WEATHER

Hallie Rose Cunningham
Second grade, Vernon
High 57 Low 32
Mostly sunny
Full forecast on
page 2A.
FIVE QUESTIONS
1 What was the first species of coffee
bean to be cultivated — in the Middle
East, as its name suggests?
2 In what modern-day nation is the city
of Timbuktu?
3 What title object of a 1957 movie
was built, and then blown up, by Colo-
nel Nicholson?
4 Which U.S. state capital is “land-
locked” in that it’s not accessible by
land — only by sea or air?
5 The Model 1015, or “Bubbler,” from
1946, is still the most iconic design of
what object?

Answers, 8B
INSIDE
Classifieds 8B
Comics 6B
Obituaries 5A
Opinions 4A
LOCAL FOLKS
Anne Murphy is a certified
pharmacy technician at Medical
Arts Pharmacy in Columbus.
CALENDAR
Tuesday, Dec. 31
■ New Year’s Eve senior
dance: Dance the New Year in
to live music at a senior dance at
the New Hope Community Cen-
ter, from 8 p.m. until midnight.
Admission is $5. No smoking or
alcohol permitted.
Saturday, Jan. 4
■ Guided bird walk: Friends of
Noxubee Refuge host a guided
bird walk with Margaret Copeland
at Bluff Lake at 10 a.m. at the
Noxubee Refuge Visitor Center in
Starkville. Identify and talk about
species of duck found commonly
during the winter at the Refuge.
For more information, contact
the center, 662-323-5548. Reg-
istration is not required; wear
appropriate outdoor clothing.
Thursday, Jan. 9
■ Exhibit opening: A free re-
ception from 5:30-7 p.m. at the
Rosenzweig Arts Center features
an open call show around the
theme of the civil rights move-
ment. In addition, the exhibit
“Birmingham: The Movement
that Changed the World” on
display contains exclusive re-
cords, artifacts and photographs
marking the 50th anniversary of
the Birmingham civil rights move-
ment. For more information, call
662-328-2787.
DISPATCH CUSTOMER SERVICE 328-2424 | NEWSROOM 328-2471
ESTABLISHED 1879 | COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI
CDISPATCH.COM
F
R
E
E
!
FRIDAY | DECEMBER 27, 2013
BY SARAH FOWLER
sfowler@cdispatch.com
Voters in the Lowndes Coun-
ty School District will no longer
be able to vote for their school
superintendent.
In a 4-1 vote, the Lowndes
County School board voted to
grant themselves the power
to appoint the superintendent.
Currently, both the superinten-
dent and members of the school
board are elected.
When reached for comment
Thursday afternoon, Superin-
tendent Lynn Wright was still
coming to terms with the board’s
decision.
When asked if he felt the
board’s decision
was personal, he
said he “didn’t
want to specu-
late.”
However, with
two years left
in his four-year
term, Wright said
he would continue to do his job in
the same way he has for the last
two years.
“I’ve got two more years,”
Wright said. “I respect their opin-
ion and they’re entitled to it. I feel
like I have an obligation to all of
the voters in Lowndes County to
be a good steward of the taxpay-
ers’ money and ensure students
get the best education possible.”
Out of more than 14,000
school districts in the nation,
only 147 have elected superinten-
dents. Of the 147, 63 of those are
in Mississippi, according to the
Mississippi Parents’ Campaign.
Wright said the board based
their decision to appoint super-
intendents to get away from pol-
itics in the school district. How-
ever, Wright said in his opinion,
the political aspect is what helps
keep superintendents account-
able.
“Any elected official has to
Lowndes County school board will appoint supe
Bike exchange
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
Eric Dumas takes a new bicycle to his truck outside of K-Mart Thursday afternoon in Columbus. Dumas was returning the bike
he gave his 11-year-old daughter, Daysha, who wanted a bike of a different color. Thursday is typically one of the busiest days of
the year for retailers, with shoppers making returns or using the gift cards they received for Christmas.
Obama signs
bipartisan
budget deal,
defense bill
Bill eases spending
cuts and cracks down
on sexual assault in the
military
BY JOSH LEDERMAN
The Associated Press
HONOLULU —
Rounding out a tough
and frustrating year,
President Barack
Obama signed a bi-
partisan budget deal
Thursday easing
spending cuts and a
defense bill cracking
down on sexual as-
sault in the military, as the president
and Congress began pivoting to the
midterm election year ahead.
Obama put his signature on both
hard-fought bills while vacation-
ing in Hawaii, where he has been
regrouping with his family since
Saturday. The bill signing marks
one of Obama’s last official acts in a
year beset by a partial government
shutdown, a near-default by the
Treasury, a calamitous health care
rollout and near-perpetual congres-
sional gridlock.
Although the budget deal falls
short of the grand bargain that
Obama and congressional Republi-
cans once aspired to, it ends the cy-
cle of fiscal brinkmanship — for now
— by preventing another shutdown
Obama
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
Lowes’
stocker
Lou Salter
tosses a
set of 60-
watt light
bulbs into a
cart at the
home im-
provement
store in
Columbus
Thursday
afternoon.
Residents have Christmas tree disposal options
BY NATHAN GREGORY
ngregory@cdispatch.com
Now that Christmas is over, Lowndes
and Oktibbeha county residents have
multiple options for disposing of their
old trees.
Columbus public works director Ca-
sey Bush said city residents can leave
their trees at the edge of their driveways
to be picked up or they can bring them to
the landfill on Armstrong Road. Crews
ask that limbs be trimmed down to at
least 4 feet in length to make for easier
and faster pick-up, he said. The city’s two
boom rubbish trucks go through wards
1 and 2 on Monday, 3 and 4 on Tuesday, 5
on Wednesday and 6 on Thursday.
Lowndes County residents can sim-
ply follow the normal procedure for rub-
bish pickup and place their trees on the
side of their driveways as
well. Rubbish including
trees will be picked up
next Monday in Districts
1 and 2. Road manager
Ronnie Burns said crews
try to wrap up the three re-
maining districts on Tues-
day and Wednesday but
there may be a few areas on
Thursdays that still need pick-up.
Trees will also be picked up by rubbish
Locals prepare to phase
out traditional light bulbs
BY NATHAN GREGORY
ngregory@cdispatch.com
“We’re selling cases.”
Helen Pridmore, owner of
Lighting Unlimited, says her
customers are buying “prob-
ably triple to four times as
many” 60-watt, incandescent
light bulbs now as they would
have normally.
Those and traditional 40-
watt bulbs will
no longer be
produced after
Jan. 1 as part of
phase-out reg-
ulations from
the Energy In-
dependence and
Security Act of
2007. Phase-outs started in
2012 with 100-watt light bulbs
followed by 75-watt bulbs this
year. Options in its place will
include compact fluorescent
lamp bulbs (CFLs) and light
emitting diode (LEDs) bulbs.
See BUDGET, 6A
Lowndes, Oktibbeha county crews will pick up next week
See CHRISTMAS TREES, 6A
Decision voted on during board meeting
Wright
See SCHOOL BOARD, 6A
Production of 40-, 60-
watt incandescents to
cease Jan. 1
See LIGHT BULBS, 6A
Pridmore
Bush
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 2A FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2013
DID YOU HEAR?
CONTACTING THE DISPATCH
SUBSCRIPTIONS
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Five-Day forecast for the Golden Triangle
Almanac Data National Weather
Lake Levels
River Stages
Sun and Moon Solunar table
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, i-ice, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow
Yesterday 7 a.m. 24-hr.
Lake Capacity yest. change
The solunar
period schedule
allows planning days
so you will be fshing
in good territory or
hunting in good cover
during those times.
Temperature
Precipitation
Tombigbee
Yesterday Flood 7 a.m. 24-hr.
River stage yest. change
Columbus Thursday
High/low ..................................... 53°/24°
Normal high/low ......................... 55°/34°
Record high ............................ 80° (1964)
Record low .............................. 19° (1977)
Thursday.......................................... 0.00"
Month to date ................................. 5.52"
Normal month to date ...................... 4.38"
Year to date .................................. 60.52"
Normal year to date ....................... 54.79"
Saturday Sunday
Atlanta 54 43 r 56 39 r
Boston 46 33 s 45 34 r
Chicago 42 30 pc 30 3 sf
Dallas 60 41 s 48 26 c
Honolulu 82 68 s 81 64 pc
Jacksonville 68 63 sh 74 46 t
Memphis 58 40 pc 57 30 pc
54°
40°
Saturday
Mostly cloudy,
afternoon rain
58°
34°
Sunday
Times of clouds
and sun
44°
26°
Monday
Cooler with variable
clouds
47°
24°
Tuesday
Mostly sunny
Aberdeen Dam 188' 164.79' none
Stennis Dam 166' 137.80' none
Bevill Dam 136' 136.40' +0.04'
Amory 20' 12.24' +0.08'
Bigbee 14' 7.41' -0.14'
Columbus 15' 7.67' -0.43'
Fulton 20' 12.52' -0.47'
Tupelo 21' 1.60' none
Last
Jan. 23
Full
Jan. 15
First
Jan. 7
New
Jan. 1
Sunrise ..... 6:57 a.m.
Sunset ...... 4:53 p.m.
Moonrise ... 1:37 a.m.
Moonset .. 12:55 p.m.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013
Major ..... 7:57 a.m.
Minor ..... 1:44 a.m.
Major ..... 8:25 p.m.
Minor ..... 2:11 p.m.
Major ..... 8:47 a.m.
Minor ..... 2:33 a.m.
Major ..... 9:17 p.m.
Minor ..... 3:02 p.m.
Saturday Friday
Saturday Sunday
Nashville 54 41 pc 54 31 r
Orlando 80 67 pc 79 57 t
Philadelphia 50 36 s 44 35 r
Phoenix 66 45 pc 65 42 s
Raleigh 58 40 pc 50 38 r
Salt Lake City 34 16 pc 31 20 s
Seattle 45 35 pc 45 38 c
Tonight
Partly cloudy
32°
A THOUSAND WORDS
AP Photo/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute
This 2013 image provided by NASA shows that Winter is approaching in the southern hemisphere of Saturn and
with this cold season has come the familiar blue hue that was present in the northern winter hemisphere at
the start of NASA’s Cassini mission. This view looks toward the non-illuminated side of the rings from about 44
degrees below the ring plane. Images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters were combined to create
this natural color view. The images were taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera.
Friday
SAY WHAT?
“...Now when I need my government it seems that I have been
totally abandoned and forgotten.”
American Warren Weinstein in a video to President Obama
pleading for help negotiating his release from his al-Qaida
captors. Story, 7A.
Singing in the cold: Bruno
preps for Super Bowl
BY MESFIN FEKADU
AP Music Writer
NEW YORK — Every-
one is in Bruno Mars’ ear
about one thing when it
comes to performing the
Super Bowl halftime show:
How will you deal with the
freezing cold?
“Everyone’s putting the
fear in god in me like there’s
going to be a blizzard,”
Mars said in a phone inter-
view this month from Los
Angeles, asking about the
weather conditions in the
New York-New Jersey area
for his “research.”
“I’m going to wear a bee-
keeper suit, I don’t know,”
he answered about how he
will keep warm when he
performs Feb. 2. “I’m not
going to know until I get
there ... I’m not trying to
hype myself up too much.
“I know it’s going to be
cold and I just got to face it.”
The 28-year-old pop
crooner will hit the stage for
the Super Bowl at MetLife
Stadium in East Rutherford,
N.J. The singer, whose hits
range from “Grenade” to
“Locked Out of Heaven,”
typically performs with a full
band where he sings, danc-
es and strums the guitar on-
stage. Mars’ performance
follows Beyonce’s electri-
fying set earlier this year,
where she danced tightly
and sang powerfully at the
big game in New Orleans.
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP
In this 2012 file photo, Bruno Mars performs during the
2012 Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show in New York.
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TUPELO — Just be-
fore Christmas, a New
Albany family of four be-
came a family of eight.
Veronica Hernandez
gave birth Monday to
quadruplets: two boys
and two girls.
Girls Allyson Sophia
and Ashley Marie and
boys Alexander Ivan and
Anthony Ricardo were
born at 25 weeks.
“This is our Christmas
present, for sure,” said
Veronica, 33.
Helias Hernandez, 27,
is a twin himself, and has
two other sets of twins
in his family. But no one
was expecting four babies
when the couple became
pregnant this summer.
Veronica Hernandez
said they’d been told to
expect triplets. In No-
vember, she said, doctors
found another baby.
The girls weigh just
over one pound each, and
the boys are just over two
pounds each.
Veronica Hernandez
has been hospitalized at
North Mississippi Medi-
cal Center Women’s Hos-
pital since the day since
the day after Thanksgiv-
ing to keep the babies
in the womb as long as
possible and ensure they
weren’t born without a
doctor around.
The babies were on
ventilators but doing well.
They have a 16-year-
old brother and a 10-year-
old sister.
“I’m proud that I de-
livered these babies,”
said Dr. Leo Bautista.
“And this may be the only
quads that I will have in
my career ... After they
were delivered, they were
of course premature, but
they did very well after
they were delivered.”
Bautista said every-
thing looks pretty good
right now if the babies
can make it to 34 weeks
without complications.
“It’s not unheard of,
but it’s exceedingly rare,”
to have quadruplets with-
out fertility treatment,
said Bautista. “It’s about 1
in 750,000.”
Helias Hernandez said
he’s happy the babies ar-
rived safely. When they
come home — likely April
if all goes well — that’s
when the shock will set
in, he said.
Four’s a party: Quadruplets born in Tupelo
Docs originally said expect triplets
ONLINE SUBSCRIPTIONS
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Bulldog news: www.cdispatch.com/msusports
@
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2013 3A
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BY HENRY C. JACKSON
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Big
multimillion-dollar water proj-
ects, once a favorite target of
good-government reformers
who made them a poster child of
political pork, are back in vogue
as a rare force of concord in a
dysfunctional Congress.
Republicans and Democrats
who found little common ground
in 2013 are rallying around a bill
they hope to pass early next year
authorizing up to $12.5 billion
over the next decade for flood
diversion in North Dakota, wid-
ening a Texas-Louisiana water-
way, deepening Georgia’s rapidly
growing Port of Savannah and
other projects.
That’s the Senate bill’s total.
The House version would cost
about $8.2 billion. Negotiators
are confident they can merge
the two and pass the package for
President Barack Obama’s signa-
ture early in 2014.
Unlike a farm policy-food
stamp bill also the subject of
ongoing House-Senate negotia-
tions, the differences in the two
houses’ water project bills are
modest and the acrimony is less.
Negotiators say the roughly
$4 billion gap between the two
bills is more about how they are
written than substantive policy or
political differences.
“The important thing is that
we all care about reform,” said
Rep. Bill Shuster, R-Pa., chairman
of the House Transportation and
Infrastructure Committee.
Shuster’s Senate counterpart,
Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., has
said much the same thing.
The last time Congress enact-
ed a water projects bill was 2007,
and it took two-thirds majorities
in both houses to override Presi-
dent George W. Bush’s veto of it.
Negotiators held their first
formal meeting just before
Thanksgiving on blending the
two versions. Staff talks contin-
ued until Congress left for its
year-end break and will resume
in January.
Lawmakers have been drawn
to the big investment in infra-
structure sketched out in both
bills — and the promise of jobs
that entails. Business groups, led
by the U.S. Chamber of Com-
merce, have lobbied members
to support the bills, saying they’ll
help keep American businesses
competitive.
The bills try to address per-
ceptions of years past that water
project legislation was loaded
with favors inserted by key law-
makers for their home districts
and states. This time, both bills
eliminate billions of dollars in
dormant and duplicative proj-
ects. Shuster stressed that this
bill contains no such “earmarks.”
Those reforms still aren’t
enough for some conservative
groups that pressed lawmakers
to oppose the bills, saying they
are reform in name only and
don’t do enough to cut spending.
“Even before the predictable
increase in authorizations as this
bill goes through the process,
this legislation would only shave
a few billion dollars off the back-
log,” Heritage Action and other
groups wrote House members.
Tea party sympathizers in
the House largely brushed off
conservative critics, buying into
the idea that this water projects
bill represents both reform and
needed investment. To waver-
ing Republicans, Schuster cited
Article 1, Section 8 of the Consti-
tution, which directs Congress
to establish roads and regulate
interstate commerce.
For their part, Democrats
breezed past environmental
groups concerned about lan-
guage that speeds up the envi-
ronmental review process for
projects.
The House bill passed 417-3 in
late October, winning support of
everyone from Democratic lead-
er Nancy Pelosi to tea party stal-
warts like Rep. Tim Huelskamp,
R-Kan.
For divided Congress, water projects are unifier
Big money water projects used to be a
favorite target of good-government types
who railed against political pork
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File
In this July 9 file photo, Senate
Environment and Public Works
Committee Chair Sen. Barbara
Boxer, D-Calif. speaks on Capi-
tol Hill in Washington.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TUPELO — Police
don’t have a suspect yet
in the death of one Tupe-
lo police officer and the
wounding of another, but
authorities are chasing
down leads and talking
to people of interest, says
Mississippi Highway Pa-
trol spokesman Ray Hall.
Cpl. Kevin Gale Stauffer
died from gunshot wounds
Monday at age 38. He is
scheduled to be buried Fri-
day. A candlelight vigil was
held Wednesday evening.
Also shot was Officer
Joseph Maher, 27. He
remained hospitalized
Thursday at North Mis-
sissippi Medical Center.
His condition was upgrad-
ed from critical to stable,
Deputy Police Chief Allan
Gilbert told The Daily
Journal.
The robbers were still
at large. On Tuesday, po-
lice released surveillance
footage from a conve-
nience store showing an
unidentified man whom
they said they want to in-
terview.
Businesses and gov-
ernments are offering a
$162,500 reward for in-
formation related to the
shootings and the robbery
of a BancorpSouth bank.
FBI Special Agent in
Charge Daniel McMullen
asked for the public’s help
in finding those involved
with Monday’s bank rob-
bery and fatal shooting
during a news briefing
Thursday night.
Authorities believe the
suspects fled in a grey
sedan and asked anyone
in the area with pictures
or information to contact
CrimeStoppers of North-
east Mississippi at 1-800-
773-TIPS or the FBI’s Tip
Line at 1-800-CALL-FBI,
WTVA-TV reports.
Wounded second officer remains hospitalized
Police don’t have a suspect yet
BY JACK ELLIOTT JR.
The Associated Press
JACKSON — Death
row inmate Charles Ray
Crawford is asking the
Mississippi Supreme
Court to let him file a new
petition that he believes
will win him a new trial.
Crawford argues in a
new motion that his pre-
vious attorneys did a poor
job of handling his first
petition for post-conviction
relief.
Crawford argues that
if the court allows him
to try again, he’ll explain
his arguments better. In
a post-conviction petition,
inmates argues they have
found new evidence — or
a possible constitutional
issue — that could per-
suade a court to order a
new trial.
Crawford is now 43 and
was sentenced to death in
1994 for the murder and
rape of Northeast Missis-
sippi Community College
student Kristy Ray in rural
Tippah County.
Crawford also has an
appeal pending before the
U.S. Supreme Court.
Crawford handcuffed
the 20-year-old Ray and
stuffed one of his socks in
her mouth before sexually
assaulting and stabbing
her to death in 1993.
Death row inmate seeks new arguments
Crawford convicted for murder and
rape of Northeast Miss. C.C. student
AREA ARRESTS
The following arrests
were reported by the
Lowndes County Sheriff’s
Office and the Columbus
Police Department:
n Sheldon Leonard
Campbell, 39, of 314 For-
rest Blvd. Apt. B, was ar-
rested at 414 Forrest Blvd.
Apt. B, on Christmas Day
by CPD and charged with
domestic violence-aggra-
vated assault by strangu-
lation.
n Jaylan Archez Colvin,
15, of 1602 Third Ave. S.,
Lot B, was arrested Dec.
18 by CPD and charged
with sexual battery. Bond
was set at $5,000.
n Jerome Wilkins
Grant Jr., 20, of 1707 Clo-
ver St., was arrested in
Greenwood Dec. 20 by
MDOC and charged with
violation of probation.
n Billy Earl Green Jr.,
40, of 4555 Nashville Fer-
ry Road E., was arrest-
ed Dec. 18 by CPD and
charged with the sale of
marijuana. He was re-
leased the same day on
a $5,000 bond. His court
date is scheduled for
March 6.
n Jerry Shondale
Nance, 35, of 1107 12th St.
S., was arrested on 15th
St. S., Dec. 19 by CPD and
charged with violation of
probation, malicious mis-
chief and simple assault.
n Mack Lenier Thom-
as, 53, of 210 Gaylane
Drive, was arrested at his
residence Dec. 21 by CPD
and charged with posses-
sion of a weapon by a fel-
on.
n Darius Quintelle
Dunlap, 22, of 706 21st
St. N., was arrested at his
residence Dec. 23 by CPD
and charged with felony
taking of a
motor ve-
hicle. Bond
was set at
$2,500. His
court date
is scheduled
for March
20.
Green Jr. Grant Jr. Colvin Campbell
Dunlap Thomas Nance
A club for boys and girls
Boys and Girls Club of Columbus
244-7090
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ABERDEEN — The city
of Aberdeen will begin pub-
lishing the names of people
owing the largest past-due
fines and fees to the city.
Originally, the city was
going to go back and list
the names of every late fine
from the past decade but al-
dermen opted to just do the
larger ones initially.
City attorney Dudley
Williams says once the list
is made public, those on it
will be given an amnesty
period to settle up. If that
passes without payment,
they will then be subject to
a court hearing.
Williams says the board
of aldermen’s action puts
consequences on those
who fail to pay within the
amnesty period.
Williams says he ex-
pects the policy to bring in
revenue.
City of Aberdeen seeks to recoup outstanding fines
4A FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2013
Opinion
BIRNEY IMES SR. Editor/Publisher 1922-1947
BIRNEY IMES JR. Editor/Publisher 1947-2003
BIRNEY IMES III Editor/Publisher
PETER IMES General Manager
SLIM SMITH Managing Editor
BETH PROFFITT Advertising Director
MICHAEL FLOYD Circulation/Production Manager
DISPATCH
THE
FROM OUR WEBSITE
OUR VIEW
It happened 70 miles to the
north, yet the tragic event that
played out in Tupelo Monday
hit far closer to home than that.
Around 3 p.m. Monday, a
pair of Tupelo Police Depart-
ment officers were gunned
down in a shootout after re-
sponding to a robbery call in a
busy area of town. The brazen
robbery and shootout in broad
daylight has stunned, saddened
and horrified the community.
One officer was killed, the
other seriously wounded. The
suspects remain at large as the
TPD, the Lee County Sheriff’s
Department, the FBI and the
Mississippi Bureau of Investi-
gations continue the search for
the suspects.
Although there is no direct
connection between what
happened in Tupelo and the
Golden Triangle, the impact
certainly crosses all juris-
dictions. It reminds us of the
very dangerous work that law
enforcement faces each day.
Events such as this bear grim
evidence that the oft-heard
phrase that law enforcement
personnel put their lives on the
line each day is no exaggera-
tion. An element of very real
danger accompanies every call
an officer responds to.
In the four days since the
shootout, details of precisely
what happened have been
few. Law enforcement has
been very guarded with what
information has been provided
to the public, which is under-
standable since the investiga-
tion is ongoing. The priority for
law enforcement, quite natural-
ly, is on identifying and appre-
hending those responsible for
this horrific crime. Aside from
releasing information such as
surveillance photos of possible
suspects and a description
of the car they believe the
suspects were driving, little is
known about how the tragedy
unfolded and how the suspects
managed to get away.
Those details, and many
others will have to wait until
the investigation has been
completed and the suspects are
brought to justice.
At that point it will be im-
portant that law enforcement
does a thorough deconstruc-
tion of the events of Dec. 23.
Were the proper policies and
procedures in place at the time
of the event? Were those pol-
icies and procedures carried
out as prescribed? In the wake
of the event, are there other
policies and/or procedures that
should be put into place?
These questions will be
asked not to assign blame to
any of the law enforcement per-
sonnel involved in the tragedy,
but to ensure that everything
that can be done to prevent
similar tragedies will be done.
No doubt, our own law en-
forcement will be paying close
attention to what is learned
from this event.
For communities every-
where, the tragedy underlines
the importance of training.
Often, when city budgets are
strained, training for our first
responders — police and fire
department personnel — be-
comes a convenient target for
cost-cutting.
Monday’s event further
emphasizes that this training
should be viewed as not just
necessary, but vital, to the
safety of law enforcement and
residents alike.
Certainly, our hearts are
with our neighbors in Tupelo.
We realize that what happened
Monday in Tupelo could hap-
pen here, too. We share their
grief.
With the images of what
happened in Tupelo fresh in
our minds, it seems appropri-
ate that when we encounter a
law enforcement officer during
our daily routine, we take a
moment to thank him or her
for the service our officers and
deputies provide.
Public safety is a dangerous
job.
What happened Monday in
Tupelo is a sobering reminder.
The following is a reader comment posted at the end
of a story published on-line. More can be found at www.
cdispatch.com.
Slimantics: Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus
Kat2u: Your reply to Virginia should have assured
her not to believe her liberal friends because they just
might be lying. Then you could have told her the follow-
ing from my friend Lori,
“Yes Virginia there is a Santa Claus, and he’s what-
ever color you think him to be. Santa is as real as the
new fallen snow that covers a mountainside. You will
only see as few flakes fall, but they will come togeth-
er as a symphony in nature and sing to you in spirit
but not in sound. The sound is in your heart, but the
symphony is just as real as if a thousand instruments
played the most beautiful song of your life... it doesn’t
matter if you see Santa as red or yellow , black or white,
it only matters that you have faith and believe and help
other to do the same. For Virginia, it is the spirit in all
of us that connects us together and makes a beautiful
symphony. “
Merry Christmas
Clarence Page: Why the right should support
boosting minimum wage
ronb39339: Wall Street is not the equivalent of Main
Street anywhere. Those economic indicators and re-
cord stock levels don’t reflect the inflation we’re already
suffering in the form of high fuel & food prices. Just go
ahead & raise that minimum wage on the private sector
& see if those food & fuel prices don’t rise in lockstep.
Minimum wage jobs are meant for young adults need-
ing some spending money & to teach responsibility to
them. Those minimum wage jobs aren’t meant to be
careers, but stepping stones to bigger jobs.
THE NATION
The disastrous
rollout of Obamacare,
worse than anyone
anticipated or warned,
could have doomed
the president’s second
term. It would require
something very big to
take your eyes off of
that disaster.
What an idea. Shut
down the government.
How clever can
you get? The only
thing worse than
Obamacare is the
crowd that would
close down the gov-
ernment, leaving peo-
ple all over the place
in the lurch, in what
they conceded from
the outset was a hope-
less act of protest
that would in practice
change nothing.
The tea party,
of course, wants
more people like
that in Washington.
And they may get them. In the
convoluted rules of Washing-
ton, that would be better for the
Democrats than the Republicans,
except that it would make getting
things done even more difficult,
which is not really good for the
president, who has to figure out
what to do for the next three
years — apart from those things
that other second-term presi-
dents have done, like leave the
country a lot.
The president could drill
down on partisan politics, make
it his priority to raise money for
Democratic candidates, attack
the “do-nothing” Republican
Congress — all of which he prob-
ably will do.
Here’s an idea. Acknowledge
mistakes. Try to fix
things. The big moves
for President Obama
may be fixing the big
moves he’s already
made.
The health care
system is the obvious
example. It is going to
be a mess, but it will
be a mess that is post-
Obamacare. Millions
of people are covered
under Obamacare.
You can’t “get rid” of
it; there is no “it” any-
more, no switch that
can be turned off.
The question is:
How do we fix all of
the things people are
complaining about
without bankrupting
ourselves?
Not to mention all
of the other things we
need to fix.
Like the NSA and
intelligence gathering.
If Obama were
a Republican president, the
disclosures relating to surveil-
lance programs would be a daily
nightmare. As it is, many of the
people you might expect to be
screaming the loudest are on
the inside or are friends with the
people on the inside, not to men-
tion supporters of the president.
So exactly whom should they
scream at?
Really, the question should
be: When is the administration
going to step up to the issue? As
far as I know, Obama is the only
former professor of constitution-
al law to become president. A
frightened and confused country
might turn to such a president in
search of a little bit of wisdom as
to how to balance overwhelming
interests (Security! Terrorism!
Liberty!) on both sides. Hello?
Are we still at war in Afghani-
stan? Any news on Guantanamo?
OK. Just had to ask.
Immigration reform? What if
you try to do it just the opposite
of the way you did health care?
Instead of all or nothing, piece by
piece. Lots of steps. Hard things
to oppose. It’s true that, from a
rules perspective, if you want
comprehensive reform, you’d
better have a comprehensive
bill — but maybe it’s enough to
say we will have a long series of
small reforms.
Education, anyone?
I am amazed at the anger I
hear from people on the topic
of Obama. Some of it, on both
sides, may be unconscious
racism. There are all kinds of
reasons not to focus on race
issues during the president’s
second term. On the other hand,
why not?
Whenever I see a “candid”
picture of Obama, I am reminded
that I have no idea what this man
is really like. Of course, I’ve read
the books and I hear stories from
those who know him. But five
years into his presidency, I don’t
feel I have come to know him.
And that allows me to project
onto him attributes — of being
cold and aloof, for example —
that make it his fault, or worse,
to be disappointed, as are many
who thought they knew him.
Five years into his presidency,
my guess is that fewer Ameri-
cans believe they know and un-
derstand this president than did
on the day he took office, which
is an agenda of its own.
Susan Estrich is a nationally
syndicated columnist. To find
out more about her go to www.
creators.com.
Our View: Local Editorials
Local editorials appearing in this space represent the
opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board: Birney Imes,
editor and publisher; Peter Imes, general manager; Slim
Smith, managing editor and senior newsroom staff. To
inquire about a meeting with the board, please contact
Slim Smith at 662-328-2471, or e-mail voice@cdispatch.
com.
Voice of the People
We encourage you to share your opinion with readers of
The Dispatch.
Submit your letter to The Dispatch by:
E-mail: voice@cdispatch.com
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In person: 516 Main St., Columbus, or 101 S. Lafayette
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Three more years
Readers comment
As we grieve for our neighbors, we wait for answers
Susan Estrich
Whenever I
see a “candid”
picture of
Obama, I am
reminded that
I have no idea
what this man
is really like.
EDITOR/PUBLISHER
Birney Imes
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THE STAFF OF THE DISPATCH
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2013 5A
Elmer Marmon, Jr.
Visitation:
Friday, Dec. 27 • 6-8 PM
Gunter & Peel Funeral Home
Graveside Services:
Saturday, Dec. 28 • 10 AM
Odd Fellows Cemetery
Macon, MS
gunterandpeel.com
Margaret Patterson
Incomplete
gunterandpeel.com
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY
1131 Lehmberg Rd.
Columbus, MS
662-328-1808
www.lowndesfuneralhome.net
© The Dispatch
Almost everyone offers cremation.
Offering on-site cremation puts us
in a class of our own.
Elmer Marmon, Jr.
Elmer Lloyd Marmon, Jr., age 88, of
Columbus, MS, passed away December 25,
2013, at Baptist Memorial Hospital.
Graveside services will be Saturday,
December 28, 2013, at 10:00 AM at Odd
Fellows Cemetery in Macon, MS, with Dr.
Jonathan Speegle officiating. Visitation will be
Friday, December 27, 2013, from 6:00-8:00 PM
at Gunter & Peel Funeral Home.
Mr. Marmon was born October 25, 1925,
in Springfield, MO, to the late Elmer Lloyd
and Katherine Young Marmon, Sr. He was a
veteran of WWII serving in the United States
Navy on the USS Wasp. Mr. Marmon worked
as a computer programmer and photographer
for many years before his retirement. He
was a member of Central United Methodist
Church where he served as choir director for
many years. In addition to his parents, he was
preceded in death by his wife, Mildred Louise
Dickson Marmon.
Survivors include his daughters, Sherry
Harmond and her husband Charles of
Columbus, MS and Becky Coward and
her husband David of Columbus, MS;
grandchildren, Edward Harmond and his wife
Terry of Atlanta, GA, Bill Harmond and his
wife Paula of Margate, FL and Josh Harmond
and his wife Shelly of Kosciusko, MS; and 9
great-grandchildren.
Memorials may be made to Covenant United
Methodist Church, P.O. Box 9228, Columbus,
MS 39705.
View all Gunter & Peel obituaries and
sign the guestbook online
www.gunterandpeel.com
AREA OBITUARIES
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tion including visitation and
service times, are provided free
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biographical information and
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to include, are available for a
fee. Obituaries must be sub-
mitted through funeral homes
unless the deceased’s body
has been donated to science.
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2471.
Martha Harris
BROOKSVILLE —
Martha Dell Harris, 65,
died Dec. 18, 2013, at
Noxubee
General
Hospital.
Services
are Sat-
urday at
11 a.m. at
Harrison
Grove Bap-
tist Church
with Billy Goodwin offi-
ciating. Burial will follow
in the church cemetery.
Visitation is today from
1-5 p.m. at Lee-Sykes
Funeral Home Chapel of
Macon.
Ms. Harris was born
April 11, 2013, to the
late William Sykes and
Willie B. Sykes. She was
formerly employed as a
factory worker.
Survivors include
her children, Ireeda
Harris of Chicago and
Earnest Bernard Harris
of Brooksville; broth-
ers, William Sykes Jr.,
Henry Sykes and David
L. Sykes, all of Brooks-
ville; and sisters, Annie
Anthony of Crawford,
Willie D. Wilcher of Chi-
cago and Helen Sharp of
Brooksville.
Andreiko Jones
STARKVILLE — An-
dreiko L. Jones, 27, died
Dec. 18, 2013.
Services are Satur-
day at 11 a.m. at Peter’s
Rock Church of God
in Christ with Joseph
Hawkins officiating.
Burial will follow in
Spring Valley Cemetery
in Mathiston. Visitation
is today from noon to 6
p.m. at West Memorial
Funeral Home.
Survivors include his
wife, Angela Jones of
Starkville; mother, Mary
Griffin; father, Eugene
Jones; stepfather, David
Griffin; sisters, Santana
Potts and Maria Potts,
both of Aberdeen, Ber-
tha Dobbs, Juria McK-
enzie and Jessica Dobbs,
all of Amory; brothers,
David Potts of Aber-
deen, Charles Dobbs
and Oneal Dobbs, both
of Amory, Tavaris Jeffer-
son and Jeremy Jones,
both of Starkville.
Annie Stallings
COLUMBUS — An-
nie Lou Stallings, 83,
died Dec. 18, 2013.
Services are Saturday
at 2 p.m. at Oakland MB
Church with Sammie
White officiating. Burial
will follow in the church
cemetery. Visitation is
today from 1-6 p.m. at
West Memorial Funeral
Home.
Survivors include her
children, Lena Stallings
and Richard Stallings,
both of Chicago, Martha
Jones, Louise Williams,
Valinda Stallings,
Bobby Stallings, Al-
bert W. Stallings and
Pamela Stallings, all
of Crawford; sisters,
Ollie Deloach and Dora
Tate, both of Starkville
and Annie McCarter
of Crawford; brother,
William Stallings of
Tomball, Texas; and 21
grandchildren.
Robert Forside
STARKVILLE —
Robert Forside, 63, died
Dec. 20, 2013, at his
residence.
Arrangements are
incomplete and will be
announced by Centu-
ry-Hairston Funeral
Home.
Virgil Harris
COLUMBUS — Vir-
gil Lee Harris, 23, died
Dec. 20, 2013.
Services are Saturday
at 1 p.m. at Fourth Street
MB Church with the
Rev. Jimmy Rice officiat-
ing. Burial
will follow
in Union
Cemetery.
Visitation
is today
from 3-8
p.m. at
Carter’s of
Columbus.
Mr. Harris was born
Oct. 2, 1990, to Virgil
Lee Brown of Crawford
and Paula Harris of
Columbus.
In addition to his par-
ents, survivors include
his daughter, Ah’Zion K.
Harris of Columbus; and
siblings, Lapeno Harris,
Keyona Harris, Precious
Harris, Jameka Eddins
and Alrico Harris, all of
Columbus.
Michelle Brown
BIRMINGHAM,
Ala. — Michelle Bailey
Brown, 50, died Dec. 21,
2013, at UAB Hospital.
Ser-
vices are
Saturday
at 11 a.m.
at Glenn
Chapel
CME
Church
with
the Rev.
Raphael Terry officiat-
ing. Burial will follow
in Union Cemetery.
Visitation is today from
3-8 p.m. at Carter’s of
Columbus.
Mrs. Brown was born
Aug. 29, 1963, to the
late Joe Alexander and
Sallie W. Bailey. She was
formerly employed as a
bookkeeper and secre-
tary for Birmingham
City Schools.
Survivors include
her husband, Charles
Brown of Birmingham;
and siblings, Gloria
Davis of West Point and
Wilda Louise Thomas of
Racine, Wis.
Pallbearers are
Anthony Sanders, M.W.
Varnes, Earnest Sand-
ers Jr., Travis Jones and
Steffan Hairston.
Johnny Gray
WEST POINT —
Johnny Lee Gray, 75,
died Dec. 21, 2013, at
North Mississippi Medi-
cal Center.
Services are Satur-
day at 3 p.m. at Carter’s
Mortuary Services
Chapel with Mary Gray
Kyle officiating. Burial
will follow in Tibbee
Community Cemetery.
Visitation is one hour
prior to services. Car-
ter’s Mortuary Services
is in charge of arrange-
ments.
Rubye Locke
COLUMBUS — Ru-
bye Temple Locke died
Dec. 22, 2013, at Aurora
Nursing Home.
Services are Satur-
day at 10 a.m. at Pine
Grove Baptist Church in
Carrollton, Ala., with the
Rev. James C. Wright
officiating. Burial will
follow in Cook-Temple
Cemetery. Visitation
is today from 3-7 p.m.
at Lavender’s Funeral
Services.
Joan Pingatore
STARKVILLE —
Joan L. Burket Pinga-
tore, 82, died Dec. 22,
2013, at the Carrington
Nursing Home.
Services are Monday
at 10 a.m. at St. Joseph
Catholic Church. Burial
will follow in Memorial
Garden Park. Visitation
is one hour prior to
services.
Mrs. Pingatore was
born Oct. 26, 1931, in
Johnstown, Pa., to the
late Earl E. Burket and
Lura I. Fink Burket. She
was a 1949 graduate of
Johnstown High School
and a 1952 graduate
of Conemaugh Valley
School of Nursing. She
was formerly employed
as a registered nurse
and was a member of St.
Joseph Catholic Church.
In addition to her
parents, she was preced-
ed in death by her sister,
Betty Burket.
Survivors include
her husband, James
“Buddy” A. Pingatore;
daughters, Kimberly
Pingatore of Kenswick,
Va., Lynn Peters of Pen-
sacola, Fla., and Janice
Mazzola of Starkville;
and three grandchil-
dren.
Memorials may be
made to Alzheimer’s
Foundation America,
322 8th Ave., 7th Floor,
New York, NY 10001.
Cornelia Dossett
MACON — Cornelia
P. Dossett, 96, died Dec.
23, 2013, at Baptist Me-
morial Hospital–Golden
Triangle.
Services are Saturday
at 1 p.m. at Cockrell
Funeral Home with Dr.
Bill Duncan officiating.
Burial will follow in Ar-
tesia Cemetery. Visita-
tion is one hour prior to
service.
Mrs. Dossett was
born Sept. 28, 1917, in
Richmond, Ky., to the
late Charlie and Willie
Lowery Parke. She
graduated from Macon
High School as Valedic-
torian. She was formerly
employed with M&F
Bank, Artesia State
Bank and Flora Insur-
ance Agency. She was a
member of First Baptist
Church, the Pilot Club
and Magnolia Club.
In addition to her par-
ents, she was preceded
in death by her hus-
bands, Silas Gillespie
and Evan Dossett; and
sister, Hazel Barnett.
Survivors include
her son, Charlie Moore
Gillespie of Huntsville,
Ala.; stepdaughter,
Mackie Bethay of
Huntsville; three
stepgrandchildren and
five stepgreat-grandchil-
dren.
Memorials may be
made to First Baptist
Church, P.O. Box 540,
Macon, MS 39341.
Alvin Markray Jr.
COLUMBUS — Al-
vin Markray Jr., 79, died
Dec. 23, 2013, at Baptist
Memorial Hospital–
Golden Triangle.
Services
are Sat-
urday at
2:30 p.m.
at Carter’s
Funeral
Services
with Jarvis
Williams
officiating. Burial will
follow in Memorial
Gardens Cemetery.
Visitation is today from
3-8 p.m. at the funeral
home.
Mr. Markray was
born Dec. 28, 1934, to
the late Alvin Markray
Sr. and Minnie Phipps
Markray. He was a
veteran of the U.S. Air
Force and was formerly
employed with DynCo-
rp.
In addition to his
parents, he was preced-
ed in death by his son,
Gordon Markray; and
sister, Pauline Stanley.
Survivors include
his wife, Barbara Love
Markray of Columbus;
sons, Rickey Markray
and Steve Markray,
both of Alexandria, La.,
Leonard Wells, Anthony
Wells, Kelly Markray
and Jimmy Markray, all
of Columbus and Mau-
rice Love of Columbus,
Ga.; daughters, Tankia
Love of San Diego and
Whitney Markray of
Sterling, Va.; sisters,
Pearlie Wiggins and
Catherine Parker, both
of Los Angeles and
Bessie Love of Minden,
La.; brother, Cardell
Markray of Los Angeles;
20 grandchildren and 12
great-grandchildren.
Harold Colbert
CEDAR BLUFF —
Harold Max Colbert, 81,
died Dec. 24, 2013, at his
residence.
Services are Saturday
at 2 p.m. at Robinson
Chapel with Andy
Parish officiating. Burial
with military honors will
follow in Cedar Bluff
Cumberland Presbyteri-
an Cemetery. Visitation
is one hour prior to
services.
Mr. Colbert was born
Aug. 11, 1932, to the
late Harold Lee Colbert
and Maxine Holmes. He
was a veteran of the U.S.
Army and was formerly
employed in landscaping
and cattle farming.
In addition to his par-
ents, he was preceded in
death by his son, Mark
Colbert.
Survivors include
his wife, Margaret
Sue Colbert; son, John
Colbert of Rochester,
Minn.; daughters, Beth
Colbert Vail of Colum-
bus and Sandy Freeland
of Oklahoma City;
brother, Frank Colbert
of Houston; sister,
Catherine Mathews of
Cold Springs, Texas; six
grandchildren and four
great-grandchildren.
Pallbearers are Brian
Barksdale, Joey Free-
land, David Colbert,
Bryan Dowdy, Michael
Kramer, Jeremy More-
land, Jason Colbert and
Jimmy Miller.
Memorials may be
made to Palmer Home
for Children, P.O. Box
746, Columbus, MS
39701.
Margaret Irvin
DETROIT, Ala. —
Margaret Irvin, 73, died
Dec. 24, 2013, at her
residence.
Services were today
at Crews Methodist
Church with Roger
Redus officiating.
Burial followed in Crews
Cemetery. Otts Funeral
Home was in charge of
arrangements.
Jeanette Rankin
STARKVILLE —
Jeanette Cooper Rankin,
91, died Dec. 24, 2013, at
Starkville Manor Nurs-
ing Home.
Services are Sunday
at 2 p.m. at First Baptist
Church with Dr. Chip
Stevens and the Rev.
Clifton Curtis officiat-
ing. Burial will follow in
Memorial Garden Park.
Visitation is one hour
prior to services. Welch
Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.
Mrs. Rankin was
born Nov. 4, 1922, in
Maben to the late James
Lamar Cooper and Exa
Rose Cooper. She was
a graduate of Starkville
High School and she at-
tended Mississippi State
College for Women. She
was formerly employed
as office manager for
Rankin Dental and was
a member of First Bap-
tist Church.
In addition to her par-
ents, she was preceded
in death by her husband,
Dr. T.W. Rankin; and
daughter, June Rankin
Johnson.
Survivors include
her daughters, Charm
McIngvale of Starkville
and Lynn Thomas of
Bolingbrook, Ill.; one
grandchild and one
great-grandchild.
Essie Spencer
MACON — Essie
Mae Davis Spencer,
85, died Dec. 24, 2013,
at Central Mississip-
pi Medical Center in
Jackson.
Services are Saturday
at 11 a.m. at Tabernacle
Baptist Church with
the Rev. Johnny Moore
officiating. Burial will
follow in Davis Ceme-
tery. Visitation is today
from 1-6 p.m. at Lee-
Sykes Funeral Chapel of
Macon.
Mrs. Spencer was
born Sept. 11, 1928, to
the late
Nathaniel
and Alma
Davis.
She was a
member of
Macedonia
Baptist
Church.
She was a graduate of
Macon High School and
Rust College where she
earned a Bachelor of
Science degree in educa-
tion. She was formerly
employed as a teacher
and member of the
Noxubee County School
Board.
In addition to her par-
ents, she was preceded
in death by her husband,
Percy Lloyd Spencer;
daughter, Delisa Mere-
dith; and siblings, Rich-
ard, Nathaniel, Stacy,
Coolidge, Hoover and
Anderson Davis.
Survivors include her
son, Lloyd Spencer of
North Chicago; daugh-
ter, Darlene Cole of Ma-
con; brothers, Charles
Davis of Gary, Ind.,
Billy Davis of St. Louis
and Roosevelt Davis of
University City, Mo.; six
grandchildren and four
great-grandchildren.
Bobbie Porter
COLUMBUS — Bob-
bie Porter, 70, died Dec.
25, 2013, at Baptist Me-
morial Hospital–Golden
Triangle.
Arrangements are
incomplete and will be
announced by Century
Hairston Funeral Home.
Deountray Roby
BROOKSVILLE —
Deountray Roby, 36,
died Dec. 25, 2013, at
Baptist Memorial Hospi-
tal–Golden Triangle.
Arrangements are
incomplete and will be
announced by Lee-
Sykes Funeral Home.
Wilson Bobo
GATTMAN — Wil-
son Bobo, 84, died Dec.
26, 2013, at his resi-
dence.
Services are Satur-
day at 11 a.m. at Otts
Funeral Home Chapel
with Terrell Jones offici-
ating. Burial will follow
in Big Creek Cemetery
in Coker, Ala. Visitation
is one hour prior to
services.
Margaret Patterson
COLUMBUS — Mar-
garet Patterson, 85, died
Dec. 27, 2013, at Salem
Nursing and Rehab Fa-
cility in Reform, Ala.
Arrangements are
incomplete and will be
announced by Gunter &
Peel Funeral Home.
Harris
Brown
Harris
Markray Jr. Spencer
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 6A FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2013
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Have a
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Budget
Continued from Page 1A
for nearly two more years.
But the rare moment of
comity may be short-lived.
Hanging over the start of
the year is a renewed fight
over raising the nation’s
borrowing limit, which
the Treasury says must be
resolved by late February
or early March to avert an
unprecedented U.S. de-
fault. Both sides are posi-
tioning behind customary
hard-line positions, with
Republicans insisting
they want concessions be-
fore raising the debt limit
and Obama insisting he
won’t negotiate.
The last vestiges
of 2013’s legislative
wrangling behind him,
Obama’s attention turns
now to major challenges
and potential bright spots
in the year ahead. In late
January, Obama will give
his fifth State of the Union
address, setting his agen-
da for the final stretch
before the 2014 midterm
elections, in which all of
the House and one-third
of the Senate are on the
ballot.
The elections could
drown out much of
Obama’s effort to focus
attention on his own, key
agenda items.
Those include his sig-
nature health care law.
The critical enrollment
period for new insurance
exchanges closes on
March 31. Also at mid-
year, Obama will be seek-
ing to secure a compre-
hensive nuclear deal with
Iran before a six-month
deal struck in November
runs out.
“Hopefully the presi-
dent has finally learned
that if he wants a produc-
tive second term we need
to focus on finding areas
of common ground,” said
Brendan Buck, a spokes-
man for House Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio.
Wary of letting ex-
pectations get too high,
Obama’s advisers have
been careful not to read
too much into Congress’
success in trumping pes-
simistic expectations and
pulling off a modest, end-
of-year budget deal.
In an email on Thurs-
day, senior Obama advis-
er Dan Pfeiffer called for a
renewed focus in the new
year on job creation, an
unemployment insurance
extension and raising the
minimum wage.
“While it’s too early to
declare a new era of bi-
partisanship, what we’ve
seen recently is that
Washington is capable of
getting things done when
it wants to,” Pfeiffer said.
“There’s an opportunity
next year for this town to
do its job and make real
progress.”
The product of inten-
sive talks before law-
makers left Washington
for Christmas, the bud-
get deal alleviates the
harshest effects of auto-
matic budget cuts on the
Pentagon and domes-
tic agencies. It reduces
those cuts, known as the
sequester, by about one-
third, restoring approx-
imately $63 billion over
two years.
A projected $85 billion
in savings are located
elsewhere in the deal, in-
cluding increases in an
airport security tax and
a fee corporations pay
to have pensions guar-
anteed by the govern-
ment. Also included: a
contentious provision to
pare down annual cost of
living increases in bene-
fits for military retirees
under age 62. Those cuts
will save the government
about $6.3 billion over a
decade.
With lawmakers eager
to leave town for the holi-
days and Republicans hop-
ing to keep the focus on
problems with Obama’s
health care law, the deal
passed with bipartisan
support in both the Dem-
ocratic-controlled Senate
and the Republican-con-
trolled House — despite
opposition from tea party
groups that lined up to op-
pose it, arguing the deal
would raise spending.
The comprehensive de-
fense bill Obama signed
will give military person-
nel a 1 percent pay raise.
It also covers combat pay,
ships, aircraft and bas-
es. Lawmakers also gave
Obama a rare victory in
his fight to close Guanta-
namo Bay, by lifting the
most rigid restrictions
on transferring detainees
overseas as part of the de-
fense bill.
In a statement Thurs-
day, Obama said Con-
gress had taken a positive
step by lifting those re-
strictions, but protested
other constraints Con-
gress left in place, includ-
ing a ban on transferring
detainees to the U.S. for
imprisonment, trial or
medical emergencies. He
said some of the remain-
ing restrictions, in some
circumstances, “would
violate constitutional sep-
aration of powers princi-
ples.”
“I oppose these provi-
sions, as I have in years
past, and will continue to
work with the Congress
to remove these restric-
tions,” Obama said.
The signing of the de-
fense bill capped a year-
long campaign led by the
women of the Senate to
address the scourge of
rape and sexual assault
in the military, which
the Pentagon estimates
may have affected 26,000
members of the military
last year.
Commanders will no
longer be permitted to
overturn jury convictions
for sexual assault. The
law also requires a civilian
review when command-
ers decline to prosecute,
requires dishonorable
discharge or dismissal
for those convicted, elim-
inate the statute of limita-
tions for courts-martial in
rape and sexual assault
cases and criminalizes
retaliation against victims
who report an assault.
The bill provides
$552.1 billion for the reg-
ular military budget and
$80.7 billion for the war
in Afghanistan and oth-
er overseas operations,
reflecting deficit-driven
efforts to trim spending
and the drawdown in Af-
ghanistan after more than
a decade of fighting there.
Obama signed the two
bills and several others
in private, without re-
porters present, after an
early-morning workout
a nearby Marine Corps
base. After signing the
bills, Obama set off for
a hike with his wife and
daughters along a popular
trail in Oahu leading to a
150-foot waterfall.
Christmas trees
Continued from Page 1A
crews in Starkville on a
normal schedule. Sanita-
tion and environmental
services foreman Calvin
Ware said residents in
north Starkville receive
rubbish pickup each
Tuesday and Friday while
south Starkville residents
are served Monday and
Thursday. Residents
can also use the landfill
on 6506 Old West Point
Road.
Oktibbeha County
road manager Victor Col-
lins said his crews will
respond to calls from resi-
dents at 662-323-5752 and
remove leftover trees at
their request.
School board
Continued from Page 1A
answer to the voters,” he
said. “It’s their tax money
that you’re responsible for
making sure that it’s used
effectively and efficient-
ly.”
Wright also pointed out
that board members will
still be elected.
“On the one hand,
they’re saying one of the
reasons to have an ap-
pointed superintendent is
because it becomes too po-
litical but if you have elect-
ed board members, that’s
probably even more politi-
cal,” he said. “There’s no
statistics from what I have
seen and heard that show
that appointed superinten-
dents are any more effec-
tive than elected superin-
tendents.”
Regardless of what
the future holds for him,
Wright said he will con-
centrate on doing his job.
“I enjoy my job,” he
said. “I love the people I
work with. I love the peo-
ple that I serve and the
students and I look for-
ward to going to work ev-
ery day. I trust with God’s
help it will work out, how-
ever it works out. Whether
I’m there for two years or
however long, I just want
to make sure we’re doing
all we can for the students
of Lowndes County.”
Light bulbs
Continued from Page 1A
The 40- and 60-watt
incandescent bulbs are
the two most commonly
used in households. They
are significantly cheaper
than their alternatives,
yet multiple studies show
they’re much less energy
efficient and more costly
long-term.
Data also shows they
don’t last as long as their
alternatives. Compared
to CFLs and LEDs, which
have projected lifespans
of 10,000 and 50,000
hours, an incandescent
bulb has a shelf life of
1,200 hours, according
to energy statistics by
sustainable living compa-
ny Eartheasy.
The incandescent
bulbs also need to use 60
watts to produce 800 lu-
mens. Lumens measure
amounts of visible light.
Fifteen-watt CFL bulbs
and 8-watt LEDs produce
the same number of lu-
mens.
But the average incan-
descent bulb costs $1.25
compared to $3.95 for a
CFL and over $10 for an
LED, which is why the
conventional option is fly-
ing off shelves.
“A 60-watt incandes-
cent is 75 cents. CFLs
are running about $2-3
a piece,” Pridmore said.
“The LEDs right now are
running $14-15 a piece,
but I’m told in February
they’re going to have a
dramatic drop in price.”
Pridmore said she’s
encouraging people to
bite the bullet and switch
to bulbs that will still be
approved when 2014 ar-
rives, but customers are
still getting the old sup-
plies while they last.
“If you’ve got high
ceilings or somewhere
where you use them a
lot and you’re changing
them a lot, I encourage
people to put (LEDs)
in their kitchen and put
them in their high ceil-
ings because they’re go-
ing to a last a long time
and they’re so much
more energy efficient,”
Pridmore said. “They
burn at such a low watt-
age that you’re going to
get your money back. It’s
hard to wrap your mind
around that when you’re
paying $24 for a bulb.”
Doug Hutcherson, a
local electrician, said he
recently replaced light-
ing in a room that was
using 6,000 watts of in-
candescent bulbs to 900
watts of LED bulbs, and
the switch will result in
long-term savings. But
the alternatives are not
without their own faults,
he said.
“The dimming is the
biggest issue. LEDs don’t
dim as well,” Hutcherson
said. “What we fight as
contractors is equipment
being able to control
the light like an incan-
descent. Technology is
catching up, but right
now if we put a dimmer at
10 percent the bulb will
go off. You can’t get a soft
glow.”
Hutcherson estimates
an 80 percent energy sav-
ings from an LED bulb
compared to its prede-
cessor. Like Pridmore,
he expects the cost to go
down as the phase-outs
take effect, but they’ll
still cost a lot more than
the one businesses, in-
dustries and families
have used since the
light bulb became main-
stream.
“If you do your whole
house with them you’re
going to see a big differ-
ence but it’s going to be a
big investment,” he said.
“It’s not going to get a lot
cheaper than $10 for a
while. Once it’s required
that people buy them I
expect the technology
will catch up and they’ll
become more afford-
able.”
BY CHARLES BABINGTON
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — A
world-famous symbol of de-
mocracy is going under cover,
as workers start a two-year, $60
million renovation of the U.S.
Capitol dome.
Curved rows of scaffolds,
like Saturn’s rings, will en-
circle it next spring, enabling
contractors to strip multiple
layers of paint and repair more
than 1,000 cracks and broken
pieces. The dome will remain
illuminated at night and partly
visible through the scaffolding
and paint-capturing cloths. But
the Washington icon -- and por-
tions of the Rotunda’s painted
ceiling that lies below -- will
be significantly obscured for
many months.
The project is beginning
just as the nearby Washington
Monument sheds scaffolding
that was used to repair damage
from a 2011 earthquake.
Half-completed when Abra-
ham Lincoln stood beneath it
to summon “the better angels
of our nature” in 1861, the
Capitol dome has since tow-
ered over Washington, which
limits building heights to 130
feet. Time, however, has let wa-
ter seep through hundreds of
cracks. The water attacks cast
iron, which “continues to rust
and rust and rust,” said Ste-
phen T. Ayers, Architect of the
Capitol.
This first major renovation in
more than 50 years should add
decades of structural integrity
to the dome, which Ayers calls
perhaps “the most recogniz-
able symbol across the globe.”
Capitol’s historic dome set for 2-year renovation
AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File
This Dec.
19 file photo
shows the
ceiling of the
Capitol Rotun-
da during a
media tour on
Capitol Hill in
Washington.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2013 7A
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TEHRAN, Iran — Iran’s nuclear
chief said the country is building a
new generation of centrifuges for
uranium enrichment but that they
need further tests before they can
be mass produced, apparently try-
ing to counter hard-liner criticism
of its nuclear deal with word pow-
ers.
Under a landmark nuclear deal
reached last month in Geneva, Iran
promised not to bring new centri-
fuges into operation for six months,
part of temporary limitations on its
uranium enrichment program in
return for the easing of some sanc-
tions. But the deal does not stop it
from developing centrifuges.
Salehi’s comments appeared
aimed at showing the country is
moving ahead with its nuclear pro-
gram into order to fend off criti-
cism by Iranian hard-liners, who
have denounced the deal, calling it
a surrender in the face of Western
pressure. The government of new
President Hassan Rouhani says the
deal recognizes Iran’s right to en-
rich uranium.
The United States and its allies
accuse Iran of seeking to build a
nuclear weapon. Iran denies the
charge saying its program is only
for peaceful purposes, including
power generation and developing
medical treatments.
Iran says it is developing new centrifuges
Deal reached last month does not stop country
from developing devices for uranium enrichment
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISLAMABAD — A
72-year-old American
development worker
who was kidnapped in
Pakistan by al-Qaida
more than two years ago
appealed to President
Obama in a video to nego-
tiate his release, saying he
feels “totally abandoned
and forgotten.”
The video of Warren
Weinstein was the first
since two videos released
in September 2012. Wein-
stein, the country director
in Pakistan for J.E. Austin
Associates, a U.S.-based
firm that advises a range
of Pakistani business and
government sectors, was
abducted from his house
in the eastern city of La-
hore in August 2011.
In the video, sent
Thursday to reporters in
Pakistan including The
Associated Press, Wein-
stein asked the U.S. gov-
ernment to negotiate his
release.
“Nine years ago I came
to Pakistan to help my gov-
ernment, and I did so at a
time when most Ameri-
cans would not come here,
and now when I need my
government it seems that
I have been totally aban-
doned and forgotten,”
Weinstein said during the
13-minute video.
It was impossible to
tell how much of Wein-
stein’s statement, made
under the duress of cap-
tivity, was scripted by his
captors. A phone mes-
sage left with Weinstein’s
family Thursday was not
returned.
Abducted American in Pakistan seeks help
AP Photo via AP video
This image shows Warren Weinstein, a 72-year-old American development worker
who was kidnapped in Pakistan by al-Qaida more than two years ago, appealing to
President Obama to negotiate his release.
Man kidnapped
by al-Qaida feels
‘totally abandoned
and forgotten’
BY BRADLEY KLAPPER
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Mailing a letter is about to
get a little more expensive.
Regulators on Tuesday
approved a temporary
price hike of 3 cents for a
first-class stamp, bringing
the charge to 49 cents a
letter in an effort to help
the Postal Service recover
from severe mail decreas-
es brought on by the 2008
economic downturn.
Many consumers won’t
feel the price increase im-
mediately. Forever stamps,
good for first-class postage
whatever the future rate,
can be purchased at the
lower price until the new
rate is effective Jan. 26.
The higher rate will last
no more than two years,
allowing the Postal Ser-
vice to recoup $2.8 billion
in losses. By a 2-1 vote,
the independent Postal
Regulatory Commission
rejected a request to make
the price hike permanent,
though inflation over the
next 24 months may make
it so.
The surcharge “will last
just long enough to recov-
er the loss,” Commission
Chairman Ruth Y. Gold-
way said.
Bulk mail, periodicals
and package service rates
will rise 6 percent, a deci-
sion that drew immediate
consternation from the
mail industry. Its groups
have opposed any price
increase beyond the cur-
rent 1.7 percent rate of
inflation, saying charities
using mass mailings and
bookstores competing
with online retailer Ama-
zon would be among those
who suffer.
First-class stamps to cost 49 cents as of Jan. 26
Forever stamps can be purchased at
lower price until new rate is effective
BY JOHN
CHRISTOFFERSEN
The Associated Press
NEW HAVEN, Conn.
— The planned release to-
day of thousands of pages
of police documents from
the investigation into last
year’s school massacre in
Newtown could shed light
on the world of the 20-year-
old gunman.
State police said their
report totaling several thou-
sand pages would be re-
leased at 3 p.m. The report
“has been redacted accord-
ing to law,” and includes
text, photos and 911 calls re-
ceived by state police, they
said Thursday.
Prosecutors issued a
summary of the investiga-
tion last month that por-
trayed the gunman, Adam
Lanza, as obsessed with
mass murders, but the re-
port concluded that Lanza’s
motives for the massacre
might never be known.
The summary report
referred to items found
on a computer at Lanza’s
house that included writ-
ings detailing relationships,
personal be-
liefs, a daily
schedule, de-
sires, goals
and other
topics.
L a n z a
g u n n e d
down 20
f i rst - grad-
ers and six educators with
a semi-automatic rifle at
Sandy Hook Elementary
School on Dec. 14, 2012, af-
ter killing his mother inside
their home. He committed
suicide with a handgun as
police arrived at the school.
The summary says Lan-
za had “significant mental
health issues.”
The report said that in
2005, Lanza was diagnosed
with Asperger’s disorder,
a mild form of autism that
is not associated with vio-
lence, and that he lacked
empathy for others and be-
haved strangely. Nobody
was allowed into his room,
he wouldn’t touch door-
knobs, his food had to be
arranged on the plate in a
certain way and he changed
clothes often during the
day, according to the report.
Police file on Newtown shooting to be released
Lanza
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 8A FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2013
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BY BARBARA ORTUTAY
AP Technology Writer
NEW YORK — Mix
blatant bigotry with poor
spelling. Add a dash of
ALL CAPS. Top it off
with a violent threat. And
there you have it: A reci-
pe for the worst of online
comments, scourge of the
Internet.
Blame anonymity,
blame politicians, blame
human nature. But a
growing number of web-
sites are reining in the
Wild West of online com-
mentary. Companies
including Google and
the Huffington Post are
trying everything from
deploying moderators
to forcing people to use
their real names in order
to restore civil discourse.
Some sites, such as Popu-
lar Science, are banning
comments altogether.
The efforts put sites in
a delicate position. User
comments add a lively,
fresh feel to videos, sto-
ries and music. And, of
course, the longer visitors
stay to read the posts, and
the more they come back,
the more a site can charge
for advertising.
What websites don’t
want is the kind of off-put-
ting nastiness that spewed
forth under a recent CNN.
com article about the Af-
fordable Care Act.
“If it were up to me, you
progressive libs destroy-
ing this country would
be hanging from the gal-
lows for treason. People
are awakening though.
If I were you, I’d be very
afraid,” wrote someone
using the name “JBlaze.”
YouTube, which is
owned by Google, has
long been home to some
of the Internet’s most ju-
venile and grammatical-
ly incorrect comments.
The site caused a stir
last month when it be-
gan requiring people to
log into Google Plus to
write a comment. Besides
herding users to Google’s
unified network, the com-
pany says the move is de-
signed to raise the level of
discourse in the conversa-
tions that play out under
YouTube videos.
One such video, a
Cheerios commercial
featuring an interracial
family, met with such a
barrage of racist respons-
es on YouTube in May that
General Mills shut down
comments on it altogeth-
er.
“Starting this week,
when you’re watching a
video on YouTube, you’ll
see comments sorted by
people you care about
first,” wrote YouTube
product manager Nundu
Janakiram and principal
engineer Yonatan Zunger
in a blog post announcing
the changes. “If you post
videos on your channel,
you also have more tools
to moderate welcome
and unwelcome conversa-
tions. This way, YouTube
comments will become
conversations that matter
to you.”
Anonymity has always
been a major appeal of on-
line life. Two decades ago,
The New Yorker maga-
zine ran a cartoon with
a dog sitting in front of a
computer, one paw on the
keyboard. The caption
read: “On the Internet, no-
body knows you’re a dog.”
Bye bye, bile? Websites try to nix nasty comments
Some websites banning comments
AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File
In this 2013 photo illustration, hands type on a com-
puter keyboard in Los Angeles.
AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade
In this Dec. 6 photo, an Indian salesman stands by a counter at a gold jewelry shop in Mumbai, India. Gold is
India’s second-biggest import behind oil, and purchases have soared in recent years as rising incomes from a
decade of economic growth sent Indian consumers on a buying streak. The problem is that the greater buying of
the precious metal has dealt a blow to India’s economy by increasing the flow of money out of country compared
to inflows.
India gold tax hits bridal budgets
BY KAY JOHNSON
AP Business Writer
MUMBAI, India — With India’s
wedding season in full swing, the
glass sales counters in Mumbai’s
famed Zhaveri gold bazaars are
crowded with customers eyeing
elaborate headpieces, nose rings
and necklaces. No one does jewel-
ry quite like an Indian bride, who
by tradition wears all the gold she
can stand up in and her family can
afford.
These days, though, even the
most ambitious bridal budgets don’t
bring the bling like they used to,
thanks to hikes in import duties and
a rise in local gold prices that have
shoppers like Rajanikant Mehta
grumbling.
Mehta, who owns a factory out-
side the capital, had planned to
spend about $1,800 on a necklace
for the woman marrying his son
late this month, but he’s unhappy
about what he’s getting for his mon-
ey. Gold prices in India, which im-
ports nearly all its gold, have risen
50 percent over the past three years
to about 87,000 rupees, or about
$1,400, an ounce.
Thanks to the new tax and weak-
er rupee, that’s about a 20 percent
premium over the world market
price, hovering just under $1,200 an
ounce.
“The price of gold should be low-
er,” Mehta complained. “This is a
globalized world. If the prices are
similar to the prices elsewhere, then
the purchase of gold will increase.”
More gold-buying, though, is ex-
actly what the Indian government
is trying to stop by raising import
duties three times this year to 10
percent on gold bullion — up from 2
percent in January — and 15 percent
on gold jewelry.
Gold is India’s second-biggest
import behind oil, and purchases
have soared in recent years as rising
incomes from a decade of economic
growth sent Indian consumers on a
buying streak.
The problem is that the greater
buying of the precious metal has
dealt a blow to India’s economy by
increasing the flow of money out of
country compared to inflows. As a
result, the current account deficit
rose to a historic high of 4.8 percent
of India’s gross domestic product in
the fiscal year that ended in March.
Indian tradition dictates the bride wear all the
gold she can stand up in and her family can afford
BY SCOTT WALTERS
swalters@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE — The
Starkville High School
boys basketball team
spent the first half losing
the tempo battle in its
opening-round game at
the Travis Outlaw Slam
Dunk at The Hump tour-
nament.
The Yellow Jackets
found clear sailing to vic-
tory after they resolved
that problem.
A 12-2 run in the fourth
quarter helped Starkville
defeat Parkview (Arkan-
sas) 63-52 in the final
game of Thursday’s three-
game session at Hum-
phrey Coliseum.
“Coach always tells us
to go out and play hard
and defend and we can
win,” Starkville senior
Jontavius Baker said. “We
lost track of some of that in
the first half. We came out
slow and we let beat them
to some loose balls. In
the second half, we didn’t
have those issues.”
Baker had 13 of his
game-high 17 points as
Starkville (10-2) finally
found a rhythm. In the
opening quarter, Parkview
(5-2) beat Starkville in
transition and built a 15-8
lead.
Starkville finally pulled
ahead for the first time,
19-18, on a 3-pointer by
Josh Skinner. The lead
was short-lived, as the Pa-
triots used their speed and
success with the full-court
trap to continue to hold
the upper hand.
Parkview scored the fi-
nal six points of the open-
ing half and led 28-24 at
the intermission.
“We allowed one score
in transition in the second
half,” Starkville coach
Greg Carter said. “The
rebounding was so much
better too, like night and
BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE — One coach
hopes to help his team find an
ingredient that will propel it to
greater heights in 2014.
Another coach plans to use
his team’s three-game stint
against Mississippi teams as a
bonding exercise that will help
his squad come together for the
stretch run.
How well New Hope boys
basketball coach Drew McBray-
er and Lausanne Collegiate
School coach Kenneth White
fare in each of their pursuits re-
mains to be seen. On Thursday,
White and the Lynx from Mem-
phis, Tenn., took a bigger step
toward their goal with a 69-52
victory against New Hope in the
first game of the Travis Outlaw
Slam Dunk at The Hump.
Junior Marc Crawford paced
Lausanne (5-3) with 26 points,
while freshmen Isaiah Stokes
and James Babb added 12 and
11 points, respectively. The
Lynx used a 20-6 run in the final
6 minutes, 20 seconds after the
Trojans (5-4) had cut the deficit
to three points.
BY BRETT MARTEL
The Associated Press
METAIRIE, La. —
Injuries in New Orleans’
defensive backfield have
yet to stop the Saints from
fielding one of the best
pass defenses in the NFL.
They can only hope
that trend holds in this
Sunday’s regular season
finale against Tampa Bay,
which will mark the first
full game without stand-
out rookie safety Kenny
Vaccaro.
“It seems like every
week it’s a different little
lineup and little shake-
up,” said veteran strong
safety Roman Harper, who
could see more action this
week because of Vaccaro’s
absence. “But at the end
of the day, we’ve all got
to depend on everybody.
Whoever’s in, we’ve got to
make some plays. It defi-
nitely will hurt us without
Kenny.”
Vaccaro fractured his
left fibula Sunday late in
the first quarter of a 17-13
loss at Carolina, becoming
the third regular in the
defensive backfield to go
down with a season-end-
ing injury. Cornerback
Patrick Robinson went out
for the year with a right
knee injury in Week 2 at
Tampa Bay. In Week 11
against San Francisco,
starting cornerback Jabari
Greer went out for the year
with a left knee injury.
The Owls (10-3) last shared a con-
ference title in 1994 when it was still
a member of the SWC.
“I think when you look at it, we
executed at a high level on a huge
stage, on a cold day in front these
excited home fans,” McHargue
said. “What else could you ask for?”
Rice will try to end on an even
higher note at 3 p.m. Tuesday
(ESPN) when it takes on Mississip-
pi State (6-6) in the AutoZone Lib-
erty Bowl in Memphis, Tenn.
“This is where our seniors
BY MATTHEW STEVENS
mstevens@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE — Mississippi
State baseball coach John Cohen
always used to frustrate his wife,
Nelle, when he’d talk about winning
a national championship.
“My wife Nelle always tells me,
‘John, stop talking about winning a
national championship at Mississip-
pi State,’ and I tell her, ‘Nelle, we’re
in the Southeastern Conference,
(so) 13 other coaches begin the sea-
son with that idea as the goal, so we
have to as well,’ ” Cohen said.
Cohen, who played for MSU from
1987-90, took over the program five
years ago from coach Ron Polk and
promised to get MSU back to col-
lege baseball’s biggest stage. The
Bulldogs went 48-62 in his first two
seasons and didn’t advance to the
postseason as he tried to rebuild the
program’s talent pool.
In 2013, MSU was two victories
away from winning its first national
championship in a team sport. Four
players — Kendall Graveman, Chad
Girodo, Sam Frost, and Ben Brace-
well — were with Cohen in his sec-
ond year at MSU, and they helped
their coach get the program back to
the College World Series.
“I said at the press conference
(five years ago) we would win a na-
tional championship,” Cohen said.
“This is why we do it — to win the
SECTION
B
SPORTS EDITOR
Adam Minichino: 327-1297
SPORTS LINE
662-241-5000
Sports
THE DISPATCH n CDISPATCH.COM n FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2013
INSIDE
n MORE NFL: Aaron Rodgers
will return this week for the
Green Bay Packers to play
against the Chicago Bears.
The Dallas Cowboys still
aren’t sure if quarterback
Tony Romo will be able to
play Sunday against the
Philadelphia Eagles.
Page 3B
Year in Review — Top MSU Stories of 2013
Football: NFL
See MSU, 5B
See SAINTS, 6B
See RICE QB, 5B
SUNDAY
n MORE YEAR IN REVIEW: Scott
Walters will highlight the East
Mississippi Community College
football team’s run to the national
title as part of the top 10 local sports
stories from 2013.
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
Members of the Mississippi State baseball team pose
with the second-place trophy following their loss to
UCLA in game two of the College World Series
championship series in Omaha, Neb.
Bulldogs recapture glory in CWS run
Rice University Athletic Media Relations
Rice quarterback Taylor McHargue (16) is carried off
the field per a school tradition that every senior is
carried off the field after the final practice on campus.
LIBERTY BOWL
Tuesday’s Game
At Memphis, Tenn.
nRice (10-3) vs.
Mississippi State (6-6),
3 p.m. (ESPN)
INSIDE
n Schedule, Thursday’s
Games. Pages 2B, 4B
College Football
BY MATTHEW STEVENS
mstevens@cdispatch.com
Taylor McHargue is living the
dream.
The Rice fifth-year senior quar-
terback defines having it all. An ath-
letic 6-foot-2, 220 pounds, McHar-
gue is recognized by everybody on
campus and is believed to have a
bright future after he graduates.
McHargue helped raise his pro-
file at school by helping to lead
the football team to a 41-24 victo-
ry against Marshall in the Con-
ference USA championship game.
QB McHargue has raised Rice’s profile
Rice, which was in its first C-USA
title game, hadn’t won an outright
championship since claiming the
Southwest Conference title in 1957.
Injuries
could hurt
Saints in
secondary
Prep Basketball — Travis Outlaw Slam Dunk at The Hump
Late push
propels
Starkville
See STARKVILLE, 5B
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
TOP: New Hope High School’s Lee Brandon drives through two Lausanne defenders Thursday, while
Carlos Brooks (BELOW) tries to power up with a shot in a 69-52 loss at Humphrey Coliseum.
LYNX PULL AWAY TO BEAT TROJANS
See NEW HOPE, 5B
Prep Basketball
Today’s Games
Travis Outlaw Slam Dunk at The Hump
At Humphrey Coliseum, Starkville
Aberdeen girls vs. H.W. Byers, 1 p.m.
Parkview vs. Mt. Lebanon, 2:30 p.m.
Starkville girls vs. New Hope, 4 p.m.
Aberdeen boys vs. New Hope, 5:30 p.m.
Starkville boys vs. Lausanne Collegiate, 7 p.m.
Immanuel Christian School Christmas
Tournament
Tupelo Academy boys vs. Immanuel Christian,
2:30 p.m.
Vardaman girls vs. Winona Christian, 3:50 p.m.
Carroll Academy boys vs. Winona Christian,
5:10 p.m.
Carroll Academy girls vs. Columbus, 6:30 p.m.
Presbyterian Christian boys vs. Greenville St.
Joe’s, 7:50 p.m.
South Lamar Invitational Tournament
Hatley girls vs. Lamar County, 3 p.m.
Hatley boys vs. Lamar County, 4:30 p.m.
Caledonia girls at South Lamar, 6 p.m.
Caledonia boys at South Lamar, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Travis Outlaw Slam Dunk at the Hump
At Humphrey Coliseum, Starkville
New Hope boys vs. Parkview, 1 p.m.
New Hope girls vs. Aberdeen, 2:30 p.m.
Aberdeen boys vs. Lausanne Collegiate, 4 p.m.
Starkville girls vs. H.W. Byers, 5:30 p.m.
Starkville boys vs. Mt. Lebanon, 7 p.m.
Immanuel Christian School Christmas
Tournament
Presbyterian Christian boys vs. Immanuel
Christian, 9:40 a.m.
Columbus girls vs. East Webster, 11 a.m.
East Webster boys vs. Greenville St. Joe’s,
12:20 p.m.
East Webster girls vs. Immanuel Christian,
1:40 p.m.
Tupelo Academy boys vs. Carroll Academy, 3 p.m.
Vardaman girls vs Carroll Academy, 4:20 p.m.
South Lamar Invitational Tournament
NOTE: The girls losers bracket game starts at
3 p.m. Saturday, followed by the boys losers
bracket game at 4:30 p.m. The girls title game
will be at 6 p.m., followed by the boys title game
at 7:30 p.m.
Men’s College Basketball
Saturday’s Game
Alabama at UCLA, 9 p.m.
Women’s College Basketball
Saturday’s Game
Alabama vs. Princeton (Charlottesville, Va.),
11 a.m.
Sunday’s Game
Alabama vs. Opponent TBD (Charlottesville), TBD
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
1:30 p.m. — Military Bowl, Marshall vs.
Maryland, at Annapolis, Md., ESPN
5 p.m. — Texas Bowl, Syracuse vs. Minnesota,
at Houston, ESPN
8:30 p.m. — Fight Hunger Bowl, BYU vs.
Washington, at San Francisco, ESPN
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. — Lafayette at Seton Hall, FS1
NHL
7:30 p.m. — Nashville at Dallas, Fox Sports
South
WINTER SPORTS
7 p.m. — Olympic trials, speed skating: long
track women’s 3,000 and men’s 5,000, at
Kearns, Utah, NBC Sports Network
Saturday
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
11 a.m. — Pinstripe Bowl, Rutgers vs. Notre
Dame, at Bronx, N.Y., ESPN
2:20 p.m. — Belk Bowl, Cincinnati vs. North
Carolina, at Charlotte, N.C., ESPN
5:45 p.m. — Russell Athletic Bowl, Miami vs.
Louisville, at Orlando, Fla., ESPN
9:15 p.m. — Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl, Michigan
vs. Kansas State, at Tempe, Ariz., ESPN
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11 a.m. — Nebraska at Cincinnati, ESPN2
11 a.m. — FIU at Georgetown, FS1
1 p.m. — Villanova at Syracuse, WCBI
1 p.m. — E. Michigan at Duke, ESPN2
1 p.m. — Samford at Marquette,SportSouth
1:30 p.m. — St. John’s vs. Columbia, at
Brooklyn, N.Y., FS1
3 p.m. — Louisville at Kentucky, WCBI
4 p.m. — Wake Forest at Xavier, FS1
5:30 p.m. — Old Dominion at Richmond, NBC
Sports Network
7 p.m. — Missouri at North Carolina State,
ESPN2
9 p.m. — Alabama at UCLA, ESPN2
NBA
6:30 p.m. — Charlotte at Atlanta, SportSouth
NHL
7 p.m. — Los Angeles Kings at Nashville, Fox
Sports South
SOCCER
6:40 a.m. — Premier League, West Bromwich at
West Ham, NBC Sports Network
8:55 a.m. — Premier League, Manchester
United at Norwich, NBC Sports Network
11:30 a.m. — Premier League, Sunderland at
Cardiff City, WTVA
WINTER SPORTS
2 p.m. — Olympic trials, speed skating, at
Kearns, Utah, WTVA
3 p.m. — Olympic trials, women’s hockey, United
States vs. Canada, at St. Paul, Minn., NBC
Sports Network
CALENDAR
ON THE AIR
BRIEFLY
Local
Starkville Academy girls basketball team wins
Anna McKell scored 18 points, grabbed seven rebounds, and
made two steals Thursday to lead the Starkville Academy girls basket-
ball team to a 48-30 victory against North Delta Academy.
Nora Kathryn Carroll had 12 points, three assists, and four blocked
shots, while Sallie Kate Richardson had 10 points, four rebounds, and
two assists. The Lady Volunteers built a 17-4 lead after one quarter and
cruised to the victory.
Registration for summer baseball, softball opens in
January
The Columbus-Lowndes Recreation Authority will hold registration
for its summer baseball and softball leagues starting Jan. 2, 2014.
Registration for the leagues will run through Feb. 22. Registration
is for T-Ball baseball, Coach-Pitch baseball, T-Ball softball, Coach-Pitch
softball, and fast-pitch softball.
The cost is $60 for registration is at the Propst Park office. The cost
is $70 for registration at www.clra.net. Please bring a birth certificate to
verify the child’s age.
The Propst Park office will be open from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday,
Feb. 22, for late signups.
A late registration fee of $70 will be charged for registrations after
the last published date.
For more information, call 327-4935.
n In related news, CLRA will hold coaches meetings for the
upcoming adult and youth baseball and softball seasons.
There will a meeting for 7- to 8-year-old boys Coach-Pitch
coaches, 9-10 boys coaches, and 11-12 boys coaches from 6-7 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 9, at the Townsend Community Center.
There will be a meeting for 7- to 8-year-old girls Coach-Pitch
coaches and all girls recreational fast-pitch softball from 6-7 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 16, at the Townsend Community Center.
There will be a meeting for all 4-year-old and 5- to 6-year-old
boys and girls T-Ball coaches from 6-7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 23, at the
Townsend Community Center.
There will be a meeting for all men’s and women’s adult softball
coaches from 6-7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 30, at the Townsend Community
Center.
Please contact the CLRA office at 327-4935 to request to return
to coach a team. The team’s coaches already may have been filled by
the above dates.
Registration continues for Columbus United Soccer Club
Registration continues for the Columbus United Soccer Club.
Columbus United, which is the Columbus-Lowndes Recreation
Authority’s competitive soccer club, is open to all soccer players in
Lowndes and surrounding counties. The primary goal of Columbus
United soccer is player development. This is pursued through enhanced
skills training, challenging conditioning, and wider competition. Teams
typically will play 25-30 matches in a combination of intra-city competi-
tion and tournaments.
Players may register online at clra.net or at the CLRA Propst Park
Office. For further information, contact Director of Competitive Soccer
Tom Velek at tvelek@as.muw.edu, Facebook: search Columbus United
Soccer Club, or clra.net.
Junior Colleges
ICC announces 2014 softball schedule
FULTON — Itawamba Community College softball coach Andy
Kirk announced a schedule for the 2014 season Thursday that features
20 home games and 24 MACJC North Division games.
The two-time defending MACJC North Champion Lady Indians
open the season with back-to-back home doubleheaders against Hinds
C.C. (Feb. 10) and Gadsden State C.C. (Feb. 13).
Other home games include: Calhoun C.C. (Feb. 18), Jackson State
C.C. (Feb. 24), Northwest Mississippi C.C. (March 4), Holmes C.C.
(March 10), Northeast Mississippi C.C. (March 28), Mississippi Delta
C.C. (April 5), East Mississippi C.C. (April 14), Coahoma Community
College (April 16). Visit LetsGoICC.com for the complete schedule.
NBA
Harden leads Rockets past Grizzlies
HOUSTON — James Harden and the Houston Rockets found their
legs in time to get another big win.
Harden scored 11 of his 27 points in the fourth quarter, helping
Houston rally for a 100-92 victory against the Memphis Grizzlies on
Thursday night.
Coming off a 111-98 win at San Antonio on Christmas, coach
Kevin McHale said he could tell the Rockets were “draggy” during the
pregame shootaround. But they still managed to outscore the Grizzlies
34-20 in the final period of their third victory in four games.
Harden was 2 of 9 from the field, but he was a career-best 22 of 25
from the free throw line. He made 9 of 11 foul shots in the final quarter
while matching a Rockets single-game record for made free throws set
by Sleepy Floyd in 1991.
Harden because the first player in NBA history to register 27 points
on two or fewer made field goals.
Griffin shouldn’t have been ejected
NEW YORK — The NBA said Thursday that its referees made
a mistake when they ejected Los Angeles forward Blake Griffin in the
Clippers’ 105-103 loss at Golden State on Wednesday night.
Griffin was ejected for his second technical with 10:43 left after
scuffling with Andrew Bogut, following Warriors forward Draymond
Green to the showers after they got into it at the end of the third.
“After a league review of the Clippers-Warriors game, we have
come to the conclusion that Blake Griffin should not have been ejected
from the game,” said Rod Thorn, the NBA’s president of basketball oper-
ations. “A common foul should have been called on Griffin for initially
attempting to dislodge the Warriors’ Andrew Bogut and a technical foul
should have been assessed to Bogut for grabbing Griffin by the shirt
and wrestling with him.”
Major League Baseball
Posting period for Japanese pitcher Tanaka starts
NEW YORK — The bidding for Japanese star pitcher Masahiro
Tanaka has begun.
All 30 major league teams were notified that the 30-day period
to sign the star 25-year-old right-hander began at 7 a.m. Thursday,
according to MLB spokesman Michael Teevan. Clubs have until 4 p.m.
Jan. 24 to attempt to reach an agreement with the ace.
If Tanaka and a major league team come to terms, that franchise
is required to pay his Japanese club, the Rakuten Eagles, a posting
fee, now capped at $20 million under a deal reached two weeks ago
between MLB and Nippon Professional Baseball. Under the old,
no-limit system, the Texas Rangers paid over $50 million for the right to
negotiate with Yu Darvish before the 2012 season.
AP source: Choo passes physical with Rangers
Shin-Soo Choo passed his physical with the Texas Rangers,
clearing the way for the completion of the outfielder’s $130 million,
seven-year deal.
A person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press on
Thursday night that Choo passed his physical and would be introduced
today in Texas. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because
there was no official announcement from the team.
The Rangers scheduled a press conference this afternoon. They
said only that it was to “announce a major free agent signing” and
provided no other details.
Choo’s deal, worth about $18.6 million per season, is the third-high-
est this offseason. The deal was agreed upon last weekend, but was
pending the completion of the physical.
Former Orioles star Blair dies
BALTIMORE — Paul Blair, the eight-time Gold Glove center fielder
who helped the Baltimore Orioles win a pair of World Series while
gliding to make catches that former teammates still marvel at more than
four decades later, has died. He was 69.
Blair died Thursday night at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, according
to a hospital spokeswoman.
Blair’s wife, Gloria, told The Baltimore Sun Blair played a round of
golf with friends Thursday morning and later lost consciousness at a
celebrity bowling tournament in Pikesville.
A member of the Orioles Hall of Fame, the popular Blair patrolled
the outfield from 1964-76, playing key parts when Baltimore won its first
two World Series crowns in 1966 and 1970. He won two more titles with
the New York Yankees in 1977 and 1978 and also played for Cincinnati.
Longtime Indians broadcaster Hegan dies at 71
CLEVELAND — Mike Hegan, a former major league player who
was a longtime broadcaster with the Cleveland Indians, has died. He
was 71.
The Indians said Hegan had his family by his side when he
died Wednesday morning in Hilton Head, S.C. No other details were
provided by the team. Hegan was a radio and TV broadcaster for the
Indians for 23 years. He retired after the 2011 season. He also spent 12
seasons as a broadcaster with the Milwaukee Brewers.
— From Special Reports
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 2B FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2013
By The Associated Press
The only thing that keeps LeB-
ron James up worrying at night is
basketball, which simultaneously
makes perfect sense and no sense.
Serena Williams likes to make
one thing clear: She is never satis-
fied, no matter how many matches
and tournaments she wins.
The two best players in their
sports were recognized this week
as The Associated Press’ Male and
Female Athletes of the Year.
Even after a year like 2013 —
when a spectacular wedding, a
second NBA championship and a
fourth MVP award were among the
many highlights enjoyed by the Mi-
ami Heat star — James still is, as
he puts it, striving for greatness.
Technically, James is striving for
more greatness since his enormous
list of accomplishments just keeps
growing.
James became the third basket-
ball player to capture the award that
has been annually awarded since
1931. James received 31 of 96 votes
cast in a poll of news organizations,
beating Peyton Manning (20) and
Jimmie Johnson (7).
“I’m chasing something and it’s
bigger than me as a basketball play-
er,” James told the AP. “I believe my
calling is much higher than being a
basketball player. I can inspire peo-
ple. Youth is huge to me. If I can get
kids to look at me as a role model, as
a leader, a superhero ... those things
mean so much, and that’s what I
think I was built for. I was put here
for this lovely game of basketball,
but I don’t think this is the biggest
role that I’m going to have.”
Past winners include Joe Louis,
Jesse Owens, Muhammad Ali, Carl
Lewis, Joe Montana, Tiger Woods,
and Michael Phelps.
James joins Michael Jordan and
Larry Bird as NBA players to win
the award.
Driven as ever, Williams won plen-
ty this year. She went 78-4 with 11 ti-
tles, including at the French Open and
U.S. Open, raising her Grand Slam
championship total to 17. She com-
piled a 34-match winning streak. She
earned more than $12 million in prize
money, a record for women’s tennis.
In February, she became the oldest
No. 1 in WTA rankings history and
never left that perch.
It’s the third AP award for Wil-
liams, following 2002 and 2009.
Only two women have been chosen
more often as AP Athlete of the Year
since the annual awards were first
handed out in 1931.
AP Athletes of the Year
James, Williams take top honors
Basketball
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 11 15 .423 —
Boston 12 17 .414 ½
New York 9 19 .321 3
Brooklyn 9 19 .321 3
Philadelphia 8 20 .286 4
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 22 6 .786 —
Atlanta 16 13 .552 6½
Charlotte 14 15 .483 8½
Washington 12 13 .480 8½
Orlando 8 20 .286 14
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 23 5 .821 —
Detroit 14 16 .467 10
Chicago 11 16 .407 11½
Cleveland 10 18 .357 13
Milwaukee 6 22 .214 17
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 23 7 .767 —
Houston 20 11 .645 3½
Dallas 16 13 .552 6½
New Orleans 12 14 .462 9
Memphis 12 16 .429 10
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Portland 24 5 .828 —
Oklahoma City 23 5 .821 ½
Denver 14 13 .519 9
Minnesota 13 15 .464 10½
Utah 8 23 .258 17
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 20 11 .645 —
Phoenix 17 10 .630 1
Golden State 17 13 .567 2½
L.A. Lakers 13 16 .448 6
Sacramento 8 19 .296 10
Thursday’s Games
Atlanta 127, Cleveland 125,2OT
Houston 100, Memphis 92
San Antonio 116, Dallas 107
Portland 116, L.A. Clippers 112, OT
Today’s Games
Detroit at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Charlotte, 6 p.m.
Toronto at New York, 6:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m.
Washington at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Denver at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Utah, 8 p.m.
Miami at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Cleveland at Boston, Noon
Brooklyn at Indiana, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Washington, 6 p.m.
New York at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Charlotte at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Houston, 7 p.m.
Denver at Memphis, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Milwaukee, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Miami at Portland, 9 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.
Men’s College Top 25
Schedule
Today’s Games
No. 3 Ohio State vs. Louisiana-Monroe, 6 p.m.
No. 19 North Carolina vs. Northern Kentucky,
6 p.m.
No. 20 San Diego State vs. Saint Katherine,
9 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
No. 2 Syracuse vs. No. 8 Villanova, 1 p.m.
No. 4 Wisconsin vs. Prairie View, 1 p.m.
No. 5 Michigan State vs. New Orleans, 3:15 p.m.
No. 6 Louisville at No. 18 Kentucky, 3 p.m.
No. 9 Duke vs. Eastern Michigan, 1 p.m.
No. 15 UConn vs. Eastern Washington at Web-
ster Bank Arena, Bridgeport, Conn., Noon
No. 17 Memphis vs. Jackson State, 11 a.m.
No. 21 Colorado vs. Georgia, 9 p.m.
No. 23 UMass vs. Providence, 5 p.m.
No. 24 Gonzaga vs. Santa Clara, 7 p.m.
No. 25 Missouri at N.C. State, 7 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
No. 10 Wichita State vs. Davidson, 2 p.m.
No. 12 Oregon vs. Morgan State, 2 p.m.
No. 13 Florida vs. Savannah State, 2 p.m.
Women’s College Top 25
Schedule
Today’s Games
No games scheduled
Saturday’s Games
No. 4 Stanford at Fresno State, 8 p.m.
No. 8 Maryland vs. Wofford, 11 a.m.
No. 9 Baylor vs. McNeese State, 7 p.m.
No. 13 South Carolina vs. Savannah State,
11 a.m.
No. 14 Iowa State vs. Holy Cross, 3:30 p.m.
No. 17 Purdue vs. Central Michigan, 1 p.m.
No. 19 Georgia vs. Illinois, 3 p.m.
No. 21 Iowa vs. North Dakota, 2 p.m.
No. 22 Florida State vs. UT Martin, 1 p.m.
No. 24 Gonzaga at Saint Mary’s (Cal), 3 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
No. 1 UConn vs. Cincinnati, 4 p.m.
No. 2 Notre Dame at Oregon State, 4 p.m.
No. 5 Tennessee vs. Lipscomb, 1 p.m.
No. 6 Kentucky vs. Grambling State, 1 p.m.
No. 7 Louisville vs. SMU, 2 p.m.
No. 11 Oklahoma State vs. Texas-Pan Amer-
ican, 2 p.m.
No. 12 Colorado vs. Southern Utah, 3 p.m.
No. 15 Penn State vs. Hartford, 1 p.m.
No. 18 Nebraska vs. Oral Roberts, 2 p.m.
No. 23 California vs. Lafayette, 4 p.m.
No. 25 Oklahoma vs. Samford, 2 p.m.
Football
College Bowl Schedule
Saturday, Dec. 21
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
Colorado State 48, Washington State 45
Las Vegas Bowl
Southern Cal 45, Fresno State 20
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
San Diego State 49, Buffalo 24
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette 24, Tulane 21
Monday, Dec. 23
Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East Carolina 37, Ohio 20
Tuesday, Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Oregon State 38, Boise State 23
Thursday’s Games
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Pittsburgh 30, Bowling Green 27
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
Utah State 21, Northern Illinois 14
Today’s Games
Military Bowl
At Annapolis, Md.
Marshall (9-4) vs. Maryland (7-5), 1:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Minnesota (8-4) vs. Syracuse (6-6), 5 p.m.
(ESPN)
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
BYU (8-4) vs. Washington (8-4), 8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday’s Games
Pinstripe Bowl
At New York
Notre Dame (8-4) vs. Rutgers (6-6), 11 a.m.
(ESPN)
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Cincinnati (9-3) vs. North Carolina (6-6),
2:20 p.m. (ESPN)
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Miami (9-3) vs. Louisville (11-1), 5:45 p.m.
(ESPN)
Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl
At Tempe, Ariz.
Kansas State (7-5) vs. Michigan (7-5),
9:15 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday’s Games
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Middle Tennessee (8-4) vs. Navy (7-4),
10:45 a.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Mississippi (7-5) vs. Georgia Tech (7-5),
2:15 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Oregon (10-2) vs. Texas (8-4), 5:45 p.m.
(ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Arizona State (10-3) vs. Texas Tech (7-5),
9:15 p.m. (ESPN)
Tuesday’s Games
AdvoCare V100 Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Arizona (7-5) vs. Boston College (7-5),
11:30 a.m. (ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Virginia Tech (8-4) vs. UCLA (9-3), 1 p.m.
(CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Rice (10-3) vs. Mississippi State (6-6), 3 p.m.
(ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Texas A&M (8-4) vs. Duke (10-3), 7 p.m.
(ESPN)
Wednesday’s Games
Heart of Dallas Bowl
At Dallas
UNLV (7-5) vs. North Texas (8-4), 11 a.m.
(ESPNU)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Nebraska (8-4) vs. Georgia (8-4), 11 a.m.
(ESPN2)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Wisconsin (9-3) vs. South Carolina (10-2),
Noon (ABC)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
Iowa (8-4) vs. LSU (9-3), Noon (ESPN)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford (11-2) vs. Michigan State (12-1),
4 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Baylor (11-1) vs. UCF (11-1), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday’s Games
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Alabama (11-1) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 7:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Friday, Jan. 3
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Ohio State (12-1) vs. Clemson (10-2), 7 p.m.
(ESPN)\
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Missouri (11-2) vs. Oklahoma State (10-2),
6:30 p.m. (FOX)
Saturday, Jan. 4
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. Houston (8-4), Noon
(ESPN)
Sunday, Jan. 5
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Arkansas State (7-5) vs. Ball State (10-2),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 6
Bowl Championship Series National
Championship
At Pasadena, Calif.
Florida State (13-0) vs. Auburn (12-1), 7:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday, Jan. 18
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East vs. West, 3 p.m. (NFLN)
Saturday, Jan. 25
Senior Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
South vs. North, 3 p.m. (NFLN)
Football Championship
Subdivision Playoffs
Championship
Saturday, Jan. 4
At FC Dallas Stadium, Frisco, Texas
North Dakota State (14-0) vs. Towson (13-2),
1 p.m.
Hockey
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 37 25 10 2 52 106 77
Tampa Bay 37 23 11 3 49 106 87
Montreal 38 22 13 3 47 96 84
Detroit 39 17 13 9 43 99 108
Toronto 39 18 16 5 41 106 113
Ottawa 39 15 17 7 37 111 126
Florida 38 14 19 5 33 88 123
Buffalo 37 10 24 3 23 66 105
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 39 27 11 1 55 121 88
Washington 37 19 14 4 42 117 112
Philadelphia 37 17 16 4 38 93 104
N.Y. Rangers 38 18 18 2 38 88 102
New Jersey 38 15 16 7 37 92 99
Columbus 37 16 17 4 36 101 106
Carolina 37 14 15 8 36 86 105
N.Y. Islanders 38 11 20 7 29 96 129
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 39 26 7 6 58 145 107
St. Louis 36 24 7 5 53 128 85
Colorado 36 23 10 3 49 106 88
Minnesota 39 20 14 5 45 88 96
Dallas 36 18 12 6 42 106 107
Winnipeg 39 16 18 5 37 103 116
Nashville 37 16 17 4 36 85 109
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 39 27 7 5 59 127 98
Los Angeles 38 25 9 4 54 106 76
San Jose 37 23 8 6 52 121 94
Vancouver 39 22 11 6 50 106 93
Phoenix 36 19 10 7 45 111 110
Calgary 37 14 17 6 34 95 118
Edmonton 39 12 24 3 27 101 135
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for
overtime loss.

Thursday’s Games
No games scheduled
Today’s Games
Ottawa at Boston, 6 p.m.
Buffalo at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Columbus at New Jersey, 6 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 6 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 6 p.m.
Colorado at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Winnipeg, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Calgary, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Boston at Ottawa, 6 p.m.
Montreal at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Florida, 6 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders, 6 p.m.
Chicago at St. Louis, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Nashville, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Anaheim, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Transactions
Thursday’s Moves
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA — Fined Golden State F Draymond
Green $15,000 for failing to leave the court in a
timely manner upon his ejection during a Dec.
25 game against the Los Angeles Clippers.
CHICAGO BULLS — Assigned G Marquis
Teague to Iowa (NBADL).
DETROIT PISTONS — Assigned G Tony
Mitchell and G Peyton Siva to Fort Wayne
(NBADL).
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Assigned G
Lorenzo Brown to Delaware (NBADL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL — Fined Buffalo WR Roberts Woods
$15,000 for punching Miami S Reshad Jones
during a Dec. 22 game.
CHICAGO BEARS — Signed WR Chris
Williams from New Orleans’ practice squad.
Waived DT Christian Tupou.
CLEVELAND BROWNS — Signed DL Brian
Sanford. Signed WR Conner Vernon to the
practice squad. Released RB Jamaine Cook
from the practice squad.
DETROIT LIONS — Placed TE Dorin
Dickerson on injured reserve. Signed TE Matt
Veldman from the practice squad. Claimed
WR Micheal Spurlock off waivers from Dallas.
Signed WR Carlin Isles to the practice squad.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Signed DT Jeris
Pendleton and CB Sheldon Price from the
practice squad. Signed C Thomas Austin, DE
Jake McDonough and RB Tauren Poole to the
practice squad.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Released CB
Marquice Cole.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Signed RW
Oliver Bjorkstrand to a three-year, entry-level
contract.
EDMONTON OILERS — Recalled D Martin
Marincin and F Roman Horak from Oklahoma
City (AHL).
WINNIPEG JETS — Recalled D Julian
Melchiori from St. John’s (AHL). Placed D Grant
Clitsome on the injured reserve list, retroactive
to Dec. 17.
COLLEGE
FLORIDA — Named Kurt Roper offensive
coordinator and quarterbacks coach.
MICHIGAN STATE — Suspended senior LB
Max Bullough for violating team rules, making
him ineligible to play in the Rose Bowl.
Year-End Awards
Male Athlete of the Year
Voting
Athlete Votes
LeBron James................................................ 31
Peyton Manning ............................................. 20
Jimmie Johnson ............................................... 7
Andy Murray .................................................... 5
Andrew McCutchen ......................................... 5
Lionel Messi ..................................................... 4
Cristiano Ronaldo ............................................ 4
Miguel Cabrera ................................................ 4
Rafael Nadal .................................................... 4
Max Scherzer .................................................. 2
Phil Mickelson .................................................. 2
x-David Ortiz .................................................... 2
Usain Bolt......................................................... 1
x-Mariano Rivera ............................................. 1
x-Patrick Kane ................................................. 1
Clayton Kershaw ............................................. 1
Sebastian Vettel .............................................. 1
Tiger Woods .................................................... 1
x-write-in
Female Athlete of the Year
Voting
Athlete Votes
Serena Williams............................................. 55
Brittney Griner ............................................... 14
Missy Franklin ................................................ 10
Inbee Park........................................................ 7
Lindsey Vonn ................................................... 6
Lauren Holiday ................................................ 1
Candace Parker ............................................... 1
Katie Ledecky .................................................. 1
x-Diana Nyad ................................................... 1
x-write-in
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2013 3B
Standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
y-New England 11 4 0 .733 410 318 7-0-0 4-4-0 8-3-0 3-1-0 3-2-0
Miami 8 7 0 .533 310 315 4-3-0 4-4-0 7-4-0 1-3-0 2-3-0
N.Y. Jets 7 8 0 .467 270 380 6-2-0 1-6-0 4-7-0 3-1-0 2-3-0
Buffalo 6 9 0 .400 319 354 4-4-0 2-5-0 5-6-0 1-3-0 3-2-0
South
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
y-Indianapolis 10 5 0 .667 361 326 5-2-0 5-3-0 8-3-0 2-2-0 5-0-0
Tennessee 6 9 0 .400 346 371 2-5-0 4-4-0 5-6-0 1-3-0 1-4-0
Jacksonville 4 11 0 .267 237 419 1-7-0 3-4-0 4-7-0 0-4-0 3-2-0
Houston 2 13 0 .133 266 412 1-7-0 1-6-0 2-9-0 0-4-0 1-4-0
North
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
y-Cincinnati 10 5 0 .667 396 288 7-0-0 3-5-0 7-4-0 3-1-0 2-3-0
Baltimore 8 7 0 .533 303 318 6-2-0 2-5-0 6-5-0 2-2-0 3-2-0
Pittsburgh 7 8 0 .467 359 363 4-3-0 3-5-0 5-6-0 2-2-0 3-2-0
Cleveland 4 11 0 .267 301 386 3-5-0 1-6-0 3-8-0 1-3-0 2-3-0
West
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
y-Denver 12 3 0 .800 572 385 7-1-0 5-2-0 8-3-0 4-0-0 4-1-0
x-Kansas City 11 4 0 .733 406 278 5-3-0 6-1-0 7-4-0 4-0-0 2-3-0
San Diego 8 7 0 .533 369 324 4-3-0 4-4-0 5-6-0 3-1-0 3-2-0
Oakland 4 11 0 .267 308 419 3-4-0 1-7-0 4-7-0 0-4-0 1-4-0
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
Philadelphia 9 6 0 .600 418 360 4-4-0 5-2-0 8-3-0 1-3-0 3-2-0
Dallas 8 7 0 .533 417 408 5-2-0 3-5-0 7-4-0 1-3-0 5-0-0
N.Y. Giants 6 9 0 .400 274 377 3-4-0 3-5-0 5-6-0 1-3-0 2-3-0
Washington 3 12 0 .200 328 458 2-6-0 1-6-0 1-10-0 2-2-0 0-5-0
South
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
x-Carolina 11 4 0 .733 345 221 7-1-0 4-3-0 8-3-0 3-1-0 4-1-0
New Orleans 10 5 0 .667 372 287 7-0-0 3-5-0 8-3-0 2-2-0 4-1-0
Atlanta 4 11 0 .267 333 422 3-4-0 1-7-0 3-8-0 1-3-0 1-4-0
Tampa Bay 4 11 0 .267 271 347 3-5-0 1-6-0 2-9-0 2-2-0 1-4-0
North
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
Chicago 8 7 0 .533 417 445 5-2-0 3-5-0 4-7-0 4-0-0 2-3-0
Green Bay 7 7 1 .500 384 400 4-3-1 3-4-0 5-5-1 2-2-0 2-2-1
Detroit 7 8 0 .467 382 362 4-4-0 3-4-0 6-5-0 1-3-0 4-1-0
Minnesota 4 10 1 .300 377 467 4-3-0 0-7-1 3-7-1 1-3-0 1-3-1
West
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
x-Seattle 12 3 0 .800 390 222 6-1-0 6-2-0 9-2-0 3-1-0 3-2-0
x-San Francisco 11 4 0 .733 383 252 6-2-0 5-2-0 8-3-0 3-1-0 4-1-0
Arizona 10 5 0 .667 359 301 6-1-0 4-4-0 6-5-0 4-0-0 2-3-0
St. Louis 7 8 0 .467 339 337 5-3-0 2-5-0 4-7-0 3-1-0 1-4-0
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
NFL: Week 17
Sunday, Dec. 22
St. Louis 23, Tampa Bay 13
Indianapolis 23, Kansas City 7
Denver 37, Houston 13
Buffalo 19, Miami 0
Carolina 17, New Orleans 13
Dallas 24, Washington 23
N.Y. Jets 24, Cleveland 13
Cincinnati 42, Minnesota 14
Tennessee 20, Jacksonville 16
Arizona 17, Seattle 10
N.Y. Giants 23, Detroit 20, OT
San Diego 26, Oakland 13
Pittsburgh 38, Green Bay 31
New England 41, Baltimore 7
Philadelphia 54, Chicago 11
Monday, Dec. 23
San Francisco 34, Atlanta 24
Sunday’s Games
Houston at Tennessee, Noon
Detroit at Minnesota, Noon
Carolina at Atlanta, Noon
Cleveland at Pittsburgh, Noon
Washington at N.Y. Giants, Noon
Baltimore at Cincinnati, Noon
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, Noon
N.Y. Jets at Miami, Noon
Denver at Oakland, 3:25 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 3:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Seattle, 3:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 3:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Chicago, 3:25 p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 3:25 p.m.
Buffalo at New England, 3:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
By The Associated Press
IRVING, Texas — Jon
Kitna will earn $53,000
to serve as the Cowboys’
third-string quarterback
for one week — and he
plans to donate that mon-
ey to the Seattle-area high
school where he’s now a
coach.
Kitna told The Dallas
Morning News of his plans
Wednesday.
Kitna retired after the
2011 season, his 15th in the
league, and was coaching
football at Lincoln High
School in Tacoma, Wash.,
this season when he heard
about Tony Romo’s back in-
jury. Kitna sent a text mes-
sage Tuesday morning to
Cowboys coach Jason Gar-
rett, and the two would talk
by phone for 30 minutes, he
said.
“I told Jason if he wants
me or somebody to come in
and call a play and be able
to pull a play off if a bad sit-
uation happened, I would
be willing to do that,” the
41-year-old Kitna told the
newspaper.
He’ll suit up Sunday as
the backup to Kyle Orton
if Romo can’t play against
the Philadelphia Eagles, in
a game that will decide a
playoff berth.
Kitna appeared in three
games for the Cowboys in
2011 and has started 124
games overall for Seattle,
Cincinnati, Detroit and Dal-
las.
“He’s a very active guy,”
Garrett said Wednesday.
“He’s a mentally tough guy.
. And he’s certainly very
young at heart. So it was
good to have him back,
good to have him back in
the meetings, and (I’m)
excited to see him practice
today.”
Kitna will donate salary to school
BY SCHUYLER DIXON
The Associated Press
IRVING, Texas — For
years, Tony Romo’s defend-
ers have answered his pen-
chant for costly late-game
mistakes with a rhetorical
question:
What would the Dallas
Cowboys do without him?
It appears they will find
out in their fourth play-
offs-or-bust season finale
against an NFC East rival
since 2008 — and their first
elimination game without
Romo in 10 years.
Dallas hasn’t ruled out
the quarterback for Sun-
day night’s game against
Philadelphia, but all signs
point to Romo’s back injury
pushing Kyle Orton into the
starting role after two years
of play as the backup.
Orton’s name isn’t the
first that comes to mind for
fans wanting a change after
years of damaging intercep-
tions, fumbles or, most infa-
mously, the field goal flub
when Romo dropped the
snap on a kick that could
have won his first playoff
game in 2006.
Romo injured his back
Sunday in a 24-23 victory
against Washington that
included a fourth-down
touchdown pass to DeMar-
co Murray in the final two
minutes.
Romo is the franchise
leader in touchdown pass-
es, but if he misses Sun-
day’s game it will diminish
Dallas’ chances of getting
a playoff game at their
$1.2 billion stadium and
increase their chances of
going home early for the
fourth straight season.
Romo didn’t practice
Wednesday or Thursday,
and coach Jason Garrett
said he wasn’t involved in
many meetings either. He
missed his regular week-
ly media session Thurs-
day and hasn’t been seen
during the open portion
of practice or in the locker
room.
Romo still day to day
BY GENARO C. ARMAS
The Associated Press
GREEN BAY, Wis. —
Aaron Rodgers has been
cleared to return from a
left collarbone injury, just
in time to start Sunday for
the Packers against the
Chicago Bears in a game to
decide the NFC North title.
With no advance warn-
ing and little fanfare, the
franchise quarterback
received the long-awaited
good news at the same
time as the rest of his
teammates Thursday.
“This is a fun day for
me, but I think the focus
needs to be on this game
and the opportunity we
have to win the division,”
Rodgers said.
Soon enough. But
the spotlight for now is
squarely on the return of
one of the NFL’s most ir-
replaceable players.
Green Bay (7-7-1) is
2-5-1 since Rodgers went
down during the first se-
ries of a 27-20 loss Nov. 4
to Chicago. The Packers
have managed to hang on,
with a shot to win a third
straight division title with
a victory Sunday at Sol-
dier Field.
“I’ll start with the an-
nouncement that we’re
preparing for the Chi-
cago Bears with Aaron
Rodgers as our starting
quarterback,” coach Mike
McCarthy told reporters
Thursday after practice.
Win and Green Bay re-
turns to Lambeau Field the
following weekend to host a
wild-card team in the first
round of the playoffs.
“We’re in it. You know
we have a chance against
our rivals, and what a bet-
ter way than to go down
there and get some re-
demption and host a home
playoff game,” Rodgers
said.
The last two months
have been filled with
angst for Packers fans.
Discussions about wheth-
er Rodgers should risk
future injury or return to
bolster Green Bay’s play-
off chances have filled
sports talk radio shows
and holiday office parties.
Now imagine what it
was like for the Packers’
brass and team doctor.
The organization made a
big investment in Rodgers
this past offseason, sign-
ing him to a five-year con-
tract extension through
the 2019 season worth as
much as $110 million.
“Every football player
that plays in this game
Sunday will have risk. I
think we all understand
that,” McCarthy said.
“So we’ve done our due
diligence. We’ve gone
through all the evalua-
tions and we feel it is time.
Aaron is ready to play.”
Finally at 8:05 a.m.
Thursday, McCarthy
gave the official word at a
team meeting. No rousing
speeches or rounds of ap-
plause.
“The scene? We were
sitting in the team room
and he told us,” Rodg-
ers said matter-of-factly.
“That was the scene.”
Rodgers is returning
just when pass-rushing
linebacker Clay Matthews
is leaving the lineup again
with a right thumb inju-
ry. Green Bay also has
gone the majority of the
season without tight end
Jermichael Finley (neck).
Projected starting left
tackle Bryan Bulaga went
down in training camp.
Defensive end Johnny Jol-
ly (shoulder/neck) was
the latest Packer to get
knocked out for the year
last week.
Packers’ Rodgers set
to return vs. Bears
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK — Anterior Cruciate Lig-
ament (ACL) injuries are down, the NFL
has told its Health and Safety Advisory
Committee.
In a memo to the committee sent ear-
lier this week and obtained by The As-
sociated Press, the league said research
showed there were 30 ACL injuries in
games through the preseason and first
13 weeks of the schedule. There were 39
such injuries in 2012, 35 in 2011, 37 in
2010, and 31 in 2009.
ACL problems are the most severe
knee injuries.
There was an increase in Medial Col-
lateral Ligament injuries (MCL), from
74 in 2012 to 89 in games this season
through 13 weeks. But there were 106
MCL injuries in 2011, 89 in 2010 and 103
in 2009.
The injury reporting service Quin-
tiles/Outcome provided the numbers to
the league, which then sent them to the
committee chaired by 49ers owner John
York. The committee also includes Giants
owner John Mara, Cowboys owner Jerry
Jones, Packers President Mark Murphy,
and Falcons President Rich McKay. The
data are for all types of ACL and MCL in-
juries, including tears and sprains.
There have been suggestions that
knee injuries have gone up since the
NFL cracked down heavily on hits to
the head and neck area. While there
have been several high-profile hits to
the knee that sidelined players — New
England tight end Rob Gronkowski, for
example — the league-requested survey
of this year’s injuries does not indicate a
trend toward increased major knee prob-
lems through 13 weeks.
Earlier this week, Patriots coach Bill
Belichick claimed injuries were up. He
didn’t cite specific numbers, but said it
was “a matter of record not opinion” that
injuries league-wide have been on the
rise over the past three years.
Belichick blamed a decrease in the
number of offseason, preseason and
in-season practice sessions and work-
outs allowed as a main contributor to
higher injury totals.
League spokesman Michael Signora
disputed Belichick’s assertions.
“We carefully monitor player inju-
ries,” Signora said. “There is no evi-
dence that the new work rules have had
an adverse effect on the injury rate or
that injuries have in fact increased.”
And with the ACL injuries, the re-
search by Quintiles/Outcome shows the
opposite.
This season through 13 weeks, about
68 percent of ACL injuries involved con-
tact with another player. The percentage
in the four previous seasons ranged from
67 percent in 2009 to 55 percent in 2012.
A breakdown by positions showed
one tight end, one wide receiver and one
quarterback had contact-related ACL
injuries through 13 weeks this season.
That compares to five such injuries com-
bined at those positions in 2012 and four
in 2011.
For offensive players in general, there
have been six such injuries in 2013
through 13 weeks, compared to 10 in
2012, eight in 2011, nine in 2010 and six
in 2009.
On defense, there were six ACL inju-
ries involving contact with another play-
er. This compares to nine such injuries
in 2012, 10 in 2011, nine in 2010, and sev-
en in 2009.
For special teams, there were four
ACL injuries involving contact with an-
other player as compared to two last sea-
son and four in 2011.
n Bills WR Woods says punch cost him $15,000 fine:
At Orchard Park, N.Y.,
Bills rookie receiver Robert Woods has even more reason
to regret losing his cool and getting ejected against the Miami
Dolphins last weekend.
Woods told The Associated Press on Thursday he has
been fined $15,000 by the NFL for punching Dolphins safety
Reshad Jones.
“I wasn’t surprised, I was just waiting for when,” Woods
said, referring to the official notice he received from the league
upon arriving for practice.
The altercation occurred in the third quarter of Buffalo’s
19-0 win Sunday. Woods and Jones became tangled up during
a running play and eventually wrestled each other to the ground.
Woods was unhappy with how Jones threw him into a pile of
players following the whistle. Jones was on one knee and had
his back turned when Woods caught him with an uppercut
across the facemask.
nSeason finale might be Tuck’s last as a Giant: At East
Rutherford, N.J., Justin Tuck is well aware that Sunday’s game
against the Washington Redskins might be his last as a New
York Giant.
Tuck is scheduled to become an unrestricted free agent
after this season and it remains to be seen how much money
the Giants are willing to pay a player who will turn 31 in March.
There is no doubt Tuck has put up the right numbers in the
final year of his contract. He has a team-high nine sacks and
has played well against the run, according to defensive coordi-
nator Perry Fewell.
Off the field, Tuck is one of those players that coach Tom
Coughlin can count on for leadership. The problem is that the
10-year veteran has battled injuries in previous seasons, so
signing him might be a risk.
“It’s not scary,” Tuck said Thursday about his uncertain fu-
ture. “It’s interesting. The thing about it is I’m all about finishing.
We have a game to play and that’s the focus. After that, we’ll
handle that.”
Tuck would like to continue his career with the team that
drafted him in the third round in 2005, the same franchise he
helped win two Super Bowls.
“I think I did my part,” the defensive co-captain said. “Yeah,
I would love to be back. That’s how it is. That said, we’ll go down
that avenue when we go down that avenue.”
While Tuck has had an excellent season, the Giants (6-9)
have not, missing the playoffs for the fourth time in five years.
They lost their opening six and briefly got back into playoff con-
tention before losses to Dallas and San Diego in a three-game
span eliminated them.
Fewell said Tuck worked hard in the offseason to get him-
self ready for this year. It allowed him to play better against the
run and approach the game with more edge and purpose.
League says ACL injuries down through 13 weeks
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College Football
BY MARK LONG
The Associated Press
GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The
Florida football team is turning
to Duke’s Kurt Roper to improve
the Southeastern Conference’s
worst offense.
Coach Will Muschamp is
counting on Roper’s previous
success in the league and his
experience with an up-tempo
scheme to get it done.
Muschamp announced Rop-
er’s hire Thursday, three days
after he agreed to take the job.
“He has a diverse, up-tempo
background on offense and does
a good job of adapting to what
the players do best,” Muschamp
said. “The most important
thing, though, is he has always
remained balanced. He has had
success calling plays in the SEC
and has tutored three NFL quar-
terbacks. He has had players
produce at every offensive po-
sition and he is one of the most
well-respected coaches in the
country.”
Roper is leaving the same po-
sition at Duke. He also was an
assistant head coach with the
Blue Devils.
Roper spent hours interview-
ing for the job with Muschamp
on Monday. He will remain with
Duke through the Chick-fil-A
Bowl on Tuesday night.
“I feel like this was the right
situation for me and my family at
the right time,” Roper said on a
conference call with reporters.
“It’s a great university that has
a great tradition, and I look for-
ward to trying to add to that.”
The Gators (4-8) are com-
ing off their first losing season
since 1979. Muschamp wants
to overhaul the offense after
three consecutive years ranked
worse than 100th nationally in
total yards. Muschamp fired of-
fensive coordinator Brent Pease
and offensive line coach Tim Da-
vis less than 24 hours after the
season ended.
Duke coach David Cutcliffe
said Roper’s coaching style in-
cludes “intensity, tempo, and
quality of repetition.”
“From the minute they hit the
field, it’s going to be intense,”
Cutcliffe said. “I wouldn’t call
him a laid-back football coach
by any stretch of the imagina-
tion. It’s going to be what we call
treat the ground like a hot stove.
If you hit the ground, you better
get up running. And you know
by the time they get on the field
until they get off, they’re go-
ing to be moving and getting a
bunch of quality reps so I would
call it very intense.”
An 18-year coaching veter-
an, Roper spent six seasons as
Duke’s offensive coordinator.
He has 14 years of experience
coaching quarterbacks, includ-
ing working with NFL quar-
terbacks Eli Manning (N.Y.
Giants), Sean Renfree (Atlanta
Falcons) and Thaddeus Lewis
(Buffalo Bills).
He inherits an offense that
features mobile quarterback Jeff
Driskel and plenty of running
back depth, but also includes
a woeful offensive line and few
playmakers on the perimeter.
Florida announces addition of Duke’s Roper as offensive coordinator
Pittsburgh 30,
Bowling Green 27
Pittsburgh 7 10 3 10—30
Bowling Green 3 7 10 7—27
First Quarter
BG—FG Tate 28, 4:26.
Pitt—Conner 15 run (Blewitt kick), :58.
Second Quarter
Pitt—FG Blewitt 25, 8:29.
Pitt—Boyd 54 punt return (Blewitt kick), 6:43.
BG—Bayer 29 pass from Johnson (Tate kick), 1:28.
Third Quarter
BG—Gates 94 kickoff return (Tate kick), 14:49.
BG—FG Tate 46, 9:52.
Pitt—FG Blewitt 28, 5:59.
Fourth Quarter
Pitt—Voytik 5 run (Blewitt kick), 9:31.
BG—Burbrink 15 pass from Johnson (Tate kick), 4:42.
Pitt—FG Blewitt 39, 1:17.
A—26,259.
Pitt BG
First downs 21 18
Rushes-yards 39-255 34-10
Passing 232 279
Comp-Att-Int 13-22-0 21-33-0
Return Yards 69 0
Punts-Avg. 4-41.0 5-54.6
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-0
Penalties-Yards 4-50 4-36
Time of Possession 28:50 31:10
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Pittsburgh, Conner 26-229, Voytik 2-24,
Parrish 1-2, Bennett 5-2, Savage 4-0, Team 1-(minus
2). Bowling Green, Tra.Greene 18-39, Coppet 5-2,
Johnson 11-(minus 31).
PASSING—Pittsburgh, Savage 8-13-0-124, Voytik
5-9-0-108. Bowling Green, Johnson 20-32-0-272,
H.Jackson 1-1-0-7.
RECEIVING—Pittsburgh, Boyd 8-173, Holtz 2-21,
Garner 1-20, Wuestner 1-13, Bennett 1-5. Bowling
Green, Joplin 6-86, H.Jackson 5-78, Bayer 3-57,
Burbrink 3-44, Moore 2-12, Tra.Greene 2-10, Johnson
0-(minus 8).
BY NOAH TRISTER
The Associated Press
DETROIT — The way
James Conner and Tyler
Boyd played in their first
postseason game, it’s no
wonder Pittsburgh coach
Paul Chryst is excited about
next season.
With a pair of freshmen
leading the way — and
breaking some long-stand-
ing school records — the
Panthers edged Bowling
Green 30-27 on Thursday
night in the Little Caesars
Pizza Bowl. Conner rushed
for 229 yards. Boyd caught
eight passes for 173 yards
and scored on a punt return.
“We have some great
young talent. That’s why we
are so confident about the fu-
ture of this program,” Chryst
said. “We think we’re in
great shape going forward.”
Conner broke a Pitts-
burgh bowl record for
yards rushing held by Tony
Dorsett, and Chris Blewitt
kicked a tiebreaking field
goal with 1:17 remaining.
Conner even played a
handful of snaps on the de-
fensive line. Boyd gave Pitt
(7-6) a boost with his versa-
tility as well.
The Panthers will have
to replace Aaron Donald,
their All-American on the
defensive line. Donald, a se-
nior, helped thwart any last-
ditch comeback with a sack
deep in Bowling Green ter-
ritory in the final minute.
“They were without
question the most physical
team we faced all season,”
said Adam Scheier, Bowl-
ing Green’s interim coach.
“The offensive line was
tough, the running back
was obviously a bear to
tackle and the whole defen-
sive line was disruptive.”
Scheier took over af-
ter Wake Forest hired
coach Dave Clawson away
from the Falcons. Scheier
coached the bowl, but now
Dino Babers takes over.
Dorsett rushed for 202
yards in Pitt’s win over
Georgia in the Sugar Bowl
on Jan. 1, 1977. The school’s
receiving record for a bowl
came the next season. In a
Gator Bowl victory against
Clemson, Gordon Jones
had 163 yards receiving.
Both marks fell Thursday.
The 6-foot-2, 230-pound
Pitt’s Conner delivers
record-setting effort
Conner rushed for 165
yards in the second half,
helping Pitt overcome the
loss of quarterback Tom
Savage, who didn’t play af-
ter halftime because of a
rib injury. Conner and the
Panthers drove 51 yards in
seven plays in the fourth
quarter to set up a 39-yard
kick by Blewitt, who had
missed from the same dis-
tance earlier.
Then Conner was back
on the field on defense,
helping the Panthers pro-
tect the lead.
BY BERNIE WILSON
The Associated Press
SAN DIEGO — Utah
State allowed two 100-yard
rushers all season long.
Jordan Lynch, the
all-purpose Heisman Tro-
phy finalist from Northern
Illinois, failed to make it
into that exclusive club.
The Aggies’ swarm-
ing defense made Lynch
look average during a 21-
14 victory against No. 24
Northern Illinois in the
Poinsettia Bowl on Thurs-
day night.
Safety Brian Suite
intercepted a pass and
recovered a fumble by
Lynch, who was bottled
up for only 39 yards rush-
ing. That kept him from
becoming the first major
college player to rush for
2,000 yards and pass for
2,000 yards in the same
season.
Utah State stymied a
Huskies offense that had
averaged nearly 42 points
a game.
“The only thing we do
every week is not stop
the run game, but elimi-
nate the run game,” USU
coach Matt Wells said.
“But obviously he is a big
part of the run game, so
Aggies beat Lynch, No. 24 Huskies
Utah State 21,
No. 24 Northern Illinois 14
Utah St. 3 3 7 8—21
N. Illinois 0 7 0 7—14
First Quarter
USU—FG Diaz 31, 6:56.
Second Quarter
USU—FG Diaz 39, 14:09.
NIU—Lynch 1 run (Sims kick), 8:17.
Third Quarter
USU—Swindall 5 pass from Garretson (Diaz kick),
11:57.
Fourth Quarter
USU—DeMartino 1 run (Natson pass from Garretson),
4:14.
NIU—Brescacin 15 pass from Lynch (Sims kick), 1:44.
A—23,408.
USU NIU
First downs 17 19
Rushes-yards 45-168 38-99
Passing 121 216
Comp-Att-Int 17-28-2 20-35-1
Return Yards 0 15
Punts-Avg. 3-45.0 4-35.5
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards 2-20 4-46
Time of Possession 32:21 27:39
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Utah St., DeMartino 23-143, Marshall
6-40, Glover-Wright 1-3, Natson 5-3, Garretson 6-(mi-
nus 6), Team 4-(minus 15). N. Illinois, Lynch 18-39,
Stingily 11-38, Maxwell 1-10, Spencer 2-6, D.Brown
3-5, Turner 1-1, Lewis 2-0.
PASSING—Utah St., Garretson 17-28-2-121. N. Illi-
nois, Lynch 20-35-1-216.
RECEIVING—Utah St., Butler 4-33, Swindall 4-28,
Natson 3-11, Van Leeuwen 2-23, Houston 1-11,
DeMartino 1-8, Marshall 1-4, Andersen 1-3. N. Illinois,
Lewis 6-55, D.Brown 4-63, Brescacin 3-30, Eakes
3-29, Maxwell 2-23, Spencer 1-10, Stingily 1-6.
we were able to eliminate
him, make him one-di-
mensional and then we
were able to actually find
a way to run the foot-
ball, which makes them
one-dimensional, and the
ballgame is ours.”
Joey DeMartino, who
went to high school and ju-
nior college in San Diego,
carried 23 times for 143
yards and a touchdown for
Utah State (9-5). He was
the offensive MVP.
“The feeling’s unre-
al,” DeMartino said. “I
couldn’t ask for a better
senior game to go out on
and to be in front of my
hometown, my family, my
friends and everyone who
supported me out here.”
DeMartino said the
Aggies wanted to bounce
back from a loss to Fres-
no State in the Mountain
West Conference champi-
onship game.
“We took a hard loss
there,” DeMartino said.
“That’s not how we play.
We just wanted to come
back and prove to the na-
tion that we can compete
every game and we did
just that.”
Lynch was third in the
Heisman Trophy voting
and made The Associated
Press All-America team as
an all-purpose player.
He extended his major
college record for yards
rushing for a quarterback
in a season to 1,920. He
completed 20 of 35 pass-
es for 216 yards and was
sacked twice.
Lynch ran for a touch-
down and passed for
another for NIU (12-2),
which ended the season
with two straight losses.
By The Associated Press
COLUMBIA, S.C. — South Carolina
defensive end Jadeveon Clowney has been
pulled over again for going at least 25 mph
over the speed limit.
Clowney was stopped around 10:30 a.m.
Thursday going 84 mph in a 55 mph zone
on Interstate 26 near Interstate 126, about
5 miles from the Gamecocks’ campus, Co-
lumbia Police said..
The traffic stop happened about an hour
before the Gamecocks flew to Florida for
the Jan. 1 Capital One Bowl against Wis-
consin. The game will be the junior’s last
for the Gamecocks as he leaves school ear-
ly for the NFL draft.
It’s Clowney’s second ticket in three
weeks. On Dec. 7, state troopers say
Clowney was going 110 mph in a 70 mph
zone.
South Carolina’s Steve Spurrier was
asked about Clowney’s latest ticket after
the team landed in Orlando, and the coach
didn’t sound too concerned.
“He needs to go to driving school
doesn’t he? Somebody told me he got an-
other speeding ticket today,” Spurrier said.
“At least he’ll have enough money to pay
for it a week or so from now. He needs to
go to driving school. Hopefully they’ll send
him there after the bowl game.”
Drivers pleading guilty for going at
least 25 mph over the speed limit in South
Carolina get six points. State law allows a
license to be suspended after 12 points.
n Michigan State LB Bullough sus-
pended for Rose Bowl: At East Lansing,
Mich., Michigan State has suspended se-
nior linebacker Max Bullough for violating
team rules, making him ineligible to play
in the Rose Bowl.
In a news release sent early Thurs-
day, Spartans coach Mark Dantonio said
Bullough had been suspended for the rest
of the season. He did not say what rules the
two-time team captain violated.
“It is extremely disappointing for all par-
ties involved,” Dantonio said.
No. 4 Michigan State will play No. 5
Stanford in the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1 in Pas-
adena, Calif. It is Michigan State’s seventh
straight bowl game and first appearance in
the Rose Bowl in 26 seasons.
Bullough, from Traverse City, had 76
tackles and 9.5 tackles for loss this season,
earning him third-team All-America hon-
ors and first-team All-Big Ten honors. He
has 299 career tackles and made 40 con-
secutive starts.
Authorities in the Traverse City area
had no reports of legal issues involving
Bullough, the Traverse City Record-Eagle
said. The Associated Press left phone and
email messages for police and prosecutors
Thursday night.
In 2011, Bullough and then-senior tight
end Brian Linthicum were arrested af-
ter a disturbance at a bar in Aspen, Colo.
Bullough, then 19, was charged with a be-
ing a minor in possession of alcohol and
got nine months’ probation, the Detroit
Free Press reported.
Playing for Michigan State has been a
family affair. Max Bullough’s grandfather,
Hank Bullough, played for Michigan State in
the early 1950s, and his father Shane followed
in the mid-1980s. Two of Max Bullough’s un-
cles were Spartans, and his younger brother
Riley is a redshirt freshman.
“Max will forever remain a Spartan
and valued member in this team’s achieve-
ments,” Dantonio said in the statement.
n Gardner out, Morris to start for
Michigan in bowl: At Scottsdale, Ariz.,
Shane Morris sat out most of his senior sea-
son in high school and spent a good portion
of his first in college watching games from
the sideline.
After two years of mostly idling, the
big-armed quarterback will be thrust into
a spotlight unlike any he’s seen before: as
Michigan’s starter against Kansas State in
the Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl on Saturday.
“Just getting back to football after sit-
ting out has been crazy and now to start
in a bowl game is pretty amazing,” Morris
said Thursday.
Morris spent his first season in Ann
Arbor as Devin Gardner’s backup, getting
mop-up duty in three games.
Gardner sustained a turf toe injury in
Michigan’s regular-season finale against
Ohio State and suffered a setback last
week, showing up in the desert wearing a
protective boot.
Michigan coach Brady Hoke said Gard-
ner would have to practice by Wednesday
to play in the bowl game and wasn’t able to
go, opening the door for Morris.
“We recruited him at Michigan to be
the quarterback at Michigan,” Hoke said.
“This is a great opportunity. We have a lot
of faith in how he goes about his business
getting ready to play.”
n Mississippi College hires Bland
as new coach: At Clinton, Mississippi Col-
lege has hired John Bland as its next foot-
ball coach.
The school announced the hiring
Thursday.
Bland succeeds Norman Joseph, who
resigned in November as coach at Missis-
sippi College after nine seasons.
Bland had been coach at the University
of the Cumberlands in Williamsburg, Ky.,
for the past eight seasons. Bland led the
Patriots to the NAIA playoffs six times,
including a 13-1 season and a trip to the na-
tional championship game in 2013.
Clowney pulled over again for speeding
Lausanne turned up
the defensive intensity in
the fourth quarter to make
the final push. White said
the team is still trying to
find itself after losing four
seniors from last season’s
team. He said Crawford ex-
cels in an up-tempo game,
while Stokes (6-foot-7) and
Babb (6-6) give the Lynx a
two-head inside presence
when they try to slow the
tempo and work their half-
court offense.
Against New Hope,
Crawford shined the
brightest with a variety of
twisting moves around the
basket that helped him fin-
ish with a career-high.
“We want to get out and
run,” White said. “That kind
of has been a staple of ours.
We have been here for five
years, and we want to get out
in transition and push when
we can but still have the
discipline to run some half-
court sets and take advan-
tage of our size on the inside
when we need to.
“(Marc) did a real good
job today. We have kind of
been seeing that potential
from him all year long. To-
day was really the first day
he has really tapped into
(that potential). Hopefully,
this will be what he needs
to get going for the rest of
the year. For us to go very
far, he needs to play very
well for us.”
Stokes, whose brother,
Jarnell, plays at Tennes-
see, wears a size 22 shoe.
Despite his youth and size,
Stokes showed polish with
his footwork and his shoot-
ing touch. His 3-pointer
with 41.1 seconds to go in
the third quarter was a key
basket because it helped
hold off New Hope, which
had cut the deficit to 44-43.
“He is very skilled,”
White said. “He has got a
good pedigree. He is able
to step out on the perime-
ter and do a few things and
he has good footwork in
the post. As long as we can
keep him out of foul trou-
ble, he should be pretty big
for us the rest of the way.”
With pieces like that,
including a steady point
guard, Jesse Neloms, who
also is a freshman, White
wants to use remaining
games against Starkville
and Aberdeen this week-
end to build chemistry for a
playoff run.
“These guys really don’t
know each other all that
well because it is a brand
new team and we have a lot
of new faces,” White said.
“The more opportunities
we can get to bond togeth-
er, hopefully that will pay
off down the road.”
McBrayer also hopes
games against out-of-state
competition will help mold
his team into shape. Unfor-
tunately, he felt his team
missed an opportunity after
it fell behind by nine points
in the first quarter and then
stayed close throughout the
second and third quarters
but could only claim the
lead once (15-14 at the end of
the first quarter) and tie the
score five times.
Lausanne had two steals
and New Hope committed
another turnover down the
stretch as a 49-46 lead bal-
looned to a 63-50 cushion
with 2:29 to play.
“It kinda got away from
us,” McBrayer said. “It was
a lack of execution on both
ends of the floor. We are
just not tough enough.”
Crawford hit a 3-pointer
after Terryonte Thomas
(12 points) hit a free throw
to cut the deficit to 49-46 to
kick the advantage to 52-
46. A New Hope turnover
led to a layup by Spencer
Mackey that forced Mc-
Brayer to call timeout with
5:39 to go.
Whyatt Foster’s layup
off a pass from Thomas cut
the margin back to six, but
Lausanne used a 6-0 spurt
to build the advantage it
held the rest of the way.
McBrayer said the Tro-
jans have to find a way to
respond and hold their
composure when a team
make a run. He felt their
still was plenty of time for
New Hope to counter with
a run, but he didn’t see the
spark he needed from his
players.
“In the matter of 30 sec-
onds we went from being
slap in the middle of the ball-
game to oh my God, what
do we do now?” McBrayer
said. “That is the mental
toughness we talked about
the other night (following a
loss to Columbus in the Joe
Horne Columbus Christ-
mas Invitational). Some-
times it is mind-boggling to
see things like that happen.
... It is like the air went out
of them and they were com-
pletely devastated and did
not think they could win
the ballgame. You could
see it on their face and in
their eyes.”
McBrayer also lament-
ed an offensive foul that
went against junior point
guard Jaylon Bardley (nine
points). Bardley made the
basket and then absorbed
contact with 0.4 seconds
remaining and New Hope
trailing 47-43 only to be
called for a foul. On the
possession prior to that,
Toddy Jennings had a nif-
ty spin move on the post,
but he wasn’t able to finish
the play. Those what-ifs left
McBrayer wondering how
many times his players will
face tight games before
they will answer with the
toughness he wants to see.
“We get it done in prac-
tice, but now it is translating
it to the ballgame is where we
have to progress,” McBrayer
said. “They want to speed up
when they get down instead
of slowing down and execut-
ing. They have to learn how
to do that.”
Shermar Johnson paced
New Hope with 13 points,
while Foster added six.
Follow Dispatch sports
editor Adam Minichino on
Twitter @ctsportseditor.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2013 5B
MSU
Continued from Page 1B
whole thing. What this
club has done is lay some
foundation for future
teams because we’re go-
ing to come back here and
win this thing.”
MSU defeated Oregon
State (twice) and Indi-
ana to advance to its first
CWS finals in June. Fans
from the Magnolia State
didn’t let the opportuni-
ty go by and flooded TD
Ameritrade Park in Oma-
ha, Neb., with maroon
and white. However, the
turnout and excitement
of a first national champi-
onship couldn’t spark the
Bulldogs’ offense. MSU
managed one run in 18
innings against UCLA in
the CWS finals. The Bru-
ins allowed four runs in
five tournament victories
and finished with a team
ERA of 0.80.
“We are disappointed
in the outcome, but we
are proud of the season,”
MSU senior pitcher Ken-
dall Graveman said. “We
did something no other
Mississippi State baseball
team has done.”
UCLA junior right-
hander Adam Plutko was
named the tournament’s
most outstanding player
after he controlled MSU
and LSU in his two starts
in the College World Se-
ries. In 13 innings, Plutko
allowed eight hits and two
runs. Eight players in UC-
LA’s starting lineup had
hits in the 8-0 victory that
clinched the title.
“It bothers me we
didn’t play well the last
two games, but I think
we played 15 postseason
games and we played two
bad games,” Cohen said.
“I’ll never understand
why we picked this time
to play one of our worst
games of the year, but we
did.”
While the program
has some of the best fan
support in the nation, the
sight of TD Ameritrade
Park filled with people
dressed in maroon and
white was a shock to the
Bulldogs and made a
“neutral site” feel a little
bit like a home game.
“I almost feel like our
kids put a lot of pressure
on themselves because
they looked out and said,
‘Wow, look how many peo-
ple are out there to see
us,’ ” Cohen said. “That’s
not a excuse. It’s a fact
that it’s a wow factor for
our kids that in this econ-
omy people are giving up
their vacations, their pay-
checks, to come here and
watch us play baseball.”
In the preseason, MSU
senior shortstop Adam
Frazier used a Power-
Point presentation to help
introduce his teammates
to TD Ameritrade Park.
That was Frazier’s way of
fulfilling an edict from the
coaches that asked each
player to do a five-minute
presentation on anything
from the baseball pro-
gram’s past, present or
future.
“He had slides, pic-
tures of this stadium and
he said, ‘When we get
there, I don’t want it to be
new to us,’ ” Cohen said.
“Adam said, ‘We will have
already seen the dugouts.
We will have already seen
the locker rooms. We
will have already seen
the playing surface, the
stands.’ How can you not
be moved by that? Every-
thing he did in that Pow-
erPoint and all the things
our kids did in the Power-
Point presentations really
came to fruition. It’s pret-
ty remarkable when you
get 35 18- to 22-year-olds
and everything they talk
about within an eyelash is
coming true. This group
is special, and they have
helped the future of our
program.”
Follow Matt
Stevens on Twitter
@matthewcstevens.
1. MISSISSIPPI STATE BASEBALL REACHES
CWS FINALS: MSU won the Starkville Regional and
Charlottesville Super Regional on its way to face UCLA
in its first CWS championship series against UCLA. MSU
scored one run in 18 innings and dropped 3-1 and 8-0
decisions to finish the season 51-20.
2. EGG BOWL VICTORY: Dak Prescott engineered
a fourth-quarter comeback against Ole Miss that helped
MSU qualify for a bowl game for its fourth-straight sea-
son for the first time in program history. MSU also has
won six or more games in four consecutive campaigns for
the first time since 1997-2000. MSU coach Dan Mullen
has defeated Ole Miss in four of the last five meetings,
making him the second coach to do that, and the first to
accomplish the feat since 1950.
3. MSU SELECTED AS NCAA BASEBALL RE-
GIONAL HOST: For the first time in a decade, Dudy
Noble Field was the host of a NCAA regional game.
MSU closed the season by winning seven of its last nine
games, including a 3-1 showing at the Southeastern Con-
ference tournament in Hoover, Ala. MSU’s 2013 résumé
included a Ratings Percentage Index (RPI) ranking of 10
and a record of 21-15 against schools in the RPI’s top 50.
The Bulldogs played the toughest SEC schedule that fea-
tured 10 opponents with an average RPI ranking of 25.1.
4. RENFROE DRAFTED IN FIRST ROUND: Junior
outfielder Hunter Renfroe was selected 13th overall by
the San Diego Padres in the first round of the Major
League Baseball First-Year Player draft. He was the 12th
player in MSU history to be taken in the first round of
the draft.
5. MSU MEN’S BASKETBALL BEATS OLE MISS
TO END 13-GAME LOSING STREAK: A 73-67 victory
against Ole Miss on March 2 at Humphrey Coliseum
followed a week that featured coach Rick Ray speaking
to 17 Greek houses and student organizations. MSU’s
fourth-straight win against Ole Miss in Starkville marked
the Bulldogs’ first victory against team ranked in the top
100 of the RPI.
6. GABE JACKSON WINS CONERLY TROPHY:
Senior left guard Gabe Jackson was named the 2013
C Spire Conerly Trophy winner. The trophy is given an-
nually to the student-athlete voted the most outstanding
collegiate football player in the state of Mississippi. He is
the first offensive lineman to receive the award.
7. OWEN DOMINATES IN PITCHING CIRCLE:
Junior pitcher Allison Owen broke the softball team’s
single-game school record with 15 strikeouts in a com-
plete-game, two-hit shutout of Wichita State. The perfor-
mance came six days after Owen tied the previous mark
of 14, which was last set twice in 1998. One day later,
Owen returned to the circle and broke her school record
with a 16-strikeout performance against Southern Illinois
at Edwardsville. The Newnan, Ga., native fanned the
entire Cougars’ lineup consecutively to start the game,
becoming the first pitcher in school history to record nine-
straight strikeouts. The career-high 16 strikeouts marked
the most by a SEC pitcher in a seven-inning game in
2013.
8. MSU GOLF, ALLY MCDONALD DOMINATE:
Sophomore Ally McDonald shot a 10-under-par 206 to
win the individual title by five strokes at the NCAA Central
Regional in Norman, Okla. McDonald also claimed the
111th North & South Women’s Amateur title with a 3&2
victory against Cindy Feng at Pinehurst No. 2. Following
a season that included a school-record four tournament
victories, the MSU men’s golf team received a No. 4 seed
and placed in the Baton Rouge, La. for its first NCAA Re-
gional appearance in three years.
9. MSU VOLLEYBALL SWEEPS DOUBLEHEAD-
ER: For the first time in school history, the MSU volleyball
team notched consecutive 3-0 sweeps against SEC op-
ponents (South Carolina and Tennessee) on Oct. 18 and
Oct. 20 in the Newell-Grissom Building.
10. MSU GETS PENALTIES FROM NCAA FOL-
LOWING RECRUITING VIOLATIONS: The NCAA Com-
mittee of Infractions hit the MSU football program with
a loss of scholarships and a number of other recruiting
violations. The penalties came as a result of recruiting
wrongdoings involving cornerback Will Redmond. MSU
was placed on probation for two years, had its number of
scholarships reduced from 85 to 83 this fall, its number of
official visits reduced from 41 to 39 for two years, and its
number of recruiting days in the spring evaluation period
reduced from 168 to 164. Former MSU wide receivers
coach Angelo Mirando was given a one-year show cause
ban from coaching at a NCAA institution for “unethical
conduct for failing to report the booster’s activities when
he became aware of them and providing false information
during his first two interviews with the NCAA.” Redmond
was required to pay $2,660 in impermissible benefits, for-
feit his eligibility for the 2012 season, and was suspended
first five games of the 2013 season.
— List compiled by Matthew Stevens
The Dispatch’s Top 10 MSU Stories of 2013
Rice QB
Continued from Page 1B
wanted to go,” Rice coach Da-
vid Bailiff said. “The top of our
(goals) pyramid is to go to the
Liberty Bowl and win. Now
we have the opportunity to do
that.”
McHargue earned honor-
able mention All-C-USA honors
after amassing 2,727 yards and
scoring 22 touchdowns. Despite
pushing Rice to a 10-win season
and a bowl game, McHargue
isn’t satisfied.
“There will be a lot of people
who will come out and say, ‘Well
that was a good (41-24) win
against Marshall, but you’re
still a Conference USA school
with three losses,’ ” McHargue
said. “This will be an opportu-
nity to show that this team can
compete with anybody in any
conference.”
McHargue is the first quar-
terback in school history to lead
his team to consecutive bowl
berths. He set a career-high by
throwing for 2,261 yards, which
is fourth best in Rice history.
He also is the first quarterback
at Rice to start four consecutive
openers since freshmen were
granted varsity eligibility in
1972.
“When you look at those 23
seniors and 19 fifth-year guys,
this is what they said they want-
ed to do,” Bailiff said. “They
had a dream and they matched
it with effort, and here we are
making their dreams come
true. What a legacy this senior
class is going to leave us and
this university.”
Off the field, McHargue has
the suit and tie look of a sum-
mer intern in finance. As a
Managerial Studies graduate of
one of the nation’s top schools,
McHargue has completed
three summer internships,
starting with Rice University’s
finance department. After that,
McHargue spent four months
as an intern at Merrill Lynch in
Houston and then worked with
the private law firm in Austin
and Houston of Andrews My-
ers, P.C. Not too many Football
Bowl Subdivision quarterbacks
can trade in a suit for shoulder
pads and perform at a high level
in either setting, but McHargue
isn’t focused on moving on to
the NFL.
MSU coach Dan Mullen said
the Bulldogs won’t underesti-
mate McHargue or Rice.
“It would be easy for anybody
to say, ‘Well, it’s a lower level
conference team and so we’re
supposed to have more talent,
but c’mon, this is a 10-win foot-
ball team that won a conference
championship, something we
didn’t do,” Mullen said. “I see a
very disciplined, well coached,
and highly athletic group of se-
niors that can beat anybody on
a given day.”
Rice has won 15 of its last
18 games and has 23 seniors,
including 19 fifth-year players.
Bailiff bristled at the idea his
team will have problems match-
ing up against a Southeastern
Conference school.
“We know we are in for a tre-
mendous challenge, but that’s
what is exciting about the sea-
son we have had,” Bailiff said. “I
know our players are excited to
play a team from the SEC.”
Follow Matt Stevens on
Twitter @matthewcstevens.
Starkville
Continued from Page 1B
day. Those two things are
what allowed us to get sep-
aration. The thing about
this team is they know what
they are supposed to do,
and eventually they will
find a way to do it.”
Still, the verdict was in
doubt early in the fourth
quarter. The Patriots pulled
to 46-43 before being undone
by the 12-2 run. Starkville
forced eight turnovers in
10-possession stretch. A full-
court trap that had worked
with moderate success
turned out to be the Patri-
ots’ undoing once the Yellow
Jackets tried their hand at
the same defense.
Consecutive steals and
layups — one by Baker and
the other by Dontavius Self
— helped push the lead to
58-45 with 3 minutes, 45
seconds left remaining.
“Once we get it rolling,
it is hard to stop us,” Bak-
er said. “We will always
defend, so when the other
team gives us some easy
baskets they are in trouble.
We feel like we are the type
of team that can go on a run
at anytime thanks to our
defense.”
Self added 16 points,
while Jarell Nurse had 10
for Starkville.
Braelon Walker led
Parkview with 14 points.
Daryl Macon had 13 and
Jaylen Franklin added 10.
Carter liked what he
saw in his team’s second
meeting against an out-of-
state opponent in less than
a week. Starkville’s losses
came at Columbus — a re-
gion setback against the
Falcons and to Midfield
(Ala.) in the Joe Horne Co-
lumbus Christmas Classic.
“I really like how this
team is rounding in shape,”
Carter said. “We have a
good balance and a lot of re-
solve on the defensive end.
We need to rebound more
consistently. We are led by
a bunch of seniors who have
been through some rough
knocks to get to this point.”
Baker also feels like this
team is ready to play good
basketball for the stretch
run.
“Everybody’s goal is to
make state and that is our
goal too,” Baker said. “Our
No. 1 goal though is to go
out and show people that
we are a better basketball
team than we were last sea-
son. Some teams are taken
us lightly because of how
we played last season. This
is a much different team
and we got a chance to car-
ry this thing a long way.”
n Aberdeen 56, Mt. Leb-
anon (Pa.) 45: The Bull-
dogs won the second game
of the day with a dominat-
ing defensive performance
for two quarters.
Trailing by six points,
Aberdeen used an 8-0 run
midway through the sec-
ond quarter buoyed by a
string of 11 straight defen-
sive stops.
“We pride ourselves
in being a team that plays
with great defensive pres-
sure for four quarters,”
Aberdeen coach Cornelius
Gilleylen said. “Fortunate-
ly, almost three quarters of
great defense was enough.
We really got things going
in the second quarter and
made it difficult for them to
get anything inside.”
Defense helped Aber-
deen build a 21-17 halftime
lead. In the fourth quarter,
the Bulldogs scored a cou-
ple of fast-break layups and
blew the game open as the
visitors missed 12 straight
shots from the field.
“We had some struggles
early, but I really like how
this team is playing,” Gilley-
len said. “We are beginning
to see a run take place. The
main thing is confidence.
The guys are playing with a
lot right now.”
Marcus Carouthers led
Aberdeen with 17 points.
Trent Davis added 10.
Patrick Ehland led Mt.
Lebanon (3-4) with 15
points. Jonny David scored
all 14 of his points in the
second half.
Follow Scott Walters on
Twitter @dispatchscott.
New Hope
Continued from Page 1B
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
New Hope High School’s Toddy Jennings fends off
contact and attempts a shot Thursday at Humphrey
Coliseum.
DILBERT
ZITS
GARFIELD
CANDORVILLE
BABY BLUES
BEETLE BAILEY
DOONESBURY
MALLARD FILMORE
FOR SOLUTION SEE THE
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
IN CLASSIFIEDS
FAMILY CIRCUS
D
EAR ABBY: I
live in a fair-
ly well-to-do
neighborhood
on a cul-de-sac.
There has been
an increase in
the traffic on my
street, and I sus-
pect it’s because
a neighbor’s adult
son has been
selling drugs.
Most of the cars
are driven by
young people who
park for five to 10
minutes at the
most, and all of
them walk around to the back
of the house. Hypodermic
needles have been found in
the street.
Should I talk to the police
and risk alienating my neigh-
bors, or should I keep quiet
because I have no definite
proof? I don’t think the par-
ents would believe me if I told
them; they seem to think their
child can do no wrong. Also,
if I do file a police report and
they find out, I’m afraid they
will retaliate. Help! — NOT
SURE WHAT TO DO
DEAR NOT SURE: Don’t
keep quiet. It’s important that
the police be notified before
the problem becomes worse.
Call your local anonymous tip
line and report where you have
seen the suspicious activity
and the needles.
No personal
information
from you will be
asked, and your
privacy will be
protected.
DEAR ABBY:
I had some time
to think over
the summer,
and came to
the realization
that a baby my
girlfriend had
almost 30 years
ago may be my
daughter. “Sally”
and I had a very
intense, but short-lived rela-
tionship that blew up. About
a year later we met again
for lunch at the behest of a
mutual friend.
I don’t remember the
details, but I do remember
searching for an accurate way
to compliment her. Because
she had put on weight, the
best I could come up with was
“you look good.” She didn’t
hit me, but the conversation
went downhill from there. Sally
mentioned as we were parting
that she had given birth to a
daughter. I haven’t heard from
her since.
I don’t want to create
problems for anybody, but I’m
curious. I’m happily married
and plan to stay that way. At
the same time, I’d welcome
having a daughter.
I have thought about
sending cheek swabs and a
check-off DNA test to the child
along with a note suggesting
she send our samples in for
testing. But that could destroy
whatever story she may have
grown up with.
I’m at a loss here. I could
use some advice from an
outside authority. What do you
think I should do? — BLOCK-
HEAD IN CALIFORNIA
DEAR B.H.: It’s been 30
years. The “child” is a woman
now. Before you risk starting
WWIII, why not contact the
mother and ask if you are her
daughter’s father, because it’s
possible that you AREN’T.
DEAR ABBY: I’m 20 years
old and have never dated any-
one. I have a lot of friends and
do well in school and at work,
and I try to be a good, kind,
friendly person.
What can I do to make
myself datable? Am I missing
some crucial step in how to
become a girlfriend? — OLD
MAID IN ST. LOUIS
DEAR OLD MAID: Because
I have never met you in per-
son, I can’t tell you what you
might be doing that relegates
you to the “only as a friend”
category. However, some of
your guy friends might be able
to tell you. And you should
also solicit some tips from
your girlfriends.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 6B FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2013
Comics & Puzzles
Dear Abby
Dear Abby
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Dec.
27). This year features a new
way of moving through life. In
the next three months, you’ll
increasingly be active, first
physically and then socially
and intellectually. A romantic
declaration will be featured
in January. Take “before” pic-
tures, because February brings
an “after” to your domestic
scene. A promotion comes
in May. Aries and Leo people
adore you. Your lucky numbers
are: 4, 44, 49, 20 and 1.
ARIES (March 21-April
19). You can’t help but wonder
whether there’s a better way to
make money. Center your work
on something that is endlessly
interesting to you, and it won’t
feel like work at all.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20). Your heart will communi-
cate with operatic force. Follow
its powerful song. The action
you take this afternoon will
have an unusual but beneficial
outcome.
GEMINI (May 21-June
21). You may prefer to freely
share what you’ve learned,
but consider that practical
knowledge costs time and
money to acquire. Shouldn’t
you be compensated? People
are more likely to listen to the
advice they pay for.
CANCER (June 22-July
22). Be careful not to get
too wrapped up in defining
people (or yourself) through
belongings. What you own may
suggest certain talents, but
just because a person owns a
hammer doesn’t mean he can
build a house.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22).
It’s nice when people approve
of what you do, but you don’t
base your decisions on what’s
nice. It’s better to let them
think what they will than to
change your behavior to please
their fickle tastes.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Sacred things are made so by
the beliefs of people. You are
as qualified as anyone else to
declare what is sacred to you,
and as long as you treat that
item or event in a sacred way,
it will remain so.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
Ask a small favor of a friend
who seems to have the means
and the time to accommodate
you. You may not even need
the help that much, but you
do need to know on whom you
can rely.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
21). As you look at the current
cast of characters around
you, it will seem that the most
charming people tend to lead
charmed lives. It’s important
that you don’t mistake polish
for substance, though.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21). Socializing leads to
intellectual and political gains.
Those who listen twice as
much as they talk will be two
times as knowledgeable at the
end of the conversation.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). It may be convenient for
you to accommodate a loved
one’s wishes, but before you
do, consider that this also may
be setting up an unhealthy,
codependent dynamic.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). When you’re not sure
what to say, saying very little
is a wise strategy. You’ll be
surprised by the way others
fill in the silent spaces you
leave, usually to your credit
and benefit.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20). Sooner or later, the con-
versation will come around to
that subject about which you
care deeply. So why not cut
out all of the boring, meander-
ing chitchat and get right to it?
Horoscopes
ER - LM -
12.29
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DOLPHIN TALE 3D PG
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DREAM HOUSE PG13
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REAL STEEL PG13
4:10 - 7:10
THE THING R
4:35 - 7:30
FOOTLOOSE PG13
4:15 - 7:15
PARANORMAL
ACTIVITY 3 R
4:30 - 7:25
3-D THE THREE
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Open
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◆ THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY
PG
1:05 - 4:20 - 7:05 - 9:40
◆ 3-D 47 RONIN
PG13
10:00
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PG13
1:30 - 4:30 - 7:20
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1:00 - 4:00 - 7:00 - 10:00
◆ SAVING MR. BANKS
PG13
1:25 - 4:10 - 7:10 - 9:55
◆ 3-D WALKING WITH DINOSAURS
PG
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1:05 - 4:05 - 6:50
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PG13
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1:10 - 4:15
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1:20 - 4:35 - 7:30 - 9:55
Saints
Continued from Page 1B
And throughout the season,
other defensive backs, includ-
ing Harper earlier this season
and safety Rafael Bush more
recently, have missed sever-
al weeks apiece with various
injuries. Harper returned six
games ago from a knee injury,
while Bush has missed the past
three games with a high right
ankle sprain.
Through it all, the Saints
have allowed only 192.7 yards
passing per game, which ranks
second in the NFL.
“They’ve had some tough
injuries, some tough breaks for
them, but the guys they have
playing have a lot of talent as
well,” Tampa Bay quarterback
Mike Glennon said, noting in
particular what he saw on video
of how New Orleans held Caro-
lina to 10 points last Sunday un-
til the Panthers’ winning TD in
the final minute. “Holding that
Panthers offense, which is an
explosive offense, to not a lot
of points really until that last
drive ... shows they have a lot
of talent there.”
Bush has returned to prac-
tice this week, providing hope
he’ll be able to help fill the void
caused by Vaccaro’s absence.
“If I feel I can go out there
and not be a liability, then of
course I’ll go out there and
play,” Bush said Thursday af-
ter participating fully in prac-
tice. “I’m excited. It’s been a
while, so I just want to make
sure I can go out there and help
the team play — and win.”
The consensus among
Saints players and coaches is
that losing Vaccaro will hurt.
He was third on the team in
total tackles with 77. He had
one interception and also was
credited with a sack, a forced
fumble and four tackles for
losses.
“Losing a player like Ken-
ny is tough because he had
really established himself,”
coach Sean Payton said. “But
the next guy will step up. We’ll
have a plan.”
Add free safety Malcolm
Jenkins: “Obviously just his
style of play, his production, is
going to be a big loss.”
But Jenkins, who was draft-
ed as a cornerback in 2009 and
has experience defending slot
receivers as the nickel back in
a five-defensive back forma-
tion, said the Saints have ver-
satility in their favor.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2013 7B
Sudoku
YESTERDAY’S ANSWER
Sudoku is a number-
placing puzzle based on
a 9x9 grid with several
given numbers. The object
is to place the numbers
1 to 9 in the empty spaces
so that each row, each
column and each 3x3 box
contains the same number
only once. The difficulty
level increases from
Monday to Sunday.
Piping hot
WHATZIT ANSWER
ACROSS
1 Breaks, perhaps
6 Low singer
11 Really impressed
12 Over
13 Yard worker
14 Acts the nomad
15 Will Smith biopic
16 Cancel, as a
debt
18 Oxford bigwig
19 — Paulo
20 Trawling need
21 Quiche base
23 Salad servers
25 Greek conso-
nants
27 May honoree
28 Hog the mirror
30 Plunge
33 — favor
34 Prepare to fire
36 Two-piece piece
37 Somewhat
39 Help out
40 Astronomer’s
prime time
41 Generous one
43 Lucy’s pal
44 Sock site
45 Door holder’s
words
46 Finishes last
DOWN
1 Angry rant
2 Like some
watches
3 1987 John
Malkovich movie
4 Merino mom
5 Feudal workers
6 Watering hole
7 Wildly eager
8 2013 Emma
Thompson movie
9 Colanders’ kin
10 Dawn
17 Cereal bit
22 Take to court
24 Auction signal
26 Mariners’ home
28 Civil
29 Goose egg
31 Colorful bird
32 Chaplains
33 Comics unit
35 Military award
38 Those people
42 Musician Yoko
Congratulations!
on your new arrival
Share your wonderful news with all of the Golden Triangle
with a customized birth announcement in The Dispatch.
All announcement must be placed within 3 months of birth. Submit order from,
payment & photograph together. Include a self-addressed, stamped envelope
to have photo returned. The birth announcements will appear in both The
Commercial Dispatch and Starkville Dispatch.
Hospital name and siblings may also be included in the announcement.
Matthew & Tayla
Walker
proudly announce the birth
of their daughter
Brianna Nicole
May 1, 2012 at 2:14 am
6 pounds, 7 ounces
Grandparents:
Todd and Sue Walker of Columbus, MS &
Bill and JoAnn Compton of Marietta, GA.
Ad at
right shown
actual size
Andrew and Jennifer Pearson
proudly announce the birth of their son
Jonathan Andrew
June 3, 2012 at 7:43 pm
8 pounds, 3 ounces
Grandparents:
Leonard and Penny Huff
of New Hope, MS and
Jacob and Renée Pearson of
Modesto, CA.
Please Print:
Baby’s Name: ___________________________________________________________
Baby’s Date & Time of Birth: _______________________________________________
Baby’s Weight ______________ Baby's Length ________________ ❍Boy ❍Girl
Parents’ Names: ________________________________________________________
Grandparents’ Names: ___________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
Payment Information
Address: _______________________________________________________________
City: ___________________________ State:_____ Zip: _______________________
Phone:_____________________ Email: ______________________________________
Amount ❍$35 without photo B&W ❍$60 without photo color ❍$50 with photo B&W ❍$75 with photo color
❍ Cash ❍ Check ❍ Credit Card # ________________________________________
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Mail form and payment to The Dispatch, P.O. Box 511, Columbus, MS 39703
or bring in to our ofce at 516 Main Street, Downtown Columbus.
RELIGIOUS BRIEFS
Usher session
Pleasant Grove Robinson MB Church,
9203 Highway 389 N. in Starkville,
hosts an usher union ministry session
Dec. 27, 6 p.m. For information, call
Marcella Tipton, 662-418-3776.
Fifth Sunday
Mt. Olivet District One Missionary
Society hosts a fifth Sunday meeting
at Northside MB Church Dec. 29, 1:30
p.m. The guest speaker is Brenda
Bankhead.
Song fest
United Faith Ministries, 1702 22nd
St. N., hosts an end of year gospel song
fest Dec. 29, 6 p.m. For information,
call Ruby Ellis, 662-549-5378.
Fifth Sunday
Sixth Ave. MB Church, 1519 Sixth
Ave. N., hosts a fifth Sunday worship
service Dec. 29, 6 p.m. The guest
speaker is the Rev. Therman Cunning-
ham.
Song festival
Claibrone CME Church, 3775 Nashville
Ferry Road E., hosts a Christmas song
festival Dec. 31, 6 p.m. For information, call
Geneva Hodges, 662-321-3257 or Mary
Gavin, 662-435-3150.
New Year service
St. Paul MB Church, 1800 Short Main
St., hosts a New Year’s Eve service Dec. 31,
7 p.m. And a watch night service at 2231
Highway 389 N. in Starkville at 10 p.m.
Watch night
St. Paul MB Church, 5707 Highway 389
N. in Starkville, hosts a watch night service
Dec. 31, 10 p.m.
Watch night
Mount Zion MB Church, 2221 14th Ave.
N., hosts a watch night service Dec. 31, 10
p.m. For information, call 662-328-4979 or
662-549-9096.
Watch night
Pleasant Grove Robinson MB Church,
9203 Highway 389 N. in Starkville, hosts
a watch night service Dec. 31, 10 p.m.
Guest speakers are Daisy Totten, Eddie
Wooten and Marcella J. Tipton.
New year program
United Faith Inter-Denominational Min-
istries, 1701 22nd St. N., hosts an ‘Old
Year Out and New Year In’ program Dec.
31, 10:30 p.m. Breakfast will be served.
Watch night
Zion Gate MB Church hosts a watch
night service Dec. 31, 10:45 p.m.
Communion
Southside MB Church, 100 Nashville
Ferry Road E., hosts a city and county
wide communion Jan. 5, 6 p.m. The
guest speaker is the Rev. L.A. Gardner.
Usher board
Mt. Ary MB Church, 291 South Front-
age Road, hosts an usher board day Jan.
26, 2:30 p.m. The guest speaker is the
Rev. Willie Mays of St. Paul.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM — Pales-
tinian President Mahmoud
Abbas has appealed to the
U.S. to block a new Israeli
plan to build hundreds of
additional homes in Jewish
settlements, a top negotia-
tor said today, warning the
move could put U.S.-led
peace efforts in peril.
Israel officials have said
the planned construction of
new units in the West Bank
and east Jerusalem will be
announced next week, just
as Israel is set to release 26
long-serving Palestinian
prisoners under a pledge it
made at the outset of peace
talks last summer.
Minister Benjamin Ne-
tanyahu has previously is-
sued similar construction
announcements to blunt
hardline criticism of pris-
oner releases. It will be
the third of four planned
releases.
In a late-night meet-
ing Thursday with U.S.
envoy Martin Indyk, Ab-
bas “asked for U.S. inter-
vention to stop the Israeli
government from issuing
new settlement decisions
in order to save the peace
process and the American
efforts,” top Palestinian ne-
gotiator Saeb Erekat said.
The Palestinians claim
east Jerusalem and the
West Bank, areas cap-
tured by Israel in the 1967
Mideast war, as parts of a
future independent state.
They say that Israeli settle-
ment construction is a sign
of bad faith. With more
than 550,000 Israelis living
in areas captured in 1967,
the Palestinians say time
is quickly running out on
hopes to divide the land.
The planned Israeli an-
nouncement will almost
certainly spark a crisis
in the peace talks, which
resumed last July after a
nearly five-year break. Un-
der heavy pressure from
U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry, the Palestin-
ians were forced to drop
a demand for a halt in set-
tlement construction. In
exchange, Israel agreed
to release 104 of the lon-
gest-serving Palestinian
prisoners it holds.
The new construction
plans include 600 new
homes in Ramat Shlomo,
an enclave in east Jerusa-
lem, and roughly 800 ad-
ditional homes in the West
Bank, according to an Is-
raeli official familiar with
the plan. The official said
Netanyahu has ordered the
Housing Ministry to make
preparations for a formal
announcement next week.
Palestinians urge U.S. to block new settlements
AP Photo/Oded Balilty
A relative of Israelis killed in attacks by Palestinian mili-
tants holds a sign with bloody hands and Hebrew writing
that reads, “prison release form,” demonstrates against
the expected release of some two dozen long-serving
Palestinian prisoners next week, outside Israel’s De-
fense Ministry in Tel Aviv, Israel, on Thursday.
Negotiator warns peace efforts in peril
Five Questions
1 Arabica
2 Mali
3 The bridge
on the river
Kwai
4 Juneau
5 The juke-
box
THE DISPATCH
Classifieds
Classifieds
TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 328-2424
OR VISIT CDISPATCH.COM
TRIPLE EXPOSURE!
All ads appear in The Commercial Dispatch,
The Starkville Dispatch and cdispatch.com!
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 8B FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2013
TOMBIGBEE RIVER RV
Park. 85 Nash Rd. Full
hookups, $295/mo.
Has pavillion w/bath-
house & laundry. Call
328-8655 or 574-7879
Campers &
RV's 930
NEED A
CAR?
Guaranteed
Credit Approval!
No Turn
Downs!
We offer late model
vehicles w/warranty.
Call us!
We will take an
application over the
phone!
We help rebuild your
credit.
Tousley Motors
662-329-4221
4782 Hwy 45 North
(by Shell Station
& 373 Turn Off )
2009 CHEVY Impala. 4
dr. Sed. dk. blue, all
power, 71k mi, local
family owner, show rm.
clean. Must see. 59
Amanda Dr. New Hope
Pk. Sub. off Yorkville Rd.
E. $9300. 327-3081
2002 MERCEDES Benz
500 SL, metallic beige,
beige interior, good con-
dition, 87K, $14,000
OBO. 662-251-3931
1989 OLDSMOBILE Cut-
lass Calis. 2dr, good
paint, body & tires, low
miles. $1300 obo. Call
549-7250
Autos For Sale 915
4 YRS. free lot rent!!!!
That's right!....4 yrs.
free lot rent at The
Grove Mobile Home
Community! Beautiful
new energy-efficient,
16x80 Clayton home.
3BR/2BA. Move in to-
day at 508 Lehmberg
Rd, Columbus, MS. Call
662-329-9110 for more
details
HOLIDAY SPECIAL: For
sale 2013 Southern
“Rooster” 16x80.
3BR/2BA home
includes large bed-
rooms, huge kitchen
with lots of cabinets,
thermal windows,
glamour bath, “Ashley”
furniture, washer/dryer,
& more! All for only
$325. (plus escrow) per
month! Call 1-877-684-
4857 for details!
www.southerncolonel
meridian.com
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL:
For sale 2014 Clayton
“Player” 28x60. 3BR/2
BA home includes awe-
some kitchen with stain-
less appliances, glam-
our bath, living room &
separate den, “Ashley”
furniture, washer/dryer,
and more!!! All for only
$415 per month plus
escrow! Call Southern
Colonel Homes at 1-
877-684-4857!
www.southerncolonel
meridian.com
Mobile Homes
For Sale 865
INDUSTRIAL SITE for
sale. 229 acres + at
the Southwest corner of
Artesia Rd. & Manufac-
turer's Dr. Immediately
south of Severstal.
Please call 327-3154
WINTER BLOWOUT
sale. 2½ acre lots.
Good/bad credit. $995
down. $197/mo. Eaton
Land. 662-726-9648
80 AC. In Lamar Coun-
ty. 6-10 yr. old pines. 2
green fields & shooting
houses. $1200/ac. Call
205-662-8980
39.5 AC. Mature pines.
Great hunting land. 5
min. East of MS line in
Pickens Co. AL. $88k.
Call 327-1402
35 ACRES in N.H. w/24
yr. old pines. $3500/
ac. Will divide into 10
ac. plots. 2, 1 ac lots
on Hildreth Rd. $7500
each. 915 6
th
St. S.
$3500. 913 Shady St.
$2500, Owner fin. avail.
386-6619
Lots &
Acreage 860
20 AC. in Caledonia
school dist. Located on
Henry Wells Rd. Mostly
wooded. House site lo-
cated in middle of prop-
erty. $4700/ac. obo.
Call 662-889-1431
+/- 17.9 acres adjoin-
ing Lake Lowndes State
Park. Frontage on Yellow
Brick Rd. Small lake.
$79,000. Call Midsouth
Forestry Services, Inc.
205-364-7145
Lots &
Acreage 860
BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM
3 story power plus
home in West Point.
Priced reduced on this
5BR/3BA on 5.7 ac. lot.
3700 sf, wrap around
porch, dbl car garage,
hardwood floors, family
room, DR, great room,
lots of storage & energy
efficient. 18 min. from
Severstal. Call Kimberly
@ Crye-Leike 364-1423
Houses For Sale:
Other 850
3BR/2BA. 2185 sf,
CH&A, wood floors,
deck, 12' ceilings,
stained glass windows,
3 fireplaces. Beautiful
historic home. $175k.
352-3205
Houses For Sale:
Southside 830
NICE 3BR/2BA home
w/ 1565 sf. Home sits
on a nice corner 1.9
acre lot. Priced at
$112,500. Call Kimber-
ly Reed at Crye-Leike
662-364-1423
3R/2BA. 1,000 sf, new-
ly remodeled home with
6 acres on Thaxton Rd.
5 mobile home hookups
(2 currently rented) on
the property. Call 662-
889-8380 for more info
Houses For Sale:
New Hope 825
BEAUTIFUL 2BR/2BA
garden home located in
Plantation Pointe. Priced
to sell at $125k. WHAT
A DEAL! Call Kimberly
Reed at Crye-Leike 364-
1423
Houses For Sale:
East 820
COMPLETELY FURN.
West Point. Furn, appli-
ances, utilities & cable.
$135 per week. No de-
posit. 295-6309
Rooms 745
1100 SF, corner of
Bluecutt Rd. & Chubby
Dr. Call 662-327-2020
Office Spaces 730
3BD/2BA. No pets,
New Hope school dis-
trict. Deposit & refer-
ences required. Call
662-435-2232. Leave
message
2BR/1BA in Steens.
Good condition. Owner
pays for water, sewer,
garbage & lawn mainte-
nance. $360/mo. plus
dep. Call 386-8618
Mobile Homes
For Rent 725
HISTORIC SOUTHSIDE
3BR/2BA brick home.
Sale or lease. Nice back
deck, app incl. CH&A
h/wood floors, fenced in
back yard. Avail. 12/1.
352-3205
Houses For Rent:
Other 718
Autos For Sale 915
2BR/1BA. 1100 sf. All
electric, central h/a. SS
appliances. No pets. No
smoking. Like new con-
dition. $700/mo.
Lease, dep. & ref. Req.
386-1887 leave msg
Houses For Rent:
Caledonia 716
EXECUTIVE LEVEL
house for lease at Elm
Lake Golfing Communi-
ty. Spacious 3000 sf.
home on 2 acre lot, di-
rectly across from club
house. This home is up-
scale in every way & is
designed for entertain-
ing or for just family liv-
ing. Must see this one.
Asking $1850/mo w/1-
3 yr. lease. Call Elm
Lake at 662-329-8964
or Fred at 889-3103
Houses For Rent
West: 715
CUTE COTTAGE. 2BR/
2BA. Remodeled. 2 sto-
ry. ½ acre land. Walking
distance to NH schools.
Next to YMCA. $690 mo
+ $600 dep. 574-4898
BEAUTIFUL 4BR home
in Woodridge Estate.
$1600/mo. $1600 dep.
Credit & references re-
quired. Call Barbara at
SFA Realty. 662-574-
1821
House For Rent:
New Hope 713
RIDGELAND ESTATES.
3BR/2BA. $900/mo.
$900 damage dep. Ref.
required. No pets. Avail.
Jan. 1. Call Ann Carter
662-356-4764
DAVIS WOODS. 3BR/
2.5BA. Move in ready.
$950/month rent with a
$950 damage deposit.
Credit & references re-
quired. Call Barbara at
SFA Realty 662-574-
1821
3BR/2BA, $450 mo. +
$450 dep. 386-7694 or
364-1030
2BR/2BA @ 1101 9
th
Ave. N. Incl. dishwasher
range, fridge, washer/
dryer. $575 + util. & 1
mo. dep. Tvelek@as.
muw.edu. 245-1032 or
386-7393. Facebook:
TGV Properties
Houses For Rent:
Northside 711
EAST COLUMBUS.
40X60 building. Former-
ly barber & beauty shop.
Good parking. 301
North McCrary. Call
425-6505
OFFICE SPACE in east
Columbus. Starting at
$285-$800/mo. In-
cludes utilities & inter-
net. 662-386-7694 or
364-1030
Bulding for rent. 2000+
sq.ft. Formerly Tweety
Bird Florist. Hwy. 45 N.
near Columbus Air Force
Base entrance. 662-
434-6585
3 UNITS @ 413 4
th
Ave.
S. Var. layouts. $200-
$300/mo. + util. & 1
mo. dep. Tvelek@as.
muw.edu. 245-1032 or
386-7393. Facebook:
TGV Properties
Commercial
Property For Rent
710
Autos For Sale 915
Rivergate
Apartments
“Quiet Country Living”
• Studio,
1&2 Bedrooms
• Executive Units
• Water
Furnished
Monday - Friday
8a-5p
327-6333
300 Holly Hills Rd.
Columbus
© Commercial Dispatch
Chateaux
Holly Hills
Apartments
102 Newbell Rd
Columbus
Mon-Fri 8-5
328-8254
• Central Heat & Air
Conditioning
• Close to CAFB
• Onsite Laundry Facility
• All Electric/Fully Equipped
Kitchen
• Lighted Tennis Court
• Swimming Pool
Where Coming
Home is the
Best Part of
the Day
Apartments For
Rent: Other 708
HOLIDAY SPECIAL. No
rent due until Jan. 1
st
.
2BR/1BA. North &
Southside locations.
Call 662-798-4194
1, 2 & 3 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS &
TOWNHOUSES.
1BR/1BA Apt. $300
2BR/1BA Apt. $350-
$400. 2BR/2BA 3BR /
2BA Townhouses $550-
$800. No HUD allowed.
Lease, deposit, credit
check required. Cole-
man Realty. 329-2323
APTS/HOUSES for rent
$300 to $550. Associ-
ated Realty 662-327-
8557
Apartments For
Rent: Other 708
NORTHSTAR PROPER-
TIES. 500 Louisville St.
1, 2 & 3BR avail. 662-
323-8610. 8-5pm, M-F.
northstarstarkville.com.
Basic cable included
Apartments For
Rent: Starkville
707
PRIVATE STUDIO-type
furnished apartment.
Includes W/D & utilities.
$575/mo. plus dep.
Call 356-6206
Efficiency Apartment
1BR/1BA over looking
water. Direct TV, W/D
furnished, all utilities ex-
cept electricity $375 mo
+dep. 356-6123 lv ms
3BR/1BA. Duplex.
$500/mo. + $500 dep.
All new paint & carpet,
W/D hook up & DirecTV.
Call 386-7694 or 364-
1030
Apartments For
Rent: Caledonia
706
VIP
Rentals
Apartments
& Houses
1 Bedrooms
2 Bedrooms
3 Bedrooms
Unfurnished
1, 2 & 3 Baths
Lease, Deposi t
& Credit Check
viceinvestments.com
327-8555
307 Hospital Drive
Furnished &
Apartments For
Rent: West 705
HISTORIC DOWNTOWN
apartments, 1BR loft &
2BR. All appliances &
security system. Fur-
nished & unfurn. avail.
FMI, call 662-574-7176
Apartments For
Rent: South 704
Autos For Sale 915
NOW
LEASING!
1/2 OFF
1
st
Month
for 4 Bedrooms
COLUMBUS
HEIGHTS
SUBDIVISION
Spacious Homes
3 Bedroom/2 Bath
4 Bedroom/2 Bath
$
565 -
$
715
Washer/Dryer, dishwasher,
disposal, fridge, range, business
center & more!
41 Kaye Drive, Columbus
M-F, 8a-5p
662-244-8953
Income restrictions apply
FURN. STUDIO apt. No
smoking. Incl, util, satel-
lite, DSL, washer/dryer.
Quiet country setting. 5
mi. east of Columbus.
Ref. & dep. req. No
pets. $600/mo. 328-
2785/251-1829
Apartments For
Rent: East 702
1, 2, 3 BEDROOMS &
townhouses. Call for
more info. 662-549-
1953
1 & 2BR remodeled
apts. available. Colum-
bus. Free water & gas.
Call & ask about our
move in special. 662-
418-8324
Apartments For
Rent: East 702
NORTHWOOD TOWN-
HOUSES 2BR, 1.5BA,
CH/A, stove, fridge,
DW, WD hookups, &
private patios. Call
Robinson Real Estate
328-1123
LARGE 2BR apartment.
Good location near
downtown. $395/mo.
Call 328-3147 or 549-
1256
1, 2, 3 BEDROOM
apartments & townhous-
es. Call for more info.
662-549-1953
2BR/1BA duplex. $375
+ util. 1 mo. dep. Incl.
range & fridge. Tvelek@
as.muw.edu. 245-1032
or 386-1393. Facebook:
TGV Properties
***$99 1st Month***
Feels like home to me.
Clean 1-4BR remodeled
apts. Stove, fridge, w/d
hookups, mini-blinds.
HUD accepted. Call Mar-
lene. 662-630-2506
Apartments For
Rent: Northside
701
PUPPIES FOR sale.
American Water
Spaniel/Cocker Spaniel.
Solid black. Ready to go
for Christmas. $200.
Call 364-1241
DASCHUND PUPPIES.
Reds & black & tan.
$225. 205-596-3264
Pets 515
GUN SMITH. Over 45
yrs. exp. (As good as
the best, better than
most). New & used
guns, new scopes, re-
pairs, rebuilding, clean-
ing & scopes, mounted
& zeroed on range, an-
tique guns restored, &
wood refinished. Ed
Sanders, West Point. 3
mi. N. Barton Ferry on
Darracott Rd. Open Tue-
Sat. Call for appt. 494-
6218
Sporting
Goods 472
ASHLEY WOOD burning
insert. 35”wx25”hx18.
Firebox is 16”x24”. Call
328-7881 or 328-0097
General
Merchandise 460
JAMISON QUEEN size
mattress set. Top of the
line. Gently used. $450.
Call 251-3540
Furniture 448
GORDO INDOOR Flea
Market. Something for
everyone. Over 20 ven-
dors. Antiq. furn, jugs,
churns, glassware, vinyl,
knives, antiq. washing
machine, appliances,
bird houses. You name
it, we got it. Every Fri. 7-
4pm & every Sat. 7-
12pm. 256-590-4507
Flea Markets 446
HARDWOOD BLOCKS
Can deliver or you haul.
Loading available. Call
for appointment. 662-
242-0259
Firewood 445
Autos For Sale 915
AUCTION
Antiques & Fine
Furniture
14
th
Annual New
Year's Day Auction
Wednesday, Jan. 1
st
@11am
Over 400 items. We
save some of the most
unique & quality
antiques to be in this
annual auction event.
1965 Mustang Car,
Sterling Silver, Antique
Oil Paintings, Antique
French & American
Furniture, Etc.
Preview: New Year's Eve
Tue. Dec.31
st
, 2013 @
10am-6pm. Visit
website for more info. &
pictures:
www.halhunt.com
Hal Hunt Auctions
5925 Hwy 43
Northport, Alabama
Ph: 1-205-333-2517
15% Buyer's Premium
Hal Hunt Ala.#1644
Auctions 412
1522 Higbway 45 AIt. N. º West Point, M5 3?773 º (óó2) 4?4-4344
©

T
h
e

D
is
p
a
t
c
h
Robert W. Jamerson
Let Me Earn Your
Business For Your
New & Used Car Needs!
Ask for Robert
or call me at 708-955-3085.
jamersonrobert@gmail.com
WE SELL used appli-
ances & haul off your
old ones. CALL 662-
549-5860 or 662-364-
7779
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
WASHERS, DRYERS,
fridges, hot water
heaters, a/c's & stoves
for sale. 662-251-0176
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
Appliances 409
LOCAL CLINIC seeks a
LPN/certified medical
assistant. Full time po-
sition. 1 yr. Experience
required. Excellent work-
ing environment. Send
resume to Box 506 c/o
Commercial Dispatch,
PO Box 511, Columbus,
MS 39703
Medical &
Dental 330
TUMBLE INSTRUCTOR
(Experienced) needed to
teach 4 classes, Mon-
day & Tuesdays 4-6pm
(2 classes each day) to
students 3-16 yrs. of
age at JKS Studios in
Caledonia. Call Kathy at
662-356-4557 for de-
tails
LOCAL RETAIL store
seeks skilled tailoring
employee. Alteration
person needed at home
or in store. Hours &
salary flexible. Experi-
ence required. Send re-
sume to Box 507 c/o
The Commercial Dis-
patch, PO Box 511,
Columbus, MS 39703
LOCAL CONSTRUCTION
co. seeks CDL truck
drivers for FT construc-
tion work. Must pass
drug test. Health insur-
ance, holidays, vacation
& bonus pd. Send re-
sume to: truckdriver-
sneeded@yahoo.com or
Truck Drivers Needed
PO Box 2982
Columbus, MS 39704
LOCAL CONSTRUCTION
co. seeks equip. opera-
tors for FT construction
work. Must pass drug
test. Health insurance,
holidays, vacation &
bonus pd. based on job
performance. Must be
at work. Send resume
to: Equipment Operators
Needed P.O. Box 2982
Columbus, MS 39704
FULL/PART-TIME file
clerk position available
for local law office. Send
resume to David Owen
124 - 5
th
St N. Colum-
bus, MS 39701
FREELANCE WRITERS
& PHOTOGRAPHERS
needed for Community
Expressions Magazine.
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02 TEMP. Workers.
Start date 02/15/2014
ends 06/01/2014.
$9.50 P/H. 7:00 am to
1:00 pm. 35 HRS P/W.
Cultivate field maint.
water irrigate fertilize
weed by hand spot
treatment manual shov-
el work plant & harvest
rice soybean milo minor
mtc. operation equip.
farm field shed sanit.
duty able to lift 50lbs
walk stoop bend reach
kneel repetitively work
is done in all kind of
weather once hired
worker may be required
to take a random drug
test at no cost to the
worker shared housing
is avail. if outside the
commuting area at no
cost to worker tools
supplies & equip. will be
provided at no cost to
worker. Transp. & sub-
sist. expense to the
work site will be provid-
ed or paid upon comple-
tion of 50% of work con-
tract or earlier, if appro-
priate & ¾ guarantee
specified in USDOL reg-
ulation 20 CFR 655.122
(i) job contract. Contact:
Local MS WIN Job Cen-
ter. REF: Job order
#472563. Job offered
by: McCauley Farms,
Bunkie, LA 71322
General Help
Wanted 320
~Fully Insured ~Big
trees ~Small trees
~Trees over house
~Storm cleanup ~
~Brush clearing~ FREE
QUOTES. Call today.
662-801-7511
Tree Service 186
J.R. BOURLAND
Tree & Stump
Removal. Trimming
w/bucket truck
Licensed & Bonded
Firewood 4 sale LWB
$75. 662-574-1621
J&A TREE REMOVAL
Work from a bucket
truck. Insured/bonded.
Call Jimmy for a
free estimate
662-386-6286
A&T TREE SERVICE
Bucket truck & stump
removal. Free est.
Serving Columbus
since 1987. Senior
citizen disc. Call Alvin @
242-0324/241-4447
“We'll go out on a limb
for you!”
Tree Service 186
SULLIVAN'S PAINT
SERVICE
Certified in lead removal
Offering special prices
on interior & exterior
painting, pressure
washing & sheet rock
repairs. Free Estimates
Call 435-6528
Painting &
Papering 162
U.S. LAWNS handles all
your outdoor needs inc.
weed control, fertilizer
mowing, pruning, leaf
removal. 662-769-7397
will@uslawns.net
JESSE & BEVERLY'S
LAWN SERVICE. Fall
clean up, firewood, land-
scaping, tree cutting, &
clean-up. 356-6525
MIKE'S LAWN SERVICE
More than a lawn ser-
vice. 574-7189 or visit
us at facebook.com/
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Lawn Care
Landscaping 147
PECANS
DUKE PECAN
CO.
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508 Brame Ave.
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494-6767
Fresh NEW Crop
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Pecans
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OPEN YEAR-ROUND
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REMODELING OF all
types. Apartment main-
tenance, brick masonry,
stone work & painting.
Free estimates. 574-
7325 or 570-3430
MR. PIANO. Best piano
& organ service. Sales,
rentals, moving, tuning
& service. Call 465-
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RETAINER WALL, drive-
way, foundation, con-
crete/riff raft drainage
work, remodeling, base-
ment foundation, re-
pairs, small dump truck
hauling (5-6 yd) load &
demolition/lot cleaning.
Burr Masonry 242-0259
C & P PRINTING
The one stop place for
all of your printing
needs. No job too large
or too small. Call today.
662-327-9742
General
Services 136
TODD PARKS
CONSTRUCTION
New Construction, Re-
modeling, Repairs, Con-
crete. Free est. Call or
email 662-889-8662 or
toddparks.construction
@gmail.com
Building &
Remodeling 112
IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF
LOWNDES COUNTY,
MISSISSIPPI
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF GLADYS HART, DECEASED
TOMMIE JAMES HART, JR.,
EXECUTOR
CAUSE NO. 2013-0262-B
EXECUTOR'S NOTICE
TO CREDITORS
Letters Testamentary having
been granted on the 16
th
day of
December, 2013, by the
Chancery Court of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, to the un-
dersigned Executor of the Estate
of Gladys Hart, Deceased, no-
tice is hereby given to any and
all persons having any claims
against said Estate to present
the same to the Clerk of said
Court for probate and registra-
tion, according to law within
ninety (90) days from the first
date of publication of this notice
or they will be forever barred.
THIS, THE 16
th
DAY OF DECEM-
BER, 2013
/s/ TOMMIE JAMES HART, JR.,
EXECUTOR
Publish: 12/20, 12/27/13 &
1/3/2014
days of the final publication of
this notice and will be heard by
the Chancery Court. If no objec-
tions are filed within the time al-
lowed, the reclassification shall
be final.
Reclassification of the above-de-
scribed lands is made by order
of the Lowndes County Board of
Education pursuant to Sections
29-3-31 to 29-3-39, inclusive, of
the Mississippi Code of 1972,
as amended.
LOWNDES COUNTY BOARD OF
EDUCATION
BY
Lynn Wright, Superintendent
Publish: Dec. 13, Dec. 20 &
Dec. 27, 2013
Legal Notices 001
PUBLIC NOTICE
The following described Six-
teenth Section Public School
Trust Land situated in Lowndes
County, Mississippi is under the
jurisdiction and control of the
Lowndes County Board of Educa-
tion:
1.0 acres, more or less, lying in
the Northwest ¼ of Section 16,
Township 16 South, Range 17
West, Lowndes County, Missis-
sippi, more particularly de-
scribed as follows:
Commencing at the Southwest
corner of the Southeast ¼ of
the Northwest ¼ of said Section
16, run thence North along the
west side of said quarter-quarter
section and the projection there-
of for 1731.7 feet to a corner of
the existing Lowndes County
School Board property; thence
South 87 degrees 40 minutes
East along the South right of
way of a road known as Fred
Darnell Lane for 515.8 feet to
the Point of Beginning; thence
South 15 degrees 19 minutes
West for 154.4 feet; thence
South 74 degrees 41 minutes
East for 244.3 feet to the West
right of way of a public road
known as Wolfe Road; thence
North 14 degrees 05 minutes
East along said West right of
way (20 feet from centerline) for
197.9 feet to the South right of
way of aforementioned Fred Dar-
nell Lane; thence North 75 de-
grees 36 minutes West along
said South right of way (20 feet
from centerline) for 55.9 feet,
thence North 87 degrees 40
minutes West along said South
right of way for 189.0 feet to the
point of beginning.
Said Board of Education has
conducted an investigation into
the current and potential uses of
the above-described Sixteenth
Section Public School Trust
Land. Because of changes of
conditions and based upon the
finding of the highest and best
use of said land for producing a
maximum of revenue by proper
utilization, said Board of Educa-
tion by resolution duly adopted
and incorporated into its min-
utes has reclassified the above-
described land from the Farm
Residential land classification to
Commercial land classification.
All parties in interest have the
right to object to and appeal the
reclassification of the above-de-
scribed land by filing written ob-
jection with the Chancery Clerk
of the county wherein the above-
described land is located. Ob-
jections must be filed with the
Chancery Clerk within thirty (30)
continued next column
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI
COUNTY OF LOWNDES
Cause No: 2013-0252
Letters of Testamentary have
been granted and issued to the
undersigned upon the Estate of
Oneita A. Murray, Deceased, by
the Chancery Court of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, on the 5th
day of December, A.D., 2013.
This is to give notice to all per-
sons having claims against said
estate to Probate and Register
same with the Chancery Clerk of
Lowndes County, Mississippi,
within ninety (90) days from the
first publication date of this No-
tice to Creditors. A failure to so
Probate and Register said claim
will forever bar the same.
This the 5th day of December,
2013.
/s/RICHARD LEE HOPPER
Publish: 12/13, 12/20 &
12/27/2013
NOTICE OF
STORAGE CONTENTS SALE
The following individual is in de-
fault of payment on their storage
unit at McConnell Brothers
Transfer & Stg., 2406 Hwy 69
South, Columbus, MS 39702.
The contents of these units will
be auctioned on January 6,
2014 at 10:00 a.m.
Pervis Hayes Unit 30
Publish: 12/13, 12/20 &
12/27/13
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI
COUNTY OF LOWNDES
Cause No.: 2013-0267
Letters of Testamentary have
been granted and issued to the
undersigned upon the Estate of
Mary Louise Moore Hopper, De-
ceased, by the Chancery Court
of Lowndes County, Mississippi,
on the 17th day of December,
A.D., 2013. This is to give no-
tice to all persons having claims
against said estate to Probate
and Register same with the
Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, within nine-
ty (90) days from the first publi-
cation date of this Notice to
Creditors. A failure to so Pro-
bate and Register said claim will
forever bar the same.
This the 17th day of December,
2013.
/s/JOHNNY TERRELL HOPPER
Publish: 12/20, 12/27/2013 &
1/3/2014
debt service fund, unless a peti-
tion against the proposed trans-
fer, signed by twenty percent
(20%) or fifteen hundred (1500),
whichever is less, of the quali-
fied electors residing in the Dis-
trict, shall be filed with the Dis-
trict's Superintendent on or be-
fore 5:00 p.m. on January 13,
2014. As provided by the Act,
said date is thirty (30) days after
the date of the first publication
of this notice. If such petition is
filed, an election on the ques-
tion of such transfer shall be
called and held according to the
provisions of the Act.

/s/ Robert Barksdale
President, Board of Education
Lowndes County School District
Publish: 12/13, 12/20 &
12/27/2013
Legal Notices 001
LEGAL NOTICE
TO THE QUALIFIED ELECTORS
OF THE LOWNDES COUNTY
SCHOOL DISTRICT, LOWNDES
COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI:
The Lowndes County School Dis-
trict, Lowndes County, Mississip-
pi (the “District”) has monies re-
siding in a shortfall note debt
service fund that is not needed
to pay a shortfall note. Funds
remain in the note debt service
fund in the approximate amount
of $279,000, plus any future
collections and interest earnings
(the “Surplus Funds”). Notice is
hereby given pursuant to Section
27-105-367, Mississippi Code
of 1972, as amended (the
“Act”) that the District's Super-
intendent has been authorized
by the Board of Education
(the”Board”) of the District to
transfer the Surplus Funds to
the District's limited-tax notes
continued next column
SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEE'S
NOTICE OF SALE
WHEREAS, on 2nd day of July,
2007, John Davis Edmondson
and Alice C. Edmondson execut-
ed a certain Deed of Trust to Jay
Morris, Morris & McCalla,
Trustee for the benefit of JPMor-
gan Chase Bank, N.A., which
Deed of Trust is of record in the
office of the Chancery Clerk of
Lowndes, MS County, State of
Mississippi in Book/Instrument
No. 2007 at Page 19734; and
Whereas said Deed of Trust was
assigned at Deed Book 2009,
Page 22614, on September 25,
2009 to Chase Home Finance
LLC filed in the office of the
aforesaid Chancery Clerk; and
WHEREAS, JPMorgan Chase
Bank, National Association
s/b/m Chase Home Finance
LLC, has heretofore substituted
Philip L. Martin as Trustee in
lieu and in place of Jay Morris,
Morris & McCalla by instrument
dated 07/02/2013, and record-
ed in Book/Instrument # MORT
2013 at Page 20055-20057;
and
WHEREAS, default having been
made in the terms and condi-
tions of said Land Deed of Trust
and the entire debt secured
thereby having been declared to
be due and payable in accor-
dance with the terms of said
Deed of Trust and the legal hold-
er of said indebtedness, having
requested the undersigned Sub-
stitute Trustee to execute the
trust and sell said land, proper-
ty, and all fixtures in accordance
with the terms of said Land
Deed of Trust and for the pur-
pose of raising the sums due
thereunder, together with attor-
ney's fees, Substitute Trustee's
fees and expenses of sale.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, Philip L.
Martin, Substituted Trustee in
said Deed of Trust, will on
01/07/2014 offer for sale at
public outcry and sell within le-
gal hours (being between the
hours of 11:00 a.m. and 4:00
p.m.), at 505 2nd Avenue North,
Columbus, MS, Southeast Front
Door of Lowndes, MS County
Courthouse State of Mississippi,
to the highest and best bidder
for cash the following described
property situated in Lowndes,
MS County, Mississippi, to-wit:
LOT NO. TWENTY-FOUR (24) of
EASTWOOD HILLS, a subdivision
of Lowndes County, Mississippi,
according to map or plat thereof
of record in Subdivision Plat
Book No. 2 at Page 66 in the of-
fice of the Chancery Clerk of
Lowndes County, Mississippi;
SUBJECT TO the restrictive
covenants and conditions as
shown by and written on said
recorded plat and SUBJECT TO
the reservation of easements for
utility and drainage installations
as set forth in EXCEPT all miner-
als in said property as reserved
in the Deed from B.B. Peterson
Heirs to R.A. Younger dated De-
cember 31, 1941, and recorded
in Deed Book 173 at pages 438
in the Chancery Clerk s Office of ’
Lowndes County, Mississippi.
INDEXING INSTRUCTIONS: Lot
24, Eastwood Hills, Lowndes
County, Mississippi.
Title to said property is believed
to be good but I WILL CONVEY
only such title as is vested in
me as Substituted Trustee.
WITNESS MY SIGNATURE, on
November 8, 2013
/s/ Philip L. Martin
Martin & Brunavs
Attorneys At Law
2800 North Druid Hills Road
Atlanta, GA 30329
(404) 982-0088 or (877) 740-
0883- Phone
M&B File # 13-18922MS
Publication Dates: December
13, 20, 27, 2013 & January 3,
2014
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI
LOWNDES COUNTY
CAUSE NO.: 2013-0229-D
Letters Testamentary have been
granted and issued to the under-
signed upon the estate of EVA
BILLUPS, deceased, by the
Chancery Court of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, on the 5th
day of December, A.D., 2013.
This is to give notice to all per-
sons having claims against said
estate to Probate and Register
same with the Chancery Clerk of
Lowndes County, Mississippi,
within ninety (90) days from this
date. A failure to so Probate
and Register said claim will for-
ever bar the same.
This the 5th day of December,
2013.
/s/TOMMY BILLUPS
Publish: 12/13, 12/20 &
12/27/2013
Legal Notices 001
GreenWood Resources is seeking to
lease approximately 80 contiguous acres of quality soybean
ground in an advanced state of site preparation within 50
miles of Columbus, Mississippi for a 2014 cottonwood
planting. Also seeking contract farming services.
Please contact Richard Shuren at land@gwrglobal.com.
www.GreenWoodResources.com
Seeking Land
for Tree Planting
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