute: seminars for foreign editors. M.955 British-Soviet-American relations: H . travel * ) 5 ° ° Immunochernistry: M.306 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Amount $ page PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Muslem Brotherhood: R. travel 1. 2 0 0 5 0 0 . Trussell. Gedney.385 East Asian Institute: support 95»ooo Enzyme research program: support 35. Hacker. Chou. 5 0 0 Origins of modern political theory: R. 0 0 0 39 3 . Kaufmann. study 5 . Bigongiari. O. travel and research 6. Musk collections for Turkish conservatories AMERICAN NATIONAL THEATRE AND ACADEMY Arena theatres: E. 0 0 0 185 6 .ooo Higher education: L. 4 0 0 THE CONSERVATION FOUNDATION General support CORNELL UNIVERSITY Department of Pathology: research History of Thailand: W. studies 500 Modern Chinese culture: research materials 2 . Weinreich. 0 0 0 International Neurochemicat Symposium: expenses of American participants 1 0 .900 International law: research and teaching 2 4 . travel 1. 0 0 0 188 181 161 181 145 165 131 63 191 32 142 65 145 145 166 145 181 165 40 145 1 0 . Corbett. Mitchell. 0 0 0 Barnard College: Electronic Music.. 0 0 0 Public health: R. study Theories et Rtalitts en Droit International Public: P . support 9 . research 5. P. Ussachevsky. Heidelberger. BAUMGARTNER AND DR. 0 0 0 4 . INC. 0 0 0 15. J. E. BLIA8 Public health organization in India: travel COLGATE UNIVERSITY Role of humanities in general education program: study COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Adaptation of Chinese drama: W. study Office of Population Research: support Philosophy: W . L. Cumming. 0 0 0 166 127 173 148 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 Problems of linguistic policies: study 8 . D.

Synge: D . L. Flaxman. International relations: research and general support DANCE NOTATION BUREAU Labanotation: A. INC. Cook. 0 0 0 56 84 6 0 . 0 0 0 39 6 5 . 0 0 0 138 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 181 5 0 0 . 0 0 0 167 1 0 . 0 0 0 190 1. Looper. travel 37i5oo 2 . 0 0 0 59 4 . 5 0 0 172 133 172 147 3. 0 0 0 148 2 . Hutchinson. 4 0 0 163 31 4 . Maramorosch. W . Porter. M.500 5 . discussion program HASKINS LABORATORIES Microbiology: research LONG ISLAND BIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION Symposium on Quantitative Biology: expenses of foreign scientists Virus research program: development NEW YORK UNIVERSITY Dutch literature: S. B. 0 0 0 30 55tooo 175 1 0 . 0 0 0 6 .GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF GRANTS 307 Amount $ pagt> COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS. travel Plant pathology: K . H.400 800 71 104. book preparation FAR EASTERN ASSOCIATION South Asian studies: expenses of meetings FOREIGN POLICY ASSOCIATION Recruitment for foreign service: H. M. 5 . Rahn. study Biography of J. purchase of books Foreign student orientation program: S. travel SARAH LAWRENCE COLLEGE Post-college experience of students: study UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY Religious drama program: development UNION UNIVERSITY Albany Medical College: Postgraduate Education Program. Wriston. travel and research POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE OF BROOKLYN Protein structure: research PUBLIC HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK Susceptibility to tuberculosis: research ROCKEFELLER INSTITUTE FOR MEDICAL RESEARCH Electron microscopy: K. 0 0 0 66 500 1 5 . equipment UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER Canadian studies program: support High-altitude physiology: H. Greene Legal problems of the Welfare State: R. 0 0 0 4 .

travel Regional Planning and Development: G. 8 0 0 22O. H. 4 . 0 0 0 181 3. study OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY Department of Agricultural Biochemistry: seed germination. Cox. research Political science: D. D. 1 0 0 123 700 138 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Snedecor. WESTERN DIVISION Political and social philosophy: studies JOHN CARROLL UNIVERSITY College enrollments: study KENYON COLLEGE Fellowships in creative writing OBEKL1N COLLEGE International relations: R. 5 0 0 191 4*500 172 8 0 . General support NORTH CAROLINA UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA Division of Health Affairs: medical practice. 0 0 182 147 4>95Q 182 25. travel OHIO AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL ASSOCIATION. A.308 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Amount $ page VA8SAR COLLEGE Ceylonese foreign policy: W . Angrist. 2 0 0 123 3 . 6 0 0 41 7 5 . M.500 5 . 0 0 0 146 5 2 . W. study 1 2 . Tufts. study Institute of Statistics: G . study VIRUS STUDIES YESHIVA UNIVBRSITY Medical education: A. W. INC. study Political science: F. travel G . Wriggins. Gilbert. Psaty.H . W. Graf. 0 0 0 178 525 33 1 4 . Blackwell. Spitz.000 6. travel YOUNG AUDIENCES. 2 0 0 173 7 .830 99 146 9 .OOO 145 73 1 . research PENNSYLVANIA AMERICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION Conference on the "Fugitive" Poets: expenses BRYN MAWR COLLEGE Modern Japanese painting: E. travel and research CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC Production problems of modern opera.

Gilchrist. research British concept of the judicial function: P. Glpson. foreign policy: L. Spector. 0 0 0 175 9 . 5 0 0 173 2 . travel TENNESSEE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH Fellowships in creative -writing James Harrington Papers: G . S. research Literature: M. Jr. J. 0 0 0 146 6. J. 0 0 0 1 0 . Halle. Schwartz. N. F. Twaddell. research UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA European criminal law: L . 0 0 0 121 70 5 2 . Spears. Bodenheimer. research and writing VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA U. B. 4 0 0 5.GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF GRANTS 309 Amount $ page LBHIGH UNIVERSITY History: L.900 146 3 0 . research and development UTAH UNIVERSITY OF UTAH Jurisprudence: E. study RHODE ISLAND BROWN UNIVERSITY Linguistics: W . research and writing PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY Soviet foreign policy: V. 3 9 5 146 a1 . 0 0 0 171 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .230 1 0 .100 147 147 7 . Mishkin. Aspaturian. travel TEXAS UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS Algae: research Southwestern Medical School: television microscopy. travel and research 3»35o 2 5 0 . support Soviet-Muslem relations: I. H. travel Northeast Asian studies. V.. 0 0 0 173 148 165 2 . K. 0 0 0 2 .F . 0 0 0 166 157 166 1 5 0 . research VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS Community drama program: development WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Japanese literature and drama: R. 2 0 0 2. McKinnon.

5 0 0 Tax administration in Wisconsin: study 3 6 . H. Mackenzie King Religion in Canadian history: H. 5 0 0 Seminar on the Law of Land Use Control. 0 0 0 Solar energy: research 2 5 0 .850 2 . support 7 . Organization of information on orchestral groups Organization of symphony orchestras: preparation of model patterns Training program for conductors: support WISCONSIN LAWRENCE COLLEGE Federalism: W . MONTREAL Conferences on studies of Pakistan Institute of Islamic Studies: support Biographical studies of W.500 5 1 0 . 2 0 0 NORTH AMERICA CANADA CONFERENCE TO PROMOTE STUDY OF PAKISTAN IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE. study Phenomenology: H. 8 7 5 181 2. L . 7 4 0 Plant pathology: research 4 8 . 9 0 0 167 156 171 171 5 2 . 5 0 0 2 . research and writing 2 . TORONTO Fellowships and general support MCGILL UNIVERSITY. research 700 J. Webb. 0 8 2 49»5°o 181 181 178 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Riker. Walsh. 0 0 0 University of Wisconsin Press: T . 5 0 0 Talent loss in the U. 0 0 0 Symposium on Latency and Masking in Viral and Rickettsial Infections: support 4 . travel HUMANITIES RESEARCH COUNCIL OF CANADA. study QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY. Jr. S.. Kaihara. exploratory study 8 .: W. Sewell. Roberts. A. 3 0 0 Law: Lavr Review staff. Spiegelbergj completion of book UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN Economic development of Japanese agriculture: M. research 2 . 5 0 0 184 600 40 525 t68 137 146 146 146 96 118 84 146 144 185 5 . Mayda. OTTAWA Medical care: C . H. research 2 . 6 0 0 147 173 7i30o 6 . KINGSTON Conference on the Canadian Writer: expenses MEXICO AGRICULTURAL OPERATING PROGRAM 3 0 1 .310 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Amount $ page WEST VIRGINIA AMERICAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA LEAGUE. 3 0 0 106 7 . INC.H . 0 0 0 17.

G. Wheeler.OOO 171 IOI 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .525 to. Guedea L. research equipment O. RIO DE JANEIRO H. 0 0 0 5 . H. LAVRA8 College of Agriculture: support INSTITUTE OF AGRONOMY. and L. 0 0 0 23 2.ooo 35 35 6 0 .900 32 1 . RIO DE JANEIRO Training of medical school teachers: support GAMMON INSTITUTE. Ornelas K . 8 0 0 32 1. Dourado: travel Study of nursing needs and resources in Brazil: support CAMPAIGN FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION PERSONNEL. 0 0 0 62 65 35»ooo 189 13. travel UNIVERSITY OF CHIHUAHUA Medical school administration: J. Robles G. 0 0 0 91 3 5 . MEXICO CITY Commission on History: research SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE. MEXICO CITY Contemporary Mexican history: research and seminar INTERNATIONAL WHEAT RUST CONFERENCE: expenses MEXICAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE. . 0 0 0 91 1 2 4 . MEXICO CITY Institute of Chemistry: Chemistry of natural products. 0 0 0 97 6 0 .j travel CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA LATIN AMERICAN SCHOLARSHIPS TO ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION AGRICULTURAL OPERATING ACTIVITIES BRAZIL AGRONOMY INSTITUTE OF THE SOUTH. CIUDAD JUAREZ Supplies and equipment TECHNICAL INSTITUTE AND SCHOOL OF ADVANCED STUDIES OF MONTERREY Agriculture: V. 0 0 0 101 X3i5oo 171 3 0 . travel UNIVERSITY OF GUANAJUATO Medical school administration: J. PELOTA8 Cereal improvement: research BRAZILIAN NURSING ASSOCIATION.880 IO.. 0 0 0 117 1 . research PAN AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY. Bravo A. 4 0 0 104 1 0 . MEXICO CITY Establishment of permanent headquarters NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MEXICO. A. CAMPINAS Plant viruo research: equipment 3 0 .GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF GRANTS 31 I Amount $ page COLEGIO DE MEXICO.

Eston. SAO SALVADOR Department of Pathology: equipment and supplies UNIVERSITY OF BRAZE. 0 0 0 3. VIC. 0 0 0 5O. BELO HORIZONTE Faculty of Medicine: support UNIVERSITY OF PARANA. travel 4 . 0 0 0 1. 0 0 0 700 51 57 339»ooo 20 8 . 4 . Freire-Maia. Moure. de Campos. travel UNIVERSITY OF BAHIA. CURmBA Bee bionomics: J.ooo 920 2 . RIO DE JANEIRO Institute of Biophysics: research Medical education: J. travel UNIVERSITY OF SAO PAULO Piracicabat Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture: Agricultural research programs. 0 0 0 3S. 0 0 103 84 II8. 4 0 0 70 32 33 85 9»J$o 29 57»J20 1 .. 0 0 0 27 33 5 0 . travel Research Center of Brazilian Geography: support UNIVERSITY OF MINA3 GERAI9. W . Avcndano. travel Population genetics program: support VIRUS STUDIES 7 . Rodrigues da Silva. support Bee genetics.5oo 1 2 . 0 0 0 4 .000 II6 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Kerrj travel Ribfirao Preto: Faculty of Medicine: equipment and supplies Sao Paulo: Electron Microscopy Laboratory: equipment and supplies Enzyme chemistry: research Faculty of Medicine: equipment and supplies Isotope Laboratory: Research expenses T . E. de Moraes.750 4 0 .03A School of Veterinary Medicine: equipment SANTA CASA DE MISBRICORDIA. P.OOO 70 64 ai 69 70 55 70 54 73 CHILE AGRICULTURAL OPERATING PROGRAM BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF CHILE. 0 0 0 1 0 . 0 0 0 ai 6 . travel Medicine: J. 0 0 0 93 1 2 0 . 6 0 0 3 . RIO DB JANEIRO Graduate medical training program: development Orthopedic surgery: D . 0 0 0 x. Edwards.312 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Amount $ page RURAL UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF MIMAS GERAIS.750 1 7 . travel Laboratory for Cell Physiology: research Physiology: G . SANTIAGO Animal viruses: research equipment and supplies Respiratory viruses: O. S . A. 3 0 0 90 103 2 7 8 . research Genetics: N.

travel UNIVERSITY OF CHILE Faculty of Agronomy: equipment and supplies Faculty of Medicine: general development io>ooo 3 7 9 . 2 0 0 8 . travel UNIVERSITY OF CALDAS. 6 7 5 775 2. travel J. Jimenez. SANTIAGO Faculty of Agronomy: equipment and supplies Faculty of Medicine: teaching and research MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE. 4 0 0 104 *5 4 ) ^ 5 0 III 1 0 . CALI Faculty of Medicine: Library development F . travel Pathology: A... TURRIALBA Graduate School: equipment Native food crops: study Potato research program: support UNIVERSITY OF COSTA RICA.GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF GRANTS 313 Amount $ page CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF CHILE.. 6 0 0 100 24 COLOMBIA AGRICULTURAL OPERATING PROGRAM CREDIT BANK FOR AGRICULTURE. Lehmann V. MANIZALES Faculty of Agronomy: equipment. Correa-Henao.ooo 2 . 0 0 0 1 2 3 . travel Surgery: A. 0 0 0 101 19 3>ioo 103 1 0 . supplies. 5 0 0 7iS°o 4»$oo 102 102 ica 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . BOGOTA E . Chavarriagaj travel NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF COLOMBIA Medellin: Faculty of Agronomy: agricultural communication program.550 30 29 29 30 30 1 . SANTIAGO Plant physiology: A. Pelaez B. and library materials UNIVERSITY OF VALLE. C. 2 0 0 30 30 40 34 1 0 . MEDELLfN Biochemistry: J. INDUSTRY. travel Department of Physiology: equipment Microbiology: B. Ramirez. Gomez A. AND MINES. 0 0 0 2 . 0 0 0 101 7 . 0 0 0 101 COSTA RICA INTER-AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES.. 0 0 0 101 2 . A. Montoya O. support UNIVERSITY OF ANTIOQUIA. SAN JOSE School of Agriculture: development 1 0 . travel School of Nursing: support 5. 3 0 0 3>75o 4 6 .

travel Genetics: F . travel PERU NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NURSING.. travel Protein metabolism: E. 5 0 0 3 0 . SAN SALVADOR Department of Cardiology: equipment GUATEMALA UNIVERSITY OF SAN CARLOS Faculty of Agronomy: equipment and supplies JAMAICA UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES Chemistry: C . LIMA Department of Pathological Physiology: teaching and research TRINIDAD DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL SERVICES Health education: S. travel Faculty of Medicine: field training and research Physiology: S.125 3 2 .350 66 36 32 66 1 0 . travel 1 0 . 3 0 0 ioa 52 52 52 28 97 1 . Saez. Moosai-Maharaj. Caldeyro-Barcia. Ferreira B. 0 0 0 1 . MONTEVIDEO Electron microscopy: E. de Robertis.H . Patrick. travel P. A. 0 0 0 1. travel REGIONAL VIRUS LABORATORY URUGUAY RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES.250 3 . Buno. 0 0 0 95 xo. 5 0 0 1. 5 0 0 56 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . J. 0 0 0 49i25O 40 73 9 0 . 0 0 0 1 . LIMA Teaching equipment NATIONAL SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE. 9 5 0 3 1 4 .ooo 35 1 . LA MOLINA Cereals: teaching and research UNIVERSITY OF 8AN MARCOS. 0 0 0 25 4 5 .314 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Amount $ page EL SALVADOR HOSPITAL ROSALES. 5 0 0 70 56 1 . Hassall. 0 0 0 101 3 . 0 0 0 2. research UNIVERSITY OF THE REPUBLIC. Trenchi. Kean. travel Teaching and research facilities Faculty of Veterinary Medicine: Teaching and research facilities H. 9 6 0 2 . travel R. MONTEVIDEO Faculty of Agronomy: construction of insectary Faculty of Medicine: W.

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF GRANTS 315 Amount $ page EUROPE AUSTRIA SALZBURG SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES. PARIS Virus studies: J. travel UNIVERSITY OF PARIS Laboratory of Biological Chemistry: equipment UNIVERSITY OF TOULOU8E Neurophysiology: research. PARIS Science and Freedom Committee: support ECOLE PRATIQUE DE8 HAUTES ETUDES. 0 0 0 167 167 167 161 12.650 6 0 . INC. Braudel. VORDINGBORC Psychiatric nursing: I.650 2.000 85 1. Chambre. Slavic. 0 0 0 163 4 . 8 2 0 130 1 2 5 . General budget support UNIVERSITY Or VIENNA Social Science Research Laboratory: research BELGIUM UNIVERSITY OF BRUSSELS Neurophysiology: research DENMARK ORINGE MENTAL HOSPITAL. Nielsen. 0 0 0 159 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 1 0 0 2. and Islamic studies: development NATIONAL CENTER FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH. travel FRANCE AMERICAN HOSPITAL OF PARIS Chest X-ray apparatus: operating costs CONGRESS FOR CULTURAL FREEDOM. Train. 0 0 0 51 6. PARIS Neurophysiological research: equipment PASTEUR INSTITUTE. Vieuchange. SIXTH SECTION.500 191 3iQ5o 36 3 0 . travel Asiatic. staff expenses GERMANY GERMAN ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN STUDIES American studies program: support 3 0 .500 65 682 85 7>5oo 51 3 . PARI3 Area Studies: F. travel H. travel J. 0 0 0 49 9 .

travel UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM Department of Experimental Pathology: equipment UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL .500 2 5 . 6 0 0 17 50 65 33 7>5oo 37>i5° 30 H3 6 . S. W. G. Bnrnett. 9 0 0 172 2 2 . AND MRS. Purcell.Medicine: C. Bauer. 4 0 0 3 .000 4 0 . B. travel Symposium on Medical Education: T . 9 0 0 2. P . MARBURG Biochemistry: equipment UNIVERSITY OF HAMBURG Linguistics program: development UNIVERSITY OF HEIDELBERG Physiological Institute: teaching program Political science: research and teaching UNIVERSITY OF MUNICH Experimental zoology: research Organic chemistry: R. W. 2 0 0 400 142 168 6. 0 0 0 63 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . travel Physiology: W. LONDON Protein structure: research UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN Agricultural biochemistry: A. travel UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE Biophysics: research Cavendish Laboratory: X-ray crystallography of proteins. travel t Psychological Laboratory: O.3l6 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Amount $ page PHILIP UNIVERSITY. 0 0 0 3 . expenses GREAT BRITAIN LIONEL J. A.250 51 i»7So 85 2 0 . Rushton. von Uexkull.250 69 67 167 Gi 131 14$ 52 52 2. Zangwill.600 103 3 0 . F. 0 0 0 1 . L.675 2. BR1MBLE Publication of scientific articles: travel DR. travel Far Eastern history: V.800 31 2 5 . JULIAN HUXLEY Evolutionary biology: travel LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE International relations: fellowships and studentships Structure of Turkish peasant communities: A. P. van der Loon. Stirling. research Chinese Ts'ttng-shu. 3 0 0 67 16. travel 18. Huisgen.000 64 73 5 5 . 0 0 0 1. T. 0 0 0 61 2. H.500 21. travel QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY OF BELFAST Department of Chemistry: equipment Department of Microbiology: equipment ROYAL INSTITUTION OF GREAT BRITAIN. travel Department of Colloid Science: equipment Economics: P. Perry. J.

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OF GRANTS

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Amount $ page UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM Chemistry: J. Weiss; travel UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH Department of Biochemistry: equipment Nursing teaching unit: establishment Pharmacology: H. M. Adam; travel Department of Zoology: equipment UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW Department of Biochemistry: J. Paul; equipment Latin American literature: W .C . Atkinson; study UNIVERSITY OF LONDON King's College: nucleic acid structure; research St. Bartholomew's Hospital Medical College: Biochemistry; A. Wormail; travel St. Mary's Hospital Medical College: protein metabolism and enzymology; research equipment London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Department of Occupational Health; establishment Environmental sanitation; G . G. Don; travel School of Oriental and African Studies: Conference on Historical Writing on Southern Asia University College: Biology; research equipment Human genetics; research UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD Laboratory of Chemical Crystallography: research Queen's College: Causation in the Law; A. M, Honore; research St. Anne's College: higher education for women; M. Ogilvie; travel St. Antony's College: the Reformation; S. Kot; study School of Medicine: research and teaching facilities Sir William Dunn School of Pathology: W. E. van Heyningen; travel Somcrville College: Ludwig Wittgenstein Papers; G. E. M, Anscornbe; preparation for publication University College: conference on American studies and fellowships VIC10RIA UNIVLRSITY OF MANCHESTER Architecture: T . Howarth; travel GREECE UNIVERSITY OF SALONICA College of Veterinary Science: equipment and supplies ITALY INSTITUTE OF MILAN Sanitary engineering: F, Cambi; travel 318 41 1 0 , 0 0 0 101 6,650 181 9 , 0 0 0 5,365 1 , 0 0 0 15,000 156,000 650 8 , 7 0 0 12,500 70 147 186 171 22 66 171 165 3 5 , 0 0 0 700 1 3 , 0 0 0 4 5 , 0 0 0 2,575 23,500 8 , 5 0 0 3 0 , 0 0 0 58 71 64 37 40 165 51 54 300 550 66 168 7i5oo 9 0 , 0 0 0 900 1 2 , 0 0 0 65 34 51 51 1 , 7 0 0 71

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

31 8

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Amount $ page

ITALIAN INSTITUTE OF HISTORICAL STUDIES, NAPLES General support UNIVERSITY OF BOLOGNA Embryology and histology: research equipment and supplies 3 , 5 0 0 Institute of Biochemistry: equipment 1 2 , 5 0 0 UNIVERSITY or NAPLES Microcythemia genetics: research UNIVERSITY OF PARMA Human genetics: research Physiology: research equipment Plant physiology: F. Lona; travel UNIVERSITY OF PAVIA Institute of Zoology: genetics; research UNIVERSITY OF ROME Biologically significant molecules: research NETHERLANDS HAGUE ACADEMY OF INTERNATIONAL LAW International Jaw and international relations: scholarships and administrative expenses INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR PLANT TAXONOMY, UTRECHT Meetings: expenses of American participants TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY, DELFT Education: J. Kiers; travel UNIVERSITY OF AMSTERDAM Virus research: F. Dekking; travel UNIVERSITY OF LEIDEN Education: A. A. van den Brandeler; travel Social medicine: P, Muntendam; travel UNIVERSITY OF UTRECHT Genetics: research equipment NORWAY NORWEGIAN RADIUM HOSPITAL Biochemistry: research equipment UNIVERSITY OF OSLO Neuroanatomy: A. Brodal; travel Nucleic acid structure: research Register of Hereditary Diseases: establishment X-ray crystallography: research 2 , 4 . 0 0 2 , 0 0 0 9i4$o 1 2 , 0 0 0 52 65 56 70 7>Soo 65 2 , 5 0 0 56 31050 2,625 185 4 ° 2 , 5 0 0 84 3>°5o 185 1,300 57 1 2 2 , 0 0 0 139 1 0 , 0 0 0 70 1 , 3 0 0 57 1 0 , 0 0 0 3 , 0 0 0 4*250 56 52 103 4 2 , 5 0 0 53 53 64 55fooo 170

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

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319

T O E SAAR UNIVERSITY OF THE SAAR Franco-American relations:). B. Duroselle; research SWEDEN KAROLINSKA INSTITUTE, STOCKHOLM Brain physiology: research equipment Enzyme chemistry: research Nucleic acids: research UNIVERSITY OF LUND Endocrinology: research Genetics and plant breeding: research Neuropharmacology: S. W . Thesleff; travel UNIVERSITY OF STOCKHOLM Biochemistry: research UNIVERSITY OF UPPSALA Biochemistry: research Biophysics: research Chemistry of biologically active molecules: research Plant science: research SWITZERLAND FEDERAL TECHNICAL INSTITUTE, ZURICH Botany: A. F. Frey-Wyssling; travel Chemistry of physiologically important compounds: research GRADUATE INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, GENEVA J. Freymond: travel INTERNATIONAL PRESS INSTITUTE, ZURICH General budget support UNrVERSFTY OF GENEVA Philosophy, psychology, and logic: cooperative study UNIVERSITY OF LAUSANNE American literature: R. Rapin; travel YUGOSLAVIA INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE, ZAGREB Industrial medicine and hygiene: V. B. Vouk; travel UNIVERSITY OF ZAGREB Genetics: research equipment

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AFRICA EGYPT EGYPTIAN SERVICE OF ANTIQUITIES Kamose stela: L . Habashi; travel EGYPTIAN SOCIETY FOR HISTORICAL STUDIES, CAIRO Modern Arab World: book preparation MUSTAFA MOSHARAFFA Modern Egyptian music: study UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA SOUTH AFRICA VIRUS LABORATORY, JOHANNESBURG UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA Plant biochemistry: research UNIVERSITY OF WTTWATERSRAND Anthropology: P. V. Tobias; travel NEAR EAST IRAQ COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, BAGHDAD Arts Faculty: research ISRAEL HEBREW UNIVERSITY, JERUSALEM Near Eastern history: D, Ayalon and U. Heyd; study LEBANON AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF BEIRUT Pediatrics: H. M. Idtiss; travel NATIONAL CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, BEIRUT A. Fuleihan: purchase of equipment and supplies TURKEY TURKISH AMERICAN UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATION, ISTANBUL Development of Modern Turkey: book preparation UNIVERSITY OF ANKARA American literature: H. Dereli; travel Pediatrics: I. Dogramaci; travel Pharmacology: I, Konterair; travel 6 0 0 2*750 3 , 2 3 0 168 31 31 1 0 , 0 0 0 165 MOO 182 1 , 4 . 0 0 32 6 , 3 0 0 166 1 0 , 0 0 0 165 3 , 2 0 0 56 7 , 5 0 0 65 32,5OO 73 1 , 5 0 0 183 1 9 , 5 0 0 164 1 , 4 5 0 173

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OP GRANTS

3 2 !

Amount $ -page UNIVERSITY OF ISTANBUL Near Eastern studies: O. Okyar; travel H. Timur; travel 1 , 2 5 0 1 , 3 5 0 168 168

FAR EAST AUSTRALIA ALFRED HOSPITAL CLINICAL SCHOOL, MELBOURNE Medical education: E .T .T . Downie; travel AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING COMMISSION, SYDNEY N. Hutchison: travel AUSTRALIA-NEW ZEALAND FELLOWSHIP COMMITTEE Support CANBERRA UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Economics: R. H. Barback; travel and study History: C . M. H. and Mrs. Clark; travel COMMONWEALTH SCIENTIFIC AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH ORGANIZATION, MELBOURNE Radio telescope: construction QUEENSLAND INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL RESEARCH, BRISBANE Encephalitis research: P. E. Lee; travel UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE American studies: B. R. Elliott; travel Biochemistry: research equipment Obstetrics and gynecology: L. 0. S. Poidevin; travel UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE Economic development: M, M. Bayne; travel Library development UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA, NEDLANDS Botany: B. J, Grieve; travel and study 1 , 8 0 0 104 1 , 0 0 0 3»SSS 138 166 2 4 , 0 0 0 1 5 , 0 0 0 525 164 64 33 1*300 84 2 5 0 , 0 0 0 187 900 135 1 , 8 0 0 167 2 , 7 6 0 131 1 , 0 0 0 183 1 , 0 0 0 32

CEYLON DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, PERADBNIYA Chemical Division: laboratory equipment and supplies UNIVERSITY OF CEYLON, COLOMBO Drama and theatre arts: library development Department of Education: T. L, Green; travel Human and economic geography: R. and Mrs. Wikkramatileke; travel Pediatrics: P. C. C. de Silva; travel 1 , 0 0 0 3 , 8 7 5 *t<&$ 2 , 8 5 0 183 166 138 31 5 , 0 0 0 103

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

322

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Amount $ page

INDIA B. J. MEDICAL COLLEGE, POONA Medical education: J. KL Adranvala; travel CHRISTIAN MEDICAL COLLEGE, LUDHIANA Preventive medicine: research and teaching CHRISTIAN MEDICAL COLLEGE, VELLORE Department of Preventive and Social Medicine : Development Support Thoracic Surgery Department: equipment University administration: staff members; travel GAJRA RAJA MEDICAL COLLEGE, GWALIOR Anatomy Department: equipment COKHALE INSTITUTE OF POLITICS AND ECONOMICS, POONA General budget support GOVERNMENT OF INDIA, NEW DELHI Ministry of Health: Rajkumari A. Kaur; travel GOVERNMENT OF UTTAR PRADESH Horticultural Research Station: equipment and library materials INDIAN CANCER RESEARCH CENTRE, BOMBAY Laboratory for Studies on Human Variation: support INDIAN COUNCIL OF MEDICAL RESEARCH, NEW DELHI Construction of office building Virus research: M. G. Raja Varmaj travel INDIAN INSTITUTE OF ART IN INDUSTRY A. Mookerjee: travel KARNATAK UNIVERSITY, DHARWAR Library development LITERARY SOCIETY OF BENGAL, CALCUTTA Modern Bengal: S. Ray; study MEDICAL COLLEGE, TRIVANDRUM Obstetrics and gynecology: K . Ponnamma; travel STATE MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL, TRIVANDRUM Development of clinical teaching facilities MINISTRY OF HEALTH Conference of Indian medical educators 3 , 0 0 0 31 3 5 , 0 0 0 28 4,100 30 3 , 6 4 0 172 1 , 0 0 0 168 5,650 182 49»5oo 3>3oo 42 84 14.500 56 4 7 , 0 0 0 93 406 40 1 5 0 , 0 0 0 134 5 , 6 0 0 30 4 , 8 0 0 34i'oo 8 , 0 0 0 4 , 6 0 0 39 38 29 29 8 , 5 0 0 39 4 | 2 2 5 39

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323

Amount $ page PATNA UNIVERSITY Orthopedic surgery: B. Mukopadhaya; travel K. PAVRI: virus research; travel SCHOOL 07 NURSING, TRIVANDRUM L . A, Johnson: equipment and supplies UNIVERSITY OF BARODA Department of Sociology: study UNIVERSITY OF CALCUTTA Economics: A. K. Datta; travel UNIVERSITY OF DELHI Modern Indian history: research and training UNIVERSITY OF LUCKNOW Public administration: R. U. Singh; travel UNIVERSITY OF RAJPUTANA Medical education: S . K, Menon; travel VIRUS STUDIES, POONA INDONESIA INDONESIAN NATIONAL FILM COMPANY, LTD., DJAKARTA Drama instruction: U. Isma'il; travel INDONESIAN NATIONAL THEATRE ACADEMY FOUNDATION, DJAKARTA Library development LIBRARY OF POLITICAL AND SOCIAL HISTORY, DJAKARTA Social sciences: purchase of books MOHAMAD RASJIDI: Arabic studies; travel MOSLEM UNIVERSITY OF INDONESIA, MAKASSAR Library development NATIONAL HIGHER SCHOOL OF ISLAM RELIGION, JOGJAKARTA Library development JAPAN HIROSHIMA UNIVERSITY International relations: T , Horikawa; travel and research INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC HEALTH, TOKYO Department of Microbiology: Viral Studies; support Public health: K. Saito; travel 4 , 4 . 0 0 935 84 40 2 , 7 0 0 148 2 ) 0 o o 186 2 , 0 0 0 186 7,350 3(i45 137 167 2 , 0 0 0 182 5,675 182 427 5l,OOO 33 73 5»ooo 137 2 1 , 0 0 0 165 2,125 137 7,315 137 5 , 0 0 0 35 2,325 1 , 3 5 0 32 84

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

324

THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Amount $ page

JAPAN SOCIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, TOKYO Sociological studies: support KANSAI UNIVERSITY, OSAKA Mysticism in literature: M. Hori; study KEIO UNIVERSITY, TOKYO Interdisciplinary studies of Japanese fishing villages Pathology: T . Aoki; travel KOBE UNIVERSITY Economics: K . Tanaka; travel Higher education for women: M. Namba; travel KYOTO UNIVERSITY American studies: support Research Institute for Fundamental Physics: support KYUSHU UNIVERSITY, FUKUOKA Surgery: H. Miyake; travel NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES, TOKYO Research program: equipment OKAYAMA UNIVERSITY Ohara Institute for Agricultural Biology: equipment and supplies OSAKA UNIVERSITY Econometrics: S. Ichimura; travel TOKUGAWA INSTITUTE FOR BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH, TOKYO H. Tamiya: travel TOKYO CENTRAL HEALTH CENTER Public health nursing: M. Hirai; travel TOKYO INSmU'JK K>R MUNICIPAL RESEARCH Municipal organization and administration: R. Kojima; travel TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Design and architecture: S. Kiyosi; travel TOKYO UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY Linguistics: T . Miyamoto; study TOKYO UNIVERSITY Comparative religion: H. Kishimoto; research Faculty of Medicine: Biochemistry; N. Shimazono; travel Hazards of radioactive dusts and vapors; studies Tissue culture: studies Political science: library development 1,200 3 ) 7 5 ° 6 , 5 0 0 9 , 5 0 0 2 , 5 0 0 168 31 39 51 173 707 173 2 , 7 0 0 182 4,150 137 3,675 35 800 122 900 131 1 0 , 0 0 0 101 5OjOoo 92 600 33 4 6 , 2 0 0 5 , 0 0 0 158 85 3,325 4 , 3 0 0 137 185 3 , 0 0 0 3 , 4 7 5 137 31 4 , 3 9 0 172 1 3 , 0 0 0 130

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation

0 0 0 1 2 0 . travel 5 . research KOREA NATIONAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING. 2 6 4 172 2 . 0 0 0 35 6 . Calo.500 101 89 101 90 101 132 35 38 39 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . C.100 12. 0 0 0 5. Lara. 2 0 0 4 0 . Quirino S1LLIMAN UNIVERSITY. travel Equipment and teaching materials Library development Scholarships for Indonesian students D . 0 0 0 i3i9oo 166 180 3. F.350 167 84 1 0 . Unaali. travel Manila: Institute of Public Administration: research aud training Quezon City: College of Nursing: A. 0 0 0 94 2 . 2 0 0 104 4*575 185 4 7 . Nishijima. H. 0 0 0 750 6 8 . SHURI CITY Education: C . recording. SINGAPORE Chinese Societies: W. L .000 172 2 . Lara. Hale. NOUMEA Control of the Rhinoceros beetle: research OKINAWA UNIVERSITY OF THE RYUKYUS FOUNDATION.GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF GRANTS 325 Amount $ page WASEDA UNIVERSITY Political science: S. Goeku and R. DUMAGUETE Library development Philippine music: study. 7 8 4 1. L. Reyes: travel PHILIPPINE WOMEN'S UNIVERSITY Biography of General Emilio Aguinaldo: C. Nakada. travel NEW CALEDONIA SOUTH PACIFIC COMMISSION. research Virus research: J. and performance UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES Laguna: College of Agriculture: N. L. LOS BANGS A. travel PHILIPPINES BUREAU OF FORESTRY. 0 0 0 1 0 . travel Institute of Hygiene: Exchange program with Johns Hopkins University H. SEOUL Teaching activities: equipment and support MALAYA UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA.200 3. Blythe.

.6oo 138 Library science: N .326 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION A'mount $ page 2 . 1 5 0 185 600 33 x. Salcedo. Jr. travel School of Medicine: J. S . P. Verzosa. 0 0 0 98 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . travel Sociology: expenses of visiting American sociologist THAILAND KA3ET3ART UNIVERSITY. BANGKHEN Department of Home Economics: development 2 5 .

Index 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

277 Encyclopedia of Islam. 246 Anderson. Richmond K . 51 Adelaide. Netherlands experimental embryology. 232 Amsterdam. C . Washington. 11 American Council on Education. Philadelphia. Brazil cereal improvement. New York.. 220 American Shakespeare Festival Theatre and Academy of Connecticut. C . Stratford. Henry Matthew. West Virginia information program. Denmark biochemistry.INDEX AARHUS. 182 American Symphony Orchestra League.. . 2 5 2 2 5 3 . 39 Agricultural operating programs. University of. D. LeRoy.. 29 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Alfred Alvin. . C . 148 American Hospital of Paris. 278 political and social philosophy. 255 Aitken. C. . C . 39 American Law Institute. Jehangir Kaikhashru. Pennsylvania. University of. 254 Agronomy Institute of the South. 91-92. Charles R. Colombia Department of Physiology. 249 American studies. 275 Anscombe. D. Thomas H. 241 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. . Washington. 286 American Museum of Natural History. Australia biochemistry. E . . Auburn. 281 workshops and studies. 262 American Library Association. Gambier. France. . G. University of. viii Angrist. Western Division. Charleston. 183 American Philosophical Association. x Anderson. 281 American University.C . 39 American Association for the Advancement of Science. D. 275 Adranvala. Medellfn. 8688. 137 American Studies Association. 255 Allen. D. . 272 fellowships. 171 Antioquia.x Aix-Marseille. 181 training of conductors. France. 104-117. Illinois. Philadelphia. 241 Adam. D. 181 model patterns of organization and procedure. 277 Amherst College. Massachusetts. Chicago. D. 281 American Society of International Law. Washington. 233 American Council of Learned Societies. 246 psychosomatic unit at Wilhelmina Hospital. 262 American Music Center. Pennsylvania. Dictionary of American Biography. 283 American Historical Association. University of. D . 164. 33 Ankara. G . New York. 154. 172. Ohio original philosophical work. 64. C . . Washington. Pelotas.M . Inc. Washington. . 278 American Public Health Association. Washington. University of.178-179. Washington. Turkey. Inc. 191 American-Korean Foundation. New York. 241 psychiatry. University of.

. E. Gordon W . 272 Belfast. G . 167 Bodenheimer. J.330 INDEX Beirut. 123. 146 Bologna. Lebanon medical division. W . University of. 103 Baroda. Brazil. 104 Brazil. Free University of.. 182 Aspaturian. Vermont. 243 Department of Experimental Psychiafry. New Jersey conservation. 131. American University of. John P . Wilbur J . L. London. 229 studies of modern Arab Middle East. Tucson. 243 Blackwell. x Barnett. University of. 226 Association of Special Libraries and Information Bureaux. Edgar. Switzerland monetary and credit economics. . 242 virus research. Northern Ireland Department of Chemistry. Chester. 121 Armstrong. 29 Baird. 273 Avendano. Massachusetts Tanglewood Revolving Scholarship Fund. . 14 Bragg. 64 Bahia. England. T . University of. Italy. Paris. 166 BACTERIOLOGICAL Institute of Chile. Germany. vii Bender. 145 Birmingham. 254 Aoki. . . viii Barback. France. xi Balfour. Ronald H . 148 Bowen. . University of. 138 Beach. Brazil. Vienna. Fernand. 64 Borlaug. vi Boy Scouts of America. Victor. 48 Basel. 273 Bigongiari. New Brunswick. 256 farm and animal colonies. 138 Blythe. 256 Badger. Queen's University of. Vernon V . Richard x. v. 269 organic chemistry. Ross Nn 147 Berlin. 131 Baumgartner. Rio de Janeiro faculty exchange. 29 Antonio Narro College of Agricu!ture. Saltillo. 262 Berkes. Norman E . Coahuila. 103. England biochemistry. P.x Boston Symphony Orchestra. Mary M . 85 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 248 Bibliotheque Nation ale. 64. 61-62. University of. 250 Belknap.. Teisho. Oscar. 131 Barnes. 188 Bowles. 162. University of. University of. 281 Bowditch. 73. 261 Bradfield. . Illinois. Dino. University of. . 31 Araraquara Health Training Center. Leona. 191 Bennington College. Paris. 264 Austrian College Society. . India. 145 Art Institute of Chicago. Switzerland. G . Sir Lawrence. 248 Bauer. A. Frank A. 243 protein chemistry and metabolism research. iv. 68 Braudel. David. . Raymond W . . . 286 Bern. 283 Atkinson. . . 146 Association for the Mental Health of Children. 224 Arizona. Douglas. Geoffrey M . 84 Ayalon. William C . 154. 176-177. Guy B . 167 Bravo Ahuja. 191 Bayne. France. 168 Australia-New Zealand Fellowship Committee. 137 Barratt. Cbauncey. John. Mexico. . Santiago animal viruses. Marshall C .

243 Buno. 243 tol. 236 general. 14 purchase of an ultracentrifuge. vii. 101 Federal Reserve System. 283 Pasadena Brodal. 239 ment and Research. tory. Detlev W . RiverCarlsberg Foundation. Los 251 Angeles. 251 British Museum. University of. 236 Council. Copenhagen. 240 Department of Applied Economics. University of. 13 Parasitology. Bugher. v. 236 Brazilian Nursing Association. 85. Ralph J. 2 3 6 . Frederic. Ernest W . 67-68. 280 Buerger. Rio de Janeiro Colombia. iv. 239 Institute for Personality AssessInstitute of Biophysics. v. Bris62. Martin. John C . 243 Burden. 14 269 Buller. Belgium biochemistry. . side. 2 2 6 2 4 3 neurophysiology.. Robert P. Rio medical care administration. 264 organisms. Nona L . Washington. 168 Bristol. Theodor. Montreal biochemistry of marine microfellowships. 85 gram. 35 photosynthesis. VanWhite Mountain Research Station. 23-24. 262 Cambi. 194. Franco. 120. Roderic E. England. 49. 2 3 2 Bronk. University of. couver. Roberto. vi. F . 52 biology and chemistry. 275 50. California Institute of Technology. 130 Campaign for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel. x Molteno Institute of Biology and Bunche. si. 70. England. London. . vi Earhart Plant Research LaboraBrookings Institution. 262 Cambridge. England Brussels. vii.. University of. 242 X-ray crystallography. . Alf. 102. 261 Canadian Social Science Research biochemistry. 52 224 California. Buchanan. 259 D . University of. Berkeley Campbell. Angus. iv. 101 medical fellowship program. 127 algal studies. .C . Department of Theatre Arts. x. biologically important materials. University of. 14 269 Biicher. Norman S.. Lionel J. .INDEX 331 Center of Brazilian Geography.. CALDAS. 49 South Asia studies information proBrimble. 243 Department of Social Medicine. Manizales. 236 British Columbia. 41 research and education. England. 182 Center of Genetics Research. 281 Virus Laboratory. Washington. 64 Downing College. 259 Denmark. 243 Burgess. 41 de Janiero. 236 Bremer. 70 history of English criminal law. 52 neurophysiology. 63. viii. 61Burden Neurological Institute. Calo. Canada. 69. 264 Citrus Experiment Station. Caldeyro-Barcia. 240 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

169-170. Eduardo. 270 Kansas City study.thj chile> loca. Detroit. 269 industrial civilization. 270 integration of Negroes in medicine. JnCij New York) m 2 7 0 philosophy.es in jurisprudence. j <„„ Chavamaga. ix Cavalli-Sforza. Paris biochemistry. 2J<5 History of Public Administration in the United States. R. Colorado. 104 Chicago. Robert F. 167 c]arke) Deiphine H>| ix Clayj sir Ht>nrV) 262 Cojegio de M^XJCO) Mexjco City> 17J) 2 7 ? Child Research Center of Michigan. P. 185 New College de France. Hamilton. heahh workj ^ Chi. 277 Claftin. 269 City College. University of. Federico. 241 equipment for experimental monkey station. 101 ^ ^ Q£ MedIcinC) .. 24» 2 2 S Chile' ™™»tf of. 167 Chandler. Medidne> 38j 2 2 9 and Ceylon. 56 INDBX Department of Neurosurgery. York. 181 Christian Medj-caj Co]lege Ludhiana. 27-28. 116. . Colombo. Carlos. 270 John Law's system of managed currency. 223 inventions and industrial developrnent.cu]tural program. J r . Illinois applied statistics. School rf Public Hea. Santiago experimental cytology. Ottis R . Jordi. and physiopathology.L . 2 2 4 physiology. University of. Indja Deparrment of Preventive 8oda. iv. Departraent of Thoracic Surgery.* . MedelHn 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . . 279 productvity in American agriculture' 269 public finance. 152. 70 Chanjbre. Henri. 136. . India 39 Christian Medical College. Germany. University of. . 233 Child Research Council of Denver.332 Casals-Ariet. 269 8tud. 275 Colombia. National University of Faculty of Agronomy. 170 Chagas. Santiago Faculty of Agronomy. Mexico City. 241 Cologne. 25J experimental ecology. 27S travd of staff and otherS) 2? mathematical statistics. 233 Children's Hospital. 5 . £$3 greenhouse construction. 270 city Center of Mugic and Drama) Philippine Studies Program. L . 100 Medical School Colgate University. 2 4 0 Faculty of Agronomy. ix Causey. 278 29 Lafayette studies. Vellore. 253 Chou Wen-chung. Catholic University of. Mrs. „ . 148 Workshop in Money and Banking.cs Mannjng H>| 167 Clark. vi CIark> char. 152. 223 Chile.ean Agr. Charles Manning H. 183 Chabod. William H . . New York. 224 preclinicai teaching and research. neurophysiology.

University of. Canberra. 101 Coulborn. 259 Connecticut College. 188-189. 253 animal husbandry research center. Alvaro Santos. 221 New York State College of Agriculture. 251 Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. 259 research techniques for studies of underdeveloped areas. 98 Costa Rica. 273 Conference to promote study of Pakistan. 101 student dormitory. Palmira student dormitory. . 241 genetics of mental defect. 63. 24-1 Institute of Neurophysiology. 168 Congress for Cultural Freedom. Armero. Central America. El Rubi. 273 Thailand. 256 Faculty of Medicine. 263 Medical College. 151. 241 biological uses of isotopes. 142-143. 171 Costa. 252 Cornell University. 241 Corbett. B . 131-132. 273 British-Soviet-American relations. Stuart. Rushton. 233 modern culture of China. 233 international law. 253 agricultural experiment station. 253 Columbia University. R. 30 Cosio Villegas. 171 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and Palmira. 166 nursing. 277 history of Japan. 65 international politics. 286 333 Conference on interpretation of Arab tradition. 253 strengthening centers at Medellin. 222 performing arts audience. France. 233 Far Eastern studies. 133 Copenhagen. 262 study in jurisprudence. New London modern dance. New York American Press Institute. 145 marine biology. 187-188. 256 teaching and research. New York electron microscopy. 43 Corn Improvement Project. ( 148 Corey. 262 genetics and experimental zoology. 233 community action. 116-117. University of. New York biochemistry. Ithaca. Bogota^ 225 Colombian Agricultural Program. New Haven. Percy E . 262 International Neurochcmical 83 mposiura. 241 Child Guidance Clinic. 111-116. 233 enzyme research. 233 Hamilton papers. 161. 273 imraunochemistry.INDEX agricultural communication program. Alfredo. 221 statistical consultant. Paris. 253 experimental greenhouse. 180. New York administrative expenses. 145. Denmark biochemistry. 256 teaching and research. 2 7 3 study of arts in Indonesia. 85. 283 Conservation Foundation. 145 Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization. 286 research and administrative expenses. 25. Daniel. 181 Russian Institute. 2 5 1 Cook. Monteria. San Jos£. Australia radio telescope. 256 Faculty of Agronomy. 273 Correa-Henao. 262 Department of Biochemistry. 165. 263 Southeast Asian studies.

276 de Moraes. University of. Lewis W . vi Dourado. 70 Efferson. I n c . A. Haydee G . G. 238 Daniels. France area studies. Gosta. 71 de Silva. 158-159. . 168 De Roberris. Farrington. vii. Newcastle-uponTyne. 89 Eggan. 191 de Campos. 51. Julio Studarr. . Hamit. Egypt modernization of the Arab world. 263 Das. Amlan K . Peradeniya. Puerto Rico. 232 Dereli. . . vi 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 227 Near Eastern studies. 73 Dickey. 138-139. Sacramento. India. 165. 2 4 4 Department of Zoology. A. 280 Edwards. . W. iv. . North Carolina history of socio-economic thought. Japan American studies. vi. Dimas Prajeres. 136 Egyptian Society for Historical Studies. Michigan. 282 DALHOUSIE University. Poona. Fred. 164. Hanover. 145 Curtis Institute of Music. v. 84 Delhi. 70 cellular biology. James M . 274 Douglas. 33 Deccan College. 263 state per capita incomes. 165 Duroselle. Lee A. John Norman.x DuBridge. Sixth Section. v.. Frits. 276 Duri. 221 Department of Public Health. Paris. John S. 275 Edinburgh. A. 166 Datta. India modern Indian history. Loy V .334 INDEX Dodds. Edward F . Ewen Thomas Taylor. 119 D'Arms. Eduardo. Rasvihary. George A.. Scotland Department of Chemistry. . 263 Crowder. 137 Davis. 150. Gertrude M . 34.. New Hampshire artificial intelligence project. Halifax. Cairo. Nathaniel. John.. 13 Dograraaci. . Leland C . 35 Downie. Durham. 181. Philadelphia. 273 Ehrensvard. 64 Elias. 227 Nursing Teaching Unit. . si. Robert D . 263 Cox. 227 Educational Television and Radio Center. 244 Faculty of Medicine teaching of family practice. 161-162. B . J. . 273 Dekking. 31 Don. C . . 181. 263 Durham. 249 Department of Public Health. 191 Council on Foreign Relations. England King's College. 40 Doshisha University. 119 Duke University. Pennsylvania. Ann Harbor. Ceylon. iv. 33 Department of Agriculture. Mysore State. 32 Downs. 13 Duffie. 123 Crete Survey. . 48. Harold W . 146 ECOLE Pratique des Hautes Etudes. 31 DeVinney. 233 underdeveloped areas. California. xi Dartmouth College. New York general research program. Ihsan. India.. University of. xi Dick. Wilbur G . . 103 Department of Health. 263 two research and publication projtcts. George Graham. 15 dimming. Canada. University of. Percival C. .

University of. Jacques.. 192-194 Agriculture. 233 German Association of American Studies. 134-135. 161 Federal Technical Institute. Medford. D. 230 Social Sciences. Herbert. 70 European symposia on medical education. Seymour L . India. Gilbert Frank. 164 Eston. 1 9 4 . ?M Cleason. 270 Georgia State College for women. 144 Fuleihnn.. 103 Gaggero.• INDEX Elkins. Brazil College of Agriculture. Lavras. 164 Giacomello. Minas Gerais. Roger F . Switzerland Institute of Human Genetics. 2 3 2 . Brian R . . 192. 285 Humanities. Charles B . . 192. India economic and demographic search. 48 Fransen. Malcolm. 250 Division of Medicine and Public Health. 286 FAHS. R . Pedro. Gainesville agricultural counselor. Poona. Tede. Carl J. University of. 14 Far Eastern Association. . S2 Fitzsimons. Herbert. logic. 263 Ghorbal. 194. Berlin. 180 Granit. 30 Gammon Institute. 70 Gibler. 279 Genoa. xi. 181 Graham. 57 Freymond. 255 Gedney. 97 Gajra Raja Medical College. Alberto. Felix. 167 Forstcr. 192. 260 Biological and Medical Research. William J . 141 Flaxraan. and psychology. A. *'•* German School for Political Science. H. Michigan. 192. 120 Graf. B.x Glenn.. James M . 284 Division of Natural Sciences and Agriculture. H. . 148 Frey-Wyssling. . 91. Italy. ( 165 Geneva. 263 Ferreira Berrutti. 172 Elliott. Zurich. 228 Evans. 2 6 4 Gomez Arango. v. 30 Gotaas. Lucien. 148 Gillette.. v. Newton. 172 Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. xi Exchange Fund. 171 Glasgow. Edmund S . vii. Ragnar. 1? Gilpatric. 264 Florida. vii. 1952io Medical Education and Public Health. M. . 151. 248 Feis. Switzerland. 145 Fellowships. 259 library. Mohamed Shafik. 64. University of. University of. 8. 194. . 185 Gokhale Institute of Politics Economics. Massachusetts. Alclo. 1 9 2 . Lawrence H . 194. 49 and re- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Roy P. 147 GHchrist. 192. Gwalior.. 48. 10-12. . 182 335 GADGIL. Lowell S . xi. Alfonso H. 161-164. Chadbourne. Milledgeville. . 152.. Giordano. Scotland. Albert F. Stanley. John W . Martha. 194. 15 Freire-Maia. Chosho. 134 Gaggero. 166 Goeku. Anis. 264 general support. 283 list of fellows during 1955. 192. 71 Friedrich. xi Gilbert. 2f8 philosophy. 167 Febvre. Ann Arbor. xi Gipson. Marburg. 168-169. viii. . Madhya Bharat.

v. . Cambridge. viii Health Authority. Netherlands. 233 Harvey. Free Hanseatic City of Hamburg. 15 Hamburg. Massachusetts biochemistry of vision. 279 Graduate School of Public Administration. 57. 279 Hayes. 146 Halpin. 222 Graduate School of Business Administration. 221 economic research. 226 Grant. Guy S . . 283 Medical Education and Public Health. University of.H . Roland E . Alan. 14 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 264 Green. Wallace K . Germany. v. s. 265 legal and political philosophy. vii. . Pennsylvania. 221 stare election statistics. iv. Jr. 135 Hague Academy of International Law. vlii Grant. Jane. 166 Greene.. T. 285 Humanities. James E . . Netherlands Center for Study and Research in International Law and International Relations. 173 Harker. 147 tissue structure. Robert M . . David H . 172 Hamrnarsten. . J. Everett E . 1 3 9 1 4 0 . .. 234 Research Center in Entrepreneurial History research. 59-60. vi Hart. Americo. 172 Gregg. J. 32 HABASHI.. 250 Division of Medicine and Public Health. George. 234 comparative values. 145 Harwood. 1 2 8 1 2 9 . 265 conflicts within occupational roles. Labib. 70 Haverford College. 84 Halle. 265 training program.A . 2 ^ Hale. and conferences. 265 visiting scholars. xi. 122 Laboratory of Social Relations behavior patterns. 265 Graduate School of Education. William B . 285 emergency scientific equipment. 279 School of Public Health. 66 Hassel. 233 family medical care. C . 285 Division of Natural Sciences and Agriculture. Louis J. 286 Social Sciences. B. 265 studies in jurisprudence. 230 Rockefeller Foundation. Herbert L . 260 Biological and Medical Research. 58 Harbaugh. New York microbiology. 92 Groves. Odd. 130 working committees. James Henry.. 234 Department of Dermatology. David. 221 population dynamics in India. L . Juan Arturo. . 13 Grieve. studies. 102 Hagen. 144 Guedea Larios. viii. . 234 Hassall. . . 173 Hacker. si Haskins Laboratories. Einar. vii. Harold M . 283 humanides surveys. Germany. 147 Harvard University. 191 Hagan. 264 Russian language.2 6 5 enzyme chemistry. John £ . . si Grants in aid Agriculture. 1 6 2 . . . Louis M . 66 Harrar. 265 legal medicine. 104 Groszmann. Ulysses J.336 INDEX Harrison.

97-98. K . Finland. Mrs. Brazil. 228 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 229 new office building. Crowfoot. viii Hirai. University of. 32 IFO-Institute for Economic Research. 265 Institute of Agronomy. 156. Urbana action of insecticides. 226 Henry E. 30. 70 MediMunich. New Jersey program of study and writing. 259 experimental biology. Dorothy Honore^ A. Rolf. 249 Indian Council of Medical Research. 259 337 meeting of agricultural economists. University of. 56. Lee E . Princeton. 265 Hurtado. Brazil climatology. 242 Physiological Institute teaching and research. . 234 psychotherapy. 172 Horikawa. Institute of Biology and Technological Research. Michael. Takeo. Djakarta. 277 Indiana University. Masae. Francis L. Bloomington genetics. 2 7 0 research on political parties. 147 Hori. 273 Heyd. Zagreb. 266 research in history and government. . 2 7 0 School of Nursing. Huntington Library and Art Gallery. 246 Institute of Hygiene and School of Engineering. Doris. 251 Institute of Experimental Psychology. viii Hodgkin. 181 Hutchison. Indian-American relations. 65 Humanities Research Council of Canada. . Julian. Hassan Misbab. 183 Hutner. New Delhi fellowships. 266 Institute for Political Science. Curitiba. 55 Hirst. Italy.INDEX Heidelberg. Thomas. 137 Huisgen. 2 5 5 plant virology. Shinichi. 69 Hodgkin. xi Helsinki. 148 Howarth. 143-144. 181 Hsu. 265 Illinois. University of. 265 recent Indian history. Neil. 255 Institute of Applied Paris. San Marino. 184-185. 102 microbiology. 51 Huxley. Uriel. New York. 51 ICHIMURA. Germany Institute of Psychosomatic cine. 265 Economics. Alberto. 259 entomology. 226 Heidelberger. Campinas. 59. Toronto development of Canadian personnel. 60 Huxley. Julian. Germany. Esther M . Florence. 4 2 4 3 . Berlin. M . Yugoslavia. 283 Humphrey. 26 Hutchinson. Seymour. California. France. 166 Hill. Ann. 180 Hunter College. Masato. 236 Indian Cancer Research Centre. Rolla B . 232 Indian Council of World Delhi Affairs. 182 Institute for Advanced Study. . 259 biochemistry of insects. 131 Idriss. 181 Hill. 227 political science research. Lewis. 234 Indonesian National Theatre Academy Foundation. 227 teaching program. Bombay. Alan. Mrs. . 32 Heidrick. Germany.

London. 286 International Press institute. Utrecht. and Entomologists. 29 Joe. Netherlands. England. 286 International House of Japan. 266 International Christian University. 229 viral studies. 182 Italian Institute of Historical Studies. 286 Institute of Preventive Medicine. 266 International Association for Plant Taxonomy. Ames. . Ohio. j3Qf 266 Jessup. Tokyo. Inc. State University of. Tokyo. ix. . John H . London. Washington. 102 native food crops. 228 Institute of Public Health. Iowa City fellowships in creative writing. viii Japan Sociological Society. Kyu Dai. Japan additional facilities. Georg. Dharwar. 31 Kararau House. Motosuke. India. 65. .. Costa Rica general support. C . 57 International Bank for Reconstruction and Development. Japan. xi. Lillian A . Maryland biochemistry. AIvo. Naples general support. Mexico. 250 Johnson. Zurich. 2 5 6 International African Institute. England. 2 3 4 Isma'il. 143 Jimenez. Leiden. 277 JAKOBSON. Bernardo. Turrialba. Switzerland conferences and exchanges of personnel. 266 Institute of the History of Medicine..338 INDEX genetics research. 50 Kaihara. 234 conference on Asia. Swcden Institute of International Education. 236 Iowa State College. 286 Institute of Judicial Administration. 55 KAHLSON. 84 Institution of Civil Engineers. 266 visiting professors. . 137 Kaji. 103 Kantemir. Usmar. Izzet. Cleveland. history of. Stockholm. Luis Carlos. 152. 35 July. Ohio. Roman. 254 Graduate School. 222 School of Hygiene and Public Health development. Inc. . 39. 101 lowa. 191 Johns Hopkins University. Plant Pathologists. 160. 147 J0hn Carroll University. Philip C . 71-73. 162 Janney. 45. Netherlands. 145 Department of Political Economy research guidance program. 274 International Wheat Rust Conference. Tokyo. New York. 282 Karnatak University. Shinzo. New York. . 280 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 222 exchange of faculty. Harald N . D. Tokyo. 168 Karolinska Institute. 102 potato research. 222 virus research . 102 Inter-American Society of Plant Breeders. 170-171. Baltimore. 227 Inter-American Institute of Agricultural Sciences. 279 International Health Division. 15 Junqueira. 151. 137 Kallio. is Johnson. Robert W .

J. Ohio fellowships in creative writing. Switzerland. 15 Korean Language Research Society. 103 Laporte. 103 London.. 102 Kenyon College. Stanislas. Fukuoka. J. 68 Kentucky. Lexington. Sir Zafrulla. 2 4 7 Lara. Reiicbi. 145 Leghissa. 2 8 0 Kerr. 168 Knipe. v. 173 Kaur. 247 equipment and research. 65 Lambert. 158-159. 5 7 5 8 . C. . 185 Kimball. 171 Krauss. 1 2 8 . E . . Robert F . . 173-174. Tokyo. Alma F . 154. 52 Lehigh University. Rajkumari Amrit. Soren G . 2 7 4 physics research. 1 5 4 . 247 Department of Experimental Surgery. iv. Geneva. University of. 147 Loeb. 150. 103 Le Bon Secours School of Nursing. 171. . 277 Lehraann V. 247 Institute of Chemistry research in biochemistry. 148 Little Symphony Society of Berkeley. 244 electron microscope. Karl S . Lindsley F . Yves. 244 biophysics research at King's College. . Costa Rica. John R . California general support. C . . 228 Lee. 179-180. 282 Lively. Austin. J. 51 58. 1 2 0 . 284 studies of fishing villages. 14 Kimberly. Hideo. . Fred W . Japan. 247 electron microscopy. 84 Lefever. 129 Letort. x Laland. . 137 Lifson. . iv. . vii. vi Kishimoto. John G . Robert. 47 Latin American Agricultural Information Center. . Leslie. Jean W . Indonesia. 40 Kean. . 228 Department of Physical Cell Research. 25 Kiers. 4 8 4 9 . Carlos. 143 Kidd. . 66 Keio University. Hilario. Silvano. Eccleston Alphonso. Robert H . 30 Leontief.. vi Ixma. University of. 244 Turrialba. viii Library of Political and Social History. Stephen. Thai. ix Kojima.Lara. viii. Reggie J. Bangkok. G . ix. . 39 land Department of Home Economics. 137 Kendrew. 121 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Patricia Elsie. 254 Leach. Lashley. Bethlehem. Japan 339 American studies. 2 4 7 Medical Nobel Institute Department of Biochemistry. .INDEX brain physiology. England biologically important molecules. ix Kerr. Nathan. Pennsylvania. 274 Kot. 279 LAIRD. 141 Khan. Walter. 274 Korean archaeology. F. J . Ernest. Seoul. Warwick E . Robert. 103 Kertesz. 57Kyoto University. 98. Fausto. 85 Kyushu University. 65 Lipson. Wassily. Japan Japan Library School. Djakarta. 258 Kaufmann. 35 Kasetsart University. Gambier. 137 Kokernot. 247 Institute for Cell Research.

240 Lovett. 227 Long Island Biological Association.. Mary's Hospital. Otto. . xi Maryland. 2 4 5 School of Oriental and African Studies. 183-184. 50. 54. John. Cambridge city planning.. 58-S9. 1 4 2 . Priscilla V. Plymouth. 234 human heredity. 261 Massachusetts General Hospital. 165 Louisiana State University. 2 4 5 equipment for Department of Organic Chemistry. New York Symposium on Quantitative Biologv. 44. 266 fellowships and studentships. 220 Manchester.F . Boston endocrinology and metabolism. Robert B. England. 147 Lotz. . 65 Marshall. 64. Robert A. 177-178. 282 Louvain. England expansion of school plant.3 4 0 Galton Laboratory human genetics. 24S medical student selection. 227 London School of Economics and Political Science. ( 103 Looper. . 156. G . Neil B . Sweden endocrinology. John. 242 Marine Biological Laboratory. England Department of Occupational Health. University of.. 96-97. 272 Mangelsdorf. 257 MacLELLAN. 88-89. 280 mechanical translation. 234 Massachusetts Institute of Technology. England biologically important materials. 247 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . John H . Karl. 1 6 5 . 120-121. 261 St. 56 virus research. John. 2 7 6 University College Department of Zoology. 244 Institute of Psychiatry. 221 Faculty of Economic and Social Studies. 182 Maramorosch. 266 London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. 227 public health experiments. 104 Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. 51 mammalian genetics. 14 Malaria program. 84 Lonnquist. Inc. 180 Magoon. 280 humanities and social sciences. 135-136. 37-38. 244 physical and chemical properties of water. Estus H . ix. 234 Marrian. vi Luening. 244 INDEX Institute of Genetics. x Magdamo. ZU enzyme chemistry. Woods Hole. ix Maier. Belgium. vii Mangum. University of. 244 nucleic acids. 85 physical chemistry of protein solutions.. v. 266 foreign language instruction. Kentucky new music by living composers. University of. Victoria University of. . 245 experimental health center. 282 economic development. 259 Louisville Philharmonic Society. College Park algal studies. 181 Xund. Cold Spring Harbor. Paul C . iv. Baton Rouge Rice Research Station. Edward. Massachusetts.

Haven.INDEX 341 X-ray crystallography. Mexico City Mayda. Sonora and Veracruz. 237 human genetics. Ann Arbor 156-157. 7 0 . 236 Department of Psychiatry. 33 Mes. 224 Ministry of Education. 238 Miami University. 2 4 0 Ministry of Health. Oliver R . Egypt. 166 Melnick. . ix Mexico City McGill University. Paul J. Cairo. Mackenzie King. Michigan. 166 Survey Research Center McKitrick. 270 Medical Library Association. 267 Institute of Islamic Studies. vi Writing Center. 167 150. London. 135 Minas Gerais. India. . Nicholas T . University of. 234Mexican-American Cultural InstiMatthews. 239 ada Miami. field service. x relations. 252 Millikan. Joseph L . Connecticut. . Lima. 287 McCIoy. 126unallocated funds. iv. 230 library. 285 Melbourne. Brazil Faculty of Medicine. 253 poultry centers. 150. Belo Horizonte. Pakistan. 254 agricultural education. University of. 287 Ministry of Health.V . 158-159. 270 McKinnon. 69 tute.. 280 McCollum. Division of. 270 238 exchange of medical school faculty. 20. 284 279 Medical Research Council of Great Milani. 270 Mirov. John J. 2 3 0 2 3 1 . C. 57 Britain. 194. 65 Mexico. 254 agricultural education and extension service. Florida. 189-190. Margaretha G . Australia Department of Physiology. 274 American and Japanese studies. R . behavior in a small group.. 259 Department of Physiology. IS Menon. Jr. 276 physiological basis of behavior. 236 social disorganization. Harry M. John J. New theory of language and symbolism. 106Ill. 65 Mexican Agricultural Program. England... University of. 31 Ministry of Public Health. 102 Mishkin. Montreal. . Montevideo. Richard N . 146 land and building. ix 284 Medicine and Public Health. Peru. University of. 286 127. 252 State of Mexico program. E . . Uruguay. New Delhi. 270 field service. 147 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . National University of.. 240 Minnesota. 277 methodological research in human McKelvey. . Minneapolis agricultural research. Jr. 29 171. Shankar Karunakar. CanInstitute of Chemistry. Max F . Oxford. . McCoy. 172 population trends in the United Medical Education and Public Health States. 42. studies of W . Sir Bryan H . 118 research centers.L . . 232 voting behavior in 1956. University of. 2 5 2 2 5 3 . Eric. Miller. Ohio.. 252 publications program. 62-63. ix. Jaroslav.

Den. -. vii Myers. Giovanni.. New York. Bishnupada. 278 International Association for Re- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Missouri. University of. 32 Munich. 53 Montoya O . France neurophysiological research. 40 MGntzing. Pans. Mustafa. New York. . 223 neurophysiology. 287 Symposium on Cytodifferentiation. 183 Moure. 182 Moosai-Maharaj. Hiroshi. Takenosuke. 242 American Insutute. -.„ . iv. Italy Institute of Genetics general.„. Department of Sanit Engineering. France. Iowa. Roy. Colombia. 123 National Center for Scientific Research.„. Washington. 2 5 8 National Institute of Mexico City equipment. Ajit. 166 Miyake. Makasgar. South Africa 230 pharmacol- 0 & > 2 3 9 National Institute of Economic and Social Research of Great Britain» London <*e Tocquevilie papers. Pieter. 14 Moruzzi. Canada.. Paris. Monkichi. vi Myren. mark.C . v. University of. Tokyo. National Foundation of Political Sci« . m National Institute of Agricultural Sciences.276 Muntendam. William I. 2gA Muslem University of Indonesia. 97 */7 * TVA A A-* M v T Museum of Modern Art. 51 Mukopadhaya. National Catholic Rural Life Conference. . Chile. . Juan Antonio. Arne. . University of. 64 Mosharaffa. 173 Si Modern Language Association of National Bureau of Economic ReAmerica. 28 Nakada. 185 Naples. Durban.2 7 1 Mitchell. 44. 1 4 7 . 267 Mohr.. atomic radiation. New York Moe.. Richard P. 185 Namba. v. Delberi T . vi finance andfiscalpolicy. .342 INDEX National Academy of Sciences. Jesus. State of Mexico. 53^ 246 sanitary engineering. . 267 Nadonal f 1 6 ^ Department. 274 search. 33 Miyamoto. 267 Montalenti. Henry Allen. Z 4 1 National Higher School of Islam Rell&on> Jogjakarta. 2 5 4 National Council of The Churchea of chrlst in the Unjted States of Araerica) New York) 2 6 7 Nadona. Robert S . Germany experimental zoology 50. University of. 96. 15 NAIR.. 56 Soviet economic growth. 40 Montreal General Hospital. . Stephen.. Japan equipment. and Cardiology. 228 Natal. D . Indonesia. 2 5 1 National College of Agriculture. v».» ence. x. Des Moines. 40 Morison. iv. Jan. Giuseppi. . Chapmgo. K Kesavan. 190. 246 genetics of microcythemia. is. 186 Myers Jack 121 Myers! Will' Martin. 238 Mookerjee. 240 N^oml u «»> . 51 scientific conferences. 92-93.

University of. 285 Welch fellows. I n c . Shigetada. Robert D . 235 York Community Trust. 186 Oregon Medical School. Illinois physical chemistry of proteins. Henry W . 257 Neuberger. Japan. 101 Qkw Osman) 16g OUvei>| Wade w§( vin Qppenheimer. . J.T . Okayama University. 99. 282 National Postgraduate School Nursing. Norway epidemiology of mental illness. 41> 2 2 0 Northwestern University. . 285 National School of Agriculture.x Nielsen._ Neumann. Lima. Washington D C Committee'for Research in ProbJems of Sex. 260 study of general medical practice. I n c .INDEX search in Income and Wealth. 1 9 4 .. Evanston. Chapel Hill Institute of Statistics. J. Seoul. 235 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 267 New New New York Botanical Garden. „. 235 New School for Social Research. 2 8 5 natural sciences. Los Angeles> California. 2 5 6 2 5 7 cereal research. . 222 National Medical Fellowships. 64 . 247 X-ray crystallography. 172 Nissen.. 1 9 4 . . University of> Poland. Ingrid. La Molina. 2 5 7 fellowships. 70. 271 University of. New York enzyme chemistry. . 35 National League for Nursing.x Oslo. Massachusetts. Seizo» 172 Ohio State University. New York nursing accrediting service. 47 North Carolina. New OCCIDENTAL College. . . 95. New York. 278 United Nations Charter. Boston. 147 _ . postwar British economy. Albert. 274 °Silvie> Ladv Marv> 186 Ohe.i T. 36 Nishijima. . Bos^ ton. Julio. 2 4 7 Institute of Respiratory Physiology. Korea. . r o&niiJKC.t . . 235 Committee on Educational Policies. 259 o. New England Center Hospital. 287 York University. Lima. £££ J ' New England Medical Center. 247 'ork recent German history. University of. jjr °3 Notre Dame. . Sigmund. Columbus Department of Agricultural Bior . 133pa- foreign 134. 35 of National Research Council. . i/j . . Massachusetts. «crt chemistry. 267 rehabilitation of neurological tients. 27-28 National Museum of Korea. 32 Osier. Peru advanced studies. John S . . 267 National Institute of Nursing. 235 8tudv of ^ustrial markets. . 140-141. 267 Norwegian Radium Hospital. Peru. 2 3 5 Niederhauser. Oslo. 237 Ornelas K . Seoul. yoshitake 173 UKa. South Bend> Indiana international relations. New York. 267 343 student orientation. T . . 11 medical sciences.

22-23. Pasquale. Paris. 242 Philippines. Osier L . 274 Philip University. 171. 245 PAINE. 102 Paris.. Marburg. Laguna equipment and supplies. 32 Paul. 271 zoology. 245 Somerville College Wittgenstein papers. 171. 245 Nuffield College African studies. Pennsylvania. 165. 2 5 S library supplies. C. 241 Laboratory of Physical Chemistry. Janet M . 169 Pickering. 276 biochemistry. University of. 171. . 132-133. 237 Poets' Theatre. 54 Perry. University of. 271 population and economic growth in the United States. Honduras. Pcnnsylvania. 101 scholarships. Jr. . 271 social 271 science research faculty. 30 Pennafc. x Perutz. . 90. University of the. 276 Department of Human Anatomy microscopy and microspectroscopy. G. 152. H . . W . ix Philadelphia Museum of Art. organic chemistry. 245 St. 246 Pavri. Mexico City. C . Jesus. Italy. Italy. Oxford. x Parran. 165 Pan American Agricultural School. University of. John. 235 Penrose. 278 School of Medicine. University. 57 Pennsylvania. 151. 258 exchange of public health faculty. Max F . Antony's College European studies. 275 research on the Reformation. Thomas. John. iv. 68 Peterson.. Cambridge. Washington. 15 Pisa. . 271 Reflections on International Administration. England American history. 52 Pasteur Institute. of. 22 Pi™.3 4 4 INDEX Patrick. C . Universify Park. Quezon City College of Agriculture. 66 Pavia. D. 241 Parker. vi Pasquini. 277 Pan American Sanitary Bureau. Jean. . . 271 visiting sociologist. S . 279 X-ray crystallography. 84 Pelaez Botero. 65. viii Palmer.. 168. Tegucigalpa. 181 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Khorshed. John A. 38» ^ 9 Institute of Public Administration. France Laboratory of Biological Chemistry. Manila. France. 24-5 neurohistological research. University of. Germany Institute of Physiological Chemistry. Inc. . 237 Pennsylvania State University. 246 Pittsburgh. 16S P'aget. 70.. Philadelphia labor mobility. 254 Pan American Institute of Geography and History. 89-90. 24-5 conference and fellowships in American studies. L. Jesse P. x. Robert W . 138 Philips. 241 Massachusetts. University of. 227 Sir William Dunn School of Pathology. Dorothy. 63-64. Bruce. Sydney John. 31 Perry.

275 Office of Population Research. Leslie 0. . iv. vii Furcell. *» Rivlin. . J. Victor W. 30 Porter (Meyer). Ralph W . T . Bisheshwar. W. n -. TT i t T. Winston. 259 QUEEN'S University. University of. 28 Reyes. Canada conference on Canadian writing. seafch New Yorfc m PP? Rodenbiser. 163. 182 n 1 1 . vii. . Herman Alonzo. Hugh. 130 Roughton. . 103 Porter. Jose. 148 Roscoe B. 33 fiscal. . W . Hermann. Yosal.. S . Ellen D . . Carlos. Inc. 147 Rio Grande do Sul» University of. 145. 15 Rahn. . Port6 AIeSre' Brazil equipment and library materials. 40 Robfrts> Le™s M-> S1 Robinson. 72 Princeton University. 71 Postgraduate Medical Institute of the Massachusetts Medical Society. Sibnarayan.. . t t. 148 Rodrigues da Silva. viii. viii. S . 268 Quirino. Flora M . v. 65. 165 Prelog. 127128 268 seminars in criticism. •n TMI -n HO* Psaty. 64 Pretoria. 66-67. Keith. Dietrich C . 1Public Health Research „ . 268 Institute of International Studies. 166 Rasjidi. Edith L . New Jersey development of modern political institutions in the West. Helen A. Jackson Memorial Laboratory. 99-100. Vlado. 96 ™keT> William H . 13 Robles Gutierrez. 103 Randall. Lafayette. . Gerard R . . 51 Rosenmayr. vm Rockefeller Institute for Medical RePuerto Rico. 2 5 5 Facult* of Philosophy. Charles M . Africa. ' vii. 61 diana genetics. University of. 2fi% Near Eastern studies. K^ 30 Popenoe. 249 Price. J. 172 RACHIE. 56 Rogat. Isaias. and economic pol- Polytechnic Institute.INDEX Poidevin. . 3rd. Adriana. 181 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 32 Purdue University. vii. x. InRodriguez. 2 3 5 Pomerat. _. . . ix Ponnamma. Paris. Kingston. x Rick. J. . 167 Raw. Leopold. 71. 263 Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. . 59 Rapin. 64 Ray. 104 Rhind. F . France. 102 Riker. Maine genetics and social behavior. Leonel. 58. York. Jr. . . Edward. A. Rene*. 235 Tissue Culture Conference. San Juan. vi. .t 166 Roberts> Charles Augustus. . 276 Institute or „ . 172 Reitzes. . Bar Harbor. 2 6 8 geopolitics. . 345 monetary. New York ' J ' T • £ Canadian history. .. Boston. 31 Ramirez. 104 Rochester. v.. University of. j • v i T Rockefeller. . New York protein structure. 13 Richardson. v. Kenneth 0 . Mohamad. v. . 31 Prasad. Maria Isabel. John D . Aurora C .T The City of New 39 280 icy.

30 Scholarships (agricultural). Juan Sanchez. 190 Saskatchewan. University of. India. xi Rural University of the State of Minas Gerais. vii. 2 4 2 Saito. 252 Sarah Lawrence College. 239 Faculty of Medicine. Brazil equipment and library development. Thomas' Hospital Medical School. 2 5 5 Isotope Laboratory. 239 Laboratory of Histology and Embryology. London. Latin America. 239 Radiochemistry Laboratory. 227 Rupert.346 INDEX San Marcos. 275 San Carlos. England area studies. 255 science departments. London. Dean. Austria general budget. Brazil graduate training of physicians. 242 Royal Statistical Society. 1 5 4 . David A . Lima. iv. 255 Faculty of Medicine. 260 School of Agriculture. University of. University of. 25-26. Satoru. University of. 2 5 5 Institute of Agronomy. 268 history of the war and peace settlement. 268 Royal Technical College. 278 Royal Institution of Great Britain. vi. 90-91.. Jr. Paul F . 183 Sawai Man Singh Medical College. Scotland. Francisco. Rio de Janeiro. 257 Santa Casa de Misericordia. 239 population genetics. 182 Peru Department of Pathological Physiology. 55. . Brazil Biological Institute. Greece. is Rytand. 62 San Francisco Museum of Art. 101 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . London protein structure. 54-55. 40 Salcedo. London. Ribeirao Preto equipment and supplies. viii. 117. 101 Salzburg Seminar in American Studies. Vi^osa. 268 A Study of History. Chihuahua. 2 5 5 School of Veterinary Medicine. . Piracicaba. University of. xi Ruppel. 69. . 56 St. 159-160. Kiyoshi. 21-22. William Albert Hugh. 224 research. Saskatooni Canada. Mexico. 13 Russell. 67-68. Guatemala City. Joseph A . 224 Sao Paulo. Hans.. 101 Sandoval. Sao Paulo. 33 Salonica. 268 international economic policy. Ciudad Judrez. Royal Institute of International Affairs. 2 5 5 Rushton. . 224 Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. 229 Schaefer. 239 School of Agriculture. California. 93. 239 Laboratory of Cell Physiology. 225 Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. v. New York. Robert F . 32 SAEZ. 255 Schools of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine. England. Inc. 238 Sato. Campinas. England. 52 Rusk. Jaipur. 27. 2 6 8 race relations in Central Africa. 21-22. Glasgow. Alberto.

University of. W . Food . Sternberger. Wmred C . . New *or'i conferences and planning. 166 Philippine music. Smith College. 137 Skiles. . 51 Smith.. . 143. 269 monographs based on the 1950 census. 9 4 9 5 . Duraaguete. 129-130.storica] Sodety of Colorad0| Denver. Louis B . L. . Palo Alto. Massa. . 143 Strangeways Research Laboratory. vandrum. ^ H. 172 Spitz. Herbert. Massachusetts. .n research. x. John. 282 Silva. New Caledonia 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . xi Slobodkin. 269 . 269 . 52 Schwartz. . Sweden biochemistry. 258 Souza Santos. Northampton. 269 State Medical Board of Finland. Boston. . ' ' . David. Research .. G . California solar energy. England. 235 biochemistry of nucleic acids. . . 85 „ . Institute . India c]injcaj tcacbing facint. England. Barbara B . 61 Stakman. James T . Social Science Research Council. . Noumea. \xT"\(*. 268 summer seminar program. 182 Sewell.F . England. 166 Spiegelberg. 264 grants to aid research.eg) 28j 229 Stenhagen> Einar> 65 Sternberg. Norio. . A. i* Snedecor... Mrs. Arthur Hays.aA r> 1 c? Smitn. B . Paul. Dolf.. 243 Sulzberger. 147 Seike Kiyosi. . G. 2 4 8 Stone. _. 235 b i o l ° ^ '2 3 5 t T . Bruno. 261 Stanford University. 123 Social Hygiene Association of the Aisne. Hilgard O'Reilly. 2 7 5 biochemical research. 269 Current Diffttt of the Soviet Press. 245 Shimazono. 64. iv. .. Geoffrey S . University of. . . E . ~. 13 cm:*t. 92 Simmons College. William H . R. iv. . Helena. 94 Singh. 222 Singh. 165 Specter.-. 70 Spears. Hels-nkj 226 State Medi^ai College Hospital( T r i . . 269 Society for Experimental Biology. 104 Sproul. France. iv. . 146 Sprague. 144 Stewart. Julius. Xl Stirling. Ady Raul da. 243 Soules. the Philippines library development. 148 g . 31 Silliman University. 168 Stockholm. Monroe K . 180. Lawrence B . Ivar. studies in jurisprudence.x Smith.. vi Squire. Donald L .x Stanford Research Institute. John B. 118-119. Mb ' ' . oic chusetts. 221 Rhinoceros 347 beetle control. Robert L .INDEX fichreiber.' _. 157 „. Palo Alto. Smithburn. Cambridge. . London. California American studies. Kenneth C . vi Superior Institute of Public Health. . . * • ^ L TV D t/ Economic Growth: The Problem and Its Setting 269 fellowships.. U . 146 Sheffield. Soissons.rt predoctoral training. Robert G . 182 Smith. xi South Pacific Commission. 56.C . . 248 radiobiology. 11. 1 9 4 .

Canada Canadian development^ 271 Slavic studies. 276 teaching in medical care. 275 Train.. 39 Thomas. Jr. Hugo. Uruguay. 243 Taylor. Sweden biochemistry. H. 246 Surany. 226 Technological Institute and School of Advanced Studies of Monterrey. Max. Uruguay College of Veterinary Medicine. 101 Union Theological Seminary. University of. 61 Tobias. Hiroshi. 102 Trussell. D. Mexico. . New York advanced religious studies. 281 United States Committee for the United Nations. 40 ? * * * * > Robert W .. Ireland. 97. George E . 155. Tokyo. Washington. 2 5 7 Ussachevsky. Alois. 102 Faculty of Medicine. Salt Lake City. Nathaniel B . 181 Utah. Kinji. David. Austin algal physiology. Japan. 137 Tavcar. 68. Ray Elbert. 243 University Nursing School. London. Vladimir. Philip V. Torsten. 260 Department of Pathology. Hifzi. 248 biologically active molecules. Montevideo. England. 257 Faculty of Agronomy. . 28-29. Japan American studies. 15 Thompson. 63 Tamiya. 191 University College. 237 Utrecht. Stuttgart. 68-69. 56 INDEX Toyo Bunko. 137 Umali. ix. 69 Texas. 165 Twaddell. Harold A. 51 Toronto. Arne. 168 Tiselius. Fn 173 UKAI. 261 Tokyo University. 146 Turkish American University Assodarion. . 33 Thomas. . Nuevo Leon. John V . 158 Technical Institute. University of. xi. 65. Japan. 122 Tanaka. Hebert. 167 Trenchi. 95 TABLANTE.. 39 tissue culture studies. Kenneth W . Germany. 138 Taggart. Montevideo. 56 Tokugawa Institute for Biological Research. 100. . W. Sewanee. ix Theorell. Mary Elizabeth. 225 University of the Republic. 57. Dioscoro L . 281 Uppsala. 60-61. University of. 175-176.348 Rome. Tokyo. Paul. xi Timur. 237 Theiler. 121. 58 Thesleff. Tennessee fellowships in creative writing. Dublin. . 287 Training Tennant. 173-174. Leo A . 220 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 70 genetics. University of. Nobushige. University of. 248 Institute of Physical Chemistry. Stephen Wilhelm. . C . . 243 Institute of Physiology. viii. 154. Italy. Istanbul. 14 Thurston. Jean. 248 Royal Agricultural College of SwCden. 275 radioactive dusts and vapors. 287 drama program. 14Teorell. Netherlands Tavistock Institute of Human Relations. 254 Temporary Indonesian Program. 225 University of the South.

33 Vouk. Australia. Louis. . Mason. iv. 257 VALLE.INDEX biophysics and biochemistry. 85 Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. A. 34-35. 56 Institute of Clinical and Industrial Psychology. Thure.. 30 preventive medicine and public health. 225 School of Nursing. O. H . University of. 36-37. Nashville. 167 Van Dusen. Joseph. Jean. Velimir B . Vanderbilt.. 133 Wikkramatileke.. Luis. 93. Call. Edwin J. E . Henry P. 138 Wilkins. Cardiff. J. . 271 fellowships in child psychiatry.H .. T. 14 Wayne University. 281 Virus studies. 276 physical biochemistry of proteins. Austria economic situation of Austrian peasants. 84 Varner. 245 Wernimont. WADE. 2 4 9 2 5 0 von Frisch. Loring. . viii. Raja. viii. vii Weinreich. 163 Uttar Pradesh. 24 Varma. Mrs. . . Warren. 154-155. 99 Vasaar College. Detroit. G . 40 349 Walter and Eliza Hall Institute. M. Karl. 84 Wisconsin. 272 van der Loon. 237 Weaver. 14 Webb. 225 van den Brandeler. 185 Vienna.Walsh. vi Van Dyke. 237 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 185 Webb. Don C . 66 Vargas. 65 Whitman. 167 Horticultural Research Station. Poughkeepsie. Jamaica Faculty of Medicine and Departmem of Chemistry. . viii. Thompson.. Rudolph. 175. 73-84. . . Uriel. . Kingston. v. 165 Weir. India Wallbank. 145. Missouri enzyme chemistry. Kenneth. . is Wikkramatileke. 237 Washington University. 223 Wheeler. viii van Heyningen. George E . 14 Weias. Tennessee exchange of personnel in pediatrics. University College of the. 247 . 157-158. 71 Wellhausen. A . 223 Watson. 225 Vieuchange. T . 237 plant physiology and plant biochemistry. Government of. 257 pilot development project at Etawah. Rudolph. 171 94. 58. St. F . Robley C . Natividad P.E . P. H . 3 Welsh Regional Hospital Board. 100 Washington. New York. 237 preventive medicine. 223 Institute of Research and Training in the Social Sciences. University of. . H. 59 Williams. W . 185 Vanderbilt University. Walter. Melbourne. 50 von Uexkull. 14 Warren. 249 Warren. Richmond drama program. John M . 257 physical plant. Michigan. Jr. University of. Seattle Asian studies. i4 West Indies. .. University of. 272 Verzosa. Robert B . Andrew J. Madison biochemistry. Colombia Faculty of Medicine library. M. 247 genetics research equipment. vii. v.

146 Wolff. 96. William D . 165 Ydlow Fever program) 2 2 0 Yerkes. . 287 communication and attitude change. 144-145. vii Youn& William R . « . R. . vi Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. 4647. New Haven. Henry M . 154. Zfd . Barry. Florida. 171 ^ p ^ ^ Zoological Station of Naples. _ . 171 Wood. W. Connecticut biochemical research. 146 legal history. 118-119. Howard. 271 viral and rickettaial infections. . . Massachusetts. Frank M . Jr.. 145 Wriston. 223 t • i L • n • «o physical chemistry of proteins. iv. W . University of. . Switzerland. 272 metabolism of plant tissues. Silvio. Arthur. 238 .t ' * **. ix Wormall. 148 Wood. Arnold. .INDEX community arts program. 170 Wolfers. J r . Orange Park. . 56 Vazzga. x. law of land use control. 15 YouDg Audiences> lnc-. 148 YALE University. 71 Wriggina. v.' pollen analysis. 178.. 146 solar energy. 152. 26J tax administration. Robert L . 280 Department of Plant Pathology. Neal N . 249 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 238 Young. 237 research in jurisprudence. 237 eenetica 237 ' law and the lumber industry in . 7J? 6I6 history of medicine. 246 Zurich. Oliver L. 2 3 8 txr i -A t ** «ft Woolsey. Ernest C ._ 7 7 9 Wisconsin. . Chitoshi. 52 2 " " ° ? ™ * -J ' ' ? 4 Zavala. 238 Carbon 14 dating laboratory. 282 JANGWILL. Italy. 84 Wohl. New York W ^ o n . . Richard. x Yerkes Laboratories of Primate Biology. . Telford H . 30 Work. . 2 6 0 enzyme chemistry.

Related Interests

ir^ini. given in December.111 .i Museum (if l-'ine Arts in Riclinunnl includes .Hinm. in \liiell the Museum trustees with Rockefeller Knunilatiun a^istancr a t e ileveloping a community drama program having professional guidance but lelying ihiclly on vohmtaiy parlicipatimi.iliny iiliout ''^O pel • sons. i t t r a t t i \ e theatie. Abo\e is a scene trom J. 1 © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .

an internal review has been under way which has resulted in a number of specific concepts of future significance. As a result. Infectious disease as a cause of death and disability has been undergoing a marked decline in the more advanced countries of the world. Concurrently with these changes. While continuity with past programs has been maintained through project support to various institutions a t home and abroad. the composition of the populations concerned is being modified markedly.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 1955 has been a transitional one in medical education as well as public health. HE YEAR T © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Both our philosophy of medical care and our objectives in public health must be reoriented to meet the new factors that have entered upon the world scene. entirely apart from the military problems involved. which has already had a profound effect upon national and international thought. there has been introduced into our industrial and social complex the completely new factor of nuclear energy. The base of development in this field in the foreseeable future will be of such a magnitude as to tax both our scientific knowledge and our technical ingenuity in insuring public safety. These studies have been needed especially because of the rapid change in the character of our public health problems during this decade.

Not only must the medical student enter his professional training with adequate scientific preparation. the Foundation has recognized the inseparability of teaching and research and has encouraged the evolution of departments where the close interplay of these most fundamental aspects of academic life would have the greatest prospect of full development. which are inevitable and reasonable. Programs have meaning only in terms of people. but the objective character of scientific observation and the experimental approach to biomedical problems must color his entire professional life. all sound medical curricula are in harmony with the general thesis that medical diagnosis and therapy must rest upon modern scientific development.I8 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION T h e programs that the Foundation is supporting in medical education in various parts of the world are predicated on the concept that the academic structure for medical education will differ appreciably among the various cultures and national patterns that exist today. In the general support of medical schools in various countries. to extend the scientific method into the clinical training of the student. Notwithstanding these differences. T h e numerous fellowships and travel grants provided contribute to the development of the professional personnel upon whom the entire expectation of a steadily improving medical care and pub- © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . One of the most essential activities of the Foundation is its provision for the advanced training of outstanding persons who may be expected t o exhibit leadership in the educational systems of their respective countries. In extending its assistance to the improvement of the quality of instruction in medicine and public health. with emphasis upon the integration of clinical disciplines and the development of a sympathetic understanding of the patient and his problems. the objectives of T h e Rockefeller Foundation have been: to encourage the development of faculties with strong scientific orientation and a devotion to the responsibilities of teaching.

Since I942 T h e Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated $145. was started late in 1954. but the medical school faculty. is still working under exceptionally difficult conditions. planned after a study of representative medical schools in the Western world. Special studies in the United States have been supplemented on occasion by visits of the Fellow to other countries in order that he may apply to his own problems the most relevant methods and concepts.400 hospital beds. A fire destroyed the physical plant of the school in 1948. 1.600 to the University of Chile for the Faculty of Medicine. Continuing this support through the current © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Facilities for clinical teaching include about 3. especially in the preclinical sciences. about 150 years after the university itself was founded. and has remained in these quarters since that time pending construction of a new building. Construction of the building. Professional Education MEDICAL UNIVERSITY OF CHILE FACULTY OF MEDICINE T h e University of Chile's medical school in Santiago was originally established in 1738.400 under immediate university control. 90 per cent Chilean and ten per cent from other Spanish-speaking countries.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 1 9 lic health practice must depend. I n 1949 it was reestablished in temporary quarters in various Santiago hospitals. and it trains most of the physicians who enter the National Health Service in Chile. It is currently responsible for seven classes of approximately I 60 persons each.

A 150-bed teaching hospital and a new building to house most of the preclinical science departments were added to its facilities in the last three years. is centrally located in the capital of one of the largest arid potentially one of the richest of the Brazilian States.000 cruzeiros and $155. it is the fourth oldest faculty of medicine in the country. and as a first step is now making all personnel full-time in the Departments of Anatomy.222. Pathology.ooo (approximately $339. During the next two years the older buildings of the school will be remodeled for the remaining departments. increased salaries.20 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION transition period. Belo Horizonte. and Biochemistry.000 for additions to the staff. and for the travel expenses of professors visiting from abroad for three months or more while the medical school is in session.000) to the University of Minas Gerais for use through December 3 I . © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . doubling its available space. teaching and research equipment. has also been planned. The school expects to establish positions in all preclinical science departments on a full-time basis as soon as possible. The Department of Biochemistry is a national training center for teachers and research workers in biochemistry. The Belo Horizonte medical school has. been carrying through major organizational changes. Founded in I 9 I I . UNIVERSITY OF MINAS GERAIS FACULTY OF MEDICINE The Faculty of Medicine of the University of Minas Gerais. Minas Gerais. for the past several years. the Foundation has appropriated 9. the Foundation in 1955 made a five-year grant of $379. 1959. Minas Gerais depends on it for its principal supply of physicians. and an addition to the library. T o help the school bridge the period of financial stringency attached to these projects.

the Ribeir i o Preto school is situated in one of the State of Siio Paulo's richer agricultural districts. Student admissions are limited to eighty a year.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 21 UNIVERSITY OF SAO PAULO RIBEI~O PRETO AND S ~ PAULO O FACULTIES OF MEDICINE The Foundation gave assistance in 1955 to both the Siio Paulo and the Ribeirio Preto Faculties of Medicine of the University of Siio Paulo. Minas Gerais. Drawn from the States of Siio Paulo. the school includes courses in this field throughout the curriculum after the first year.000 from the Foundation in 1955 for equipment and supplies for all departments. and to a lesser extent Matto Grosso to the west. The Ribeirio Preto school received a three-year grant of $278. With the aim of teaching preventive medicine as a dominant point of view. with a single head of each department over the representatives of specialties in each field. the medical school in SCo Paulo city was constructed in 1928-29 and equipped through financial assistance amounting to approximately $~. A state-sup- © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . near the border of the State of Minas Gerais. As in other countries. Brazil. students are accepted on the basis of merit alone but preference is given to applicants from adjacent rural areas.ooo. Also unusual is the emphasis placed upon clinical psychiatry in clinical teaching. The RibeirCo Preto school departs from general practice in Brazil in having only one department of medicine and one department of surgery. An older branch of the University of Sio Paulo.ooo from the Foundation. medical care in Brazil is more readily available in the industrial and urban population centers than in the agricultural areas. The Ribeiriio Preto school was organized as a step toward meeting the special needs of Brazilian rural areas. About 200 miles northwest of Sio Paulo.

In 1955 a further one-year grant of $35. who endowed professorial chairs in medicine. formerly of St. Pickering and his research associates at St. surgery. and Physiology. some of whom will come with him to Oxford. has been appointed Regius Professor of Medicine. They will continue these studies at Oxford and at the same time develop © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . W. Professor G. and Sir Charles Sherrington. S.500 was made for the Departments of Histology. The SIo Paulo Faculty of Medicine has received approximately $55.22 T H E ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ported institution. J. During the next thirty years departments in the basic sciences were built and raised to world eminence by such outstanding scientists as Burdon Sanderson. Mary's. subsidized in recent years by the federal government. UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD SCHOOL O F MEDICINE The beginning of medical teaching a t the University of Oxford dates from 1883 when the Waynflete Professorship of Physiology was established. The university is now broadening its facilities for clinical research and teaching by building new laboratories in Radcliffe and by the purchase of new laboratory equipment. that a full clinical school was developed in Oxford at Radcliffe Infirmary. and orthopedic surgery. Haldane. it attracts students from all over Brazil. Dr. Pickering. when the clinical facilities of London were disrupted. have been conducting research on hypertension in man. Although the groundwork for clinical departments at Oxford was laid in 1936 by Lord Nuffield. Mary's Hospital. Anatomy. anesthetics. obstetrics and gynecology. London. Its entire faculty for the preclinical years is full-time and until recently was unique in Brazil in this respect. it was not until World W a r 11.000 from the Foundation since 1950 for the Department of Histology and for the development of a laboratory for work with radioactive isotopes.

and plans have been laid for at least another two by 1960.ooo (approximately $156. CAPES has developed advanced training centers in a wide variety of fields. it also awards fellowships for study in these centers. BRAZIL Ten new medical schools have been established in Brazil since 1950 in an effort to satisfy a demand for medical education which could not be met with existing training facilities.000).2 I 1.000) for the use of the Regius Professor of Medicine toward the cost of research laboratory facilities and equipment. CAMPAIGN FOR THE IMPROVEMENT O F HIGHER EDUCATION PERSONNEL. These new schools have created an unprecedented demand for teachers. In I 955. was established by the Brazilian Government in 1953.500 cruzeiros (approximately $I 24. who will © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and the University of Rio Grande do Sul were among the groups participating in this effort.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC H E A L T H 23 the new clinical school as an important training center in academic medicine. the Campaign for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES). Sgo Paulo State. In part to deal with this problem. The Rockefeller Foundation awarded the university a further grant of oE52. two more will be opened in 1956. In addition to the ten new schools already operating. Since it was founded. Candidates. In support of its medical fellowships program. to help develop the research and teaching program in the clinical sciences. About 50 one-year fellowships for study in Brazil will be awarded from the grant to teachers in medical schools assured of positions after training or to persons being prepared for specific guaranteed posts. including medicine. Rio de Janeiro. The Roman Catholic Church. the Foundation in 1955 made a two-year grant to CAPES of 6.

I 95 8. Histology. the Departments of Anatomy. Approximately $qo. 35 students were admitted. formerly organized into seven courses. Toward the expenses of preclinical teaching and research in the Faculty of Medicine. in Santiago. CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY O F CHILE MEDICAL EDUCATION Organized in 1930. and pharmacology have been closely integrated. Clinical teaching in medicine and surgery. will be interviewed personally before awards. as opposed to two in 1940. Of 25 professorships at the school.600 to the Catholic University of Chile for use through June. is the youngest of the country's three medical schools. This is only one of many changes planned and effected since the school was founded. physiology (including neurophysiology. are made. the Medical School of the Catholic University of Chile. were full-time chairs. The Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated $123. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . biochemistry.ooo was given by the Foundation for similar uses in earlier years. In 1954. no further increase is now contemplated. but since larger classes would mean curtailment of the tutorial teaching emphasized at the school.24 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION be sought in part through visits to medical schools by representatives of CAPES. Under the leadership of Director Luis Vargas. a separate chair). and Embryology have all been combined in a single Department of Morphology in the past several years. is now combined in a single general subject. Teaching and research in the functional sciences. It occupies two of the university's eight faculty buildings and an adjacent teaching hospital of 190 beds. 13 in 1955. based on merit. and until recently admitted an average of 27 Chilean students a year.

were at first lacking. promised to overcome one of the prime difficulties in the way of general pathologists. Peru. John G . o o o to Cornell University under whose auspices a program for the application of electron microscopy to the teaching of pathology and to the study of cytological changes in disease has been undertaken. has received part of its support from The Rockefeller Foun- © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . with powers of resolution and definition far greater than those of conventional microscopes. The introduction of the electron microscope. Dr. T o a degree pathologists were diverted into a fruitful investigation of the physiological alterations associated with cellular change. Lima. but this extension of their interest in many instances only increased the need for the direct visualization of cells.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 25 CORNELL UNIVERSITY ELECTRON MICROSCOPY Research in general pathology has lost some of its momentum in recent years because the lack of effective techniques blocked visual study of the cellular changes. so that they could be examined effectively under the electron microscope. UNIVERSITY OF SAN MARCOS HIGH ALTITUDE PHYSIOLOGY Research on various aspects of human physiology at high altitudes at the University of San Marcos. New York City. These methods have now been developed. secondary to disease processes. Kidd will direct the program in the Department of Pathology a t Cornell Medical College. and the time seems ripe for use of the electron microscope in cellular pathology. The Foundation has made a five-year grant of $ g ~ . occurring in morbid tissues. cytologists are making detailed studies of normal cellular structure. but methods for embedding and sectioning tissues of extreme thinness.

© 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . This group of high altitude physiologists is experienced in the physiology of respiration and circulation in their broadest aspects.900 feet above the sea.26 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION dation since 1934. Among other interesting features. and in further support of the institute's research program. The University of San Marcos now plans to integrate further the teaching and research activities of the department with the program of undergraduate instruction in normal physiology. The institute has in the past provided training a t the graduate level.889. one at Huancayo. but its unique feature is the possession of two branch laboratories at 10. has its principal laboratories in the university Medical School in Lima. Thus their work has direct application to such different clinical states as anoxia arising from heart failure and the curious multiplication of the red blood cells known as polycythemia Vera. The Rockefeller Foundation has made a two-year grant of $go. 90 miles from Lima in the high Andes. The Institute of Andean Biology is a section of the Department of Pathological Physiology. the research being conducted at the institute on such subjects as respiration and circulation under low oxygen conditions has importance for the operation of aircraft at high altitudes. But its presence in the Medical School offers an opportunity for enriching the program of undergraduate instruction there which has not yet been fully explored.ooo. Toward the costs of this reorganization. the staff of the institute includes four associate and seven assistant professors and two instructors.700 feet and 14. including such matters as the formation of the blood cells and the biochemistry of the energy systems in tissue cells. in the physiology of respiration and circulation. Under the direction of Dr. the other at Morococha. where this research is carried on. Alberto Hurtado. The Institute of Andean Biology. both for young Peruvians and for visitors from other countries. Previous Foundation support to the university for related purposes totaled $124.

The Rocke- feller Foundation has made a grant of 2 . the largest of which is the Central Hospital. maintains six hospitals in Brazil. a charitable society founded in 1580. and even more important in relation to how gation are solved. Inc.] MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 27 • SANTA CASA DE MISERICORDIA INTERN AND RESIDENCY PROGRAM The Santa Casa de Misericordia of Rio de Janeiro. its rate. the position of Negroes in allfieldsof medicine apunder- pears to have improved to a marked degree. 0 0 0 cruzeiros (about $ 5 7 . To aid the society in developing a graduate training program for interns and residents at Central Hospital. National Medical Fellowships. and its further potentialities is important in planning the future development of medical training facilities. and particularly since the end of World War II. The grant will provide partial support for the remodel- ing of the necessary living quarters for the resident staff and for the administrative expenses of the new program. The information contained in the report led this group and the Department of Sociology of the University of Chicago to plan a study which would permit an analysis of the forces and processes leadproblems of segre- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 8 5 6 . An standing of how and why this improvement has occurred. published Negroes in Medicine in 1952 as a six-year report of the progress of Negro integration in medicine. UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO STUDY OF THE INTEGRATION OF NEGROES IN MEDICINE In recent years. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility and educational value of general rotating internships and resi- dency training in medical and surgical specialties under circumstances of such facilities in Brazil.. 0 0 0 ) for a three-year period.

The hospital serves as the main clinical teaching field for the Medical College and Nursing School in Trivandrum. Reitzes. The Indian Government is providing the additional staff and the structural alterations required for the wards. The first. the Department of Physiology. Uruguay. Kesavan Nair. a general medical and surgical hospital in Trivandrum. 5 0 0 was awarded to the University of the Republic. neurophysiology.28 THB ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION ing to the growing role of Negroes in medical care and science. the Foundation in 1955 made a one-year grant of $ 3 8 . The project will be developed under the direction of Dr. R. Dietrich C . to equip and supply two model teaching wards. Founded in 1951. Montevideo. where the importance of modern clinical care will be demonstrated for students in the college and the nursing school. UNIVERSITY OF THE REPUBLIC FACULTY OF MEDICINE A one-year grant of $ 3 2 . Toward the costs of the study. India. Travancore. STATE MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL MODEL TEACHING WARDS The Foundation has appropriated $ 3 5 . in 1955 for teaching and research facilities in three departments of the Faculty of Medicine. the college is one of India's newer medical schools. is divided into research sections devoted to endocrinology and enzymatology. which will be directed by Dr. vegetative functions. hospital superintendent. 1 0 0 to the University of Chicago. 0 0 0 for one year to the State Medical College Hospital. These units all maintain research laboratories and are also concerned with teaching undergradu- 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . and physiological obstetrics.

Medical School. Medellin. professor of microbiology. Colombia: Equipment for the Department of Physiology. the De- partment of Biophysics. 0 0 0 . OTHER GRANTS University of Bahia. Histology and Embryology. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 6 0 0 . $9. $ 8 . and pattern of organization. University of Michigan. $ 2 . The second department receiving assistance. Medellin. to observe its educational policies. University of Antioquia. Bernardo Jimenez. The third department. methods. to observe recent developments in the teaching of microbiology in the United States. $ 4 . Dr. 0 0 0 . Travel by four members of the staff and Governing Body to the American University of Beirut. Ann Arbor: for the ex- change of two basic science teachers and one clinical teacher between the Medical School and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Antioquia. Faculty of Medicine. Lebanon. India: Purchase and installation of equipment for use in the Department of Thoracic Surgery. The physiological obstetrics section is internationally known for research contributions in its field. Christian Medical College. $ 8 . Vellore. 6 7 5 . Colombia. 5 0 0 .130. and in the past two years has published twenty-four papers on scientific subjects. Brazil: equipment and supplies for the Department of Pathology.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 29 ate and graduate students. also divides its time between teaching and research. $ 8 . Faculty of Medicine. is collaborating with the neurophysiology section of the Department of Physiology in a program of research involving radioactive isotopes and microdissection techniques.

Dr. Colombia: Purchase of basic reference and teaching texts for the medical library of the Faculty of Medicine. additional training in the United States in the field of virus research work and the collection of vertebrates and other animals for laboratory use. $ 5 . head. director. $ 4 . Boston: toward a program of continuing education for the practicing physician. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . to observe the teaching of biochemistry in the United States. . Surgical Clinic. under the direction of Professor Hans Schaefer. University of Michigan. to study organization and teaching methods: $ 2 . Trivandrum. Frank M. 5 0 0 . 2 0 0 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 0 . postgraduate education. University of Heidelberg. Gajra Raja Medical College. Ponnamma. India: equipment for the Anatomy Department. to visit the Department of Surgery. $ 7 . Carlos Lehmann V . chief professor. Department of Pathology. $ 2 . New York: purchase of two-way radio transmission facilities for postgraduate education programs under the direction of Dr. and in medical and nursing education. Alfredo Correa-Henao. Madhya Bharat. Department of Biochemistry. Alberto Gomez Arango. $ 7 . GwaKor. India: to observe recent developments in obstetrics and gynecology. K. Medical College. Jesus Pelaez Botero. University of Valle. Professor F . $775. Medical School. Dr. Albany Medical College of Union University. Postgraduate Medical Institute of the Massachusetts Medical Society. 3 0 0 . $ 2 . 1 0 0 . Faculty of Medicine.30 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Dr. head. Germany: toward support of the teaching program of the Physiological Institute. 5 5 0 . in the United Kingdom and the United States. additional travel in the United States. 6 o o . Dr. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Call. $ 4 . 0 0 0 . Woolsey. $ 5 .

Ministry of Health. Japan: to visit medical schools in the United States to observe recent developments in the teaching of pathology. Dr. University of Ceylon. 8 5 0 . 4 . $ 3 . Teisho Aoki. Potter (Meyer). Norio Shimazono. Professor C. 4 7 5 . de Silva. School of Medicine and Dentistry. the Middle East. associate professor. Pharmacological Institute. 0 0 0 . $ 2 . Colombo: to observe methods of teaching pediatrics in the United States and the Caribbean region with special reference to current developments in preventive medicine. head. India: preparatory expenses in condevelopments in medical educa- nection with the general conference of Indian medical educators. $ 2 . C . Dr. $ 3 . professor of pathology. Hermann Rahn. Department of Physiology. Japan: to visit medical schools in the United States to observe recent developments in the teaching of biochemistry. professor of pediatrics. England: to visit medical schools in the United States. $ 3 . 0 0 . Ankara. 7 5 0 . Dr. University of Chicago. Edith L . $ 2 . Medical School. Professor Ihsan Dogramaci. professor of biochemistry. School of Medicine. Percival C. I z z e t Kantemir. Dr. Department of Child Health and Pediatrics. Dr. Faculty of Medicine. Turkey: to visit the United States to observe new techniques in pharmacology and new tion. head. 8 0 0 . Tokyo University. $ 2 . 7 5 0 . Peru. Department of Medicine. $ 3 . 2 3 0 . 5 0 0 . and Europe. University of Bristol. New Delhi.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 31 Dr. Turkey: to visit departments of pediatrics and institutes of maternal and child health in the United States and Mexico. Illinois: to observe and lecture at centers of obstetrics and gynecology in the Far East. Bruce Perry. New York: to study high altitude physiology at Morococha and Lima. Tokyo. University of Rochester. $ 2 . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . University of Ankara. Keio University. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Department of Medicine. Australia: to observe modern trends in undergraduate medical education and family care programs in the United States and Canada. associate professor of pediatrics. 3 2 5 . Department of Physiology. Tokyo University. executive. Dr. Stanford University. Juan Arturo Guedea Larios. 3 5 0 . University of Guanajuato. $ 2 . $ 1 . University of Brazil. senior lecturer. senior general physician and dean. Bishmipada Mukopadhaya. 5 0 0 . Melbourne. Japan. $ 1 . associate professor of tropical medicine. Leon. Medical Faculty. Michael Heidelberger. Rytand. Faculty of Medicine. New York: to give a series of lectures at the Faculty of Medicine. 8 0 0 . 9 0 0 . Julio Ornelas K . 0 0 0 .32 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Dr« David A. Dr. $ 1 . $ 2 . $ 1 . to visit the United States to observe modern trends in the teaching of tropical medicine and clinical medicine. Columbia University. University of Chihuahua. $ 1 . Rio de Janeiro: Dr. director. Mexico: to observe the organization and operation of medical schools in South America. University College of the West Indies. Dr. $ 1 . assistant director. India: to visit orthopedic surgery centers in the United States. 0 0 0 . Dr. 9 0 0 . Patna University. 4 0 0 . Dr. California: to visit recognized centers of medical teaching and research in Europe. professor of immunochemistry. Lebanon: to observe recent developments in the fields of pediatrics and medical education in the United States. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Prince of Wales Medical College. Ewen Thomas Taylor Downie. . American University of Beirut. Dr. Jamaica: to study liver metabolism research techniques and to observe teaching programs in the United States. Alfred Hospital Medical School. Jose Rodrigues da Silva. lecturer in orthopedic surgery. Sydney John Patrick. Hassan Misbah Idriss. Mexico: to observe the organization and operation of medical schools in South America. College of Physicians and Surgeons. Faculty of Medicine. $ 1 .

Japan: to visit medical schools in the United States. India: additional expenses of visits to medical cation and medical school and hospital administration. medical assistant. University of Rajputana. Shanfcar Karunakar Menon. to study in the United States. Thure von Uexkiill. Sawai Man centers in the United States to observe new Singh Medical College. $427. professor and chairman. Dr. Dr. methods of medical eduJaipur. $825. School of Medicine. Australia: to visit recognized centers of gynecological pathology and obstetrical teaching and services in the United States. assistant professor of pharmacology. and principal. $525.. University of Adelaide. Jr. Rajasthan. Stephen Wilhelm Thesleff. New York: to observe teaching techniques in undergraduate education in the United States. Rio de Janeiro. dean. Kyushu University. Leslie O . Dimas Prajeres de Campos. Santa Casa de Misericordia Hospital. Dr. $ 9 2 0 . assistant professor of clinical medicine. $ 1 . Hiroshi Mi'yake. Department of Pathology. Fukuoka. Dr. Albert Einstein College of Medicine. $525. Poidevin. $600. professor of biochemistry. University of the Philippines. Dr. Dr. 0 0 0 . Orthopedic Service. director of obstetrics. Faculty of Medicine. University of Munich. University of Lund. Dr. Dr. $ 6 0 0 .MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 33 Dr. Sweden: to visit recognized centers of research in neuropharmacology in the United States. chief assistant in internal medicine. Brazil: to accept a residency in orthopedic surgery at the University of Wisconsin Hospitals. Juan Sanchez Salcedo. Julio Studart de Moraes. $17. professor of surgery. Alfred Alvin Angrist. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Yeshiva University. Quezon City: to observe new developments in biochemistry and nutrition in the United States.S . Germany: additional expenses of attendance at the European Symposium on Medical Education held in Nice in 1953.

From the beginning the university has been concerned with preparing nurses for broad community responsibilities beyond the duties of service within hospital wards.34 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION NURSING UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH NURSING TEACHING UNIT A new postgraduate program for the training of teachers and administrators in nursing is currently being developed by the University of Edinburgh in cooperation with the Scottish branch of the Royal College of Nursing. and courses in the Nursing School are now being broadened to 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Colombia. Candidates for the Nurse-Tutor Certificate offered under the program will be full students of the university and will enjoy the advantages of close contact with general university life throughout the course. Toward support of the new unit The Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated £ 3 0 . and as part of this activity developed a nursing school in 1952. still largely rural. ultimately to be housed wholly on University of Edinburgh premises. will be the first of its kind within the framework of a university in Great Britain. Its head and most of its teachers will be regular members of the university staff. was created about ten years ago as a regional institution of higher learning for the Cauca Valley. 1 9 6 0 . Cali. ooo) to the University of Edinburgh for use during the fiveyear period ending June 30. UNIVERSITY OF VALLE NURSING EDUCATION The University of Valle. Its medical center is training personnel for a health program especially adapted to the area. responsible to the Faculty of Medicine. 0 0 0 (approximately $ 9 0 . The new Nursing Teaching Unit.

Equipment and supplies for the use of Miss Lillian A. College of Nursing. The Rockefeller Foundation previously appropriated a total of $ 5 1 3 . supervisor. 0 0 0 . $2. $ 5 . and in support of the expanded Nursing School program made an additional five-year grant in 1955 of 1 1 0 . $ 1 0 . $ 5 . Korea: equipment and support of teaching activities. public health nursing. 0 0 0 . Miss Alma F . Ministry of Health. Japan: to study trends in public health nursing and comprehensive medical care programs in the United States. Mrs. $ 1 0 . Trivandrum. Lima. Special Health Service. 2 0 0 ) .MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 35 include training in community health through coordination with the curriculum of the Medical Faculty related to public health. National Postgraduate School of Nursing. Rio de Janeiro: An appraisal of nursing resources and needs in Brazil. instructor in pediatric nursing. 0 0 0 . Miss Haydee G . to study techniques for appraisal of nursing care in the United States. $3. India. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Dourado. 0 0 0 to the University of Valle. 1 0 0 . University of the Philippines. Lara.525. Masae Hirai.675. in connection with her assignment to the School of Nursing. National Institute of Nursing. The recently established Department of Preven- tive Medicine and Public Health in the Medical Faculty will furnish the technical structure for this training. 0 0 0 . OTHER GRANTS The Brazilian Nursing Association. Peru: teaching equipment. temporary Rockefeller Foundation staff member. 0 0 0 Colombian pesos (about $ 4 6 . Tokyo Central Health Center. For the Faculty of Medicine. $ 1 0 . Seoul. Johnson. Quezon City: to visit schools of nursing in the United States and Canada to observe research work and graduate programs in nursing. Travancore.

Jamaica. Denmark: to observe developments in psychiatric nursing programs in Canada and the United States. the Leeward Islands. British Guiana. matron. In addition. Trinidad. the faculty's Department of Obstetrics plans to initiate a home delivery service and facilities for training midwives in conjunction with medical students to create a team relationship.36 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Miss Ingrid Nielsen. Oringe Mental Hospital. Vordingborg. and social conditions. 0 5 0 . PUBLIC HEALTH UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES FACULTY OF MEDICINE The Faculty of Medicine of the University College of the West Indies in Jamaica has. Jamaica. $ 3 . during the past seven years. however. the faculty has wished to expand its studies to include a larger part of the population. For some time. and now plans to establish an outpatient clinic at a govern- ment-owned health center built recently in the area of Mavis Bank. Representing a cooperative effort of the United Kingdom and the several governments concerned. and the Windward 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . These conveniently located facilities serve a selected population of about 5 . the West In- dian college was founded in 1 9 4 6 to provide higher education for Barbados. developed a highly coordinated program of research and teaching focused on the diseases and health problems peculiar to that colonial area. British Honduras. customs. The University College is also eager to extend medical services to the other islands of the archipelago and to provide for an exchange of personnel between the University College and individuals in the outlying areas who might wish to do postgraduate work in their special fields. 2 0 0 persons whose health problems will be studied in connection with direct observations of their diet.

including the use of atomic energy. But neither at this school nor elsewhere in the United Kingdom has a center been developed where the methods of physics. and other arts hazards is and sciences are brought together on a major scale for training and research in this field. the United Kingdom is also one of the areas most harried by public health problems in connection with its industry. the of the clinic. Although affiliated with the University College of London. The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine of the University of London for the past several years has offered to a limited number of students an elective in occupational health.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 37 Islands. and the effects of air pollution in the general population are occasionally very serious. it is controlled by an autonomous board composed of representatives of the British West Indies and selected personnel from the United Kingdom. Such a center is now to be established at the London School in a new Department of Occupational Health. medicine. To aid in the teaching and research program. and the extension of medical establishment services to the other islands of the British West Indies. and in some parts of the country the need for an immediate attack on industrial health urgent. The rates of lost time and disability among indus- trial workers are high. The department will be associated closely with such and existing Departments of the school as Epidemiology 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . engineering. The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 made afive-yeargrant of $ 3 1 4 . UNIVERSITY OF LONDON OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH One of the most highly industrialized areas in the world. 0 0 0 to the University College. the situation is steadily becoming worse. With the increasing complexity of industrial processes.

health education. 1959. and research on significant problems of preventive medicine and public health will be carried on. 0 0 0 ) to the University of London for use during the next five years. The center will give medical and nursing students at the college the opportunity to participate in a comprehensive rural medical program. CHRISTIAN MEDICAL COLLEGE PREVENTIVE AND SOCIAL MEDICINE Among the present objectives of the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine at the Christian Medical College. Quezon City: Exchange of faculty with the School of Hygiene and Public Health 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . environmental sanitation. For salaries and for additional research and teaching equipment. The Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated £ 1 5 . and related aspects of social medicine. Institute of Hygiene. 9 0 0 rupees (approximately $ 3 4 . India. 1 0 0 ) . and with the Medical Research Council Unit on Environmental Hygiene housed at the school. the combined sums to be available through July 31. public health nursing. Plans for the project have been approved by local and state officials and will be put into execution during the next several years. 8 0 0 . OTHER GRANTS University of the Philippines. revolving around maternal and child health. is the establishment of a health center to serve the college field area—about 1 1 square miles with a total population of 3 0 . Limited medical care for the inhabitants of the field area will be offered.38 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Vital Statistics. in addition to an earlier grant of $ 4 . 0 0 0 . Toward the general expenses of the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine during this period of expansion. Applied Physiology. Vellore. 0 0 0 (about $ 4 5 . the Foundation in 1955 appropriated 1 5 4 . and Public Health.

City of New York. LeRoy Allen. Johns Hopkins University. $ 6 . Division of Applied Science. $ 1 2 . to promote teaching and research in preventive medicine and to develop village medical service. Medical College. Poona. 0 0 0 . Japan: studies of the health hazards of radioactive dusts and vapors. India: Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. $ 1 2 . and Puerto Rico. Christian Medical College. $ 5 . $ 3 . 5 0 0 . B. J. $ 1 0 . professor and dean. Dr. Baltimore. Quezon City. the United States. Thomas. 0 0 0 . 5 0 0 . The Public Health Research Institute of The tibility to tuberculosis. under the direction of Dr. $ 8 . India: promotion of preventive medicine teaching and Medicine. Jr. Baltimore. research in the Department of Preventive Inc. Vellore. Harold A. $ 5 . Maryland. Jehangir Kaikhashru Adranvala. 8 0 0 . 5 0 0 . 0 0 0 for a three-year period. to observe new develop- ments at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health and other schools of public health in the United States. Faculty of Medicine. $ 4 .: investigation of the effects of certain types of stress on suscep- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Dr. Department of Preventive and Social Medicine. The American-Korean Foundation. 5 0 0 . Maryland: exchange of faculty with the Institute of Hygiene of the University of the Philippines. Cambridge. Hilario Lara. Massachusetts: to observe recent developments in sanitary and hydraulic engineering in Europe and Latin America. New York: salary of a Health Consultant to represent that foundation in the Republic of Korea. School of Hygiene and Public Health. Tokyo University.. 2 0 0 for a three-year period.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 39 of Johns Hopkins University. Christian Medical College. Dr. Ludhiana. $ 4 . 2 2 5 . associate professor of sanitary engineering. Harvard University. India: to observe methods of teaching preventive and social medicine in the United Kingdom.

principal medical officer. Institute of Public Health. $ 4 0 6 . Minister of Health. Medical School.4O THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Dr. $1. Juan Antonio Montoya O . head. health education officer. Dr. $ 1 . $ 2 . Port-of-Spain. George Graham Don. Cali. Trinidad: to visit centers of health education and disease prevention at federal and state levels in the United States. . Dr. Department of National Health and Welfare. director-general of public health. 0 0 0 . Charles Augustus Roberts. 6 2 5 . England: to observe the organization and practice of environmental sanitation in the United States. Canada. Department of York: to public health in the Medical Services.500. head. 7 5 0 . Tokyo. Colombia: to visit medical schools and medical care centers in South America and the United States. Professor Pieter Muntendam. Vouk. New Delhi: The Hon. Canada: to observe medical care programs in the United States. the Netherlands: to visit medical schools and schools of public health in Great Britain and the United States. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 6 2 5 . $ 6 0 0 . University of London. Department of Maternal and Child Health. New visit centers of administrative medicine and United States. Japan: to visit schools of public health in the United States. Kiyoshi* Saito. and vice-director. Rajkumari Amrit Kaur. Institute of Industrial Hygiene. School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. School of Public Health and Administrative Medicine. $ 2 . $ 2 . Dr. $ 2 . Ottawa. Dr. Pilot Health Center. 5 7 5 . Mental Health and Health Insurance Studies. Columbia University. lecturer in public health. Yugoslav Academy of Sciences and Arts. University of Valle. Ray Elbert Trussell. Zagreb: to observe in the United States methods of research and training in industrial medicine and industrial hygiene. Government of India. Stephen Moosai-Maharaj. executive officer. additional expenses of visits to medical centers and public health agencies in the United States. acting director. $925. and Puerto Rico. Velimir B .

6 0 0 in 1955 to enable the Division of Health Affairs to study further this finding and its significance for medical educa- tion. towns. an effort was made to identify some of the strengths and weaknesses of the system of medical education under which they were trained. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . D . One of the most important conclusions was that training in internal medicine for periods longer than three months. Institute of Sanitary Engineering. Berkeley: to continue the development of a certificate course in medical care administration. during either the internship or hospital residency of a young M . Italy: additional expenses of visits to sanitary engineering centers in the United States. Medical Care a UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA SURVEY OF MEDICAL PRACTICE The Division of Health Affairs at the University of North Carolina in 1955 completed afieldstudy of the family doctor as he practices in the villages.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH 4 ! Professor Franco Cambi. and to complete three related projects during the next two years. and cities of the State. 0 0 0 . $ 6 . leads to better performance in his later years as a general practitioner. $ 3 1 8 . director. Extension Division. The Rockefeller Foundation made a grant of $ 8 0 . No other factor was found to be more consistently correlated with good performance. Milan. Institute of Technology. OTHER GRANTS University of California. Through this study of a representative sample of general practitioners. The project was undertaken with a view to guiding the future development of the university's medical school. .

The field offices are located in Mexico City. conducted by a professional staff with headquarters in New York City and with fivefieldoffices in foreign countries around the world.250. signed to these field offices vary somewhat depending upon the character of specific projects. Santiago. New and Tokyo. the Indian Council of Medical 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Rio de Janeiro. The field offices are maintained to provide close association with developing medical and public health problems in the areas of special interest. An area representative is able to give pergovernmental sonal attention to major institutional and projects with which The Rockefeller Foundation is associ- ated. Mexico. but all have certain functions in common. Chile. Japan. will be supported in 1956 by an appropriation of $321. General INDIAN COUNCIL OF MEDICAL RESEARCH NEW OFFICE BUILDING Working closely with various government departments and with the Indian States. The functions of the staff asDelhi.42 Field THB ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION Service The field services in medical education and public health of The Rockefeller Foundation. India. Brazil. This exceed somewhat intangible activity in some instances may in ultimate value the grant program itself. The area repre- sentative also assists in the selection of qualified individuals for postgraduate study abroad under the well-defined terms of the Foundation's fellowship program. and he is in a position to serve as an informal adviser to the national authorities in many problems within the area of his personal competence if requested to do so.

The Rockefeller Foundation has appropriated 2 2 5 . 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . 0 0 0 rupees (about $ 4 9 . to whose scientific. and other facilities the council will have ready access in its new location. publication of scientific reports. Matching sums available from Indian sources. It also awards research grants and fellowships. and performs a number of special services including support of scientific journals.MEDICAL EDUCATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH Research in New 43 Delhi exercises an advisory role in deter- mining broad public health and scientific policies and in setting standards for medical research and education. A building site has been donated by the All India Institute of Medical Sciences. 0 0 0 . and sponsorship of scientific meetings. provision of reference and information services. R. Corey. $ 2 . gives financial support to certain research laboratories. $ 5 . library. OTHER GRANTS Fund for grants of amounts not exceeding $ 5 0 0 for allocation under the supervision of the Director. Dr. Pasadena: to visit chemical laboratories in Europe and to attend conferences in Italy and Australia. 5 0 0 ) for a two-year period toward construction of an office building for the council. Department of Structural Chemistry. B. California Institute of Technology. 5 0 0 .

Its general scope has been presented previously and recent progress is sumwork marized in the following pages of this report.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH s HAS BEEN NOTED ELSEWHERE in this report. but there is some satisfaction in calling attention to the fact that the Foundation's long-standing interest in genetics is no longer split arbitrarily between the genetics of man and the genetics of lower animals. One result was the consolidation of research activities in the fields of medicine. biology. As a concrete example. The in the Foundation's own laboratories raises many questions which can only be solved by the application of specialized techniques beyond the scope of any single laboratory. For 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . public health and medicine. and their related biological sciences. the grants made last year to the Galton Laboratory in London and to the University of Naples for work in human genetics are listed side by side in this report with aid for population studies on fruit flies in Brazil. Of more far-reaching significance perhaps is the fact that the Foundation's operating program for the investigation of virus diseases has now been brought into close asso- ciation with grant-making activity in microbiology and the biochemistry of macromolecules. The operating program is currently devoted almost exclusively to a study of insectborne virus diseases affecting man. No organizational scheme can be completely logical. and biochemistry. the past year saw a regrouping of the Foundation's interest in agriculture.

the irritating personal inconvenience. the former Natural a large Sciences Division of the Foundation contributed share of its funds to laboratories engaged in such studies. The general effects of these agents.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 45 example. are all well known to everyone. but accurate knowledge of their characteristics as biological organisms has been curiously hard to come by. but the recent rapid development of tissue culture methods offers a convenient alternative. Grants to outside laboratories also serve to extend the Foundation's interest in virus into other fields which cannot conveniently be pursued by its own Thus substantial help was given laboratory staff. The re- cently reported fractionation and recombination of Tobacco Mosaic virus carried out independently during the past year in two laboratories receiving aid from the Foundation help to confirm the long-held hope that the biological and medical aspects of virus infections will ultimately find precise explanation in physico-chemical terms. Part of the difficulty stems from the fact that only a few of them will grow satisfactorily in lower animals. For years the small number of competent virologists who possessed the courage to work on the problem at all were concerned with isolating the causative agents of the diseases they already knew about. In previous years. the not infrequent severe illness and occasional deaths. there is increasing reason to believe that our understanding of the biology of viruses will be greatly enriched by advances in the knowledge of protein and nucleic acid structure. to the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene for investigation of respiratory viruses. the in effect searching viruses tables have been turned and they are now for the diseases which may be caused by the new which turn up in their tissue cultures. the lost time. Another group of grants represents the continuing interest of the Foundation in what is termed the biological 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Almost overnight. Several current additions to this series of grants are briefly described in the following sections of this report.

chologists are employing improved mathematical and Psyphy- sical techniques for the measurement of stimulus and response. between the investigation of processes that are largely inside the cells of the body and those larger adjustments which the whole organism makes to the environment around it. Neurophysiologists are finding it helpful. Broadly speaking. and the early development of biology proceeded hand in hand with the development of the physical sciences of mechanics and thermo-dynamics. The biological study of behavior as the term is used here is concerned primarily with the patterning of the flow of information from the environment to the organism. it has begun to look as though electro-physiological signs can be found to correlate with the establishment of the psychologists' "conditioned reflex. Florida. to familiarize themselves with the functioning of computer mechanisms. at least m degree. all the physical chemical events in the body contribute in some way to an organism's behavior. Robert M." There seems every reason to pursue on this level a Foundation interest in behavior which in the past was expressed in a long program of grants for the development of psychiatry and its related basic sciences. its processing within the organism and the control of the responses ultimately elaborated as a result. The Biological Basis of Behavior YERKES LABORATORIES OF PRIMATE BIOLOGY The Yerkes Laboratories of Primate Biology in Or- ange Park. The analysis of the internal biological organisms economy is concerned in large part with how produce or convert energy.46 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION and basis of behavior. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . but there is an important difference. for example. were established in 1925 as a division of Yale University under the direction of Dr. and in part underlies its continuing activity in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Quite recently.

anatomy. by the associate director. and adult behavior. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . The chimpanzee program was continued. Dr. Lashley as director in 1956. and accumulated much valuable information on their growth. and discrimination. motivation. perception. Foundation aid to the laboratories has totaled $1. During the first seventeen years. Henry W . Karl S . and psychopathology. The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 appropriated $ 5 0 .232. who will succeed Dr.ooo since 1925. Nissen. Previous observation of infants and children suggests that early environmental influences are critically important for the development not only of normal behavior. development. Dr. and learning ability. utilizing the peculiar advantages of the chimpanzee for controlled studies of inferences derived from clinical observations of human beings. Dr. next five years Dr. 0 0 0 to the Yerkes Laboratories of Primate Biology. was introduced in 1942 as the result of the interest of the new director. Yerkes and his associates solved the many problems involved in breeding and rearing a captive colony of chimpanzees. Nissen and his associates will test the behavior and psychological functions of several groups of chimpanzees reared in a series of differing but carefully controlled environments. but a new whereby neighboring Southern universities would assume responsibility is presently under consideration.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH Yerkes. however. Nissen. and his co-workers will concentrate during the next few years on an experimental analysis of socio-emotional behavior. 47 Since 1942 Harvard University has shared replan sponsibility for the laboratories with Yale. utilizing refined techniques of neurosurgery. and his group. in the cerebral physiology underlying the psychological functions of sensation. intelligence. Experimental work on monkeys. To help meet budgetary requirements during the next five years. Lashley. and experimental psychology. Dr. but of such fundamental psychological functions as During the perception.

select and then excrete certain substances from the blood. Forster's direction. is not only a top-ranking research laboratory. In 1952 The Rockefeller Foundation made a grant in aid of $ 1 0 .48 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION DARTMOUTH COLLEGE RESEARCH IN CELLULAR BIOLOGY For several years Professor Roy P. Forster. and another grant in aid of $ 1 0 . 0 0 0 to continue this w o r k . like urea. across cell boun- daries are still undetermined. has been conducting research directed toward determining how secretory cells. directed by Professor Ragnar Granit. but the details of the mechanisms by which individual cells utilize oxidative energy to move metallic ions and organic substances. 0 0 0 in 1954 toward an interrelated program of research in cellular physiology under Dr. KAROLINSKA INSTITUTE RESEARCH IN NEUROPHYSIOLOGY The Nobel Institute for Neurophysiology of the Ka- rolinska Institute. but enjoys. world eminence as a training center for senior research students. and his long experience in 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Professor Granit and his associates have been responsible for many contributions to present-day knowledge of the function of nervous receptors. Forster and in microbiology under the direction of Dr. Raymond W . director of the Department of Zoology at Dartmouth College. Barratt. In 1955 the Foundation gave Dartmouth College a four-year grant of $ 5 0 . The Foundation has supported Professor Granit's work since 1931. as well. 0 0 0 to Dartmouth College toward a program of research in cellular physiology under Dr. especially those of the kidney. The over-all results of this process have been studied and are reasonably well understood.

emphasizing the transmission of impulses along neural pathways and the effects of their experimental disconnection. Bremer. is aided by about ten visiting scientists and graduate students as well as by a permanent group of six investigators. 0 0 0 to the University of Brussels to be used toward the expenses of the laboratory over the next five years. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation .650 since 1939. 4 0 0 ) 1 2 0 . He now plans to enlarge his research program and to participate more actively in a nation-wide expansion of basic brain research in relation to mental illness being developed by the Swedish National Research Council. In 1955 The appropriated Rockefeller Foundation (about $ 2 3 . For these pur- poses the laboratory requires the use of electroencephalographic equipment. In 1955 the Foundation awarded a further grant of $ 3 0 . 0 0 0 Swedish crowns to the Karolinska Institute to provide Professor Granit with the equipment he needs. His research program deals with almost every phase of the physiology of the nervous system. Grants made by The Rockefeller Foundation in sup- port of Dr. UNIVERSITY OF BRUSSELS RESEARCH IN NEUROPHYSIOLOGY One of the outstanding laboratories in Europe for neurophysiological research is located at the University of Brussels under the direction of Professor Frederic Bremen The laboratory is not only internationally renowned for its research.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 49 this general field has demonstrated the importance of combining investigations of peripheral sense organs with concomitant electrophysiological studies of the brain. but is a training center for young neurophysiologists from all over the world. Dr. Bremer's laboratory have totaled $66. who for many years has occupied the chair of general pathology at the university.

0 0 0 for a three-year period. 0 0 0 was made for his work. 2 0 0 3 The Rockefeller Foundation . Sweden: research in endocrinology. In 1955 a new award of $ 2 0 . University of Lund. sound. 2 6 0 ) for a two-year period. and the first for his particular use was made in 1 9 4 8 . 6 8 . The Foundation'sfirstgrant to the Institute of Zoolo- gy was made in 1930 when Professor von Frisch was a member of the institute. Professor von Frisch directs at Munich a large group of younger workers who him in these studies and who assist are extending the range of the investigations. the methods they utilize to communicate this information to the hive ( t h e "language" of the bees). the psychological behavior of swarm fish. 0 0 0 Swedish crowns (about $ 1 3 . Berkeley: support of the White Mountain Research Station. to be available over a three-year period. $ 1 5 . the response sounds. grasshoppers. has made spectacular contributions to scientific knowledge of the behavior of bees: the means they use to find food. the physiological chemistry of insect blood and insect foods. director of the Institute of Zoology of the University of Munich. under the direction of Professor Georg Kahlson. Department of Physiology.50 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION UNIVERSITY OF MUNICH STUDIES IN ANIMAL BEHAVIOR In a long and distinguished career Professor Karl von Frisch. the orientation beof bats to high-frequency havior of ants. and their responses to sight. the sense of smell in fish. and smell. Among the newer projects are subjects such as the response of various arthropods to polarized light. OTHER GRANTS University of California. As a teacher and guide. and the zoo-psychological questions involved in the behavior of voice-gifted crickets. and other insects.

Dr. $ 7 . 6 0 0 . 5 0 0 .BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH University of Edinburgh. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . and Mrs. England: equipment for biological research in the Department of Zoology. 1956. Ann Arbor: Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology. 0 0 0 for a two-year period. Julian Huxley. C . 1956. 0 0 0 . Maine: expenses of foreign scientists invited to participate in the Decennial Tissue Culture Conference. Department of Pharmacology. $ 6 . Paris. to visit recognized centers of teaching and research in pharmacology in the United States. Dr. $ 9 0 0 . Lawrence B. to be held during October. 0 0 0 . London. Bar Harbor. $ 6 . France: equipment for neurophysiological research. 5 0 0 . National Academy of Sciences. Jackson Memorial Laboratory. $ 8 . Curitiba. $ 5 . Japan: tissue culture studies in the Department of Anatomy. University of Michigan. Washington. $ 1 2 . 0 0 0 . University of Parana. $ 7 . $ 9 . 2 5 0 . under the direction of Agrege Professor Yves Laporte. Slobodkin. Scotland: 51 Biochemical equipment for research in experimental biology in the Department of Zoology. University of Toulouse. under the general direction of Professor Jesus Moure. Tokyo University. $ 4 . National Center for Scientific Research. University of London. Faculty of Medicine. Brazil: research on the bionomics of neotropical bees. Henry Matthew Adam. pro- gram of research in population studies. France: Department of Physiology. under the direction of Dr. 5 0 0 . Roscoe B. $ 3 . research in neurophysiology. held during the summer. England: to visit the United States in connection with a proposed book on evolutionary biology. D . : expenses of foreign delegates invited to participate in a Symposium on Cytodifferentiation. University College. 0 0 0 .

William Albert Hugh Rushton. 2 5 0 . Institute of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. Psychological Laboratory. $ 2 . $ 3 . 0 0 0 . 2 5 0 . 4 . Faculty of Medicine. reader in physiology. equipment and supplies for research in embryology and histology. 0 0 . psychological research in the 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . $ 2 . under the direction of Professor Bruno Schreiber. Faculty of Medicine. professor of anatomy. University of the Republic. 0 0 0 . head. under the direction of Professors Pasquale Pasquini and Silvano Leghissa. Department of Histology and Embryology. Roberto Caldeyro-Barcia. $1. University of Oslo. to in the investigation of retinal and visual study methods used physiology in the United States and Canada. Italy: equipment for physiological research. Zangwill. to study advances in the field of obstetrical physiology in the United States and Canada. Washington Buno. Institute of Pathological Anatomy. Dr. England: Dr. Norway: to visit centers of neuroanatomical and neurophysiological research in the United States and Canada. to visit centers of neurological and United States. $ 2 . 6 7 5> Professor Oliver L . University of Cambridge. director. $ 3 . to visit research centers in the United States. University of Parma.52 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION University of Bologna. New York. Uruguay: Dr. $ 2 .125. Professor Pedro Ferreira Berrutti. Faculty of Medicine. 5 0 0 . to study at Columbia University. Dr. Montevideo. $ 3 . Italy: Institute of Comparative Anatomy. Alf Brodal.

and the fact that carriers of the gene are easily identifiable. and his co-workers will extend and Professor Montalenti intensify surveys in order to obtain the data necessary for investigation of this and other questions. Extension of the surveys would allow case registers to be established in the villages. the fatal form of the disease. and provision is now being made to furnish genetic counseling to people in the affected areas. Professor Giuseppi Montalenti of the University of Naples has conducted research on the genetics of micro- cythemia for many years. one in four of whose children will die of Cooley's anemia. One marriage in every 25 will bring together two carriers of the gene. Twenty per cent of the inhabitants of certain villages in the Po Valley carry the gene causing microcythemia. and provides unusual opportunities for studies of importance to the development of human genetic theory. The Rocke- feller Foundation has made a supplementary grant of 23. 5 0 0 ) .BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 53 General Biology UNIVERSITY OP NAPLES GENETICS OF MICROCYTHEMIA The high incidence of microcythemia. in certain areas of Italy constitutes a serious public health problem. 0 0 0 lire year period. (about $ 4 2 . make it a particularly favorable subject for theoretical studies. an inherited blood disease. Certain important problems remain unsolved. available during a three- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . In continued support of the studies on microcythemia being carried on at the University of Naples.5 0 0 . one being the reasons for the peculiar geographical distribution of the gene. The wide prevalence of microcythemia.

biochemical genetics. the research at the Galton Laboratory now follows three main lines. psychoses. and © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . L . The Rocke- feller Foundation has supported this program since 1942. Sir Francis Galton. and malignant disease in which environmental effects play an important etiological part. and includes investigations in statistics. Rio de Janeiro. Its present program involves research on all aspects of human genetics.54 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION UNIVERSITY OP LONDON GALTON LABORATORY Under the leadership of Dr. On two past occasions the department has sponsored collaborative research projects in which scientists and trainees from other Brazilian universities and from a number of other countries have participated. A major part of the program is in the rapidly developing field of biochemical genetics. Scientists at Sao Paulo. the Galton Laboratory of the University of London has continued in the brilliant tradition established by its founder. blood group serology. and of such conditions as mongolisrn. and chromosomal cytology. Porto Alegre. Penrose. Also in progress are studies of human gene linkage. 1955.S . 0 0 0 to the University of London to be used toward research expenses during the next five years. In 1955 The Rockefeller Foundation renewed its longstanding support of research at the Galton Laboratory with a grant of $ 3 0 . UNIVERSITY OF SAO PAULO POPULATION GENETICS Since 1 9 4 0 the Department of General Biology of the University of Sao Paulo has increasingly intensified and expanded its researches on population genetics. Directed toward increasing understanding of the mechanism of human heredity. Another such cooperative effort on a broader scale was begun in June.

As a contribution toward the expenses of the research program in the Laboratory of Cell Physiology during the nextfiveyears. UNIVERSITY OF SAO PAULO LABORATORY OF CELL PHYSIOLOGY The Laboratory of Cell Physiology at the University of Sao Paulo. and tissue culture. 0 0 0 at the beginning of 1955. under the direction of Professor Luis Carlos Junqueira.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 55 Curitiba in Brazil are carrying out coordinated investigations with the participation of investigators from at least five other countries. Chile. Toward the travel expenses of the scientists from Australia. The Foundation contributed $ 1 7 . Junqueira and the his associates are cell secretion of the pancreas and submaxillary gland. A Spinco preparative ultracentrifuge has been made available through a recent Foundation grant. diversified regions of Brazil. into one of the outstanding Latin American centers for research in histology and embryology. radioautography. chromatography. microspectrometry. The chief research interests of Dr. The Rockefeller Foundation in 1955 appropriated $ 4 0 . Italy. and the physiology of the mast-cell. 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Denmark. 0 0 0 to the university. a leucocyte especially numerous in leukemic blood and in foci of chronic inflammation. 6 0 0 since 1948. the research program is being conducted with methods which include tracer techniques. nucleic acid chemistry. Brazil. and has been officially selected as the Brazilian training center for teachers in this field. The several groups are holding periodic meetings and conducting ecological surveys in a number of distant. Foundation aid to Professor Junqueira's research has totaled $ 4 8 . In the excellently equipped laboratory. a former Foundation fellow. and the United States Rockefeller invited to participate in the program. freezing-drying methods. has developed.

0 0 0 . Italy: research in human genetics. $ 1 0 . 5 0 0 . 4 5 0 ) . $ 2 . Cavalli-Sforza. San Salvador. under the direction of Dr. 0 0 0 . New Haven. $ 5 . 5 0 0 . Yugoslavia: Institute of Plant Breeding and Genetics. University of Oslo. Institute of Genetics. Massachusetts: research in genetics at the Genetics Experiment Station. Long Island Biological Association. $ 3 . Montevideo. under the direction of Professor Alois Tavcar. University of Utrecht. Cold Spring Harbor. Norway: establishment of a register of hereditary diseases. Connecticut: toward the development of research in pollen analysis. $ 3 . El Salvador: Department of Cardiology. University of Zagreb. 1955. 5 0 0 . Medical School. $ 2 .L . Research Institute of Biological Sciences. Hospital Resales. 0 0 0 . under the direction of Acting Professor L . Jan Mohr. 6 3 . equipment for use in genetics research. Uruguay: research in genetics. © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . New York: to enable five European and two Japanese geneticists to travel further in the United States during a visit to attend a Symposium on Quantitative Biology held at Cold Spring Harbor in June. Smith College. Union of South Africa: to visit research centers in the United States. $ 3 . Tobias. Bombay: operation and expansion of its laboratory for studies on human variation. 2 0 0 . Yale University. University of Parma. equipment for the use of Dr. University of Witwatersrand. Philip V. Francisco Saez. Dr. $ 3 . 5 0 0 for a f°uryear period. 0 0 0 Norwegian crowns (about $ 9 . $ 4 . Northampton. Netherlands: equipment for research in genetics. under the direction of Dr. Maria Isabel Rodriguez. $ 1 4 . 2 0 0 . Johannesburg. 5 0 0 . Department of Anatomy.56 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION OTHER GRANTS Indian Cancer Research Centre.

These continue a series of grants for the researches of these two men which began in 1933. Stockholm.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 57 University of Pavla. Netherlands: travel and living expenses of two American members of the Editorial Committee invited to attend meetings of the association during November. University of Colorado. under the direction of Assistant Professor R. Dr. Pennak. Professor Newton Freire-Maia. Milani. and utilizes the nucleic acids so intimately associated with its metabolic and reproductive activity. 0 0 0 lire (about $ 1 . 3 0 0 . 1955. Italy: toward the expenses of maintaining a collection of Musca domestica in connection with the development in the Institute of Zoology of a new program for the genetical study of fly resistance to insecticides. during the summer. University of Parana. 3 0 0 ). 7 2 0 . for the support of research programs in biochemistry directed by Professor Einar Hammarsten and by Professor Hugo Theorell. Biochemistry KAROLINSKA INSTITUTE RESEARCH IN BIOCHEMISTRY In 1955 the Foundation made two grants to the Karolinska Institute. Utrecht. Curitiba. $ 1 . An expert in the uses 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . with increasing emphasis in recent years on the way the living cell builds up. Brazil: to visit centers of genetics research in the United States. Finland. Department of Biology. $ 7 0 0 . Faculty of Philosophy. International Association for Plant Taxonomy. Boulder: to attend a meeting of the International Association of Theoretical and Applied Limnology. held in Helsinki. accumulates. 1956. $ 5 0 0 . Robert W . For nearly two decades Professor Hammarsten has devoted a major portion of his research effort to the study of nucleotide synthesis.

58 THJ3 ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION of isotope tracer techniques. and was able to venture into new areas of research which have earned him an international reputation for his contributions on the chemistry and metabolism of cytochrome C and on the nature of various enzyme-coenzyme systems. A grant of $ 2 9 . T . An appropriation of $ 4 5 . Trained by Hammarsten and for many years his close research associate. he has made many distinguished contributions to his chosen field and to the broader area of protein synthesis. In this excellent new laboratory he continued his studies of porphyrins and of haem-containing compounds. In the autumn of 1955 he was awarded the Nobel prize in medicine. 0 0 0 was also made to the institute in further support over five years for the research in enzyme chemistry directed by Professor Theorell. UNIVERSITY OF LONDON STRUCTURE OF NUCLEIC ACIDS Since 1947 the Foundation has been giving financial support for the program of research in biophysics and biomolecular structure which is being carried on at King's College of the University of London under the direction of Professor J. Aimed at the application of the most exacting techniques of physics to such biological problems as cell division. and the response of the living organism to its physical environment. the submicroscopic anatomy of the cell. Theorell was appointed head of the newly created Department of Biochemistry of the Medical Nobel Institute in 1938. this program has included in recent years a special emphasis on the structure and The distribution of nucleic acids within the cell. 0 0 0 in 1955 provides continuing support of his work for three years. the nature of plant and animal fibers. research begun by Wilkins and his collaborators Stokes and Wilson at King's College several years ago on the X-ray crystal analysis of deoxypentose nucleic acid led 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Randall.

F . HASKINS LABORATORIES RESEARCH IN BIOCHEMISTRY At the Haskins Laboratories. biochemists. to the biologists who see it as the principal who organic moiety within the cell nucleus. These latter investigators. and to provide financial aid for the laborious task of confirming by every conceivable means the facts and theories which have already been accumulated. Randall and the immediate direction of Dr. Seymour Hutner directs biochemical researches in which 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . To enable Dr. separation. a finding which was almost immediately confirmed by Watson and Crick at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge. in turn. then suggested that the structure of the salt of deoxyribose nucleic acid would follow the pattern of two helices coiled around the same axis. The tributions—to the chemist who importance of these con- is concerned with the struc- ture of this basic molecule and the problems of protein synthesis in general.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 59 them to propose in early 1953 the probable helical nature of the nucleic acid molecule. these discoveries are of outstanding significance. Dr.000 over three years to the University of London for research on the structure of nucleic acids under the general supervision of Professor J. Wilkins and his group to devote most of their research activities to the further study of nucleic acid structure. H. T . to the geneticist looks upon it as possibly the chief "stuff" of inheritance— has stimulated scientists all over the world. The Rocke- feller Foundation has made an additional grant of $35. Wilkins in the Department of Physics at King's College. in New York City. M. and physicians who the group are search- ing the kingdom of chemical compounds for suitable agents In cancer chemotherapy. To of biologists. to make possible the continuing improvement of methods for the isolation. and purification of these acids.

60 THB ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION special emphasis is placed on protozoa. Hutner and his associates is con- cerned with the nutritional requirements of protozoa and other microorganisms. In 1955 the Foundation appropriated $ 6 0 . Due it now to their researches. Hutner and his group. One topic under particularly active study involves an investigation of the common pathways in the biosynthesis of vitamin Bia and the chemical substances known as the purines. appears safe to say that in wide areas. These findings have led to a great increase in related activities in laboratories. to be available over a three-year period. Another recent development in the group's work which has attracted wide attention is a gratifying confirmation of the faith that microbiological scientists can eventually contribute to the food supply problem. 0 0 0 for the work of Dr. especially in the United biology. and that therefore protozoa may furnish a more dependable guide to mam- malian biochemistry. The work of Dr. and over wide intervals. concerned with marine Rockefeller Foundation both because of its basic relationship to the program in experimental biology and because of its potential long-range relation to the problems of the world's food supply. Microbiology is presently of especial interest to The States and in England. UNIVERSITY OF UPPSALA RESEARCH IN BIOCHEMISTRY The development of more exact methods and equip- ment for the fractionating of organic substances is the central aim of the research program conducted at the Bio- 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . most of the phytoplankton organisms at the base of the food pyramid in fresh water bodies and in the ocean require vitamins. in the belief that the protoplasm of certain protozoa is more like that of higher animals than the protoplasm of bacteria.

0 0 0 to the institute toward the purchase of certain major items of equipment. diffusion. 0 0 0 . W . and the combined sums have been made available through September. In 1955 The Rockefeller Foundation made a grant of $ 6 0 . the chemistry of bacteria and viruses. This grant supplements a 1952 appropriation of $ 5 0 .BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL RESEARCH 61 physical Institute of the University of Uppsala. J. protein fragments. Other aspects of the work being done by Professor Tiselius and his associates include the study of biologically active peptides. UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE AND THE UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM RESEARCH IN BIOCHEMISTRY Two British universities engaged in research on the chemistry and metabolism of proteins will each be furnished with an analytical ultracentrifuge through Foundation aid. polypeptides. the biophysics of various fractions of common grass pollens capable of inducing allergic reactions. Professor John Squire and his staff 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . Roughton. with emphasis on the structure of gamma globulin antibody. the use of zone electrophoresis and chromatographic methods for the isolation and characterization of peptides. and light scattering. 1960. electrophoresis. the Department of Colloid Sciences at the University of Cambridge is studying proteins by the techniques of ultracentrifugation. Under the leadership of Professor F . and the behavior of bovine serum albumin and other proteins in solution. The significant re- sults produced by this program have made the institute one of the outstanding study centers of Europe in the field of biochemical research and have brought increasing numbers of foreign investigators there for study. and proteins. under the direction of Professor Arne Tiselius. osmotic pressure. At the University of Birmingham's Department of Experimental Pathology. Sweden.

To provide this equipment The Rockefeller Foundation. Early in 1954 the institute moved into excellent laboratories in the new University City where with quadrupled space this program and all the activities of the institute could be given increased impetus. and by the invitation of professors from foreign countries to work in the laboratories. however. Detroit. where the spectrometric analyses are made. Under the leadership of Dr. 0 0 0 each to the University of Cambridge and the University of Birmingham. 0 0 0 was appropriated for use during the year for the purchase of specialized research equipment. awarded grants of $ 2 5 . an analytical ultracentrifuge has now become essential to the scientific faculties of both universities. To facilitate thefinerseparation of pure proteins from mixtures. In 1955 $ 3 0 . and their chemistry and metabolism as related to human physiology and to various disease processes. in consideration of provision by the university © 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . their synthesis by plants. particularly proteins. the work of the institute has been extended by the addition of several specialized branches. Alberto Sandoval.62 THE ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION are engaged in an extensive research program for the study of macromolecules. The permanent staff has been augmented and provided with increased support. Part of this program is conducted in cooperation with the Department of Chemistry of Wayne University. NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MEXICO INSTITUTE OF CHEMISTRY An important research program of the Institute of Chemistry of the National University of Mexico concerns the chemistry of the natural products of Mexican plants and fruits and of several genera of cacti from Mexico and other countries which have been found to be good sources of pharmacologically active compounds. in 1955. The Rockefeller Foundation made itsfirstgrant to the institute in 1941. the director.

0 0 0 was made in 1955 to Columbia University for the use of Dr. emphasizing such points as a 2003 The Rockefeller Foundation . They have done numerous in vitro experiments with kidney slices and whole organs to elucidate the transport mechanisms responsible for tubular excretion of various organic acids. Taggart and his colleagues in the Department of Medicine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University have in the past eight years made important contributions to knowledge of the biochemistry of kidney function. is studying the comparative morphology of enzymes from a physicalchemical point of view. One group. directed by Professor Bucher. John V. PHILIP UNIVERSITY INSTITUTE OF PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY Under the leadership of the director. and to study the transport of sodium and potassium ions against concentration gradients in kidney tissue. Taggart and his associates. led by Professor Bucher's assistant. is investigating free nucleotides with energy-rich phosphate bonds. a five-year grant of $ 3 5 . COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY ENZYME RESEARCH Dr. Professor Theodor Bucher. to examine the role played by coenzyme A in this process. A second group. To help with this program of applying the techniques of enzymology to the problems of renal physiology. has embarked on two biochemical research programs centering on enzyme systems. and function. the Institute of Physiological Chemistry of Philip University.BIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL R