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I N T E R N A T I O N A L

F I LT R AT I O N   N E W S

January/February 2013 Volume 32 No. 1 www.filtnews.com

Your Global Source

SpinTek Filtration: SpinTek Filtration: Improving Aqueous Coalescers Improving Aqueous Coalescers
SpinTek Filtration:
SpinTek Filtration:
Improving Aqueous Coalescers
Improving Aqueous Coalescers
• Integrated Dual Membrane Systems • Integrated Dual Membrane Systems for Drinking Water Production for Drinking
• Integrated Dual Membrane Systems
• Integrated Dual Membrane Systems
for Drinking Water Production
for Drinking Water Production
• Perforated Metals: Clarifying Options
• Perforated Metals: Clarifying Options
• Cloth Media Filtration
• Cloth Media Filtration
For Wastewater Treatment
For Wastewater Treatment

Special Reports on Water Filtration:

Special Reports on Water Filtration:

I N T E R N A T I O N A L F I LT

Filtration

Filtration ...

...

Perhaps Perhaps the the Greenest Greenest

of All Industries

of All Industries

I N T E R N A T I O N A L F I LT
Xinxiang Tiancheng Aviation Purification Equipments Co. Ltd. For airplane For special vehicle For coal machinery For
Xinxiang Tiancheng Aviation Purification Equipments Co. Ltd. For airplane For special vehicle For coal machinery For
Xinxiang Tiancheng Aviation Purification Equipments Co. Ltd. For airplane For special vehicle For coal machinery For

Xinxiang Tiancheng Aviation

Purification Equipments Co. Ltd.

Xinxiang Tiancheng Aviation Purification Equipments Co. Ltd. For airplane For special vehicle For coal machinery For
For airplane For special vehicle For coal machinery For ultrafilter For fluid cleaning system For dust
For airplane
For special vehicle
For coal machinery
For ultrafilter
For fluid cleaning system
For dust
collector
of cement
industry
Our company specializes in designing & manufacturing and supplying many kinds of filters,
complete filtrating equipments and their elements with different materials according to your
drawings or new & old samples.
Xinxiang Tiancheng Aviation Purification Equipments Co. Ltd.
No. 1, Chuanye Road, Dvelopment Area, Xinxiang City 453003, Henan
P.R. China
Contact Person in China: Mr. Li Minghao
Tel: +86-13673735086 Fax: +86-373-3520026 Website: www.tchkjh.com
Email: liminghao@tchkjh.com • renchenghua@tchkjh.com • niushaohui@tchkjh.com
Contact Person in USA: Mr Liu Shengyuan
Tel: 4015881868 • liushengyuan@tchkjh.com

IN THIS ISSUE

January/February 2013, Vol. 32, No. 1

Industry | News

 

Filtration

Perhaps

the Greenest of All Industries

6

Environment Effort Boosts Filtration and Separation Industry

12

 

Cover Story | SpinTek Filtration

 

CoMatrix and Aqueous Coalescer for Entrained Organic Removal

16

Water | Filtration

 

Integrated Dual Membrane Systems for Drinking Water Production

20

Perforated Metals: Clarifying Options

24

Cloth Media Filtration For Wastewater Treatment

28

 

Filtration | Recycling

 

Advanced Filtration Technology Enables the Production of High-Quality Recycled PET Fibers for the Textile Industry

32

 

Coolant | Filtration

 

The Best Practice for Supplying Filtered Coolant to

 

High Pressure Pumps

 

38

 

News | Briefs

 

Call for Papers for FILTECH 2013

41

Eliminating High Maintenance Costs With Orival Filters

41

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2 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com
IN THIS ISSUE January/February 2013, Vol. 32, No. 1 Industry | News Filtration Perhaps the Greenest

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Editorial Advisory Board
Editorial Advisory Board
Editorial Board Chairman Haluk Alper, President Peter S. Cartwright, PE Ultrafiltration

Editorial Board Chairman

Editorial Board Chairman Haluk Alper, President Peter S. Cartwright, PE Ultrafiltration

Haluk Alper, President

Editorial Board Chairman Haluk Alper, President Peter S. Cartwright, PE Ultrafiltration

Peter S. Cartwright, PE

Ultrafiltration

Edward C. Gregor, Chairman E.C. Gregor & Assoc. LLC Tel: 1 704 442 1940 Fax: 1 704 442 1778 ecg@egregor.com M&A, Filtration Media

MyCelx Technologies Corp. Tel: 1 770 534 3118 Fax: 1 770 534 3117 alper@mycelx.com Oil Removal – Water and Air

Cartwright Consulting Co. Tel: 1 952 854 4911 Fax: 1 952 854 6964 pscartwright@msn.com Membranes, RO,

 
Wu Chen The Dow Chemical Company Peter R. Johnston, PE Tel/Fax: 1 919 942 9092 Jim

Wu Chen The Dow Chemical Company

Wu Chen The Dow Chemical Company Peter R. Johnston, PE Tel/Fax: 1 919 942 9092 Jim

Peter R. Johnston, PE Tel/Fax: 1 919 942 9092

Wu Chen The Dow Chemical Company Peter R. Johnston, PE Tel/Fax: 1 919 942 9092 Jim

Jim Joseph Joseph Marketing

Tel: 1 979 238 9943

ddandp3@aol.com

Tel/Fax: 1 757 565 1549

wuchen@dow.com Process Filtration (liquid/gas) Equipment and Media

Test procedures

josephmarketing@verizon.net Coolant Filtration

 
Dr. Ernest Mayer E. Mayer Filtration Consulting, LLC Tel: 1 302 981 8060 Fax: 1 302

Dr. Ernest Mayer E. Mayer Filtration Consulting, LLC Tel: 1 302 981 8060 Fax: 1 302 368 0021

Dr. Ernest Mayer E. Mayer Filtration Consulting, LLC Tel: 1 302 981 8060 Fax: 1 302

Robert W. Mcilvaine Tel: 1 847 272 0010 Fax: 1 847 272 9673 mcilvaine@ mcilvainecompany.com

Dr. Ernest Mayer E. Mayer Filtration Consulting, LLC Tel: 1 302 981 8060 Fax: 1 302

Henry Nowicki, Ph.D. MBA Tel: 1 724 457 6576 Fax: 1 724 457 1214 Henry@pacslabs.com www.pacslabs.com

emayer6@verizon.net

www.mcilvainecompany.com

Activated Carbons Testing,

Mkt. Research & Tech. Analysis

R&D, Consulting, Training

Brandon Ost, CEO Filtration Group High Purity Prod. Div. Tel: 1 630 723 2900 bost@filtrationgroup.com Air

Brandon Ost, CEO Filtration Group High Purity Prod. Div. Tel: 1 630 723 2900 bost@filtrationgroup.com Air Filters, Pharmaceutical

Brandon Ost, CEO Filtration Group High Purity Prod. Div. Tel: 1 630 723 2900 bost@filtrationgroup.com Air

Gregg Poppe The Dow Chemical Company Tel: 1 952 897 4317 Fax: 1 942 835 4996 poppeg@dow.com Industrial Water, Power,

Brandon Ost, CEO Filtration Group High Purity Prod. Div. Tel: 1 630 723 2900 bost@filtrationgroup.com Air

Dr. Graham Rideal Whitehouse Scientific Ltd. Tel: +44 1244 33 26 26 Fax: +44 1244 33 50 98 rideal@ whitehousescientific.com

and Micro-Electronic

and Membrane Technology

Filter and Media Validation

Andy Rosol Global Filtration Products Mgr. FLSmidth Minerals andy.rosol@flsmidth.com Tel: 1 800 826 6461/1 801 526
Andy Rosol
Global Filtration Products Mgr.
FLSmidth Minerals
andy.rosol@flsmidth.com
Tel: 1 800 826 6461/1 801 526 2005
Precoat/Bodyfeed Filter Aids
Clint Scoble
Filter Media Services, LLC
Office: 1 513 528 0172
Fax: 1 513 624 6993
cscoble@filtermediaservices.com
Fabric Filters , Filter Media,
Baghouse Maintenance
Tony Shucosky
Pall Microelectronics
Tel: 1 410 252 0800
Fax: 1 410 252 6027
tony_shucosky@pall.com
Cartridges, Filter Media,
Membranes
Mark Vanover
Bayer MaterialScience LLC
Key Account Manager
Tel: 1 314 591 1792
Email:
mark.vanover@bayer.com
Polyurethane Systems
Scott P. Yaeger
Filtration and Separation
Technology LLC
Tel/Fax: 1 219 324 3786
Mobile: 1 805 377 5082
spyaeger@msn.com
Membranes, New Techn.
Dr. Bob Baumann
Advisory Board
Member Emeritus
4 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com
Industry | News Filtration ... By Edward C. Gregor Perhaps the Greenest of A Filters, separation

Industry | News

Filtration

...

By Edward C. Gregor

Perhaps

the Greenest of A

Filters, separation or coalescing can solve any pollution or environmental challenge the world is facing.

“T here isn’t a pollution or environmental problem that cannot either be

prevented or remediated through the use

of filtration, separation or coalescing.”

I’ve been making the above state- ment for 20 plus years and have never had its veracity questioned or chal- lenged. A few processes may not be 100 percent perfect yet, but the principal re- mains and is hard to dispute. Filtration, separations and coalesc- ing companies are always on the search for new opportunities and chal- lenges, which brought to mind the idea of exploring the broad world of filtration, separations and coalescing,

Industry | News Filtration ... By Edward C. Gregor Perhaps the Greenest of A Filters, separation

through examples. What follows is a “day in the life” of a married couple – John and Mary – and noting some of the many technolo- gies that engineers, scientists, academia and companies have created to prevent or resolve many pollution problems that result in a higher standard of living for us while also maintaining a cleaner and safer world environment.

THE DAY BEGINS

John and Mary wake in the morn- ing with the help of their digital alarm clock – who’s acids, solvents and de- ionized water were safely used to make its microchip, and which was

6 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

filtered by prefilters, reverse osmosis and microfiltration. John turns up the thermostat, not giving a thought to how their home air filters protect the heating unit. The electricity being provided by the local utility company from a coal-fired power plant uses scrubber technology and baghouse fil- tration to remove particulate from the exhaust stream. Mary heads to the kitchen to make a pot of coffee, pulling out a coffee filter, without knowing the coffee had the caffeine removed safely via super-critical fluid extraction. Her water is pre-filtered through a series of meltblown and carbon prefilters as well as an RO unit

ll Industries

ll Industries hidden under her sink. Now, Mary heads back to the bathroom where John is

hidden under her sink. Now, Mary heads back to the bathroom where John is in the shower, using clean and odorless filtered municipal water. Mary applies her cosmetics, many of which were filtered for purity. Getting dressed, neither considers the poly- ester fiber in their clothing that was filtered during the fiber manufactur- ing process. Included, were the man- ufacture of John’s cotton/polyester blend shirt and Mary’s dress, which were both finished with a filtered anti- microbial treatment. Running a bit late for work, they quickly open breakfast protein bars wrapped in multi-layered plastic packaging used

to keep convenience-foods fresh, and which have benefited from polymer filtration once again. They drink their coffee and orange juice, where pulp has been removed using ultrafiltra- tion. Being diabetic, John uses his membrane diagnostic test kit and gives himself an insulin shot, which had been filtered by the pharmaceuti- cal supplier.

OFF TO WORK

Time to leave and both jump in their cars. Mary drives a hybrid, but dislikes the odor of exhaust fumes and pollutants and made sure a cabin air filter came with her car. It’s a foggy

www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 7

winter morning as she leaves, not thinking about a potential moisture build-up in the head and tail lamps, which evaporated overnight via the oleophobic membrane media vents embedded in the glass. These are sim- ilar to the vents where water by-passed the gaskets in the small motors con- trolling the windshield wipers and power windows in her car, which col- lected when she was driving in the rain the afternoon before. John’s a lead-foot and an amateur racer, driving his pride and joy “muscle” car with its high-per- formance engine. In the back of his mind, he knows he can rely on the gas tank filter from monofilament and

ll Industries hidden under her sink. Now, Mary heads back to the bathroom where John is
Industry | News Virtually every aspect of human life is touched by the principles of filtration.

Industry | News

Industry | News Virtually every aspect of human life is touched by the principles of filtration.

Virtually every aspect of human life is touched by the principles of filtration.

meltblown fabric and the fuel injector filters of monofilament woven fabrics to provide clean fuel, and that the en- gine air-intake and lube oil wetlaid media filters will provide peak per- formance as well. He’s also confident the space between the engine block and the pistons, only a few microns wide, are clean, thanks to two honing coolant filtration systems at the en- gine production plant that eliminated shavings and other debris, using 25 micron bag filters, and the other line with gradient density nonwoven fab- ric roll stock to clear debris during precision machining of both his en- gine and transmission. Mary’s car has an automatic transmission, which in- corporates a transmission filter con- taining needlefelt and/or monofilament woven fabric. Both Mary and John’s batteries also utilize porous plastic media vents to prevent a build-up of gasses, eliminating the potential of a battery failure and even an explosion. Before reaching the of-

Industry | News Virtually every aspect of human life is touched by the principles of filtration.

fice John calls his mother on his cell phone, which contains a microchip, not all that dissimilar to the digital clock. Mom is receiving hemodialysis using a cleanable hollow fiber mem- brane filter. She was fine, but asked John to please come by over the weekend to get her lawn mower ready for the spring with a new paper fuel and reticulated urethane foam air fil- ter as well as to look at her gas dryer’s lint filter screen, which might need replacement. As Mary reaches her office as VP of OA/QC Manager at Living Well Phar- maceutical & Medical Device Com- pany, LLC, she turns on her computer containing an e-PTFE disk-drive air vent, but before she can remove her coat, an anxious employee tells her about problems on the production line over night. The injectables pro- duction line used to produce diabetes medication was having problems. The meltblown prefilter and membrane sterilizing filter line might not be

8 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

working properly as the microbiology test lab detected bacteria in the serum on their membrane disk filter. Fur- thermore, the insert molding lines used to produce I.V. vent and in-line bacteria medical filters were acting up. Yesterday, they had a similar prob- lem with the ophthalmic and pre-by- pass filter line used in extracorporeal open heart surgery. In the meantime, John arrives at his chemical plant where he is Direc- tor of Operations. Unlike Mary’s situ- ation, everything is running smoothly. The filter presses using woven fabric, flat bed filters with rolls of nonwoven media and filters, and leaf filters using filter aids are all op- erating efficiently. However, one chamber of the bag house needs to have its filters replaced today as part of routine maintenance along with all the meltblown box air filters in the offices. The new fleet of large diesel trucks used to transport liquids and powders produced at his facility had

Industry | News finally arrived overnight. John feels relieved, as he has had many com- plaints

Industry | News

finally arrived overnight. John feels relieved, as he has had many com- plaints about the diesel soot exhaust from the neighbors. He is also pleased to learn in the company newsletter, printed using filtered ink, that the oil and gas drilling operations the com- pany owns elsewhere, has success- fully installed improved coalescing and absorption separation systems. This was done to remove the higher percentage of oil and fine droplet chemicals from produced water in the oil and gas recovery process.

TRAVEL TO HEADQUARTERS

The day goes smoothly for John, before leaving for lunch and the air- port and a flight to headquarters. At lunch, John enjoyed a burger, fries and sweet tea - the fry oil efficiently filtered using a polyester media, and the sugar sifted to size for his tea. On

his way, John drove by a plating facil- ity, where he previously was em- ployed, and said hello to his replacement that had just installed both tubular and RO crossflow mem- brane systems to remove heavy met- als before water disposal and recycling. Once at the airport, John boarded the aircraft confident the FAA-approved fuel, cabin air and hy- draulic filters would perform per- fectly. Looking out the cabin window, John noticed the hydrant cart, coa- lescing water out of the aviation fuel being loaded onto the aircraft. Upon arrival at the hotel, John had supper, called Mary asking how things went today. Mary said she had concerns, but everything turned out well, relating the microbiology lab diabetes report proved to be a false-positive. John said the same from his end and mentioned his company has just uncovered a new

highly-efficient technology that sounds capable of complete mercury removal and direct recovery at the company’s huge natural gas drilling facility. Best of all, there were no disposable absorbents requiring post-cleaning. John said good- night and he’d call in morning. Before turning out the lights, John watched the news, where the TV had an LCD screen made in a factory cleanroom using HEPA filters to prevent surface contam- ination during the manufacturing

process. And so it goes

...

another healthy

and trouble free day for John and Mary as well as the rest of us, thanks to safe and reliable filtration, separations and coalescing technologies.

FN
FN

Ed Gregor is a specialist in filtration technologies and media, and has both Consulting and M&A businesses in filtration. He can be reached by phone: 704-442-1940 or email: ecg@egregor.com

10 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com
10 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com
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Industry | News Environment Effort Boosts Filtration and Separation Indu By Jason Chen, China Correspondent More

Industry | News

Environment Effort Boosts Filtration and Separation Indu

By Jason Chen, China Correspondent

More than 300 exhibitors participated at Filtration & Separation Asia 2012, where experts predicted a strong growth for filtration in th

A t the 4th Filtration & Separa- tion Asia and the 7th China International Filtration &

Industry | News Environment Effort Boosts Filtration and Separation Indu By Jason Chen, China Correspondent More

Separation Exhibition & Conference (FSA + CIFS 2012) held November 14 - 16, 2012, experts and executives from

all around the world discussed the mar- ket and technology trends of the Chi- nese, Asian and global filtration and separation industry. The participants concluded that a strong market growth would continue in the next few years,

which will continue to provide ongoing momentum to innovation.

EXHIBITORS AND EXPERTS

The event was sponsored by the

China Technology Market Associa-

12 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

stry

stry tion & Exhibition Co Ltd. Around 300 exhibitors from Main- land China, France, Austria, Hong

tion & Exhibition Co Ltd. Around 300 exhibitors from Main- land China, France, Austria, Hong Kong, Japan, Germany, Taiwan, Bel- gium, Finland and the United States attended the FSA + CIFS 2013 at INTEX Shanghai, covering exhibi- tion halls of 6,000 square meters. They included filtration materials manufacturers, filtration and separa- tion equipment producers, research and development institutes, associa- tions, and industrial publications. Some of the exhibitors said that the growing market demand was the deciding factor in participating at this biannual event. “We expect a growth of sales this and next year. So we are here to look for more business opportunities,” said Mr. Zhou Shen, manager of a Shanghai-based filtra- tion equipment company. One the other hand, experts dis- cussed recent advances in technolo- gies and market trends of the filtration and separation industry in the forums of the FSA + CIFS 2012.

e coming years.

tion (CTMA) and the China Filtra- tion Society (CFS), and was sup- ported by International Filtration News, the American Filtration & Sep- arations Society (AFS), the Asia Non- woven Fabrics Association (ANFA),

stry tion & Exhibition Co Ltd. Around 300 exhibitors from Main- land China, France, Austria, Hong

and the European Disposables and Nonwovens Association (EDANA). The organizers included CNTA Sci- ence & Technology Co Ltd (CNTA), UBM Asia Trade Fairs Pte Ltd (UBM), and Shanghai Technology Conven-

www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 13

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION EFFORTS

Some of these forums focused on the market opportunities that will be brought by the Chinese government’s environmental protection efforts. One of these opportunities is cre- ated by the Chinese government’s plan to improve the nation’s sewage treatment and recycling system. “This effort will provide a strong mo- mentum to the Chinese filtration and separation industry in the next three years or more,” said Mr. Deng Zhiguang, deputy president of the China Central and Southern China Municipal Engineering Design & Re- search Institutes. He described the Chinese government’s policies and targets for sewage treatment and re- cycling by 2015, and the consequent market demands and related oppor- tunities. According to the targets, China’s sewage water treatment will increase from 124.8 million cubic meters to 208.1 million cubic meters per day from 2010 to 2015, and sewage sludge treatment will increase 5.18 million cubic meters per day in the same period. In addition, recy-

stry tion & Exhibition Co Ltd. Around 300 exhibitors from Main- land China, France, Austria, Hong
Industry | News A rosy outlook for the filtration industry in the coming years was a

Industry | News

Industry | News A rosy outlook for the filtration industry in the coming years was a

A rosy outlook for the filtration industry in the coming years was a deciding factor for many of the exhibitors at the event.

Industry | News A rosy outlook for the filtration industry in the coming years was a

cling water will triple to reach 38.85 million cubic meters per day from 2010 to 2015. Another opportunity is China’s ef- forts to reduce air pollution. The Chinese central government has set a plan to reduce the Chinese indus- tries’ air emissions per metric ton of production by 10% to 29% between 2010 and 2015. This plan will strongly boost the consumption of filtration fabric. According to Mr. Sun Jinliang, member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering (CAE), the Chinese industries emit a total of about eight million metric tons of fine particles (PM2.5) a year, which accounts for 80% of China’s total air pollution. The fine particles emission is hard to be eliminated through tra-

ditional ways. The main solution is filter bags made by filtration fabric. “Last year (2011), China pro- duced about 120 million square me- ters of filtration fabric, with a total value of 20 billion yuan ($3.2 bil- lion). In 2012, the market in value terms will grow by 25% and reach 25 billion yuan ($4.0 billion),” said Mr. Jiang Shicheng, vice president of the China Chemical Fiber Association (CCFA). But Mr. Jiang said that the Chi- nese filtration fabric manufacturers still had many problems. “Among the filtration fabric made in 2012, about

  • 70 million square meters were com-

mon filtration fabric with poor heat- and corrosion-resistance, and only

  • 50 million were high-quality prod-

ucts. On the other hand, among China’s more than 200 filtration fab- ric production lines, only 15 lines are advanced lines introduced from other countries, and more than 100 lines are low-quality ones. Overca- pacity of low-quality products has appeared in the industry and restruc- turing will be required,” explained Mr. Jiang. Other experts said that the rela- tively high cost would be another factor that retards the growth of filter bags and filtration fabric. For exam- ple, the investment on the filter bags for a chimney in a steel plant could

cost up to a half million yuan ($81,000) and the lifespan of the fil- ter bags is only about two years, ac-

cording to Mr. Huang Ning, engineer

14 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

of the environmental department of China’s Ji Nan Steel and Iron Plant. “The cost is too high and we are al- most unable to afford it. Therefore, cost reduction and lifespan increase of the filtration products will be cru- cial to our environmental protection efforts,” said Mr. Huang. To reduce the environmental pro- tection costs of the Chinese compa- nies, the government has started to subsidize the filtration fabric produc- ers. For example, the government of China’s Funing County subsidizes 10% to 17% of the prices of new equipment bought by local filtration fabric manufacturers, which will re- duce their cost of manufacturing ad- vanced filtration fabric. Since 2011, the Funing government has given about $700,000 to 146 local filtration

of the environmental department of China’s Ji Nan Steel and Iron Plant. “The cost is too

tion at China’s Hangzhou Dianzi Uni- versity, provided his recent findings of melt-blown polypropylene elec- trets web in medical applications. New materials for filtration and separation were discussed at the FSA + CIFS 2013 too. For example, Ms. Bian Sisi, researcher of the Northeast- ern University of China, described her recent experimental research on degradation of aramid filter media. Some experts presented their re- cent research on new manufacturing methods for filtration materials. For example, Mr. Lu Jiankang, researcher of the Qidong Kanghui Coating & Lamination Co Ltd, described their recent research and development (R&D) of the manufacturing tech- nologies and equipment for multi- layer filtration materials.

FN
FN

fabric manufacturers. “Supported by the government, the Chinese filtration fabric industry will have an average annual growth rate (AAGR) of no less than 15% in the next five years,” said Mr. Li Lingshen, president of the China Nonwoven & Industrial Tex- tiles Association (CNITA).

MATERIALS, APPLICATION, METHODS

In some other forums, experts dis- cussed the applications of filtration and separation technologies for vari- ous industries. For example, Mr. Liang Jinlong, researcher of China’s Nanchang Filter Machinery Research Institute, described in a forum the re- cent development of uranium separa- tion and concentration technology; Mr. Chen Gangjin, researcher of the Laboratory of Electrets and Applica-

of the environmental department of China’s Ji Nan Steel and Iron Plant. “The cost is too
of the environmental department of China’s Ji Nan Steel and Iron Plant. “The cost is too
www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 15
www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 15
Cover Story | SpinTek Filtration CoMatrix and Aqueous Coalescer for Entrained Organic Removal By William A.

Cover Story | SpinTek Filtration

CoMatrix and Aqueous Coalescer for Entrained Organic Removal

By William A. Greene, President, SpinTek

Cover Story | SpinTek Filtration CoMatrix and Aqueous Coalescer for Entrained Organic Removal By William A.

Spence Copper Mine, Chile

A development and field-test- ing program was undertaken for an improved aqueous co-

alescer for produced water, oily water,

and electrolyte and raffinate streams. The achievement of such a program would provide low cost and effective coalescence of entrained organics that would improve the performance of sub- sequent dual-media filters and on raffi- nate provide for a stand-alone solution.

Cover Story | SpinTek Filtration CoMatrix and Aqueous Coalescer for Entrained Organic Removal By William A.

The desired goals as a pre-treatment to dual-media filters are to 1) improve final effluent quality, 2) reduce back- wash frequency of the filters, and 3) provide a more easily recovered organic then the reprocessing of backwash elec- trolyte or water. The system was shown capable of operating at pressures under 140 kPa and obtained entrained organic re- moval of up to 95%. The low operat-

16 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

ing pressures allow for lower capital costs and the ability to treat entire raf- finate streams previously not feasible due to extremely high capital and op- erating costs. This paper discusses the design and basic operational considerations of this improved coalescer and how it can be applied to new construction as well as operating plants. A unique feature will be discussed as how the coalescer can

be incorporated into existing dual- media filters to significantly improve organic removal, extend service runs and reduce backwashing frequency.

INTRODUCTION

The removal of entrained organic from aqueous streams is an essential process to minimize plant operating costs and maximize the quality of the electrolyte. Current technology in- cludes the CoMatrix™ filter and con- ventional Dual-Media filters. The desire is to produce a low operating and cap- ital cost coalescer that can be used to feed these media based systems. It is desirable to remove high levels of en- trained organic to provide a more con- stant aqueous feed stream to this type of equipment. In addition, entrained organic re- covery equipment has found very lim- ited commercial implementation due to the very high flow rates compared to electrolyte and subsequent higher than acceptable capital costs. Another goal then is to produce a low cost but very high flow rate system that can consistently remove 75% or greater or- ganic removal. The following reports on the recent study of an improved Matrix Tower™ and the initial application is for the re- moval of organic (liquid ion exchange + diluent) from a strong copper elec- trolyte solution. A Matrix Tower coalescer design produces an enlarged droplet size of the organic for more efficient removal by the subsequent filter. It is commonly known that as modern SX-EW plants become increasingly more advanced in design, the organic droplet sizes de- crease accordingly as a result of this en- hanced mixer/settler operation. This consequently causes lower efficiency in the filters. Crud and organic loads as- sociated with crud can also be reduced from the electrolyte by placing less of a load on the filters. An added benefit is that a reliable coalescer can smooth out levels of en-

trained organic to a media filter and thus compensates for normal plant up- sets that can cause excessive organic levels from entering a filter. Stabilizing the organic level to electrolyte filters re-

be incorporated into existing dual- media filters to significantly improve organic removal, extend service runs and
be incorporated into existing dual- media filters to significantly improve organic removal, extend service runs and
be incorporated into existing dual- media filters to significantly improve organic removal, extend service runs and
www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 17
www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 17
Cover Story | SpinTek Filtration duces the chance of overrunning these filters, which send organic to

Cover Story | SpinTek Filtration

Cover Story | SpinTek Filtration duces the chance of overrunning these filters, which send organic to

duces the chance of overrunning these filters, which send organic to the tank house. The service cycle of the filters prior to backwash can be more accu- rately predicted. The added benefit of fewer backwashes is that filters are on line for longer periods of time and the amount of water or lean electrolyte used for backwashing is minimized.

METHODOLOGY

The coalescer can be viewed as a “tank within a tank” where the outer tank can be pressurized up to 100 kPa and has an access man-way and nozzles for service inlet, service outlet and or-

Cover Story | SpinTek Filtration duces the chance of overrunning these filters, which send organic to

ganic recovery. The inner tank is a cylinder that is connected at the bottom but open at the top. The flow path is up through the center of this cylinder and then the electrolyte changes direction and flows down through the annulus formed by the inner cylinder and the inner walls of the outer tank. The or- ganic floats to the top of the tank and exits the system. The operation of the system is en- hanced by placing anthracite or poly- ethylene beads in the cylinder and putting a grid on the top of the cylinder to prevent the escape of the coalescing media. In the annulus area, SpinTek in- stalls a Matrix packing™ that consists of hydrophobic corrugated packing. The distance between the corrugations are typically 12 mm up to 17 mm. The flow rate through the cylinder is in the 60 m3/hr-m2 range hence if anthracite

Cover Story | SpinTek Filtration duces the chance of overrunning these filters, which send organic to

18 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

is used the flow velocity forces it to the top of the cylinder and the containment plate. Free organic can be formed and flow to the top of the cylinder. To further im- prove organic removal efficiencies – if the organic touches the Matrix packing – the hydrophobic nature of the pack- ing will cause the organic to stick to its surface. This organic on the plates eventually form larger droplets that break free from the Matrix packing and are buoyant enough to flow upwards (counter flow to the electrolyte) and migrate to the dome of the tank and exit the coalescer. A further enhancement is to intro- duce air into the feed inlet. The air provides lower surface tensions and hence helps coalesce organic. The air/organic then reaches the media layer where larger organic droplets are formed that will float up to the top of the domed top. The test system was set up and op- erated at 38 l/m and used the feed pres- sure from the electrolyte filter feed pumps and after usage the electrolyte was returned to the same feed tank. There was no loss of electrolyte from the plant during operation of the pilot. The coalescer was operated for 48 hours without sampling to stabilize op- eration and to coat the system with or- ganic from the feed electrolyte. It is necessary to coat the coalescer with or- ganic as this will be its normal operat- ing condition.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

The chart shows the result of the Matrix Tower coalescer over a contin- uous five (5) day service run. As can be seen, the results show low levels of organic in the total effluent with the vast majority of organic removed by the coalescer. Efficiency removals approached 95% during parts of the service run. The raw data in Table 1 gives an in- dication of system performance. As can be seen with organic inlet concentra- tions as low as 9 ppm the average en- trained organic removal was 75%.

     

When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic

efficiency rose to 88%. As the level of organic is even higher in the 30 ppm

ates at 600 m3/hr and can be con- structed of FRP or thin wall stainless

Four (4) Coalescers:

 

associated with crud, the efficiency rises to 88%.

range removal efficiency rises to the 95% range.

steel, which is enough for many elec- trolyte or strip applications.

 

CONCLUSIONS

The Matrix Tower has the ability to significantly reduce the amount of or-

Large raffinate streams, for example, at 2400 m3/hr could be configured as

The coalescer performed well even with the presence of significant amounts of crud (organic + sus-

ganic in the electrolyte, which will ex- tend the service run of CoMatrix or Dual-Media filters used to polish and

follows:

pended solids), and the system was

filter the electrolyte.

  • 4872 mm diameter

never out of service during the five (5) day test run.

The system is a low cost method of entrained organic removal either as a

Three (3) Coalescers:

The system consistently averaged

stand-alone system on raffinate or a

  • 5785 mm diameter

75% organic removal from the feed electrolyte. When the organic present

pre-treatment to polishing filters on electrolyte. As an example, a 4872 mm

Two (2) Coalescers:

in the feed was greater then 20 ppm the

diameter Matrix Tower coalescer oper-

7308 mm diameter

FN
FN
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
When the entrained organic level is above 20 ppm, indicating less organic efficiency rose to 88%.
Water | Filtration Integrated Dual Membrane Systems for Drinking Water Production Spain’s Llobregat River directs Ultrafiltration

Water | Filtration

Integrated Dual Membrane Systems for Drinking Water Production

Spain’s Llobregat River directs Ultrafiltration pilot plant:

Operation and Optimization Experiences

By Wu Chen, Dow Water & Process Solutions

Water | Filtration Integrated Dual Membrane Systems for Drinking Water Production Spain’s Llobregat River directs Ultrafiltration

Figure 1: Process flow diagram, Barcelona unit for drinking water applications.

T he use of Ultrafiltration (UF) as pretreatment to Reverse Osmo- sis (RO) has been increasing in

recent years. Its operation utilizing sur- face water as source to produce drink- ing water has been of particular interest, since it varies based on location (Pearce, G.K., 2008 [1]), raw water origin and local particularities. When considering surface water, the difficulty usually comes from its fluctuating characteriza- tion, being especially challenging dur- ing periods with high natural organic matter (NOM), high turbidity or high

Water | Filtration Integrated Dual Membrane Systems for Drinking Water Production Spain’s Llobregat River directs Ultrafiltration

suspended solids and seasonal biologi- cal activity, which inevitably affects per- formance and other factors such as, cleaning (duration and frequency), down time and chemical dosing.

The effects of fouling increase in severity over filtration cycles – building up and resulting in higher energy con- sumption. Establishing a protocol to optimize the type of cleaning and its re- quired frequency is therefore of great importance. Optimization allows for more effective operational protocols to be considered, providing an economi- cally attractive alternative to conserva- tive operating modes (Porcelli and Judd, 2010 [2]). Non-optimized sys- tems can lead to filtration cycles that are too short, coupled with high back- wash duration and higher chemical concentrations during chemically en- hanced backwashes (CEB) and clean in place (CIP) operations. This will ulti- mately result in a higher cost of pro-

20 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

duced water. In the present project, a DOW™ Ultrafiltration system has been chal- lenged with raw surface brackish under highly variable conditions of turbidity (5 - > 1000 NTU) and tem- perature (10 – 29ºC). In order to es- tablish the feasibility of the process consisting of a basic filtration (hydro- cyclon and ring filter), Ultrafiltration and Reverse Osmosis, the following objectives were considered:

• Assessing the viability of using direct UF as an alternative to conventional pre-treatment (coagulation/ flocculation – settling – sand filtration) in drinking water treatment

plants (DWTPs) • Evaluation of the suitability of direct UF as pretreatment step for RO from a hydraulic and quality perspective • Determination of the sustainability of the process (UF + RO) and characterize its performance taking into consideration various parameters, such as water yield, reagents’ consumption, energy consumption, etc.) • Optimizing the performance of the UF to increase the efficiency of the process, through controlling filtration cycles operational parameters, such as filtration duration, backwash duration, chemically enhanced backwash frequency, etc.

MATERIALS AND METHOD

The work described in this paper was developed in a pilot plant consist- ing of a UF and a RO system with direct surface water feed. Water was pumped to the pilot plant from the Llobregat

plants (DWTPs) • Evaluation of the suitability of direct UF as pretreatment step for RO from

downstream (2 stage process; 4.5 m3/h nominal capacity). Permeate from stage one and two was stored in a permeate tank, while the concentrate from both stages was discharged (See Figure 1).

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Initially the filtration flux was set at 50 L/m2h, and fairly conservative op- erational cleaning regimes were ap- plied: Air Scouring (AS), Air Scouring + backwash top (AS +BWT), backwash bottom (BWB), forward flush (FF) and draining (D) were set at 75, 60, 15, 20 and 30 seconds, respectively. As these operating conditions demon- strated stable membrane performance,

backwash frequency was decreased from 30 to 60 minutes. Results of this period also highlighted manageable performance, allowing for further im- plementation of constraints. However, this time, a significant reduction in the BW sequence was carried out to test the performance outcome, so the only functioning parameters were AS +

River (Barcelona, Spain), and solely pretreated by a combination of hydro- cyclone and a ring filter. After primary storage, the feed was sequentially pumped to two parallel independent DOW SFP - 2880 UF modules (pres- surized outside-in PVDF hydrofilic membranes with 30 nm pore size; 3.0 – 4.6 m3/h capacity each module). One of the modules was employed as the control line (Line – 201) and the other as the experimental line (Line – 200). To optimize the process, modifications in the operating sequence were firstly implemented in the experimental line. The benefit of the change was then val- idated from a process point of view and the sustainability of the operation was demonstrated by comparing with the control line. The response of changing operational parameters with respect to variations in feed water quality was also evaluated. The filtrate produced by the UF modules was purged into an inter- mediate tank, which was used to sup- ply water to the subsequent RO system

plants (DWTPs) • Evaluation of the suitability of direct UF as pretreatment step for RO from
plants (DWTPs) • Evaluation of the suitability of direct UF as pretreatment step for RO from

www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 21

Water | Filtration Figure 2: Normalized TMP variation along time both at the experimental line (UF200)

Water | Filtration

Water | Filtration Figure 2: Normalized TMP variation along time both at the experimental line (UF200)

Figure 2: Normalized TMP variation along time both at the experimental line (UF200) and the control line (UF201) at 60 and 30 minutes of filtration, respectively.

Water | Filtration Figure 2: Normalized TMP variation along time both at the experimental line (UF200)

Figure 3: Normalized TMP variation along time both at the experimental line (UF200) and the control line (UF201) at 24 and 12 hours of CEB frequency, respectively.

Water | Filtration Figure 2: Normalized TMP variation along time both at the experimental line (UF200)

Figure 4: Varying feed and UF permeate turbidity

BWT (30 s) and FF (30 s), results in- dicated a significant and irreversible rise in fouling or TMP (Trans Mem- brane pressure). Conditions were then altered so that the default five steps were implemented again but

Water | Filtration Figure 2: Normalized TMP variation along time both at the experimental line (UF200)

each one with duration of 30 seconds. Once these changes were imple- mented, operation was stable at 30 minutes filtration cycles, which was then increased to 60 minutes soon after, showing a similar trend (Figure

22 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

2). Consequently, it was decided to re- duce the CEB frequency in order to minimize chemical usage, so an ad- justment was made from 12 hour cy- cles to once every 24 hours, yet again implication of such a constraint

showed no hindrance on performance (Figure 3). More recently the operat- ing flux was increased to 60 L/m2h with a 60 minute filtration cycle; both UF modules continue to display satis- factory operation, however, more test- ing is required before a final conclusion can be drawn. Thanks to the optimization under- taken, the recovery or water yield, which is described as the ratio of water produced and feed water has been in- creased from 87% to 96.5%

PERMEATE QUALITY

The Llobregat River is known for presenting a highly variable water quality as highlighted in Figure 4, which shows that turbidity during the experimental period ranged from 5 to over 1000 NTU. Despite the high vari- ability of the influent water, the volatile nature of the river has a very minimal affect on UF filtrate quality:

from the middle of March 2012 until the beginning of September 2012, the feed turbidity has varied significantly, whereas the filtrate turbidity averaged 0.06 NTU and deviated as little as 0.036 NTU.

CONCLUSIONS

Ultrafiltration demonstrated an adept ability to deal with challenging surface water conditions, becoming a feasible solution to conventional pre- treatment for drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs). Direct UF sustain- able performance was accomplished even with reduced BW step duration, increased flux, increased filtration cycle and reduced CEB frequency, achieving a water yield of 96.5% of raw water intake for the tested condi- tions. Furthermore, UF confirmed that once an acceptable protocol has been reached, a CEB and CIP could be ini- tiated every 24 hours and 3 months, respectively, ultimately reducing chemical consumption, within the tested conditions. Although the ultra- filtration application was successful,

further optimization is believed still to be possible. The innovative scheme proposed, direct UF followed by RO, would en- compass compact systems with low

Acknowledgements

This work has been conducted under the fi-

nancial support of the LIFE+ Program of the European Commission within the framework of the UFTEC Project (LIFE09 ENV/ES/000467 UFTEC).

References

Pearce, G.K. (2008), UF/MF pre-treatment to RO in seawater and wastewater reuse appli-

cations: a comparison of energy costs, De-

chemicals’ consumption and a rela- tively high water yield. Additionally, due to the constant and high water quality produced by the DOW Ultra- filtration system, RO membrane life- time may also be extended, benefiting the overall treatment scheme.

FN
FN

For more information email:

vgarciamolina@dow.com

salination 222, 66-73. Porcelli, N.; Judd, S. (2010), Chemical clean- ing of potable water membranes: The cost benefit of optimization, Water Research 44, Issue 5, 1389-1398.

www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 23
www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 23
Water | Filtration Perforated Metals: Clarifying Options Function, selection and benefits of perforated metal in water

Water | Filtration

Perforated Metals: Clarifying Options

Function, selection and benefits of perforated metal in water filtration applications

By Keith Mailloux, IPA Technical Committee Chair

Drop in perforated stainless steel basket allows for easy removal and cleaning.

  • I n many of the tough conditions associated with water filtration – whether dealing with coarse sep-

aration, desalination, deionization or other applications – perforated metals provide strength, structural integrity and flexibility for a long-lasting, cost

Water | Filtration Perforated Metals: Clarifying Options Function, selection and benefits of perforated metal in water

efficient solution. The water purification uses of perfo- rated materials are growing more di- verse, including a wide array of applications that sort and manage de- bris in liquid. To match unique needs, perforated metal can be as thin as foil

24 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

or as thick as a 1½-inch steel plate, with holes punched in a wide array of shapes, patterns and sizes from micro- scopic up to 3 inches in diameter. Cost-efficiency heavily influences purchase decisions. Since engineers have access to many alternative mate-

rials, including wire mesh, expanded metal, PVC or plastic screens, it’s im- portant to know when and where per- forated metals are the best choice. This article will discuss the key functions and advantages of perforated metals, as well as considerations for specifying the right hole configurations, metal and options.

PRIMARY FUNCTIONS

Perforated Metals can be used in a

variety of ways in water filtration appli- cations, but they generally serve two functions better than competitive prod- ucts: Primary Treatment (Coarse Sepa- ration) and Support Cores.

Coarse Separation: Perforated met- als are commonly used as primary treatment filters. Wastewater is passed through a perforated metal screen to re- move large objects and/or a series of in- crementally smaller screens to remove grit that can cause excessive wear on equipment. Typically, these filters aren’t intended to be disposable; they’re used in a system where they’re easy to clean off with a scraper bar.

Support Mechanisms for other Fil-

ter Media: Since pass-through open- ings in perforated metal can’t be made much smaller than about 1/100th of an inch, removing tinier particles requires other filtration media. The second common function of perforated metal is as a support mechanism for these more delicate, non-rigid filters, com- monly made from paper, Styrofoam, fabric or sintered metal. While it is pos- sible to use plastic or other materials as the support core, perforated metal is necessary when dealing with high pres- sures or temperatures.

Another common application is to combine the two functions. Many fil- ters will have a perforated metal cylin- der and an inner support core with an inner filter media sandwiched in be- tween, similar to an oil filter. The outer core serves to filter out the coarse materials, and the inner core, usually permanently attached to the filter material, keeps it from collapsing on itself. This type of filter is com-

rials, including wire mesh, expanded metal, PVC or plastic screens, it’s im- portant to know when

through punching holes out of a sheet of metal, maintains much of the struc- tural integrity of the original metal sheet – enabling the design to with- stand high amounts of stress. Because of its strength, perforated metal handles high-temperature and high-pressure applications much better than its alternatives. For example, dem- ineralization takes place in a high-pres- sure tank. If that pressure builds up too high or suddenly drops, wire cloth is susceptible to bending or breaking.

monly found in large commercial buildings, factories, power generation plants, hospitals or other buildings to demineralize and deionize water up- stream of ion exchange units or other filtration systems.

STRENGTH AND DURABILITY

In general, perforated metal is stronger and more durable than other alternatives, such as wire cloth or ex- panded metal. The perforation process, usually accomplished

rials, including wire mesh, expanded metal, PVC or plastic screens, it’s im- portant to know when

www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 25

Water | Filtration Perforated filter core provides stable support and initial filter stages for outer micro-filtration

Water | Filtration

Water | Filtration Perforated filter core provides stable support and initial filter stages for outer micro-filtration

Perforated filter core provides stable support and initial filter stages for outer micro-filtration media.

Perforated metals provide the struc- tural integrity to withstand the stress without adding much weight. Perforated metals are most often used in commercial settings, where pressure and temperature are a factor, rather than in residential applications, where lower-cost material functions just as well.

DESIGN CRITERIA

Most filters are design-engineered products, meaning their design must meet certain known specifications. The type of metal used, the hole design and size, all impact the strength, flexibility and capabilities. However, the science behind filtration and water flow is ad- vanced enough that engineers can calcu- late pressure drop across a perforated surface, pressure drop against fluid flow, flow dynamics, cavitation and other fac- tors that influence design. From there, they can specify what they need in a de- sign and know with a high degree of confidence how the part will function. While hole patterns are fairly con- sistent for water filtration applications, most perforators have the flexibility to customize tooling to meet customized design requirements. They can also provide recommendations for more standard options that have similar properties to help manage cost.

SPECIFYING MATERIALS

In the same way that the desired flow rate and pressure gradient will dictate the hole size, the environment will dictate the type of metal needed. For low-cost applications, it makes sense to use as thin and inexpensive of a material as possible. However, corro- sive or high-pressures environments re- quire more robust metals. Four of the most common metals are Stainless Steel, ETP, Brass and Titanium.

Stainless Steel: Perforated stainless steel sheet is essentially a low carbon steel that contains chromium at 10% or more by weight. The chromium con- tent of the steel allows the formation of a rough, adherent, invisible, corrosion-

   
 

26 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

resisting chromium oxide film on the steel surface. If damaged mechanically or chemically, this film is self-healing in most environments. Austenitic: Austenitic stainless steels are non-magnetic, non-heat- treatable steels that have excellent cor- rosion and heat resistance with good formability over a wide range of tem- peratures. Additions of molybdenum can increase the corrosion resistance. Ferritic: Ferritic stainless steels are magnetic non heat-treatable steels that contain chromium but not nickel. They have good heat and corrosion resist- ance, in particular to seawater, and good resistance to stress-corrosion cracking. Martensitic: Martensitic grades are magnetic and can be hardened by heat treatment. They are not as corrosion re- sistant as austenitic or ferritic grades, but their hardness levels are among the highest of all the stainless steels.

ETP: Commonly called tinplate, ETP is a coated steel product composed of a thin sheet of steel, providing strength and structural integrity, elec- trolytically coated with a layer of tin for corrosion resistance and other protec- tive characteristics.

Titanium: While it’s one of the most expensive options available, Titanium provides the best strength-to-weight ratio among metals – 40 percent lighter than steel and 60% heavier than aluminum.

Inconel Alloys: Inconel refers to a family of high strength nickel-chromium- iron alloys known for their resistance to oxidation and their ability to maintain their structural integrity in high-temper- ature environments. While each variation of Inconel has unique traits that make it effective in a different circumstance, they all stand up very well to caustic corro- sion, corrosion caused by high purity water, and stress-corrosion cracking.

Brass: When zinc is added to copper, it forms brass, which is stronger and harder than either of the pure metals and extremely useful for many perfo- rated metal applications. As a general rule, corrosion resistance decreases as

resisting chromium oxide film on the steel surface. If damaged mechanically or chemically, this film is

tration choices, reach out to experts in the perforation industry. They’ll help identify specific needs, consider options and em- brace the proven benefits and boundless potential of perforated materials.

FN
FN

zinc content increases, so brass used for water filtration applications usually re- quires a copper content as high as 80 percent and 90 percent.

CHOOSING THE RIGHT OPTION

As mentioned earlier, there are many different filtration options available to en- gineers. Perforated metal, expanded metal, wire cloth or plastic polymers all present different advantages. It’s impor- tant to consider more than just price when evaluating these options. It’s also crucial to understand the functional de- mands of the application and find the ma- terial that strikes the best balance between long-term cost efficiency and utility. For perforated metals, the main factors influencing the cost are material cost, the perforated pattern’s level of difficulty (hole size versus material thickness, margins), tol- erances and the quantity ordered. Working with a member company of the Industrial Perforators Association assures a reputable perforator and a known standard of quality. This can open up new avenues of cost sav- ings through alternative op- tions, stan- dardized hole arrangements or new tech-

nologies. Today, the water purifi- cation uses of p e rf o r a t e d materials are growing more diverse, and perforators are helping push the bound- aries through r e s e a r c h , knowledge sharing and innovation. They can be an excellent resource to help over- come many of the tough challenges. So when consid- ering water fil-

This article was written by a joint collabora- tion of the members of the Industrial Perfo- rators Association (IPA). About the Industrial Perforators Association:

As the only North American organization de- voted to the advancement of perforated ma- terials, the Industrial Perforators Association continues to push the boundaries of what these materials can do. Through extensive research, knowledge sharing, standards set- ting and more, the IPA provides members with the tools to drive innovation and in- crease utilization in perforation. In the process, they act as an essential resource to anyone who may benefit from incorporating perforated materials into their design.

For more information on perforated metals, their applications and their benefits, visit www.iperf.org

resisting chromium oxide film on the steel surface. If damaged mechanically or chemically, this film is

www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 27

Water | Filtration Cloth Media Filtration For Wastewater Treatment By Edward W. Lang, Filtration Product Manager,

Water | Filtration

Cloth Media Filtration For Wastewater Treatment

By Edward W. Lang, Filtration Product Manager, Aqua-Aerobic Systems, Inc.

“R evolutionary” and “New” are adjectives generally reserved for

the consumer products industry, not for the traditionally conservative water and wastewater treatment markets. Conservative, by rights, since the pub- lic welfare is the most important con- sideration. However, there are few words to describe the impact of Cloth Media Filtration, the most revolution- ary innovation to influence tertiary treatment in decades. Tertiary filtration of secondary treated wastewater has become more of a focus in recent years due to ever tightening discharge limits on many contaminants. For instance, the advent

of reclaimed wastewater for beneficial reuse and the establishment of total phosphorous limits below 0.1 mg/l re- quire plant operators to provide spe- cialized levels of treatment. Historically, deep bed rapid gravity

filters have been called upon to provide these low filtered effluent discharge levels. That is, until a technology was introduced that provided the filtration characteristics of deep bed filters but offered many desirable advantages. The technology is commonly referred to as Cloth Media Filtration. Textiles have been used for some time as filtration media in a variety of applications. Swiss manufacturer Mecana Umwelttechnik developed cloth media filter technology for wastewater filtration in the 1980s. In the early 1990s, Aqua-Aerobic Systems of Rockford, Ill., utilizing the Mecana design, introduced it to the United States. Over the past 30 years, both companies have improved the technol- ogy and have combined for the instal- lation of thousands of cloth media filters in a variety of applications around the world. The key to the high performance of

the technology is the cloth. OptiFiber® cloth filtration media is a woven textile having 13mm long bundles of fibers that are woven into a structured, grid- like carrier fabric. In wastewater filtra- tion, the carrier fabric, or backing, serves as an underdrain of sorts. It pro- vides support for the fiber bundles while offering the necessary porosity to allow free flow of backwash water, re- moving solids from the fiber media during cleaning. In its natural state, the fiber bundles are full-bodied and protrude outward, perpendicular to the backing material. Once placed into operation, or wetted, the fibers relax and overlay one an- other, creating a barrier to solids. There are two major advantages of pile cloth media: 1) it offers a signifi- cant amount of surface area and, 2) depth. There are literally thousands of fine fibers per square foot of media, each one capable of intercepting solid

Figure 1. Pile Cloth Active Depth illustration
Figure 1.
Pile Cloth Active Depth illustration
Figure 2 Pile Cloth Filtration Mode illustration
Figure 2
Pile Cloth Filtration Mode illustration

28 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

particles, improving the probability of solids removal. Once intercepted, the depth of the media provides solids stor- age capacity to help mitigate increased headloss, prolonging filter run time while reducing backwash frequency and waste generation (Figure 1). The pile filtration cloth is especially engineered for wastewater treatment application and is available in a variety of materials of construction and filtra- tion ratings (Figure 2). Just as the pile filtration cloth is cus- tomized, so are the available mechanical configurations in which it is utilized.

DISK CONFIGURATION

The disk format is probably the most recognizable mechanical form of cloth media filtration. Besides provid- ing high quality filtrate, the AquaDisk® filter’s most significant at- tribute is its ability to offer more filtra- tion surface area in a much smaller footprint than gravity flow, granular media filters. For example, the foot- print area of a disk filter consumes only about ¼ the footprint area of a gravity

particles, improving the probability of solids removal. Once intercepted, the depth of the media provides solids

are extended into the slot due to the vacuum generated by the backwash pump. This serves to actively agitate the fibers to induce dislodging of the solids. Within a matter of minutes, the entire media surface area of the filter is cleaned. Once cleaned, defined by the return of the water surface in the tank to its normal operating level, the disks stop rotating and the pump is de-ener- gized. At no time during the cleaning cycle is the filter taken off-line. It is worth noting that the cloth disks are static during filtration, set in motion only for cleaning. The result is a signif- icant savings in power consumption over other technologies. Because of the vertical orientation of the disks, suspended solids having higher specific gravity may settle to the bottom of the filter tank. These solids are periodically removed via timed function, utilizing the same pump and manifolding used for backwashing (Figure 4).

DIAMOND CONFIGURATION

Another mechanical design utilizes

sand filter offering the same hydraulic throughput. Figure 3. shows a 12 Disk Configu- ration in Concrete Basin The direction of flow through the media is from the outside in. This fea- ture, combined with the vertical orien- tation of the media, results in a second substantial advantage – high-applied solids loading capacity. Compared to other gravity flow filters, cloth disk fil- ters offer more than 2x the solids load- ing capacity. The pile cloth media disk filter em- ploys an automatic vacuum cleaning or “backwash” function. As head loss through the cloth increases due to solids deposition, the operating water level in the tank rises. The differential pressure is sensed until a predeter- mined set point value is reached, sig- naling the PLC based controls to initiate a cleaning cycle. Upon initiation, the backwash pump energizes and the disks begin a slow, 1 rpm rotation. As the cloth media passes over the slotted opening in the backwash shoe, the fiber bundles

www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 29
www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 29
 

Water | Filtration

Water | Filtration Figure 3. 12 Disk Configuration in Concrete Basin Figure 4. AquaDisk Backwash Mode
Water | Filtration Figure 3. 12 Disk Configuration in Concrete Basin Figure 4. AquaDisk Backwash Mode

Figure 3. 12 Disk Configuration in Concrete Basin Figure 4. AquaDisk Backwash Mode

pile cloth media in a diamond format. The AquaDiamond® filter (Figure 5) embodies the same operational princi- ples as the AquaDisk filter, i.e., pile cloth filtration media; outside-in flow path, vacuum backwash and solids dis- charge. Because it possesses a lower hy- draulic profile than the disk format, it can be retrofitted easily into existing shallow filter basins, i.e., traveling bridge filters. One of the featured benefits of this technology is its ability to offer more than 2x the hydraulic capacity of the gravity sand filter that occupied the same basin prior to replacement.

SMALL DISK CONFIGURATION

The small disk format, or Aqua MiniDisk® filter, is a smaller scale version of the full-sized disk format described previously. As such, it of- fers the same high performance fea- tures as the AquaDisk filter, but is used to treat smaller flows. All of the above-described tech- nologies provide exceptional filtrate quality. For example, effluent total suspended solids (TSS) and turbidity (NTU) are generally less than 5.0 mg/l and 2.0 NTU, respectively. This

performance is achievable with cloths having fine pile fibers manu-

factured from nylon, acrylic or poly- ester. A unique cloth made of Mi- crofiber construction improves TSS and turbidity removal by approxi- mately 50%. This level of perform- ance rivals that of deep bed rapid gravity filters while minimizing foot- print and life cycle costs. The impact of cloth media filtra- tion on the wastewater treatment in- dustry is widespread. Today, in the municipal wastewater treatment mar- ket, cloth media filtration is consid- ered during design by plant owners and consulting engineers for almost every project. Many times, cloth

30 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com
30 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com
Figure 5. AquaDiamond Overview with Diamond Lateral (inset). media filtration is used to replace old sand

Figure 5. AquaDiamond Overview with Diamond Lateral (inset).

media filtration is used to replace old sand filters. There are some application limitations for cloth media filtration. For example, they are not generally used for denitrification or as a final barrier for

potable water treatment. There is no doubt, however, that cloth media filtra- tion provides high quality filtrate that meets, or exceeds, state regulatory require- ments with low cost of ownership.

FN
FN

For more information contact:

AQUA-AEROBIC SYSTEMS, INC.

Tel: 1-815-639-4483

Fax 815-654-2508

Email: elang@aqua-aerobic.com

Website: www.aqua-aerobic.com

www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 31
www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 31
Filtration | Recycling Advanced Filtration Technology Enables the Fibers for the Textile Industry By Raj Shah,

Filtration | Recycling

Advanced Filtration Technology Enables the Fibers for the Textile Industry

By Raj Shah, Pall Corporation

T he 2012 London Olympic Games were as much about the “green” as they were

about the “gold,” and described by some as being the greenest Olympics to date. Not only did the Olympic or- ganizing committee and sponsors do their parts in ensuring a green ap- proach to constructing and operating the Olympic venues, but the apparel companies designed sustainable clothing and accessories, which were worn by the athletes. According to the website of a

major apparel company, each uniform that the USA men’s basketball team

wore was made from 22 recycled plas- tic bottles. Several countries and teams proudly wore uniforms featur- ing material that was largely made from recycled content. This was a major accomplishment considering the importance given to the function of the athletic wear. Polyester fiber is the most com- mon building block for sustainable clothing and delivers high perform- ance for flexible, light-weight, re- duced-wind, and drag-resistant fabrics. However, in order to produce such athletic garments from recycled materials, the quality of the recycled

Filtration | Recycling Advanced Filtration Technology Enables the Fibers for the Textile Industry By Raj Shah,

32 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

polyester fiber needs to be on par with that of virgin material. Pall Corporation is a leader in fil- tration, separation and purification and has been providing filtration so- lutions to the textile industry since the 1960s. In recent years, Pall’s tech- nology has extended into the recy- cling industry and has enabled the production of high-quality fibers from recycled feed stock. Pall helps its customers to enable a greener, safer future and has once again been named one of the greenest companies in America by Newsweek magazine. Chung Shing Textile Company was

Production of High-Quality Recycled PET Large photo shows used plastic bottles of various kinds, and after
Production of High-Quality Recycled PET Large photo shows used plastic bottles of various kinds, and after

Production of High-Quality Recycled PET

Large photo shows used plastic bottles of various kinds, and after they are turned into bales (insert) from Chung Shing Textile.

founded in Taiwan in 1949. It is a fully integrated, large-scale textile manufacturer engaged in chemical fiber manufacturing, yarn spinning, weaving, dying & printing, and gar- ment manufacturing. Chung Shing Textile operates an 850-ton per day manufacturing site at Yang-Mei Chemical Fiber factory in Taiwan, where it produces virgin-grade poly- ester fibers and chips for textile use. Synthetic fiber production and pro- cessing is a chemically intensive process that is costly and draws on limited natural resources. As an eco- conscious corporation, Chung Shing

Textile believes in contributing to en- vironmental sustainability and oper- ates under the 3R waste management principle (Reduce, Reuse, and Recy- cle). In fact, in 2005 it started manu- facturing high-quality PET textile fiber from recycled plastic bottle waste. These fibers are currently mar- keted under the “GreenPlus” brand and are used in a wide variety of tex- tile applications by leading manufac- turers of popular brands. GreenPlus fibers are certified by Oeko Tex Stan- dard 100 (Certificate Number: TPYO 055042) and Greenmark (Certificate Number: 3159).

www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 33

GREENPLUS FIBER PROCESS

Post-consumer PET bottles are col- lected at communities and recycling centers throughout the world. The bot- tles are baled and brought to a process- ing facility, where they are sorted by type (PET, HDPE, LDPE, etc.) and color. The PET bottles are then stripped of their labels and caps and washed multiple times to remove any adhesives and other possible contami- nants. Next, the bottles are crushed and chopped into flakes. The small flakes are fed into an extruder, filtered,

and spun through spinnerets to pro- duce recycled PET fiber. The fiber is

Production of High-Quality Recycled PET Large photo shows used plastic bottles of various kinds, and after
Filtration | Recycling
Filtration | Recycling

CPF System from Pall

crimped, cut, drawn, and stretched into required lengths for baling. Baled fiber can be processed into fabric for a variety of textile products.

CHALLENGE OF HIGH-QUALITY FIBERS

Polyester fibers made from post- consumer bottles are expected to be of equal quality to those produced from virgin raw materials. These fibers should possess the same desirable properties including strength, abrasion resistance, flexibility, and moisture ab- sorption. While good for the environ-

quality of recycled fibers may vary:

• The feed stock is from different sources (water bottles, soft drinks, detergents, and other packaging containers). • Washing and other technologies used for converting the bottles into flakes can differ substantially between processors. • Recycled flakes may contain impurities such as paper, metal, foil, other polymers, sand, or dirt.

ment, recycled fibers present a real challenge to manufacturers, as the pri- mary feed stock (recycled PET flakes) can vary considerably in quality. There are several reasons why the

As a result, melt filtration must play an important role in the recycling process by removing contaminants and ensuring consistent, high-quality feed stock. This crucial step is necessary to

34 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

Filtration | Recycling CPF System from Pall crimped, cut, drawn, and stretched into required lengths for

eliminate variance in the feed stock quality, which ultimately will impact the end fiber quality. Two technologies are typically used during the melt filtration process:

1) Screen changers 2) High-area duplex-style continuous melt filter systems

Screen changers allow operators to collect hard contaminants on woven wire screens during the extrusion process. They are easy to use, but offer limited filter area and thus plug up very rapidly, resulting in undesir- able polymer shearing and high dif- ferential pressure. They also require multiple daily interventions, result-

Inside Chung Shing Textile plant
Inside Chung Shing Textile plant
Inside Chung Shing Textile plant www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 35
www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 35
www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 35
Filtration | Recycling Chung Shing Textile operates an 850 ton per day manufacturing site at Yang-Mei

Filtration | Recycling

Chung Shing Textile operates an 850 ton per day manufacturing site at Yang-Mei Chemical Fiber factory in Taiwan, where it produces virgin-grade polyester fibers and chips for textile use.

ing in an unstable operation that lasts a few hours on-stream at best. Even the most expensive and sophis- ticated screen changers result in dis- continuous operation. In general, screen changers are considered basic technology and are hardly ever pre- ferred by any fiber producer. High-area continuous melt filter systems allow operators to run sub- stantially longer with less downtime than screen changers. These systems offer clear advantages when process- ing recycled materials, as well as ma- terials that require long run cycles. Continuous melt filter systems are often the technology of choice. Chung Shing Textile had been running a duplex-style filter system for processing its recycled fibers. A European textile company supplied the duplex filter system, which used

Filtration | Recycling Chung Shing Textile operates an 850 ton per day manufacturing site at Yang-Mei

a plug-style diverter valve that caused polymer degradation and rapid plugging of the filter elements. The on-stream life of the filter was only 1-2 days, requiring expensive changeovers and considerable down time. More importantly, the quality of the resulting fibers was not compara- ble to that of fibers made from virgin material.

PALL’S ADVANCED FILTRATION TECH

After reviewing the polymer feed stock and operating conditions, Pall offered its duplex-style Continuous Polymer Filter (CPF system®) cus- tomized to suit process requirements. Pall’s CPF technology uses a patented, contoured spool-type di- verter valve and is designed for use in various polymer melt filtration processes. To date, Pall has sold over

36 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

2600 CPF systems, many of them in polyester fiber production processes. Chung Shing Textile has adopted Pall’s model 100 CPF system across its 11 chip spinning lines. Currently, five of the lines are used to produce GreenPlus fiber. The system was de- signed to use filter elements made with Pall’s Dynalloy® filter media – a premium nonwoven type sintered metal fiber media suitable for remov- ing hard and soft gelatinous content through its tapered pore geometry. The results were immediately notice- able – the operation became stable and on-stream filter life increased to 7-8 days. “Pall’s CPF technology enabled us to achieve the high-quality recycled polyester fiber that is comparable to virgin fiber,” said Mr. Dai, Chung Shing Textile plant manager. “The

CPF system is a compact and proven design ideally suited for such fiber processes. The system provides con- sistent fiber quality and improved on-stream filter life with minimal op- erator intervention. This was funda- mental in lowering our cost of production. We are proud of our GreenPlus fiber product and its wide- spread use at the 2012 London Olympic Games.”

RESULTS

Since its beginning in 2011, GreenPlus fiber capacity has ex- panded to five production lines total- ing 56 MTD. Each production line is now retrofitted with Pall’s CPF tech-

nology for high-quality continuous fiber production. The next step is to extend the on-stream life of the fil- ters by introducing Pall’s innovative Ultipleat® Polymer Candle elements into the existing systems.

CPF system is a compact and proven design ideally suited for such fiber processes. The system

printing, and garment manufactur- ing. All are vertically integrated through a comprehensive coverage of the upstream, midstream and down- stream operations. Its capital has skyrocketed from the initial NT$40,000 to today’s NT$8.4 billion. The company markets its products both at home and abroad under brand names, which have become synonymous with quality.

FN
FN

For more information contact:

Raj Shah Pall Corporation Tel: 1-386-822-8014 Fax: 1-386-822-8010 Email: raj_shah@pall.com Website: www.pall.com

PALL CORPORATION

Pall Corporation is a filtration, sep- aration and purification leader provid- ing solutions to meet the critical fluid management needs of customers across the broad spectrum of life sciences and industry. Pall works with customers to advance health, safety and environmen- tally responsible technologies. The company’s engineered products enable process and product innovation and minimize emissions and waste. Pall Corporation is an S&P 500 company, serving customers worldwide. Pall has been named by Newsweek magazine “a top green company.”

CHUNG SHING TEXTILE COMPANY

Chung Shing Textile, founded in 1949, is a fully integrated, large-scale textile manufacturer based in Tai- wan. It includes five operating divi- sions: chemical fiber manufacturing, yarn spinning, weaving, dying &

CPF system is a compact and proven design ideally suited for such fiber processes. The system
www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 37
www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 37
Coolant | Filtration The Best Practice for Supplying Filtered Coolant to High Pressure Pumps By James

Coolant | Filtration

The Best Practice for Supplying Filtered Coolant to High Pressure Pumps

By James Joseph, Joseph Marketing

Coolant | Filtration The Best Practice for Supplying Filtered Coolant to High Pressure Pumps By James

A reservoir between the filter, which is cleaning the coolant, and the high pres-

sure pump, which is using the coolant, is an important component to protect the pump and the filter, regardless of the system’s size The objective of this article is to ex- plain what happens in machining op- erations which use high pressure

Coolant | Filtration The Best Practice for Supplying Filtered Coolant to High Pressure Pumps By James

pumps to feed coolant to flow-through tools or other nozzles where a higher than normal pressure is needed. High pressure pumps are incorporated to meet the needs, which can range from 300 psi to as high as 5000 psi. These pumps have precision components and must have cleaner coolant to mainly protect the pump as well as protect the sensitive tools. Applications needing

38 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

pressures just below 300 psi are usually handled by pumps, which are more tol- erant of some contamination in the coolant. But they still need better qual- ity fluid for the operations they serve. The filter for the high-pressure sys- tem can be the primary filter for the process or could be a secondary “pol- ishing” filter, which enhances the clar- ity of the coolant received from a main filter. In either case, the filter discussed here is dedicated to the needs of the high pressure pump. Large systems serving several sta- tions are usually designed with a reser- voir because of the volume needed. Figure 1 shows a typical schematic with the needed controls to insure safe operation and easy start up. However, individual machines may not need all the elaborate controls but should use a reservoir as part of the system’s design to serve the filter and pump.

TYPICAL EFFECTIVE SYSTEM

Figure 2 shows a typical reliable arrangement where the tank (sized for the flow) helps the filter and the pump perform their functions. The reliability comes from:

• The filter sees a constant flow totally independent of the pump’s cycle, which usually is intermittent. Continuous flow does not constantly “pulse” the filter’s surface which can adversely affect the element’s performance and life; particularly for bag filters.

• The continuous overflow from the reservoir to either the machine’s sump or systems main tank, allows

the filter to maintain the coolant’s clarity all the time. It is like a sidearm filtration
the filter to maintain the coolant’s clarity all the time. It is like a sidearm filtration

the filter to maintain the coolant’s clarity all the time. It is like a sidearm filtration loop. If overflow is not possible than level controls can be used in the reservoir. They will at least reduce the cycling of the filter’s flow.

• The high pressure pump has a constant suction head of liquid so its output will be stable. A variable suction head can cause starving or even cavitation, both of which can shorten pump life.

This is the best practice and below are two schematics of familiar existing systems applied to individual ma- chines. Their schemes are compared to the Figure 2 layout to show their vul- nerability. This is not an indictment on the designers of these systems. Many of these designs were developed to stay within the limits of space and money. Others may have evolved as the needs in the machine’s operations changed and high pressure pumps were added to the station. They all work and serve needs. However, they do have weaknesses, which everyone should be aware of and try to avoid where possible.

TWO PROBLEMATIC ARRANGEMENTS

Figure 3 shows the most common arrangement where the filter is tied directly to the suction of the high pressure pump. It is an in-line filter trying to keep up with the demands of the pump.

Vulnerability

1.

As

the

filter loads,

the flow

through it is throttled back and the pump is sensing a dropping suction head. The flow can be cut so low that the pump is starved and could cavitate, which shortens its life and creates prob- lems with the tools on the machine. Many systems have automatic by pass, which just sends dirty liquid to the pump. Some of these are fitted with vi- sual indicators that often go unnoticed.

2. The pump usually cycles on and

off or diverts flow as the station goes through its machining sequence. The constant change in flow and pres- sure can routinely pulse (flex) the filter each time, and two things can happen:

• The element flexing can reach a point to possibly rupture the surface or cause channeling where the cake and media open up allowing dirty liquid to flow through uncontrolled

www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 39
www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 39
Filtration Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestures GL Capital, LLC We understand the nuances of the domestic and

Filtration Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestures GL Capital, LLC

We understand the nuances of the domestic and international filtration industry and bring over 70 years of combined business, technical and finan- cial expertise. The current eco- nomic climate is an ideal time for sellers to locate buyers seeking to diversify and for buyers to identify growth op- portunities through acquisition.

Filtration Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestures GL Capital, LLC We understand the nuances of the domestic and

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Filtration Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestures GL Capital, LLC We understand the nuances of the domestic and
Filtration Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestures GL Capital, LLC We understand the nuances of the domestic and
 

Edward C. Gregor

P. John Lovell

704-442-1940

719-375-1564

 

ecg@egregor.com

glcapital@comcast.net

   

Coolant | Filtration

Filtration Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestures GL Capital, LLC We understand the nuances of the domestic and

• When flow is stopped the cake can

slide down on the media, which

adversely affects the filters ability to offer uniform cake filtration

Figure 4 reflects another common

arrangement where the filter is sand-

wiched between the discharge of the primary supply pump and the suction of the high pressure pump.

This arrangement is similar to Fig-

ure 3 except the difference is that Fig-

ure 3 shows the filter receiving coolant

from a common manifold or a pump which is serving more functions and not dedicated to the filter. This pump is

connected only to serve the filter.

Vulnerability

1. The same set of problems de- scribed for Figure 3 occurs here as well.

2. The problems above are further

aggravated with the normal variances occurring in the pressure changes in

the pumps. The pressure differential

across the media can be generated by the pressure changes between the pumps only. The element should only be affected by the force of one pump, not both. As the element gets dirty it could easily be the variances in the two pumps’ pressures, which push the ele- ment to its set point and call for a change. This would be a premature change since the element itself is not “dirty” enough to be changed on con- tamination only.

SUMMARY

The basis of this article is to stress the importance of an intermediate reservoir working in conjunction with the filter to

serve the high pressure pump. The key is to filter the liquid for the reservoir and then let the high pressure pump draw clean coolant from it.

FN
FN

Jim Joseph is a member of International Filtration News' Editorial Board and an industry consultant for coolant filtration. Tel/Fax: 1-757-565-1549 Email: josephmarketing@verizon.net

Read International Filtration News online: www.filtnews.com
Read International Filtration News
online: www.filtnews.com

40 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com

News | Briefs Call for Papers for FILTECH 2013 T he world of filtration and sep-

News | Briefs

Call for Papers for FILTECH 2013

T he world of filtration and sep- aration will come to Germany for FILTECH 2013 from Oc-

tober 22nd through the 24th. The largest filtration show worldwide will feature 300 exhibitors and will be ac- companied by a three-day conference presenting the latest filtration and sep- aration research to an international au- dience from around the world. The FILTECH Congress will offer a representative cross section of cur- rent research findings, global devel-

opments, and new approaches to solving problems with respect to the methods for the classic mechanical separation of particles from liquids, the gas cleaning and membrane fil- tration methods. This ranges from mineral dressing to biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, and chemicals right up to environmental technol- ogy and water purification. Special highlights are a plenary and six sur- vey lectures in which internationally renowned experts give a comprehen-

sive overview of state of the art knowledge and techniques concern- ing important aspects of separation technology. In addition, one day prior to FILTECH 2013, two one-day Short Courses will be held featuring “Fine Dust Separation” and “Solid- Liquid-Separation." Congress language is English. Ab- stracts can be submitted until Febru- ary 14, 2013. Details for abstract submission and stand booking are available at www.filtech.de.

FN
FN

Eliminating High Maintenance Costs with Orival Filters

P lugged nozzles, coated heat exchange surfaces and dirty chillers are not only a costly

maintenance item but result in higher operating costs. The only way to pre- vent this potential is to remove sus- pended solids from the distribution system. The OR-Series of filters by Ori- val, Inc. are designed to reliably remove both organic and inorganic suspended solids. With their highly efficient flush- ing systems and large screen areas, Ori- val OR Filters provide superior performance and quick payback. OR filters are generally mounted in a hori- zontal configuration parallel to the pip- ing for quick and easy installation. The ORG-Series of Orival Filters offer the same qualities and performance but in a vertical mounting configuration. Pay- back on investment has been docu- mented as quickly as 33 days for flow rates of 1100 gpm. Rugged OR and ORG Filters, with their stainless steel screens and rugged dirt collectors, do not rely on electricity for filter opera-

tion. A simple integrated hydraulic sys-

News | Briefs Call for Papers for FILTECH 2013 T he world of filtration and sep-

Orival Filters

tem manages the short cleaning cycle triggered by a predetermined pressure loss across the dirty screen. Complete screen cleaning takes only 5-15 sec- onds with no interruption of water flow. Sizes are available from 1½” to

24” with screen openings from 3000 microns down to 10 microns.

FN
FN

For more information:

Email: filters@orival.com Website: www.orival.com

Did you know that ... The American Filtration and Separations Society (AFS) Spring Conference is May
Did you know that ...
The American Filtration and Separations Society (AFS) Spring Conference
is May 6-9th. The AFS is the largest Filtration Society in the world and the
principal educator of the industry. AFS Corporate Sponsorships have
increased 157 percent since 2009.
For more information visit: www.afssociety.org
www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 41
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Mergers & Acquisitions GL Capital, LLC Specialists in Mergers, Divestitures and Acquisitions of filtration industry companies
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Specialists in Mergers, Divestitures
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704-442-1940
ecg@egregor.com
Mergers & Acquisitions GL Capital, LLC Specialists in Mergers, Divestitures and Acquisitions of filtration industry companies
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www.filtnews.com • February 2013 • 43
Advertiser Index Page Website A2Z Filtration Specialities AFS Conference Ahlstrom Air Filter, Inc. Ashby Cross Co.
Advertiser Index
Page
Website
A2Z Filtration Specialities
AFS Conference
Ahlstrom
Air Filter, Inc.
Ashby Cross Co.
Clack Corporation
Contract Pleating Services
Dexmet Corporation
Ferguson Perforating
Flow Ezy
Industrial Netting
JCEM-USA
Magnetool Inc.
Metalex
Metcom Inc.
Orival Inc.
PerCor Mfg.
Perforated Tubes
Rosedale Products
Sealant Equipment
Solent Technology Inc.
Sonobond Utrasonics
SpinTek Filtration
Xinxiang Tiancheng Aviation
11
www.a2zfiltration.com
Inside Back Cover
www.afssociety.org
5
www.ahlstrom.com
9
www.airfilterusa.com
10
www.ashbycross.com
35
www.clackcorp.com
29
www.solentech.com
21
www.dexmetfilter.com
21
www.fn.perfnow.com
30
www.flowezyfilters.com
37
www.industrialnetting.com
1
www.jcem.ch
27
www.magnetoolinc.com
39
www.metlx.com
37
www.metcomusa.com
15
www.orival.com
35
www.percormfg.com
19
www.perftubes.com
3
www.rosedaleproducts.com
25
www.sealantequipment.com
31
www.solentech.com
23
www.sonobondultrasonics.com
Back Cover
Inside Front Cover
www.spintek.com
www.tchkjh.com
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International Filtration News
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44 • February 2013 • www.filtnews.com