1. Know your material well. 2. Prepare an outline - follow it.

Organize presentation into three sections: Beginning, Middle, and End. Memorize the Beginning and End

 Beginning:  Middle:  End:

“Tell us what you’re going to tell us” (Overview of topics you’ll cover, session plan, timeframe, handouts) “Tell us” (This is the body of your presentation)  “Tell us what you’ve told us” (Summarize)

3. Practice your presentation (in front of a mirror, a family member, or a friend; & in an empty room). Videotape yourself. Add some movement – “using the space” adds interest & energy. 4. When you practice, time yourself; time is your enemy. 5. Be “ready & waiting” before the audience is ready & waiting; arrive 15 minutes before your presentation. 6. Be familiar with the room arrangement, including the A/V set-up. 7. Establish your credibility early; start by introducing yourself & panel members by name, position, & LGA. 8. The first five minutes are everything.        Check the microphone sound with the audience. Exhibit that you are prepared. Use eye contact. Be energetic through your voice and facial expressions. Tell participants when they can ask questions. Audiences tend to remember the first and last bits of a presentation. Have a “cheat sheet” to remember to do these things.

9. Eye contact establishes rapport.  Look directly at one person for a few seconds, then at another, etc., so everyone can feel included.  Avoid the inclination to speak to only one section of the audience. 10. Audience participation increases attention span and learning; use participants’ names when you can. 11. Use your voice to best advantage to maintain audience interest & exhibit confidence.  Modulate your volume & tone, putting “light and shade” in your voice.  Avoid: speaking in a monotone Avoid: dropping words at the end of a sentence  Avoid: raising your voice at the end of a sentence (connotes uncertainty) 12. To emphasize an important point, say it a second time using different words; illustrate with an example, story or anecdote. 13. Accept some fear as being good (energizing stress vs. destructive stress). 14. Identify your fears; categorize them as controllable or uncontrollable, & confront them. 15. Rest up so that you are physically and psychologically alert; dress comfortably. 16. Convince yourself to relax (breathe deeply; meditate; talk to yourself). 17. Imagine yourself as a good speaker (self-fulfilling prophecy).
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P R A C T I C I N G B E F O R E H A N D W I L L M AK E A DI F F E R E N C E !

KEEP THE AUDIENCE WITH YOU
AVOID THESE PITFALLS

A weak opening

Reading your presentation
Know your subject matter in order to use your own words. Use more than one training aid/approach to deliver your info.

Small PowerPoint font

Too much detail
Most participants can only remember up to 5 main points. Give a handout for useful detailed info.

Long or slow-moving statement/example Talking to a specific handout without confirming participants are “on the same page”
“Tell & Show” participants where you are.

A/V glitches
Check out the set-up beforehand. Have a checklist re: cords, connections, microphones, etc. If you have A/V assistance, the two of you need to be “on the same page” during your presentation.

PREPARATION

PAYS

OFF!

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