Modern World History Curriculum Guide

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Modern World History Curriculum Guide Introduction
Course Reference Number: 27070 Content Area: Social Studies Course Title: Modern World History Credits: 0.5 Course Description:

1.0

2.0

Conceptual understandings, major issues and turning points will be emphasized during this study of world history from the industrial revolution to present day. Modern World History students will actively engage in a study of modern world history that will explore how individuals, events have shaped our lives and issues of the recent past. This course will build on the foundations established during grades 6-8 Social Studies instruction by continuing the development of historical and geographic knowledge and skills needed to understand the modern world. Course Standards: MWH.1 Reconstruct, interpret, and represent the chronology of significant events, developments, and narratives from history. MWH.2 Compare and contrast institutions and ideas in history, noting cause and effect relationships. MWH.3 Recognize and interpret continuity and/or change with respect to particular historical developments in the 20th century. MWH.4 Evaluate how contemporary perspectives affect historical interpretation. MWH.5-Recognize, assess, and interpret relationships among events, issues, and developments in different spheres of human activity (i.e. economic, social, political, cultural). MWH.6 Illustrate and use geographic information with the implementation of a variety of scales, patterns of distribution, and arrangements. MWH.7 Interpret and evaluate information using complex geographic representations. MWH.8 - Hypothesize why places and regions are important to human identity and serve as symbols to unify or fragment society. MWH.9 Analyze and evaluate the impact of economic, cultural or environmental factors that result in changes to population of cities, countries, or regions MWH.10 - Determine how human modification of the physical environment in a place affects both that place and other places SSA.1 Ask questions that access prior knowledge, identify reasons to learn, and clarify key terms. SSA.2 Acquire and organize information by investigating multiple sources and recognizing patterns and trends. SSA.3 Analyze by evaluating opposing claims, interpreting ideas, synthesizing information, and formulating a thesis. SSA.4 Apply learning through communication and problem solving skills in order to contribute to the betterment of personal, community and global circumstances.

Academic/Content Vocabulary: Social Development Physical Environment Political Development Chinese Revolution of 1911 Mexican Revolution of 1911 –1917 Russian Revolution of 1917

Economic Development Indigenous populations Nationalism Colonialism Imperialism Isolationism Industrial Revolution Units of Study:

WWI Treaty of Versailles Chinese Communist Revolution of 1949 Japanese Expansion Nazism The Holocaust

1. Understanding and using basic geographic information – 2 weeks 2. Western Europe in the Modern World – 7 weeks 3. The Rise & Fall of the Soviet Union – 4 weeks 4. The Middle East – 4 weeks* 5. Modern Africa – 5 weeks 6. Modern China & Japan* -4 7. Modern Latin America* - 4 * These units will be available in September 2009 Adopted Core Materials:

In 2007, the PPS School Board approved the following texts for adoption and purchase for the English 1-2 course. These texts are in addition to the Core Works listed on a previous page.
History Alive! Modern World History Program TCI Modern World History: Pattern of Interaction –McDougal Littell-2007 This includes a teacher edition and a CD-ROM that includes all the ancillary resources. • Easyplanner includes Pdf’s of all resources categorized by uint, chapter, and section. • Presentation Pro – Interactive visual resources. • Test generator

Perthes World Atlas. - McGraw Hill World and U.S. Map Set - Nystrom *If you do not have access to these adopted resources, please first contact your librarian or book clerk, and then contact the Textbook office.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY

MAP SKILLS

Subject Area: Social Studies

Course: MWH

CRN:2707

Unit Title: Understanding and using basic geographic information Stage 1 – Desired Results Established Goals/Standard(s): MWH.6 Illustrate and use geographic information with the implementation of a variety of scales, patterns of distribution, and arrangements. MWH.5-Recognize, assess, and interpret relationships among events, issues, and developments in different spheres of human activity. (i.e. economic, social, political, cultural) Key Vocabulary: Map Projection, Longitude, Latitude, Coordinates, Prime Meridian, International Dateline, Equator, Hemisphere Perspective, Scale, Tropic of Capricorn, Tropic of Cancer. Big Ideas and Enduring Understandings: Students will understand that… Maps are not just a presentation of facts but are affected by the map makers’ perspective. Essential Questions: How are maps the product of the map makers’ perspective?

Learning Target(s) I will know… …the locations of major physical features on a world map.

Learning Target(s) Students will be able to… Identify how a map might illustrate the map makers perspective. Identify the longitude and latitude of locations on maps. Locate major physical features on a map of the world. Analyze maps for bias (perspective Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence

Culminating Assessment: Map enlargement project

Other Evidence: Pre-Test Post-test Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Lesson Plans 1. Tear the World -1, 45 minutes period 2. Pre-Test – 20 minutes 3. PowerPoint presentation: Map Basics – 1, 45 minute period 4. Map enlargement project – 4, 45 minute periods 5. Post –Test – 20 minutes Approximately equivalent to 7- 45 min class periods.

TEAR THE WORLD

In this activity, groups of 3 to 4 students will make a map of the world using only construction paper, a glue stick, and their own memory and perspective. This creative activity will assess student’s background knowledge of global physical geography and their sense of how the continents, oceans and other major geographic features are related to one another. The diverse student products are used as the subject of the follow up discussion about how maps are a product of the map maker’s perspective. Materials needed: 1. Two pieces of construction paper for each group of 3 or 4 students. Each group will need two different colors of construction paper, one to represent water and one to represent land. (I like to have several colors of paper for student choice) 2. One glue stick for every group. That’s all! Standard - MWH.6 Illustrate and use geographic information with the implementation of a variety of scales, patterns of distribution, and arrangements.
Vocabulary –Perspective, Projection, Centrism

Time Frame: 1- 45 min. class although it is better if you have an hour. Procedure (Teacher Instruction): 1. Make sure you cover up all maps on your walls. (You don’t want students to have hints as to what a world or regional maps look like.) 2. Get students into heterogeneous groups of 3 or 4. Have group members choose 1.“A lead presenter 2. “Someone in charge of the materials”. 3. Give direction for activity: A. Using only the two pieces of construction paper and the glue stick create a map of the world. i. Choose one piece of paper to represent the oceans and other water. Make the continents out of the other piece. ii. No scissors allowed, you must tear the paper. (Teacher tears a piece of construction paper.) iii. You may not look at maps of any type while you are making yours. iv. Answer questions and expect a lot of complaining, but students will soon settle down and get to work once they get their materials. v. Inform students that they have 20 minutes (modify for specific students) to complete their map 4. Have the “Students in charge of materials” for each group collect two sheets of construction paper and glue stick. 5. Groups work for approx. 20 minutes creating their map. 6. All groups post their maps on walls.

7. Groups present their map to the rest of the class identifying the main features such as oceans and continents as well as other specifics. Encourage individuals to offer information based on what you observe them doing during the work time. (There will most likely be lots of laughter from the class when some things are identified. It turns out that all groups make funny mistakes or representations and this is part of the point of the activity.) 8. Have student write a few sentences on the two following in their student interactive notebook. A. Describe some of the things these maps have in common. B. Identify and give an example of major differences between some of these maps. 9. Have student pair/share the above with a partner. (It is best if they talk to someone who was not in their group.) 10. Reveal your classroom map of the world and let students process this additional information for just a couple minutes. 11. Whole class discussion based on student writing. The idea that maps are the product of perspective is the main idea that come out of this discussion and the teacher can help attach vocabulary (Perspective, Projection, Centrism, and even Nationalism) to the ideas. The relative size and placement of the continents, countries and other features is is usually a major focus. This can lead to robust discussions about perspective, projection and centrism of all kinds. For example, students generally make the U.S., and North America, much larger in relation to other countries and continents. Students who grew up in other countries tend to exaggerate the size of the place they came from. Is the U.S. in the middle of any of the maps? Why? 12. Students write and an exit ticket answering the following. What is the most interesting and/or important information or idea you learned about maps during this activity?

SHOW POWERPOINT AND DISCUSS AS NECESSARY.

1. Seattle, Washington 2. New Orleans, Louisiana 3. Quito, Ecuador 4. Mexico City, Mexico 5. Cape Town, South Africa 6. Mogadishu, Somalia 7. Tokyo, Japan 8. Beijing, China 9. Moscow, Russia 10.Lisbon Portugal 11.Lima Peru 12.Oslo Norway

A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. k. l.

47oN, 29.5oN, 0, 19oN, 33oS, 2 N, 33oN, 39.5oN, 55 N, 38oN, 12oS, 59.5oN,
o o o

122oW 90oW 78 W 99oW 18oE 45 E 139oE 116oE 37 E 9oW 77oW 10.5oE
o o o

Map Enlargement Project 1.
2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Choose one of the base maps provided by your teacher. Cylindrical projections are easier and conic and other projections are more difficult. Draw either 1” or .5” grid lines over your base map. Be sure to use a colored pencil or pen. Get a big sheet of poster board and put either 3” or (better) 1.5” grids on it in PENCIL. Put the same Alfa-numeric numbering system on both. Numbers for columns and letters for rows. Going from square to square copy what is in the small map to what is on the large map being sure that what is in say “5d” on the little map is in “5d” of the big one. Label of your map with the required features listed below.
A. Latitude, Longitude, Distance, and Direction : Label the Followin

•Compass Rose •Scale •Prime Meridian, O° Longitude •International Dateline •Equator, 0° Latitude •Hemispheres (4) •Tropics of Capricorn at 23.5° S. Latitude •Tropic of Cancer at 23.5° North Latitude •Prime Meridian, O° Longitude •International Dateline B. Physical Features
1. North America 2. South America 3. Africa 4. Asia 5. Europe 6. Australia 7. Antarctica 8. Pacific Ocean 9. Atlantic Ocea 10. Indian Ocean 11. Arctic Ocean

•Equator, 0° Latitude •Hemispheres (4) •Tropics of Capricorn at 23.5° S. Latitude •Tropic of Cancer at 23.5° North Latitude •Prime Meridian, O° Longitude •International Dateline •Equator, 0° Latitude •Hemispheres (4) •Tropics of Capricorn at 23.5° S. Latitude •Tropic of Cancer at 23.5° North Latitude

12. North Sea 13. Mediterranean Sea 14. Arabian Sea 15. Sea of Japan 16. Bearing Sea 17. Red Sea 18. Caribbean Sea 19. Persian Gulf 20. Gulf of Mexico 21. Gulf of Alaska

C. Thematic layer (Demographic or natural feature
Sample Grading Guide for Map Enlargement Project First Impression (Unapologetically subjective):

What is the first impression? Does it look like an accurate depiction of the world? Is this high quality work? Is this a piece you and I can be proud of? A B C D F 10-9 8 7 6 5-0
Wow, beautiful, deserves to be framed and hung on a wall with pride Fairly accurate, reasonably expressed Not perfect by any means, but complete, not great, not terrible either Not pretty, not necessarily accurate, complete or nearly so Ouch, ugly, incomplete, grossly inaccurate

Complete: Are all major landforms expressed? Is map labeled with required place geography? A B C D F 10-9 8 7 6 5-0
Complete and accurately labeled 8/10 items are labeled accurately May be incompletely labeled or have an inaccuracy or two Incompletely labeled or careless errors in labeling Incomplete to not labeled

Workmanship: Is the map carefully crafted? Are reference and working lines erased cleanly? Does the map accurately represent the proportions and placement of the original? Is the map neat? Has it been carefully handled? Does it reflect attention and careful execution of detail? Did you sweat the big and small aspects of this project? A B C D F 10-9 8 7 6 5-0
Exceptionally, crisp, accurate, cleanly rendered, reflects great effort Neat, no glaring inaccuracies, not overtly sloppy, reflects effort Sloppy in places, some inaccuracies; skimped on time, care, and effort Sloppy, inaccuracies easily detected, working lines left displayed Proportions glaringly wrong, sloppy, crumpled, drawn freehand

Key and/Legend: Does your map use color or symbols to represent demographic and/or physical features effectively? Is the information easy to read and understand? Is it accurate? Is it significant information to you or this class in Modern World History? Does use of symbol/color add to the map or confuse, muddy, and detract from the map? A B C D F 10-9 8 7 6 5-0
Clearly and accurately shows demographic information, easy to read, adds to value and interest to map as a piece of visual art Conceptually clear but not precise or usable, neither adds nor detracts from map as a piece of visual art Either unclear or not accurate enough to really work but shows that you were playing around with the use of symbol/color to represent more information Unclear, not labeled, grossly inaccurate, overly sloppy. Map would be better if this had been left out. Incomplete representation Unclear, not labeled, grossly inaccurate, overly sloppy. Map would be better if this had been left out. Not Present or substantially incomplete.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY

EUROPEAN MODERNIZATION

Subject Area: Social Studies Unit Title: European Modernization

Course: Modern World History

CRN: 2707

Stage 1 – Desired Results Established Goals/Standard(s): HS.1.1 Reconstruct, interpret, and represent the chronology of significant events, developments, and narratives from history. HS.2.1 Compare and contrast institutions and ideas in history, noting cause and effect relationships. HS.3.1 Recognize and interpret continuity and/or change with respect to particular historical developments in the 20th century. HS.4.1 Evaluate how contemporary perspectives affect historical interpretation. HS.5.1-Recognize assess and interpret relationships among events, issues, and developments in different spheres of human activity (i.e. economic, social, political, cultural).

SSA.1 Ask questions that access prior knowledge, identify reasons to learn, and clarify key terms. SSA.2 Acquire and organize information by investigating multiple sources and recognizing patterns and trends. SSA.3 Analyze by evaluating opposing claims, interpreting ideas, synthesizing information, and formulating a thesis. SSA.4 Apply learning through communication and problem solving skills in order to contribute to the betterment of personal, community and global circumstances.

Big Ideas and Enduring Understandings: Students will understand that… Much of what defines the modern world developed in Western Europe during the last five centuries. During this unit you will study four key historical themes that have profoundly shaped the history of Europe and the entire world. These themes are (1) the development of modern political systems, (2) the Industrial Revolution, (3) European Imperialism, and (4) war in the modern world. As you study each of these historical developments you will actively assess in what ways modernization brought true progress. In addition, you will assess the human costs associated with modernization, judging for yourself if progress is indeed the right world for the modern history of Western Europe. Learning Target(s) I will know… • How nationalism contributed to the outbreak of the World Wars. • Nazism • Isolationism • Holocaust • How the Treaty of Versailles ended World War I yet contributed to the

Essential Question: To what extent should the history of modern Western Europe be praised or condemned?

Learning Target(s) I will be able to… • Apply evidence to a thesis statement • Write a persuasive essay • Write a historical narrative • Reconstruct, interpret, and represent the chronology of significant events, developments, and narratives from history. • Compare and contrast institutions and ideas in history, noting cause and effect relationships.

outbreak of WWII.

Recognize and interpret continuity and/or change with respect to particular historical developments in the 20th century. • Evaluate how contemporary perspectives affect historical interpretation. • Recognize assess and interpret relationships among events, issues, and developments in different spheres of human Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Other Evidence: • Debating the Ideal Form of Government • Storybook on the French Revolution • Editorial on Investigating the Effects of the Industrial Revolution • Tests from Modern World History Assessment bank

Culminating Assessment: Museum to Evaluate Modern World History Test Generator

Stage 3 – Learning Plan Lesson Plans Pre-Assessment *<1 day 1. Debating the Ideal Form of Government: A Meeting of Minds (TCI Western Europe 1.2) 2. Experiencing the Fervor of the French Revolution (TCI Western Europe 1.3) 3. Creating a Storybook on the French Revolution (TCI Western Europe 1.4) 4. Rise of Industrialization (TCI Western Europe 2.1) 5. Investigating the Effects of the Industrial Revolution (TCI Western Europe 2.2) 6. The Quest for Empire: Analyzing European Motives (TCI Western Europe 3.2) 7. The First World War: European Tensions Ignited (TCI Western Europe 4.1) 8. World War II Events: Predicting European Responses (TCI Western Europe 4.2) 9. Night and Fog: A Documentary Analysis of the Holocaust 10. Designing a Museum to Evaluate European Modernization (TCI Western Europe 5) Post-Assessment *1 day

*3 days *3 days *5 days *2 days *5 days *5 days *2 days *3 days *3 days *5 days

*These estimated times are based on the experience of classroom teachers using these materials. This 8 week unit (based on 5-45 min. periods per week) is the longest in this curriculum guide and lays much historic, political, and social groundwork for the other units.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY Debating the Ideal Form of Government: A Meeting of the Minds: Lesson #1

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: European Modernization Title: Debating the Ideal Form of Government: A Meeting of the Minds Time Frame: Three 45 minute periods Learning Targets: I will… • Compare and contrast differing styles and ideologies of government • Debate the ideal form of government • Write about the ideal form of government Academic/Content Vocabulary: Democracy, Republic, Louis IV, Versailles, Autocracy, Divine Right, Women’s Rights, Human nature, separation of powers, Evidence of Student Learning: Debate of the Ideal Form of Government Matrix of student notes Answer to writing prompt: You are president of the United States. Which of the panel members would you invite to be your chief advisor? Why? Procedures: 1. Refer to procedures in Western Europe in the Modern World p. 7-44 There are primary source documents included in the adopted materials which could be given to some groups to help them prepare for the conference. These include: “Louis XIV’s Advice to His Son” In-Depth Resources Unit 2 p. 10 “The Social Contract” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau In-Depth Resources Unit 2 p. 34 “Two Treatises on Government” by John Locke In-Depth Resources Unit 2 p.35 “A Vindication of the Rights of Woman” by Mary Wollstonecraft In-Depth Resources Unit 2 p.37 “Writing the Science of Government” by Baron de Montesquieu In-Depth Resources Unit 2 p.42 Students complete a SOAPS on the document for their group.

2. Read Chapter 6 Section 2 in Modern World History.
Reading Study Guide Ch. 6 Sec. 2

MODERN WORLD HISTORY Experiencing the Fervor of the French Revolution: Lesson #2 Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: European Modernization Title: Experiencing the Fervor of the French Revolution Time Frame: Three 45 minute periods Learning Target: I will… Empathize with oppressed peoples Explain the basic chronology of the French Revolution Academic/Content Vocabulary: Old Regime, estate, Louis VXI, Marie Antoinette, Estates General, National Assembly, Tennis Court Oath, Great Fear, Legislative Assembly, emigire, sansculotte, Jacobin, guillotine, Maximillien Robespierre, Reign of Terror, Napoleon Bonaparte, coup d’etat, plebiscite, lycee, concordant, Napoleonic Code, Battle of Trafalgar, Democracy, Republic, Louis XIV, Versailles, Enlightenment, Salon, Declaration of Rights of Man, Reign of Terror, Bourgeoisie, Meeting Estate General, Comm. Of Public Safety, Vote by Order Scorched Earth Policy Evidence of Student Learning: Class notes on historical summary Journal entries Reading notes from text

Procedures: 1. Refer to pages 45-85 in TCI Western Europe in the Modern World. 2. Read chapter 7 in Modern World History with guided reading notes. Use the “Taking Notes” suggestions on p. 217, 222, 229, 234, 238 or use the following “Reading Study Guides” RSG 7.1 RSG 7.2 RSG 7.3 RSG 7.4 RSG 7.5 There are primary source documents in the adopted materials which pair nicely with “Experiencing the Fervor of the French Revolution.” In the appended packet of documents After Stage One: “Plight of the French Peasants” After Stage Two: “Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen” In appended packet of documents After Stage Three: “The Execution of Louis XVI” by Firmont In-Depth Materials p.59 “Republic of Virtue” Maximilian Robespierre, In the appended packet of documents Students complete a SOAPS on selected documents.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY European Modernization: Lesson #3 Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: European Modernization Title: Creating A Storybook About the French Revolution Time Frame: Five 45 minute periods Learning Target(s): I will… Write a historical narrative

Academic/Content Vocabulary: Financial Crisis, vote by order, Third Estate, Meeting of the Estates General, Tennis Court Oath, Storming of Bastille, March of Versaille, The Reign of Terror, The Rise of Napoleon Evidence of Student Learning: Storybook on the French Revolution Procedures: 1. Refer to procedure in TCI Western Europe in the Modern World p. 86-95. Suggested changes to procedures: 1. Allow students to complete the project individually. Writing is a personal process and individual work allows for more exploration. 2. Follow the procedures for the “Writing Process” given in the 9th grade writing toolkit. 3. Consider modifying and assigning as homework

MODERN WORLD HISTORY The Rise of Industrialization: Lesson 4

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Western Europe in the Modern World Title: The Rise of Industrialization Time Frame: Two 45 minute periods Learning Target(s): I will… Explain the basic chronology of the Industrial Revolution

Academic/Content Vocabulary: Industrial Revolution, enclosure, crop rotation, industrialization, factors of production, factory, entrepreneur, urbanization, middle class, stock, corporation, laissez faire, Adam Smith, capitalism, utilitarianism, socialism, Karl Marx, communism, union, strike, Agricultural Revolution, Steam engine’s impact, Railroad benefits Evidence of Student Learning: Discussion of slides Student notes Illustrated flow chart Procedures: 1. Refer to “The Rise of Industrialism” in TCI Western Europe in the Modern World 2. Reading Chapter Nine in Modern World History. Have the students take guided notes. Chapter 9 Reading Study Guide 3. Consider Screening the Film: The Day the Universe Changed #6: The Factory and Marketplace Revolution (V02132) This film parallels the material in the slide lecture with an emphasis on the interrelatedness of various factors that contributed to industrialization. Lends itself to the flow-chart notes students are asked to construct in the TCI lesson. The document “Britain’s Industrial Advantages and the Factory System” in the appended documents reinforces this material and does so from the perspective of a contemporary.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY LESSON TEMPLATE Investigating the Effects of the Industrial Revolution: Lesson #5 Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: European Modernization Title: Investigating the Effects of the Industrial Revolution Time Frame: Five 45 minute periods Learning Target(s): I will… Write an editorial Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of industrialization Academic/Content Vocabulary: Urbanization, middle class Evidence of Student Learning: Notetaking Matrix Political cartoon on reform Editorial on the Industrial Revolution (Lends itself to Common Assignment)

Procedures: 1. Refer to pages 122-142 in TCI Western Europe in the Modern World Suggested changes to procedures: 1. Pair primary source documents with stations for the activity “The Opening of the Liverpool to Manchester Railway” In-Depth Resources Unit 3 p. 9 pairs with Urbanization “Testimony on Child Labor in Britain” In-Depth Resources Unit 3 p.10 pairs with Child Labor “Sadler Commission of Child Labor” Another excerpt from the same Parliamentary hearings exerted above and in the appended documents also pairs with Child Labor “Prostitution in Victorian London” Henry Mayhew, pairs well and with adds depth and intensity to both changing Role of Women and Changing Class Structure 2. Follow the writing process outlined in the 9th grade writing binder to complete the editorial. This is a well scaffolded writing assignment in a persuasive form. It lends itself to the common assignment.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY The Quest for Empire: Analyzing Imperial Motives: Lesson #6

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: European Modernization Title: The Quest for Empire: Analyzing Imperial Motives Time Frame: Five 45 minute periods Learning Target(s): I will… •Explain what is imperialism and colonialism •Analyze primary and secondary source documents to discover why Europe seized continents and races of people, then exploited them in vast empires toward the end of the 19th/C. Academic/Content Vocabulary: Imperialism, Colonialism, racism, social Darwinism, Berlin Conference, Paternalism, assimilation, indirect control, direct control, resistance movements, “Jewel of Crown,” Great Trek Evidence of Student Learning: Note matrix Spectrum of motives Procedures: 1. Students review Chapter 11, Sections 1 & 2 individually or in small groups a. Have students create spoke diagram notes from the text that illustrate the Academic/Content Vocabulary i. With spokes showing a relation of one term to another ii. The terms themselves are defined with an analysis of why it is significant with regards to the topic b. Consider having students make copies of the maps on page 343 i. Have students answer the following questions that go to defining imperialism and explaining how it was accomplished: 1. Geography skill builder questions at the bottom of page 343 2. What factors allowed for the political map of Africa to be so radically changed so quickly 2. Refer to the procedures on pages 166-173 in TCI Western Europe in the Modern World. This lesson explains the motives for European Imperialism. 3. Consider reading, writing SOAPS, and discussing the appended “Imperialism” selected primary source documents or others that illustrate the motives and human consequences of the “New Imperialism”. 4. Screen Film: Peoples Century: Freedom Now a. Have students Label a page of their Notebook: “Freedom Now” Video Levels of Questions. (Levels of Questions Analysis Directions) i. Have students pose three level one, two level two, and one level three question as they watch the film. ii. After the film use the questions to structure a discussion of the film, steered toward questions of how independence was accomplished and the problems it has saddled former colonies with in recent times. Document “Mohandas Gandhi: Passive Resistance” and “Ho Chi Minh: Declaration of Independence of the Republic of Vietnam” pair nicely with this film.v

MODERN WORLD HISTORY LESSON TEMPLATE The First World War: European Tensions Ignited: Lesson #7 Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: European Modernization Title: The First World War: European Tensions Ignited Time Frame: Two 45 minute periods Learning Target(s): I will… Explain the causes and outcomes of WWI Explain how the Treaty of Versailles contributed to a “flawed peace”

Academic/Content Vocabulary: Militarism, Triple Alliance, Kaiser Wilhelm II, Triple Entente, Central Powers, Allies, Western Front, Schlieffen Plan, Trench Warfare, Eastern Europe, unrestricted submarine warfare, total war, rationing, propaganda, armistice, Woodrow Wilson, Georges Clemenceau, Fourteen Points, self-determination, Treaty of Versailles, League of Nations, “Powder keg of Europe”, Fourteen Points, War Guilt Clause, Triple Alliance, Triple Entente Evidence of Student Learning: Student notes Powder Keg notes Weapon notes Alternate ending to Dulce et Decorum Est Soldier faces notes Negotiators’ face notes Procedures: 1. Refer to pages 176-202 in TCI Western Europe in the Modern World

Read chapter 13 in Modern World History. Complete guided note taking and literacy activities on each section. Use the “Taking Notes” suggestions on p.407,411, 417, and 424 or use following Reading Study Guides RSG 13.1 RSG 13.2 RSG 13.3 RSG 13.4

MODERN WORLD HISTORY World War II: Predicting European Responses: Lesson #8 Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Western Europe in the Modern World Title: World War II: Predicting European Responses Time Frame: Three 45 minute periods Learning Target(s): I will… Predict allied responses to Germany’s aggression

Academic/Content Vocabulary: Nonaggression pact, blitzkrieg, Charles de Gaulle, Winston Churchill, Battle of Britain, Erwin Rommel, Atlantic Charter, Dwight D Eisenhower, Battle of Stalingrad, D-Day, Battle of the Bulge, Kamikaze, Unstable new democracies Fascism, Nationalism, Mussolini, Nazism, Nazi Party, Axis, US Isolationism, Sudetenland, Invasion of Poland, Kristalnact, Final Solution, Holocaust Evidence of Student Learning: Discussion of Events 1-8 Written responses to each event Report card for Allies’ responses to Germany’s actions Procedures: 1. Refer to page 203 in TCI Western Europe in the Modern World. For smaller classes, eliminate the group for Switzerland. 2. Read pages 491-496 and 506-513.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY Holocaust through Historical Documents: Lesson #9 Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Western Europe in the Modern World Title: Holocaust Through Historical Documents Time Frame: Three 45 minute periods Learning Target(s): I will… Evaluate the primary source documents on the Holocaust Apply the concepts of the Holocaust to current events Academic/Content Vocabulary: Holocaust, Nazism, Nationalism, Other??? Evidence of Student Learning: SOAPS Analysis Sheet Procedures:

1. Follow the attached procedures for the film “Night and Fog.” 2. Complete a SOAPS on Holocaust primary source documents.

Night and Fog (Alain Resnais 1955)
Summary and Rationale This powerful exploration of the Holocaust is like a long poem, an ode to the horrors of man’s abilities to hurt one another. While it provides facts, statistics, and dates like any other documentary, Night and Fog transcends many other Holocaust texts mainly because of its narration, written by poet Jean Cayrol, a political prisoner during the war, delivered in an allknowing, but world-weary and detached manner and its stark and shocking visual track. Made only ten years after the end of World War II, the film, which focuses on the concentration camps and the “final solution,” is extremely explicit and you should take care to preview the film ahead of time, but the explicitness of the images is exactly the point: we cannot forget the Holocaust because the ability to commit these atrocities lies within mankind and is not limited to the events of this one war. The film is only 32 minutes, though it feels much longer (in a good way), so I actually tend to show the film twice. After we do some of the previewing activities below, students watch the film once without any note taking, interruption or discussion. Whenever my colleague Dave Lickey teaches this film, after the viewing, he suggests silence: no talking, writing, or discussion; he likes to time it so that class ends just as the film does so that students are forced to see the real world through the lens of the horrors they have just seen. For me, I like to ask them to journal their initial thoughts and feelings, though I, too, like this to be done in silence. There has never been a class that is not profoundly and deeply affected by what they have seen: be prepared for anger, tears, and confusion. When students watch it a second time, I ask them to pay attention to the construction of the film and the details noted below, particularly the narration and the contrasting use the director’s use of primary and archival footage.

A Holocaust study is a mandatory part of many districts’ curricula, and I have generally taught this film as part of my regular 10th grade class, which has a world culture focus. An English and History teacher could easily team up with this film, each class viewing it for different, but related purposes. Previewing 1. While it might seem amazing that students come to high school with little knowledge of World War II and the Holocaust, I have stopped being surprised after years of blank looks when I ask about “the final solution,” so I start with a KWL chart about various topics: concentration camps, causes of the war, Allied and Axis powers, etc. After the “K” part of the chart, you can ask students to conduct a brief internet research on further topics that they need to know in order to understand the film, witch they put under the “W” column. After they share their research, have students fill out the “L” portion of their chart. 2. What is “evil”? This is an essential question for the class to discuss since too often we say that the Holocaust happened because Hitler was evil, but as the film suggests, the evil is within humanity and we need to be ever vigilant of evil within ourselves. 3. Read the following section of the narration from the film written by poet and survivor Jean Cayrol, and ask students to identify and describe the speaker of the passage. What is the tone? Theme? What images come to mind? “At the moment I speak to you, the icy water of the ponds and ruins is filling up the hollows of the charnel house. A water as cold and murky as our own bad memories. War is napping, but with one eye always open.” Viewing Day: 0:00:00-0:32:03; all chapters on DVD (about 32 minutes) • • Begins with opening scene Ends with closing credits

Things to Notice As I noted above, I think that it is essential that they have at least one viewing that uninterrupted, but once students have seen the film already, I pause it at various times to discuss certain points. The following are some of the key parts of the film that you might want to note upon second viewing: Time Code 0:01:43 Description/Comment The first shots seem appear to be of a beautiful, open landscape, until the camera moves downward to reveal that we are behind a barbed wire fence. Each of the initial camera movements starts in the open and moves toward and in the camps with the wire dominating the frame. The narration repeats the word “ordinary” and notes that it is silent now with “no footstep heard but our own.” It is clear that the director wants us to be here in the present day, long after the atrocities 0:02:56 for a reason, though we may not know why just yet. The first switch to black and white signaled with a drumbeat and images of the Nazi party (many taken from Triumph of the Will) gaining power, but the film quickly returns to the concentration camps, focusing on the construction and mechanisms of the camps 0:07:15 and including archival footage of people boarding the trains. A piece of narration here always strikes me as odd. As the trains pull away, a piece of paper falls out of one of the cars, and the narrator says, “A message flutters to the ground. Will it be found?” The narrator is clearly not an objective one and he also appears to be commenting on the actual footage included in the finished film, not just on the historical events that the film is recounting. It’s a good place to discuss the role of this narrator and contrast him to a typical

0:07:35-0:10:54

narrator in a historical, expository documentary. We return to the present tense, signified by the color pictures of the “same tracks…looking for what?” The color images are now beginning to be established as our conscience: our need to know and understand what happened in the black and white images. As the narrator asks later (0:09:14): “Who does know anything?” We begin to notice that there are no living, moving things in any of these color pictures. The camera, though, never stops moving in the color shots.

0:12:20-0:12:50

It is, perhaps, continuing to search for something. Listen to the music – slow, mournful – in the past images of prisoners starving, contrasted with the more strident, angry tones of the present images of the latrines. The music in this film is continuing changing,

0:16:00

keeping us unsettled. Images and descriptions of contrast again: men staying sharp intellectually with letters, politics, and religion v. their bodies

0:20:20

withering away from hunger and exhaustion. 1942: plans are made to convert the prisoner camps into death camps as the Final Solution is put into place: the gas chambers and crematoriums. The images become steadily more graphic and explicit. The shots in color explore the intricate details of the mechanisms of the camps, sometimes slowing down just enough to

0:26:00-0:28:20

let certain details sink in. These are some of the toughest images in the film where the Nazi explore various ways of disposing the bodies of the dead and to utilize whatever they can from them to use in the war effort. Then, once the camps are liberated, the Allies – and we – see mountains of corpses. We know all of this, of course; we’ve read about it, but

seeing the sheer numbers of dead has a paralyzing effect. I rewatched this sequence three times until I remembered to write about it. When the narrator says, “All the doors,” we see lines of German female soldiers leaving the camps, healthy, well-fed, and clean contrasted with the skeletal corpses being thrown into common 0:29:17 graves. The ending of the film begins here when a camp’s Kapo, officer, and commandant each say, according to the narrator, “I am not responsible.” Over another picture of the mountain of corpses, the 0:29:56-end narrator asks, “Then who is responsible?” We stay in the present tense for the rest of the film. The narration here includes the section that students looked at before beginning the film about “war is napping” and also says that the “faithful grass has come up again” which implies that we are in danger of forgetting what happened here as soon as the grass comes in to cover things up. As the narrator delivers the final section (see Fig #), we see the wreckage of the camps and as the camera finally comes to a halt, we hear the words that implore us toward vigilance. Discussion Questions 1. Complete a SOAPStone for the final portion of the narration (see Fig. #) and write an analysis of the theme and tone. 2. How is this film similar or different from other Holocaust films you have seen? 3. Describe the delivery of the narration. How does the narrator’s tone of voice, pace, and diction affect the audience? 4. Select a particularly powerful image on the visual track. Why was it included and how does it relate to something you heard on the audio track?

Closing Questions/Activities
1. In groups, research contemporary genocides before or since the Holocaust. Unfortunately, there are no shortages of possibilities: Armenians, Iraqi Kurds, Cambodia, Bosnia, Rwanda, Darfur, etc. Did the world learn not to forget the lessons of the Holocaust that this film suggests it must? Read excerpts from A Problem from Hell: America in the Age of Genocide by Samantha Power, which addresses this topic. 2. Philosopher Theodor Adorno wrote that “to write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric.” What do you think that he meant by this and is it true? Read examples of Holocaust poetry, from such writers as Miklos Radnoti, Primo Levi, Paul Celan. How does this poetry fit with Adorno’s statement? 3. Select a Holocaust poem and imagine that it were the narration for a documentary. Create a storyboard for it. What images, sounds, and graphics would you use and why? 4. Watch scenes from Schindler’s List, The Pianist, Life is Beautiful, or another Holocaust fiction film. How does a fictional representation of the Holocaust differ from a documentary? Are your feelings similar or different as you watch the fiction film as when you watch a non-fiction film on the subject? Why or why not?

Night and Fog Analysis (Fig. #)
Re-read the final portion of the narration of the film, complete a SOAPStone for this passage only, and then write an analysis of how the tone of the piece reflects the theme.
The crematorium is no longer in use. The devices of the Nazis are out of date. Nine million dead haunt this landscape. Who is on the lookout from this strange tower to warn us of the coming of new executioners? Are their faces really different from our own? Somewhere among us, there are lucky Kapos, reinstated officers, and unknown informers. There are those who refused to believe this, or believed it only from

time to time. And there are those of us who sincerely look upon the ruins today, as if the old concentration camp monster were dead and buried beneath them. Those who pretend to take hope again as the image fades, as though there were a cure for the plague of these camps. Those of us who pretend to believe that all this happened only once, at a certain time and in a certain place, and those who refuse to see, who do not hear the cry to the end of time.

Speaker Occasion Audience Purpose Subject Tone
Analysis

MODERN WORLD HISTORY Designing a Museum Project on Western Europe: Lesson #10

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Western Europe in the Modern World Title: Designing a Museum Project on Western Europe Time Frame: Five 45 minute periods Learning Target(s): I will… Evaluate the success of European modernization Apply evidence to a thesis Write persuasively Academic/Content Vocabulary: Evidence of Student Learning: Museum Project on Western Europe Procedures: 1. Refer to procedures on page 267 in TCI Western Europe in the Modern World. Alternate Procedures: These procedures were written under the guiding principle that culminating work should the taught not assigned. It also assumes that students have more freedom in their writing if they write individually. Students will choose one topic and complete on museum exhibit individually.

1. Give modified assignment sheet to students. This assignment sheet allows students to 2.
pick one topic to create a museum exhibit on. Read through assignment sheet with students and answer any questions they have. Divide students into groups and give each group an example of an exhibit. Students examine the exhibit in groups and fill out “Evaluating Museum Projects.” After each group has examined some exhibits, project each exhibit and discuss what works in each exhibit. Pass out a “Rough Draft of Museum Exhibit” to each student. Each student individually chooses their own topic and writes the plaque. Pair share and have a few students share out with the class. Encourage students to read, not summarize, what they have written. Students finish the rest of the brainstorming sheet in pairs or individually. Pass out a sheet to students telling them which assignments to examine to find information on their topic. Pass out the “Checklist for Completing Museum Projects.” Allow students adequate lab time to type captions and plaques and gather materials for poster. Allow time to assemble poster.

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Designing a Museum Exhibit on Modern Western Europe
The culminating project for this unit is to design a museum exhibit examining modern Western Europe that answers this question: To what degree should European modernization be praised or condemned? To do this, you will create an exhibit that contains one of the unit’s four main topics: ideal forms of government, industrialization, colonialism, and world wars. The exhibit, which you will construct on posterboard or butcher paper, must incorporate a variety of elements--- pictures, replications of art and artifacts, graphic displays, maps, primary –source documents, current events---to show to what degree each aspect of modernization should be praised or condemned. You will use materials accumulated throughout the unit---original writing, visuals, historical quotes---and resources collected through additional research.

Requirements
1. Your museum must be created to support your answer to this question: To what degrees should European modernization be praised or condemned? The museum should be comprised of one exhibit which addresses one of the aspects of modernization covered in the unit: • Rise of Democracy –French Revolution • Industrialization • Colonialism • World Wars- World War I and II 2. Each exhibit of your museum must combine at least four elements listed below. A caption should accompany each explaining how the information supports your answer to the project question. • Pictures -Collages • Diorama -Maps • Symbols -Replications of art and artifacts • Music -Important quotes • Charts and graphs -Copies of primary source documents • Timelines -Slide presentations • Computer-generated displays -Illustrations • Accounts of current events -Video presentations • Accounts of personal experience -Poetry 3. The exhibit in your museum must have a written plaque that introduces museum goers to the exhibit by providing 1) an introduction to the topic and 2) and explanation of how the historical information in the exhibit supports you answer to the question: To what degrees should European modernization be praised or condemned? The plaque should be two paragraphs in length.

Checklist for Completing Museum Exhibit on ________________
Step One: Fill out the Rough Draft of the Museum Project  Rough Draft of Museum Project on ___________________ Step Two: Finding Evidence and Resources  Find the resources and materials you need to represent your evidence. Print out any materials you will be using from the internet.  Gather all of your pieces of evidence together. See handout “Designing a Museum Project” for ideas. Step Three: Writing  Re-write your plaque – a one to two paragraph overview of your ideas on your exhibit’s topic. It is the first box on your “Rough Draft of the Museum Project.” Your plaque also contains your thesis.  Re-write a caption for each piece of evidence. The caption must explain how your evidence answers the question “To what degree should ____________ be praised or condemned?” The caption should be 3-4 sentences long. It is like the body paragraph in your essay.  Print your plaques and captions. Cut them out. Step Four: Assembling the Exhibit  Carefully and neatly attach all writing and evidence to your poster  Give your exhibit a title  Write your name on your exhibit

Rough Draft of Museum Exhibit for __________________
Unit Question: Should ______________ be praised or condemned? Directions: Use evidence from your notebook to complete a rough draft for a Museum Project Exhibit. Fill in each of the boxes with explanations or evidence.

Writing the Plaque
The Purpose of the plaque is to: o Introduce the reader to your topic o Explain your answer to the unit question to the reader Plaque: This is an overall description of your topic. What are key facts you should include in your introduction of ______________. Write one paragraph answering the unit question: Should ____________ be praised or condemned?

Write one paragraph answering the unit question: Should ____________ be praised or condemned?

Writing Captions
The point of a caption is to:  Explain the evidence  Explain the significance of the evidence  Explain how the evidence supports your thesis What was the thesis of your exhibit:

What is your evidence?

Explain and introduce your evidence:

What is the significance of your evidence (analysis):

How does this evidence support and prove your thesis?

Writing Captions
The point of a caption is to:  Explain the evidence  Explain the significance of the evidence  Explain how the evidence supports your thesis What was the thesis of your exhibit:

What is your evidence?

Explain and introduce your evidence:

What is the significance of your evidence (analysis):

How does this evidence support and prove your thesis?

Writing Captions
The point of a caption is to:  Explain the evidence  Explain the significance of the evidence  Explain how the evidence supports your thesis What was the thesis of your exhibit:

What is your evidence?

Explain and introduce your evidence:

What is the significance of your evidence (analysis):

How does this evidence support and prove your thesis?

Evaluating Museum Projects
Unit Question: To what degree should European modernization be praised or condemned? Number of Museum Project Does the exhibit have a plaque (1-2 paragraphs), a caption for each piece of evidence, and four pieces of evidence? Does the exhibit answer the unit question? What does it say? How many pieces of evidence does it have? What types are they? Does the evidence support their answer to the Unit Question? Why or why not? How would I improve the content of this exhibit?

MODE RN WOR LD HISTORY

AFRICA

Subject Area: Social Studies Unit Title: Modern Africa

Course: Modern World History

CRN:2707

Stage 1 – Desired Results Established Goals/Standard(s): MWH.1 Reconstruct, interpret, and represent the chronology of significant events, developments, and narratives from history. MWH.2 Compare and contrast institutions and ideas in history, noting cause and effect relationships. MWH.3 Recognize and interpret continuity and/or change with respect to particular historical developments in the 20th century. MWH.5-Recognize, assess, and interpret relationships among events, issues, and developments in different spheres of human activity (i.e. economic, social, political, cultural). MWH.8 - Hypothesize why places and regions are important to human identity and serve as symbols to unify or fragment society. MWH.9 Analyze and evaluate the impact of economic, cultural or environmental factors that result in changes to population of cities, countries, or regions. MWH.10 - Determine how human modification of the physical environment in a place affects both that place and other places. SSA.1 Ask questions that access prior knowledge, identify reasons to learn, and clarify key terms. SSA.2 Acquire and organize information by investigating multiple sources and recognizing patterns and trends. SSA.3 Analyze by evaluating opposing claims, interpreting ideas, synthesizing information, and formulating a thesis. SSA.4 Apply learning through communication and problem solving skills in order to contribute to the betterment of personal, community and global circumstances.

Key Vocabulary:
Social Development Nationalism Colonialism Imperialism Industrial Revolution Physical Environment Political Development Economic Development Indigenous Populations

Big Ideas and Enduring Understandings: Students will understand… The impact of European colonialism and imperialism on modern Africa. The motives behind European colonialism/imperialism.

Essential Questions: How does physical geography impact the development of a region? Do the former colonial powers owe modern Africa? How did the notions of Race play into the consolidation of power by the Europeans Were any of the motives for imperialism/ colonization justified? How will the critical issues facing modern African nations best be resolved?

Learning Target(s) I will know… I will know how to read map of Africa and locate key features such as countries. I will know the laws that created South African Apartheid. I will know the causes and effects of colonialism and imperialism. I will know the different styles of colonial control/management. I will be able to show how the Transatlantic slave trade impacted African society. I will know the different motives for European colonization in Africa. I will be able to show how Africans resisted European colonization. I will be able to show how African societies changed over the course of pre-colonial through post-colonial eras. I will be able to formulate and defend a thesis involving events in modern Africa.

Learning Target(s) Students will be able to… Students will access prior knowledge and clarify key terms Identify key geographic features in the continent of Africa and recognize their impact. Compare and contrast the diversity of precolonial African societies. Explore the motives behind European colonialism in Africa. Evaluate the different colonial governing methods (direct/indirect rule) and show how they impacted African society. Evaluate the impact of the Transatlantic slave trade on both the enslaved and African society. Recognize the cause and effect of European incursion into Africa and the African resistance to it. Analyze the societal and historical “arc” of pre-colonial through post-colonial African societies. Understand the cause and effect relationship between colonialism and the issues facing African nations today. Analyze key events/movements by evaluating opposing claims and formulating a thesis. Apply learning through communication and

problem solving skills.

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Culminating Assessment: Choose from the following. NOTE: This unit offers many different opportunities to assess student learning as they are learning. To assume that a single post-unit assessment truly measures student growth is questionable. That being said, here are the culminating assessment opportunities. sn 1.Document-based essay: Document 6 on page 80 and Documents 2-6 on pages 90-94 in the McDougal Littell Document Based Questions supplement. 2. Create a Political Cartoon that accurately depicts the relationship between The legacy of European colonialism and the troubles faced by modern African nations. 3. Write an essay in support or opposition of proposals to forgive the debt of economically fragile African nations. Support your views with the historical perspective of European colonialism and its impact on the development of modern Africa. Stage 3 – Learning Plan Lesson Plans 1. Explore the African Map 1-2 days 2. The Quest for Empire: Analyzing European Motives 2 days 3. Creating Illustrated Spoke Diagrams of pre-colonial Nigeria 2-3 days 4. Transatlantic Slave Trade/Amistad 2-3 days 5. Major Events in South Africa 1-2 days 6. Apartheid 4-5 days 7. Facing Colonialism: How would you Respond ? 2 days 8. A Conference on Independence: Planning Nigeria’s Future 2-4 days 9. Additional Resources/Case studies 10. Post-assessment 23 days plus assessment. 5 weeks Other Evidence: • Pre-assessment KWL on African geography KWL on African history/culture KWL on colonialism and imperialism

MODERN WORLD HISTORY Explore the Map of Africa: Lesson #1

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Africa Title: Explore the Map of Africa Time Frame: 1-2, 45 min. class periods Learning Target(s): MWH.8 The student will see the visual of the size of the African continent. The student will learn the names and locations of the countries of Africa Academic/Content Vocabulary: Physical Environment Indigenous populations Evidence of Student Learning: The student will fill in the names of each African Country on a blank continent map. (Blank Africa Outline Map, Political) Write in name of colonizing country on the current African Continent Map Procedures: To show the size of the African Continent Go to: http://strangemaps.wordpress.com/2006/11/20/35-the-size-of-africa/ It is suggested that you compare this map, showing the size of Africa, to the world map on pg 29 in the PETHES World Atlas, where Africa appears to be much smaller. Hand out a blank map of the continent of Africa pg 15 Outline Maps from MWH Geography Skills and Outline Maps source. (Blank Africa Outline Map, Political) Take student to a computer lab and have students go to: http://www.yourchildlearns.com/mappuzzle/africa-puzzle.html where the student will fill in the name of the country into the blank map. At the same time the student will place the outline of the country into the correct location on the map. The name of the country is visual when placed correctly on the map. Also, at the end of the activity, the time is shown on the screen for how long it took for the student to complete. Day 2: Have students work with a partner to compare this current map of Africa with the African map in the MWH book on pg 337, Colonial Claims. Label the map with the colonizing country from the 1900s. Suggested Questions that could be used by the teacher: What is the difference between the Colonial Map and your political map? Can we predict anything from these maps?

MODERN WORLD HISTORY: MODERN AFRICA The Quest for Empire: Analyzing European Motives: Lesson #2

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Modern Africa Title: The Quest for Empire: Analyzing European Motives Time Frame: Two 50-minute class periods Learning Target(s): MWH.3 Recognize and interpret continuity and/or change with respect to particular historical developments in the 20th century. MWH.5-Recognize, assess, and interpret relationships among events, issues, and developments in different spheres of human activity (i.e. economic, social, political, cultural). SSA.3 Analyze by evaluating opposing claims, interpreting ideas, synthesizing information, and formulating a thesis. To understand and assess the motives behind European colonization of Africa Academic/Content Vocabulary: Imperialism, Colonialism, Social Darwinism, Berlin Conference, “Scramble for Africa” Evidence of Student Learning: Completed chart on European motives Procedures: 1. Use political cartoon “The Mad Scramble for Africa” by David Bainbridge to discuss imperialism and the Berlin Conference. 2. Compare maps of Imperialism in Africa, 1878 and 1913 on p. 343 of MWH textbook. Discuss how the maps changed and have students come up with a list of possible reasons for the expansion of colonialism in Africa. 3. TCI Activity 3.2 from Western Europe in the Modern World. Additional resources: Chapter 11-1 The Scramble for Africa from MWH textbook, pp. 339-344 (suggested notes on p. 344) “To the Person Sitting in Darkness,” Mark Twain “On Colonies and Colonization,” John Stuart Mill (compare and contrast Twain’s and Mill’s views on colonialism) Excerpts from the Berlin Conference “The White Man’s Burden”, Rudyard Kipling “The Black Man’s Burden,” Edward Morel This Magnificent African Cake, video from PPS Multimedia Library

MODERN WORLD HISTORY Creating Illustrated Spoke Diagrams of Pre-colonial Nigeria: Lesson #3

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Modern Africa Title: Creating Illustrated Spoke Diagrams of Pre-colonial Nigeria Time Frame: 2-3 45 min. class periods Learning Target(s): MWH.1 Reconstruct, interpret, and represent the chronology of significant events, developments, and narratives from history. MWH.2 Compare and contrast institutions and ideas in history, noting cause and effect relationships. MWH.9 Analyze and evaluate the impact of economic, cultural or environmental factors that result in changes to population of cities, countries, or regions. Compare and contrast the diversity of pre-colonial African societies. Academic/Content Vocabulary: Social Development Indigenous populations Evidence of Student Learning: Successful completion of the spoke diagram activity and Venn diagram.

Procedures: Follow instructions for activity 2.1 in the TCI Modern Africa lesson guide.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY: Modern Africa The Transatlantic Slave Trade and La Amistad: Lesson #4

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Modern Africa Title: The Transatlantic Slave Trade and La Amistad Time Frame: 2-3 45 minute class periods Learning Target(s): MWH.1 Reconstruct, interpret, and represent the chronology of significant events, developments, and narratives from history. MWH.2 Compare and contrast institutions and ideas in history, noting cause and effect relationships. SSA.3 Analyze by evaluating opposing claims, interpreting ideas, synthesizing information, and formulating a thesis. Explore the motives behind European colonialism in Africa Evaluate the impact of the Transatlantic slave trade on both the enslaved and African society Recognize the cause and effect of European incursion into Africa and the African resistance to it Academic/Content Vocabulary: Colonialism Imperialism Evidence of Student Learning: Students will write a “letter” to McDougal Littell (the publishers of our textbook) opposing or supporting their decision to omit any mention of the Amistad Slave Revolt. Procedures: 1. Brainstorm what students know about the Atlantic slave trade 2. Introduce the textbook reading pages 132-136. Have the students complete the reading and pull out five key details from the reading. Or use Guided Reading Atlantic Slave Trade 3. Handout reading The Life of Olaudah Equiano (Unit 1 in-depth resources page 92) 4. Have students reflect on how Equiano’s account deepened their understanding of the slave trade. 5. Introduce the case study of the Amistad slave revolt. Interestingly, our text does not mention the event. Luckily, you can find plenty of info at www.amistad.mysticseaport.org and www.archives.gov/education/lessons/amistad Visit these sites beforehand and cull the resources you would like to use. In addition, United Streaming has a very good video titled Slave Ship that is 52 minutes long. This video can be shown in its entirety or in segments. 6. Students should take notes using either Cornell notes or Levels of Questioning to bolster their understanding of the event. 7. Question to the class “Should the Amistad Slave Revolt have been mentioned/included in the Atlantic Slave Trade section of the text?” Have students brainstorm their reasons in support or opposition to the lack of inclusion. 8. Students will choose a side and write a letter of no less than 150 but no more than 300 words to the publisher detailing their support or opposition their decision to omit the story of the Amistad Slave Revolt from the text. Persuasive Essay Rubric There are great strategies and graphic organizers in the TCI Writing Toolkit.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY: Modern Africa Major Events in South African History: Lesson 5

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Modern Africa Title: Major Events in South African History Time Frame: 1-2 class periods Learning Target(s): SSA.3 Analyze by evaluating opposing claims, interpreting ideas, synthesizing information, and formulating a thesis. MWH.1 Reconstruct, interpret, and represent the chronology of significant events, developments, and narratives from history. MWH.2 Compare and contrast institutions and ideas in history, noting cause and effect relationships. Evaluate the impact of the Transatlantic slave trade on both the enslaved and African society. Recognize the cause and effect of European incursion into Africa and the African resistance to it. Explore the motives behind European colonialism in Africa Academic/Content Vocabulary: Colonialism Imperialism Political development Indigenous populations Evidence of Student Learning: Successful completion of the short essay. Procedures: Photocopy Student Handout 3.2A (pages 100-102 in TCI Modern Africa Guide). The TCI lesson provides students the opportunity to finish each of the illustrations before each event. You can break students into six groups (one for each of the major events) and have them create a poster/overview of their Major Event and present it to the class. You could also just have students read in pairs or alone and then complete a brief write-up addressing the following prompt “Which of the Major Events in South African History had the greatest impact on its history?” or “Compare and contrast two of the major events in South African history.”

MODERN WORLD HISTORY: Modern Africa Apartheid: Lesson #6

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Africa Title: Apartheid Time Frame: 4-5, 45min. class periods Learning Target(s): MWH.1 The student will reconstruct and interpret the laws that form apartheid in South Africa The student will use the S.O.A.P.S. Document form to research and to take notes on laws The student will experience discrimination by participating in the experiential exercise in TCI. Academic/Content Vocabulary: Apartheid, Colonialism, Political Development Evidence of Student Learning: The student will research pre-apartheid Laws and complete the S.O.A.P.S. Document Response Form. The student will take notes on laws presented by other students and complete same form Participation in the TCI experiential exercise 3.1 Procedures: Assign one of the following laws for teams of students to research. The student should use the S.O.A.P.S. Document Response Form: The Population Registration Act of 1950 Prohibition of Mixed Marriages Act of 1949 Group Areas Act of 1950 The Bantu Authorities Act of 1951 The Reservation of Separate Amenities Act of 1953 The Suppression of Communism Act of 1958 Promotion of Black Self-Government Act of 1958 The Bantu Investment Corporation Act of 1959 The Bantu Education Act The Black Homeland Citizenship Act of 1970 The Afrikaans Medium Decree of 1974 Have the students share out what they learned from their research and other students take notes from all presentations. Teacher will project a map showing Racial Concentrations and Homelands based on the 1970 census found at: http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/africa/south_africa_racial_1979.jpg Suggested questions while students are viewing this map could be: Can someone point to the area of South Africa where the Indians were given? Can you find where the Bophuthatswana are? Where are the Whites? Which group has the ideal locations? DAY 2: Understanding the System of Apartheid. TCI Experiential Exercise, pg 80-89 see procedures in TCI book. DAY 3: Student Handout 3.1E An Overview of Apartheid. Have the students pair and share what they understand from the reading. TCI Activity 3.3 pg 103-112 Writing Songs of Resistance to Apartheid, writing for understanding. Handout: Pg 108, Timeline of Resistance to Apartheird Pg 110-111 Brainstorming Lyrics for a Song of Resistance, 3.3C + 3.3D Directions. DAY 4: Have students present their songs.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY: Modern Africa Facing Colonialism: How Would You Respond? Lesson #7

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Modern Africa Title: Facing Colonialism: How Would You Respond? Time Frame: two 45 minute class periods Learning Target(s): MWH.1 Reconstruct, interpret, and represent the chronology of significant events, developments, and narratives from history. MWH.2 Compare and contrast institutions and ideas in history, noting cause and effect relationships. Explore the motives behind European colonialism in Africa. Evaluate the different colonial governing methods (direct/indirect rule) and show how they impacted African society. Academic/Content Vocabulary: Colonialism Imperialism Evidence of Student Learning: Successful completion of the Critical-Thinking questions that follow each of the five scenarios. These questions might work well in a Socratic Seminar setting.

Procedures: Follow the procedures for Activity 2.2 in the TCI Modern Africa lesson guide. If time is a constraint, this lesson can be modified to not include the transparency images section and to focus just on the five scenarios. In addition, further information for Jaja of Opobo can be found online.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY LESSON TEMPLATE A Conference on Independence: Planning Nigeria’s Future: Lesson # 8

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Modern Africa Title: A Conference on Independence: Planning Nigeria’s Future Time Frame: 2-4 class periods Learning Target(s): MWH.3 Recognize and interpret continuity and/or change with respect to particular historical developments in the 20th century. MWH.5-Recognize, assess, and interpret relationships among events, issues, and developments in different spheres of human activity (i.e. economic, social, political, cultural). Analyze the societal and historical “arc” of pre-colonial through post-colonial African societies Understand the cause and effect relationship between colonialism and the issues facing African nations today Academic/Content Vocabulary: Colonialism Nationalism Political Development Evidence of Student Learning: Successful completion of the Experiential Exercise & “Plan for Independent Nigeria” Procedures: Follow the procedures for Activity 2.3 listed on pages 52-66 in the TCI Modern African lesson guide

MODERN WORLD HISTORY: Modern Africa Additional Resources

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Modern Africa Title: Additional Resources Time Frame: To round out the curriculum Learning Target(s): The resources listed below represent a small portion of what is available through district or local sources. These resources will undoubtedly help students meet all of the standards adopted by the state. Due to the limited nature of the district adopted materials (TCI Modern Africa and McDougal MWH text), this list of additional resources play extremely well to SSA.2 Acquire and organize information by investigating multiple sources and recognizing patterns and trends and SSA.4 Apply learning through communication and problem solving skills in order to contribute to the betterment of personal, community and global circumstances. Academic/Content Vocabulary: Imperialism Colonialism Social Development Industrial Revolution Physical Environment Political Development Economic development Evidence of Student Learning: An array of opportunities to be determined by the classroom teacher Additional Procedures/Resources that are readily available throughout the district: Guns,Germs, and Steel DVD disc 2 Into the Tropics. This DVD details European incursion into Africa and how Africans resisted. The DVD also explores issues facing modern African societies. Strangers in their Own Land, curriculum on South Africa by Bill Bigelow Rethinking Globalization: Teaching Justice in an Unjust World, Bill Bigelow and Bob Peterson. Sarafina (Film) The story of a young girl growing up during Soweto riots against Apartheid. Wonders of the African World, series with Henry Louis Gates Jr. CONGO: WHITE KING, RED RUBBER, BLACK DEATH DVD describes how King Leopold II of Belgium turned Congo into its private colony between 1885 and 1908.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY

THE MIDDLE EAST
Subject Area: Social Studies Unit Title: THE MIDDLE EAST Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707

Stage 1 – Desired Results Established Goals/Standard(s): MWH.1 Reconstruct, interpret, and represent the chronology of significant events, developments, and narratives from history. MWH.2 Compare and contrast institutions and ideas in history, noting cause and effect relationships. MWH.3 Recognize and interpret continuity and/or change with respect to particular historical developments in the 20th century. MWH.4 Evaluate how contemporary perspectives affect historical interpretation. MWH.5 Recognize, assess, and interpret relationships among events, issues, and developments in different spheres of human activity (i.e. economic, social, political, cultural). MWH.7 Interpret and evaluate information using complex geographic representations MWH.8 Hypothesize why places and regions are important to human identity and serve as symbols to unify or fragment society. MWH.10 Determine how human modification of the physical environment in a place affects both that place and other places SSA.1 Ask questions that access prior knowledge, identify reasons to learn, and clarify key terms. SSA.2 Acquire and organize information by investigating multiple sources and recognizing patterns and trends. SSA.3 Analyze by evaluating opposing claims, interpreting ideas, synthesizing information, and formulating a thesis. SSA.4 Apply learning through communication and problem solving skills in order to contribute to the betterment of personal, community and global circumstances. Big Ideas and Enduring Understandings: Students will understand that… The Middle East is a region of geographical importance. The Middle East is the birthplace of three major world religions: Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. The Middle East is a complex region where history, religion, politics, oil, and water all set the stage for potential conflict. Learning Target(s) I will know… The names of countries located in the Middle East. The similarities and differences between Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. The history of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Essential Questions: Is peace possible in the Middle East?

Learning Target(s) Students will be able to… Locate countries in the Middle East on a map. Compare and contrast the three major religions in the Middle East: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Explain how western European colonial powers shaped the Middle East after World War I. Analyze key events in the formation of Middle Eastern states. Understand the roots and development of the ArabIsraeli conflict. Explain the importance of natural resources in the Middle East. Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence

Culminating Assessment: Create a visual metaphor of the Middle East (TCI Culminating project in History Alive: Modern Middle East)

Other Evidence: • Pre-assessment • Map test • Reading response journals

Stage 3 – Learning Plan Lesson Plans 1. Geography of the Middle East – 3, 45 min. periods 2. Natural Resources in the Middle East - 2, 45 min. periods 3. Religion in the Middle East – 2, 45 min. periods 4. State Formation in the Middle East - 2, 45 min. periods 5. Key Events in the Formation of States in the Middle East – 2, 45 min. periods 6. Israeli-Palestinian Conflict - – 6, 45 min. periods 7. Culminating Project- Visual Metaphor of the modern Middle East - 3, 45 min. periods Approximately 4 weeks Resources: MWH textbook TCI History Alive: Modern Middle East (Available online CLICK HERE)

Modern World History Geography of the Middle East Lesson #1

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Modern Middle East Title: Geography of the Middle East Time Frame: Two to Three 50-minute class periods Learning Target(s): MWH.7 Interpret and evaluate information using complex geographic representations To locate countries in the Middle East on a map Academic/Content Vocabulary: Middle East, geo-political, demographics, physical environment Evidence of Student Learning: • Entry page for Geographic Handbook • *Map test Procedures: 1. Pre-assessment to see if students know the location of the countries in the Middle East. http://www.rethinkingschools.org/just_fun/games/mapgame.html 2. The Middle East as a crossroads: discuss geographic significance of the Middle East (display a map of the Middle East) http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/globalconnections/mideast/themes/geography/index.html 3. Activity: (computer lab, The World Factbook, www.cia.gov web site) a) In pairs, students will research a country in the Middle East to learn about the country’s demographics—GDP, oil wealth per capita, language, life expectancy, literacy rate, population density, religion, and urbanization. b) Write an entry summarizing the information you learned about your assigned country for a Geographic Handbook on the Middle East. Provide information about how it compares to other countries in the region. Include a map or graph illustrating one of the demographic categories. c) Students will share findings and compare demographic data among Middle Eastern countries. 4. Closure/Wrap up: a) What did you learn about the Middle East that you did not know before? What relationships do you see between categories? b) Create your own simile or metaphor (like the crossroads) for the Middle East. The Middle East is (like) __________ because________. *Post-assessment can include a map test. Additional resources: MWH textbook, A40-41 (map) Perthes World Atlas

MODERN WORLD HISTORY Natural Resources in the Middle East: Lesson #2

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Modern Middle East Title: Natural Resources in the Middle East Time Frame: Two 50-minute class periods Learning Target(s): To explain the importance of natural resources and its role on politics and economy in the Middle East MWH.5 Recognize, assess, and interpret relationships among events, issues, and developments in different spheres of human activity (i.e. economic, social, political, cultural). MWH.10 Determine how human modification of the physical environment in a place affects both that place and other places Academic/Content Vocabulary: physical environment, geo-political, economic development, political development, Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) Evidence of Student Learning: Will vary Procedures: There are a variety of lessons available to teach students about the role of natural resources in the Middle East. Here are some possible activities: 1. Compare Energy Resources and Energy Consumption maps on page 57 of Perthes World Atlas. 2. TCI History Alive: Modern Middle East Activity 2.3, “Negotiating for Oil: Who Will Profit?” 3. Visit http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/globalconnections/mideast/educators/resource/lesson3.html and follow instructions for lesson “Oil Crisis: What would you do?” 4. Visit http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/globalconnections/mideast/educators/resource/lesson2.html and follow instructions for lesson “Got Water?” Additional resources: The Middle East in Transition curriculum by Southern Center for International Studies The Middle East: The Story of Oil - Chief Economic Resource, PPS Multimedia Library Smith, Donald. “Water and Peace in the Middle East.” National Geographic. July 14, 2000. Water Issues in the Middle East, http://www.waternet.be/middle_east/

MODERN WORLD HISTORY Religion in the Middle East: Lesson #3

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Modern Middle East Title: Religion in the Middle East Time Frame: One or Two 50-minute class periods Learning Target(s): To compare and contrast the three major religions in the Middle East: Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. MWH.2 Compare and contrast institutions and ideas in history, noting cause and effect relationships. MWH.8 Hypothesize why places and regions are important to human identity and serve as symbols to unify or fragment society. Academic/Content Vocabulary: Christianity, Islam, Judaism Evidence of Student Learning: Completion of Venn diagram Procedures: 1. *Pre-assessment (Worksheet 1: Introduction to Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, http://www.southerncenter.org/Middle_East_Activity.pdf) 2. TCI Activity 1.2: Modern Middle East (available online, PPS Instructional Resources) *You might want to give the pre-assessment as a post-assessment. Additional resources: MWH textbook, pp. 704-705, 708-711, 714 Mystic Lands: Jerusalem: Mosaic of Faith, United Streaming video

MODERN WORLD HISTORY State Formation in the Middle East: Lesson #4

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Modern Middle East Title: State Formation in the Middle East Time Frame: Two 50-minute class periods Learning Target(s): To learn how western European colonial powers shaped the Middle East after World War I. MWH.1 Reconstruct, interpret, and represent the chronology of significant events, developments, and narratives from history. MWH.10 Determine how human modification of the physical environment in a place affects both that place and other places SSA.3 Analyze by evaluating opposing claims, interpreting ideas, synthesizing information, and formulating a thesis. Academic/Content Vocabulary: Ottoman Empire, sultan, millet system, colonialism, imperialism Evidence of Student Learning: • Maps • Group and whole-class discussion Procedures: TCI Activity 2.1 (available online, CLICK HERE) 1. The present-day map of the Middle East was shaped by the events of World War I after the fall of the Ottoman Empire. (show map of Ottoman Empire) a. Read about Ottoman Empire and its Fall (Student Handout 2.1A) b. Discuss accomplishments of the Ottoman Empire (make sure to point out harmony of diverse ethnic and religious groups) 2. Complete map activity (Student Handouts 2.1B and 2.1C; Directions 2.1D) 3. Post maps. Students will look at maps and record one strength and one weakness for each map based on potential areas of conflict. 4. Closure/wrap up: “Connecting the Experience with History” from TCI Activity 2.1 on pp. 3-4. Additional resources: Ch. 2-1 The Muslim World Expands in MWH textbook, pp. 73-77

MODERN WORLD HISTORY Key Events in the Formation of States in the Middle East: Lesson #5

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Modern Middle East Title: Key Events in the Formation of States in the Middle East Time Frame: Two 50-minute class periods Learning Target(s): MWH.4 Evaluate how contemporary perspectives affect historical interpretation. MWH.5 Recognize, assess, and interpret relationships among events, issues, and developments in different spheres of human activity (i.e. economic, social, political, cultural). To analyze key events in Middle Eastern state formation Academic/Content Vocabulary: Balfour Declaration, Sykes-Picot Agreement, mandate, Palestine Partition Plan, Arab nationalism Evidence of Student Learning: • Illustrated timeline • Response journal Procedures: 1. Background info: After the British and the French gained control of the region, they created new borders for six nations after the Ottoman Empire fell at the end of World War I. The British and French signed a secret agreement called the Sykes-Picot Agreement in which they divided the region into British and French mandates and protectorates. (show maphttp://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=3860950) The new nations- Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Palestine, and Syria- were formed based on British and French interests in the region which included access to oil, military bases, and trade routes. 2. TCI Activity 2.2 (available online, CLICK HERE) 3. Response journal: Write a one-paragraph response to this prompts: What if France and Britain had never been involved in the Middle East? How might it be different? Similar? Additional resources:

MODERN WORLD HISTORY

Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Lesson #6

MODERN WORLD HISTORY

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Modern Middle East Title: Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Time Frame: 5-7, 50-minute class periods Learning Target(s):
To understand the roots and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict. MWH.1 Reconstruct, interpret, and represent the chronology of significant events, developments, and narratives from history. MWH.3 Recognize and interpret continuity and/or change with respect to particular historical developments in the 20th century. MWH.4 Evaluate how contemporary perspectives affect historical interpretation. SSA.1 Ask questions that access prior knowledge, identify reasons to learn, and clarify key terms. SSA.2 Acquire and organize information by investigating multiple sources and recognizing patterns and trends. SSA.3 Analyze by evaluating opposing claims, interpreting ideas, synthesizing information, and formulating a thesis.

Academic/Content Vocabulary:
Israel, Palestine, Jerusalem, Zionism, Holocaust, Balfour Declaration, Palestine Partition Plan, Arab Revolt, Six-Day War, Intifada, Palestinian Liberation Organization, Oslo Accords Evidence of Student Learning: Group responses and discussion

Procedures:
Day 1: 1. Introduction questions: What do you know about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? What are your sources of information? What do you think you know but aren’t sure about? 2. TCI Activity 3.1 Jeds/Pads()—students assume roles of Jews and Palestinians to understand how Jewish immigration into Palestine between 1918 and 1948 affected each group. 3. Background reading: Ch. 18-4, Conflicts in the Middle East, in MWH textbook, pp. 583-589. Students will develop Levels of Questions from the reading. Use the student-generated questions for a class discussion. Day 2: 1. Modern Middle East TCI Activity 3.2: United Nations Responses to the Arab-Israeli Conflict Days 3-4: 1. Modern Middle East TCI Activity 3.3: Attending a Conference on the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict All resources for available onlinefor TCI activities in ch.3 CLICK HERE Dav 5: 1. Divide class into groups. Each group will be assigned a Middle East peace proposal such as 2001 Taba summit, 2003 Geneva Accord, or 2003 Road Map for Peace. Groups will read a summary of the proposal and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the proposal. 2. Each group will present the pros and cons of the proposal. 3. As a class, discuss which proposal shows the most promise. 4. Closure/wrap-up: Do you think a solution can be achieved? If not, do you think any of the issues can be resolved? Possible Extensions: Come up with a peace proposal of your own. Create a political cartoon depicting your thoughts on peace between Arabs and Israelis. Create a conversation between a Palestinian and an Israeli working towards peace. Days 6-7 (optional): Show the 2001 documentary film Promises (106 minutes).

Additional resources:
United Streaming video: Israel and the Mideast Conflict (31 minutes) Film: Promises, 2001 The Middle East in Transition curriculum by Southern Center for International Studies

Culminating Project Visual Metaphor of the Modern Middle East

Course: Modern World History CRN: 2707 Unit: Modern Middle East Title: Visual Metaphor of the Modern Middle East Time Frame: Two to Three 50-minute class periods Learning Target(s): MWH.1 Reconstruct, interpret, and represent the chronology of significant events, developments, and narratives from history. MWH.3 Recognize and interpret continuity and/or change with respect to particular historical developments in the 20th century. MWH.5-Recognize, assess, and interpret relationships among events, issues, and developments in different spheres of human activity (i.e. economic, social, political, cultural). Academic/Content Vocabulary: Evidence of Student Learning: • Visual metaphor project Procedures: 1. Refer to procedures in TCI The Modern Middle East, Culminating Project, pp. 1-8. CLICK HERE for all the resources you will need

Additional resources:

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