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ESP Workload Manager

Version 5.2

Operators Guide
ESP-OG-02

Second Edition (October 1999) This edition applies to Version 5 Release 2 of ESP Workload Manager Documentation. The software and related manuals are protected by copyright law.

ESP Workload Manager Documentation 1992-1998,1999 Cybermation Inc. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means without express written permission of Cybermation Inc., 80 Tiverton Court, Markham, Ontario, L3R 0G4, Canada, (905)-479-4611. www.cybermation.com U.S. Government Users. RESTRICTED RIGHTS - Use, Duplication or Disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract with Cybermation Inc.

Trademark Notice: ESP Workload Manager is a registered trademark of Cybermation Inc. All other brand and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies.

Table of Contents
About this Guide ................................................................................................................. 6 Conventions Used in this Guide.......................................................................................... 7 Summary of Changes .......................................................................................................... 8 Introduction to ESP .................................................................................................................. 9 Overview ............................................................................................................................. 9 Introducing ESP Workload Manager ................................................................................ 10 ESP Concepts .................................................................................................................... 11 The ESP Big Picture ....................................................................................................... 14 Controlling ESP....................................................................................................................... 15 Overview ........................................................................................................................... 15 Starting ESP ...................................................................................................................... 16 Stopping ESP .................................................................................................................... 21 Quiescing ESP................................................................................................................... 22 Consolidated Status Facility................................................................................................... 23 Overview ........................................................................................................................... 23 How CSF Works ............................................................................................................... 24 Understanding What You See ........................................................................................... 25 CSF Commands ................................................................................................................ 27 CSF Extensions ................................................................................................................. 31 Customizing CSF..................................................................................................................... 33 Defining a View ................................................................................................................ 34 View Characteristics ......................................................................................................... 35 Changing Filter Information in a View ............................................................................. 36 Changing Presentation Information in a View .................................................................. 39 Defining Color Options in a View .................................................................................... 42 Freeform Filtering ............................................................................................................. 43 ESP Applications ..................................................................................................................... 52 Overview ........................................................................................................................... 52 An Example ESP Application........................................................................................... 53 Application Generations.................................................................................................... 56 Common ESP Application Statements.............................................................................. 57 Resources .......................................................................................................................... 64 Controlling Applications ................................................................................................... 66 Controlling subApplications ............................................................................................. 67 Controlling Jobs in an Application ................................................................................... 69 ESP Events ............................................................................................................................... 72 Overview ........................................................................................................................... 72 Functions of an Event........................................................................................................ 73 Defining an Event.............................................................................................................. 75 Data Set Triggering ........................................................................................................... 77 Scheduling an Event.......................................................................................................... 78

Displaying the Schedule.................................................................................................... 79 Displaying When an Event Will Execute.......................................................................... 80 Postponing Event Execution ............................................................................................. 81 Bypassing Event Execution............................................................................................... 83 Triggering an Event Manually........................................................................................... 84 Simulating an Event .......................................................................................................... 88 Simulating the Next Occurrence ....................................................................................... 89 Simulating a Specific Day................................................................................................. 92 Scheduling Workload.............................................................................................................. 94 Schedule Criteria ............................................................................................................... 95 Calendars........................................................................................................................... 97 Controlling the Work............................................................................................................ 100 Overview ......................................................................................................................... 100 Holding a Job .................................................................................................................. 101 Completing a Job............................................................................................................. 103 Bypassing a Job ............................................................................................................... 105 Resubmitting a Job.......................................................................................................... 107 Requesting a Job.............................................................................................................. 108 Inserting a Job ................................................................................................................. 109 Dropping Dependencies .................................................................................................. 111 Resetting a Time Dependency......................................................................................... 114 Holding an Application ................................................................................................... 115 Working with Delayed Events.............................................................................................. 116 Overview ......................................................................................................................... 116 System Outage................................................................................................................. 117 Data Set Contention ........................................................................................................ 118 Event Data Set Unavailability ......................................................................................... 119 Extended Outages............................................................................................................ 120 Restarting ESP in Phases................................................................................................. 122 Working with ESP Classes ................................................................................................... 124 Overview ......................................................................................................................... 124 Controlling Classes ......................................................................................................... 125 Hold Queues.................................................................................................................... 126 Masking........................................................................................................................... 127 Multiple Class Restrictors ............................................................................................... 128 ESP Reports ........................................................................................................................... 130 History Reporting ............................................................................................................ 131 Scheduled Activity Report .............................................................................................. 132 ESP System Topology ........................................................................................................... 134 Overview ......................................................................................................................... 134 Multiple ESPs on a Single MVS Image .......................................................................... 135 Multiple Copies of ESP in a Shared Spool Environment ............................................... 136 Multiple Copies of ESP on Multiple JES Nodes ............................................................ 137 Frequently Used Commands ................................................................................................ 138 APPLJOB (AJ) Command .............................................................................................. 139

List Application (LAP) Command .................................................................................. 140 List Job (LJ) Command................................................................................................... 141 List Tracked Job (LTJ) Command .................................................................................. 142 Using ESP Operator Commands ......................................................................................... 144 Overview ......................................................................................................................... 144 ESP Operator Commands................................................................................................ 145 ESP Backup Commands.................................................................................................. 150 Distributed Processing Commands ................................................................................. 151 Glossary of Terms ................................................................................................................. 152 Glossary........................................................................................................................... 152

About this Guide

Overview

Enterprise Systems Platform (ESP) is a very powerful and versatile system for scheduling jobs and managing workload. There are many different users of ESP. These users have specific and sometimes overlapping requirements.

Introduction

This guide contains the information you require to do the following: Start and stop ESP Workload Manager Define views in ESPs Consolidated Status Facility Define and control ESP Events Create ESP Applications Monitor and control workload managed by ESP Workload Manager Enter ESP Operator commands.

Conventions Used in this Guide

Input

ESP is not case sensitive. Even though we show commands in uppercase, when you type a command on the command line, you do not need to type the command in uppercase letters.

Syntax conventions

The Syntax diagrams in this guide use the following conventions:

Notation Apostrophes or Comma , Ellipsis Lower Case Italics parameter Uppercase parameter OR-bar ( | )

Underline ______ Parentheses ( ) and special characters Single parameter in square brackets [ ] Stacked parameters in braces { } { } Stacked parameters in square brackets [ ] [ ] Stacked parameters with OR-bars ( | ) and square brackets [ ] |[ ] Stacked parameters in square brackets within braces {[ ]}

Meaning Must be entered as shown. Must be entered as shown. The parameter can be repeated. Do not enter ellipsis. A parameter must be substituted. User supplied variable or character string. The parameter must be spelled as shown. You can enter the command and the parameter in either upper or lower case. Indicates an exclusive value on left or right of bar. You must enter one of the items. You cannot enter more than one. If you do not enter one of the parameters, the system supplies the underlined parameter, which is the default. Parameter enclosed in parentheses is mandatory and must be entered as shown. Optional parameter, do not type the brackets. Mandatory, you must enter one of the parameters. You cannot enter more than one. Optional parameter, you can enter one value, or none.

Optional, mutually exclusive parameters. Enter one or none.

Mandatory, you must enter one of these parameters. You can enter more than one.

Summary of Changes

Introduction

This guide contains information previously presented in ESP-OG-01, which supports ESP Workload Manager version 5 release 1.

Changed Information

This guide contains terminology, maintenance and editorial changes. A vertical line to the left of the text indicates technical changes or additions to the text.

New Information

The following ESP START parameter has been added: CQFORMAT

Introduction to ESP Overview

Introduction

Enterprise Systems Platform (ESP) Workload Manager is a very powerful and versatile system for scheduling jobs and managing workload. ESP allows users to automatically schedule workload on multiple systems, while maintaining a single point of control.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics: Topic Introducing ESP Workload Manager ESP Concepts The ESP Big Picture See Page 10 11 14

Introducing ESP Workload Manager

Overview

ESP Workload Manager is a very flexible and versatile job-scheduling and workload-management system.

What ESP can do

ESP can be used to: Automate and manage workload Schedule jobs and other workload objects Manage dependencies Track jobs and started tasks Forecast future workload Provide historical reporting.

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ESP Concepts

Introduction

This topic introduces you to basic ESP concepts and the ESP objects you encounter when using ESP.

ESP Applications

An ESP Application is a series of statements defining one or more (usually related) jobs that run under the control of an ESP Manager across your enterprise on mainframes, mid-range, and small systems. For more information on ESP Applications, see ESP Applications on page 52.

ESP Procedures

An ESP Procedure is a set of stored instructions invoked by ESP. These instructions may define a group of jobs and tasks as an Application, but not all ESP Procedures contain ESP Applications. Procedures control processing requirements using: Job definition statements CLANG (ESPs Control Language) IF/THEN/ELSE logic ESP built-in functions REXX processing Use of symbolic variables.

ESP Events

An ESP Event tells ESP when to run workload, and what actions to take to perform the work. For more information on Events, see ESP Events on page 72.

ESP Jobs

ESP allows you to define jobs with many characteristics: On request jobs that run only when requested manually External jobs that exist in another Application Manual jobs submitted outside of an ESP Application Tasks that require manual intervention Links tasks that do not require manual completion Data set trigger workload objects Jobs that run on almost any platform in addition to MVS.
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ESP Concepts, Continued

Consolidated Status Facility (CSF)

The ESP Consolidated Status Facility (CSF) is your scheduling focal point. Using CSF, you: Monitor workload Control jobs Edit JCL and ESP Procedures Browse or edit documentation libraries Rerun jobs Restart jobs via ESP Encore.

For more information on CSF, see Consolidated Status Facility on page 23.

Resources

A resource can be an item of hardware or software, or it can be an abstract condition. Resources are used to ensure a job is not submitted until all of its requirements are met. For more information on resources, see Resources on page 64.

Reporting

ESP provides two types of reporting: History reporting Scheduled Activity reporting.

History reporting allows you to look at the history of an individual job, to determine such things as how long it runs, how many print lines it generates, and how much CPU time it requires. Scheduled activity reporting allows you to look at schedule data for a time period to see such things as how long work runs, how many print lines are generated, and how much CPU time is required. For more information on reporting, see ESP Reports on page 130.
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ESP Concepts, Continued

Masters and Slaves

You can run multiple copies of ESP in your installation and maintain a single point of control using an ESP Master and ESP Slaves. The Master maintains the single point of control, while the Slaves perform the work under direction of the Master. For more information on Masters and Slaves, see ESP System Topology on page 134.

ESP Workstation

ESP Workload Manager interfaces with many other products on MVS and on other platforms. ESP Workstation provides a Graphical User Interface (GUI) to ESP Workload Manager. You can use ESP Workstation to control Applications and jobs in ESP.

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The ESP Big Picture

Overview

The following diagram illustrates how the objects used with ESP are defined, what they look like, and how they work together:
The ESP Solution

EVENT

EVENT ID(CYBER.EXAMPLE) SCHEDULE 4PM WORKDAYS INVOKE 'CYB.ESP.PROCLIB(EXAMPLE)' ENDDEF

JOB A
APPL EXAMPLE JCLLIB 'CYB.JCLLIB.CNTL' JOB A RUN WORKDAYS RELEASE B JOB B RUN WORKDAYS RELEASE C JOB C RUN LAST DAY OF MONTH ENDJOB

ESP PROCEDURE

JOB B
ESP--CONSOLIDATED STATUS: VIEW PANEL --ESP COMMAND ==> JOBNAME JOBNO APPL __ __ __ A B C 123 124 125 EXAMPLE EXAMPLE EXAMPLE APGEN STATUS 1 1 1 COMPLETE EXECUTING WAITING

CSF

JOB C
REPORTING

REPORT FROM 8AM YESTERDAY UNTIL 8AM TODAY CRITERIA APPLSYS EQ EXAMPLE DISPLAY JOBNAME JOBNO EXECST ENDT CMPC ENDR JOBNAME JOBNO EXEC START EXEC END CMPC CODE A 123 16:05 16:10 0 B 124 16:11 16:15 S0C1 C 125 16:20 16:47 0

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Controlling ESP Overview

Introduction

This chapter tells you how to use the various options available to start and stop ESP.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics: Topic Starting ESP Stopping ESP Quiescing ESP See Page 16 21 22

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Starting ESP

Overview

ESP can be started from the operators console or by an automatic command from SYS1.PARMLIB. To start ESP from the operators console, issue the START command, specifying the name assigned to the ESP started task procedure normally ESP. Refer to the following description of the START command. Once the ESP499 message is issued, ESP is ready for communication. You can start ESP in phases. Refer to Restarting ESP in Phases on page 122 for more information.

START command

Several parameters can be specified on the START command or the PARM keyword of the EXEC card. Note that any parameters specified on the START command override corresponding parameters on the EXEC card PARM statement.

Syntax of START command

S ESP[,PARM=[WARM|COLD] [NOTRACK] [PROMPT] [QFORM] [RELOAD] [NOQUIESCE|QUIESCE] [SYSID(sysid)] [SUBSYSTEM(subsysid)] [RESFORM] [TPFORM] [SKIP] [CQFORMAT]

Parameter WARM

COLD

Description Requests a warm start. On a warm start, the main ESP Initialization Parameter member and the ESPWARM member are read. This is the default. Requests a cold start. Do only under direction of Cybermation Technical Support. On a cold start, the main ESP Initialization Parameter member and the ESPCOLD member are read.
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Starting ESP, Continued

Syntax of START command (continued)

Parameter NOTRACK

PROMPT QFORM

QUIESCE

NOQUIESCE RELOAD

SYSID(sysid)

SUBSYSTEM (subsystemid)

Description Indicates that ESP is not to collect job-tracking data. This option should be used if you are starting an ESP subsystem on a CPU that already has an active ESP subsystem sharing the same tracking data sets. It prevents duplicate updates to the tracking files. Requests that ESP prompt the operator for additional Initialization Parameter input after reading ESPPARM. Requests that the QUEUE data set be reformatted. Do only under direction of Cybermation Technical Support. When using this parameter, ensure that no ESP subsystem is currently using the QUEUE data set on another processor. Requests that ESP initialize in the quiesced state, which defers Event execution. Use the RESTART command to take ESP out of the quiesced state. Requests that ESP initialize in the non-quiesced state. Event executions are not deferred. This is the default. Requests that all ESP modules residing in CSA are reloaded (that is, control blocks re-initialized). Use this after a change is made to CYBSS010, CYBJS031 or CYBSS016 or if your system has experienced any SMF problems. Specifies the system identifier to be used. This overrides the corresponding parameter in the ESPPARM data set. It can consist of up to eight alphanumeric characters. Specifies the subsystem name that ESP is to use. It should be up to four characters long. The default subsystem name is the started task procedure name.
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Starting ESP, Continued

Syntax of START command (continued) Parameter RESFORM Description Requests a format of the RESFILE, used for ESPs resource feature. Do only under direction of Cybermation Technical Support. Requests that the TP server checkpoint data set, used for LU6.2 communication, be reformatted. Do only under direction of Cybermation Technical Support. Skips the first time-driven request in ESPs queue. Use only on the advice of Cybermation Technical Support. Requests a reformat of the COMMQ data set. The COMMQ data set is the ESPCOM checkpoint data set.

TPFORM

SKIP CQFORMAT

Specifying multiple parameters

You can specify multiple parameters by separating them with commas:


S ESP,PARM=(parm1,,parmn)

Cold starting ESP

A COLD start re-initializes the Checkpoint data set, and destroys the schedule queues. ESP automatically does the following: Re-specifies the Event data sets. As each data set is opened, if it contains data, an immediate scan is performed and the schedule is rebuilt. Executes any commands contained in the cold parameters. CLASS hold queues are lost, as are the overdue and deferred queues.

For more information, see COLD start on page 20.

Starting ESP with the RELOAD option

Starting ESP with the RELOAD option causes ESPs primary control blocks in CSA to be re-initialized. If you experience problems with SMF, you need to use this option to resolve the SMF problem. You also use this option when upgrading to a new release of ESP.
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Starting ESP, Continued

Starting ESP with the RELOAD option cont

Before you issue a START with the RELOAD option, the auxiliary address space and any Workstation server tasks must be shut down. Batch interface or TSO users that are active at the time of a RELOAD must restart, or they see the subsystem as inactive.

Example Cold start ESP with reformat of Queue file

S ESP,PARM=(COLD,QFORM)

Example Starting ESP in a quiesced state

S ESP,PARM=(QUIESCE)

Starting ESP with QFORM option

Starting ESP with the QFORM option formats the QUEUE file, which contains tracking information in transit from ESP Slaves to the ESP Master. After starting ESP with the QFORM option: The ESP Master system may miss notification of job or data set activity from a Slave. The DAB command is out of date use CSF. Locally defined P-Nodes are deleted. They are automatically created again when new job tracking information is received. If this is the first ESP start following an IPL, ESP rebuilds via the QUPDATE function. The completion status of some jobs may be indeterminate. If there is no intervening IPL, data is rebuilt with the receipt of buffered TCELL information. Inbound or outbound tracking or triggering information may be lost.
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Starting ESP, Continued

COLD start process

An ESP COLD START reformats the Checkpoint file, and initializes all ESP components, with the exception of: The ESP QUEUE file, which is formatted the first time ESP is started, or when ESP is started with the QFORM option. ESP CSA-loaded modules. These modules are loaded into CSA the first time ESP starts after an IPL, or when ESP is started with the RELOAD option.

An ESP COLD START rebuilds its to-do list by scanning all Event data sets and extracting the next scheduled times to execute. If an Event data set was added dynamically to ESP, and is not recorded in the Initialization Parameters or cold start member, it is not found and examined during a cold start. Once the to-do list is rebuilt, ESP starts triggering Events unless QUIESCE was specified at start time. When ESP is quiesced, no new workload is submitted. Provided ESP data sets (INDEX, JOBINDEX, APPLFILE and so on) are intact, ESP retains status over a COLD START. For example, Application status or data set trigger activity is retained. ESP internally issues a QUPDATE command during a COLD START. This command compares ESPs view on a job-by-job basis. If ESP recorded that job PAYROLL was in execution and JES shows that job PAYROLL is on the output queue, ESP updates its status.

Items lost in a COLD start

The following items are lost in a COLD START: Event Class Actions Any CLASS actions entered, like hold, ignore, or suspend are lost. Trigger-added Events If an Event was added to the schedule via a TRIGGER ADD command, it is lost over a COLD START. Pending Application Manager actions Application actions that are pending are lost in a COLD START. These are entries that may show as queued for submission in CSF. Resubmit these jobs. (Items displayed with a leading + in the output from the LISTSCH command are pending Application actions.

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Stopping ESP

Overview

ESP can be stopped from the operators console or by an automatic command from SYS1.PARMLIB. To stop ESP from the operators console, issue the STOP command, specifying the name assigned to the ESP started task procedure normally ESP.

STOP command

The syntax of the STOP command is as follows:


P started_task_name

where started_task_name is the name of the ESP started task. For example:
P ESP

Where the name of the started task is ESP.

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Quiescing ESP

Overview

If you want to stop further processing on ESP, without shutting it down, you can use the Quiesce option. Any active jobs continue to process to completion. No further workload is submitted.

QUIESCE command

To quiesce ESP, issue the following command from the system console:
F ESP,QUIESCE

or from ESP page mode, using OPER authority, option G from the ESP main menu:
OPER QUIESCE

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Consolidated Status Facility Overview

Introduction

ESPs Consolidated Status Facility (CSF) provides a focal point for monitoring and controlling ESP workload. It allows you to see a list of the jobs running under the control of ESP, and control those jobs easily.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics: Topic How CSF Works Understanding What You See CSF Commands CSF Extensions See Page 24 25 27 31

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How CSF Works

Overview

ESP maintains a scoreboard containing details about every workload object in its control. This scoreboard is updated constantly as workload is processed.

Customizable

What you see on CSF is customizable to suit you. You can filter and sort the data displayed as required.

SCHDFILE data set

The scoreboard that ESP maintains is contained in a data set called SCHDFILE. Information is contained in this data set in rows that represent the workload objects, and columns that represent attributes of the workload object. It is this data set that provides the data for CSF. By default, all active Applications are displayed on CSF.

PURGSCHF command

The PURGSCHF command is used to delete data from the SCHDFILE data set. When PURGSCHF is issued, all completed jobs from completed Applications, which completed prior to the schedule criteria specified in the command, are deleted from CSF. OPER authority is required to issue this command. The following is an example of the PURGSCHF command:
OPER PURGSCHF NOW LESS 1 HOUR

You can also set filter options to not display completed jobs without purging the Schedule file.

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Understanding What You See

Overview

ESPs CSF can display many types of information regarding the workload running under ESPs control. CSF is commonly used to display the following types of information about workload: P-Node fields Status fields

A job can be in only one P-Node at a time, but may have more than one status. For example, if a job is waiting until 5 pm, and is also on hold, the PNode shows MANHOLD, and the status shows MANHOLD and Waiting until 5 pm. For more information on customizing what displays on CSF, see Customizing CSF on page 33.

P-Node fields

A Processing node (P-Node) identifies a processing stage through which a job may pass during its time on the system. The following is a list of the possible P-Nodes you may see on CSF, and their meanings: P-Node MANHOLD APPLHOLD PREDWAIT WAITING JANCWAIT SANCWAIT RESWAIT EXTERNAL TASK MANSUB READY SUBERROR SUBDELAY INPUT EXEC COMPLETE FAIL Description Manual hold Application hold Predecessor wait Delayed submission time Job ancestor wait SubApplication ancestor wait Resource wait External job submitted by another Application Task required completion Manual submission Eligible Submission error Submission delayed Input queue JES number assigned Executing Completed successfully Completed unsuccessfully
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Understanding What You See, Continued

Status fields

You can display the following status fields on CSF: Status User status System status Description Displays information set by the user. Displays the system state of a workload object. This is the system state that ESP continues to change during job processing. You cannot change the values in this field. Displays the user status, if set. If the user status is set to null, it displays the system status.

Status

User Status field

The User Status field contains more information than what is contained in the P-Node field. The User Status field is set by either of the following: HR command holds a job with a reason SUS command resets User Status for a job.

For example, if you bypass a job you can use the User Status field to notify others of the reason for this action. The User Status field for a job might look like this:
JOBNAME TAPEJOB PNODE BYPASSED USER STATUS NO INPUT TODAY

ESP does not reset the User Status field. To reset the User Status field to null, issue the SUS command and enter a period (.) in the field.

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CSF Commands

Overview

Several line commands are available to control the following workload objects: Applications SubApplications Events ESP Procedures Jobs.

Command availability

You can issue the following commands from CSF in the field next to the object. (Many of these commands have an equivalent APPLJOB (AJ) command, which can be issued in Page mode, batch, an ESP Procedure, or from the system console.)

For controlling Applications

Command AA CA HA LA UWA

Description Release an Application from ESP hold status Complete an entire Application Place an Application into ESP hold status List an Application Remove an Application from wait status
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CSF Commands, Continued

For controlling subApplications

Command AS BYS CS HS LS RQS UBS URS UWS

Description Release a subApplication from ESP hold status Bypass a subApplication Complete an entire subApplication Place a subApplication into ESP hold status Display a subApplication Request a subApplication Un-bypass a subApplication Un-request a subApplication Remove a subApplication from wait status

For controlling Events and Procedures

Command BE EE BP EP

Description Browse an Event Edit an Event Browse a Procedure Edit a Procedure


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CSF Commands, Continued

For controlling jobs

Command A BC BJ BY C DD DIN DR EC EJ H HR IJ IJA IJB L L, then D LI LJ LR R

Description Release a job Browse COPYJCL Browse last executed JCL Bypass a job Complete a job Drop all predecessor dependencies Display an Info record Drop all resource dependencies Edit COPYJCL Edit last executed JCL Place a job into ESP hold status Place a job into ESP hold status with a reason Insert a job Insert a job after a selected job Insert a job before a selected job Display all dependencies Drop individual dependencies Display index entries Display step-level statistics Display job resource waits Resubmit or restart a job
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CSF Commands, Continued

For controlling jobs (continued)

Command RD RP RQ RR RT SUS UB UIN UR UW

Description Ready a job, removing all predecessor and submit time dependencies Replies to an AS/400 message Request a job View ESP Encore panels Reset a time dependency Reset User Status field for a job Un-bypass a bypassed job Update an Info record Un-request a requested job Un-wait a job from job-ancestor wait (JANCWAIT)

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CSF Extensions

Overview

CSF Extensions allow an installation to customize CSF to meet its needs. Frequently performed functions can be reduced to a single command. CSF Extensions can be used to access other ISPF applications, such as output distribution products, spool viewers and so on from within the CSF display.

What you need to know

As an ESP operator, you should be aware of any installation-defined commands. Check with your System Programmer. For detailed information about CSF Extensions, refer to the ESP Workload Manager Installation Guide.

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Customizing CSF

Overview

You can customize what you see on CSF by defining a CSF view. A CSF view limits the workload objects displayed on CSF to match criteria you specify. You can have an unlimited number of views per user.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics: Topic Defining a View View Characteristics Changing Filter Information in a View Changing Presentation Information in a View Defining Color Options in a View Freeform Filtering See Page 34 35 36 39 42 43

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Defining a View

Overview

You define a view by replicating an existing view and changing the characteristics of the view.

Replicating a view

To define a view, replicate an existing view and customize the new view to meet your requirements: Step 1 2 3 Action From the ESP Main Menu, choose Option C to access CSF. Type V in the command line to list the current views. To define a view, type R to replicate an existing view and customize the new view to meet your requirements:

Press Enter. The Replicate a View panel appears. Type the name, a description and optionally the message you want displayed when no workload objects match your filter criteria:

Press Enter. The view you defined is now displayed in the list of views

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View Characteristics

Possible views

Once you select an existing view, or create a new view, you can customize the information presented. For example, you can create: Application-specific views Exception monitoring views that display: Overdue jobs Abended jobs Waiting job views Incomplete job views.

Customizing a view

You can change the characteristics of a view, to specify what workload objects you want included, how you want the view presented, the sort order of the fields, and any color options you desire. Select the view you want to customize, and use the following commands on CSF to change the characteristics of the view: Command FI PR PL PT SO CO Description Select Filter information Specify Presentation fields Alter the default Presentation field length Alter the default Presentation titles Specify the sort order of the information presented Define color options based on job status

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Changing Filter Information in a View

Overview

When you filter information, you are describing the criteria for selecting a job as part of a view. This information defines the rows or workload objects in your display.

Steps to changing the filter criteria

Step 1 2

Action From the ESP Main Menu, choose Option C to access CSF. Type V in the command line to list the current views. Type S next to the view you want to customize, as shown below:

Press Enter.
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Changing Filter Information in a View, Continued

Steps to changing the filter criteria (continued)

Step 3

Action The CSF display appears, displaying workload based on its current attributes. Type FI to change the filter information:

Press Enter.
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Changing Filter Information in a View, Continued

Steps to changing the filter criteria (continued)

Step 4

Action The Filter Specification panel appears. Specify the desired filter criteria:

(All filter criteria is tested with Boolean OR logic.) Press Enter. The CSF display reappears, displaying only the specified workload objects:

The changes to the view are saved automatically.

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Changing Presentation Information in a View

Overview

You can change the way your view of CSF looks by changing the presentation fields of the view. You can change the order in which the fields appear, the order they are sorted on, the length of the fields, and the title of each column.

Changing the fields

To change what fields are displayed and how they are displayed in your view, do the following: Step 1 2 3 4 Action From the ESP Main Menu, choose Option C to access CSF. Type V in the command line to list the current views. Type S next to the view you want to customize. Press Enter. The CSF display appears, displaying workload based on its current attributes. Type PR to change the Presentation fields displayed. The Presentation Fields for View panel appears. Specify the presentation order, new titles, sort order and so on. Specify presentation order first, because it determines what is displayed:

Press Enter. The Presentation information is changed.

Presentation order (Pres order)

Presentation order determines what is presented (the columns) and what order it appears in, from left to right on your display. Specify the workload object fields to be presented for display and the order in which you want them shown, from left to right. Identify a field to be displayed by typing a one or two-character string for each field. The strings you specify can contain any character and are sorted in normal collating sequence. The jobname field is always displayed first.
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Changing Presentation Information in a View, Continued

Presentation fields

In addition to the jobname, a series of user level or system level fields can be displayed: User Level Entries Account Number Appl Generation Appl Def Seq DJC Jobnet Subapplication Qualifier Status User Status System Status Tag Scheduled Time Event Name Job Number Hold Count Job Start Time Job End Time Completion Code Auth String System Level Entries Job Status Flag Job Attr Flag Job Status Byte Appl Status Flag SAD Flags ApplFile name ApplFile Slot# TrakFile Slot# EXH File Slot# NS Cart Mounts NS Reel Mounts HW Cart Mounts HW Reel Mounts Color Index SCB Entry# SCB Token SCB Cycle

Presentation length (Pres Len)

Specify the width of each column of data selected for display if the default display widths are not what you want. If the specified width is too short for the data, the data is truncated. If the column is wider than the data, the data is left justified and padded to the right with blanks.

Presentation title (Pres Title)

If you do not specify a heading for any column, a default heading is used. If the field is not selected for display via the Presentation order, the field is ignored.
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Changing Presentation Information in a View, Continued

Sort order

Specify the order in which the columns are to be sorted. (The rows of the display.) Type a one or two-character string next to the field. Strings are sorted in normal collating sequence to determine the sort order of the displayed data. You can specify more than one Sort order field. Specify A or D to request an Ascending (the default) or descending sort order. For example, you may want to sort by Application generation number.

What is displayed

User level fields are always displayed. System level fields can be requested via the ESP DEFAULTS panel (option O from the ESP Main Menu).

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Defining Color Options in a View

Overview

You can use different colors to represent certain job conditions to highlight those conditions and make them easier to see. For example, you might want to highlight all failed jobs in red.

Steps to changing color options

Step 1 2 3 4

Action From the ESP Main Menu, choose Option C to access CSF. Type V in the command line to list the current views. Type S next to the view you want to customize. Press Enter. The CSF display appears, displaying workload based on its current attributes. Type CO to change the color options. The Highlight Attributes panel appears. Select from the available color, highlighting and intensity options:

Press Enter. The color options of the view are changed.

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Freeform Filtering

Introduction

Freeform filtering is an extension to the CSF filtering capabilities that allows you a more versatile and customizable method of filtering your ESP Applications. You have the option to filter your Applications using the standard filter panel or to use the Freeform filter panel for scenarios that cannot be handled using the standard panels.

Some suggestions

For example, you may choose to filter based on the following criteria: Jobs that have started and ended between specific times Jobs on a critical path Completion codes for jobs within a subApplication Jobs within an Application that have restart steps.

Filter criteria

A filter consists of a filter string. A filter string consists of the following:


keyword logical_operator value|condition [Boolean_operator]

Operand keyword

Description Identifies the kind of workload objects on which you want to filter, such as Applications or workload object names. logical operator Specifies the operation, such as filter on Application name, when it is equal to some specified character string. value or What you want the Application name to be equal to, such condition as PAYROLL. If you want to see all Applications that are incomplete, filter on the condition INCOMPLETE. Boolean Boolean operators are used to AND or OR one or more operator keyword and value sets.

Example

The following is an example of freeform filtering that limits what is displayed to incomplete jobs in Applications called PAYROLL:
APPL=PAYROLL AND INCOMPLETE

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Freeform Filtering, Continued

Entering a freeform filter

Step 1 2

Action Type FI on the CSF command line. This displays the Filter Specification panel. Type Y in the Freeform filter ===> field. This places you in ISPF Edit, where you can enter a Freeform filter. Replace the following text shown with your freeform filter.
(COMPLETE OR INCOMPLETE)

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Freeform Filtering, Continued

Filtering Keywords

Keyword ACCOUNT

Description Keyword Account number JSBYTE

Description Job status byte: C-completed P-post-process D-dependency R-resources E-executing S-scheduled F-failed T-time I-input W-wait Job status flag DJC/JES3 network id Non-specific cart mounts Non-specific reel mounts Processing node

AGENT APPL

Agent name Application name APPLFILE Application file APPLGEN Application generation APPLSEQ Application definition sequence APSLOT Application file slot # ASFLAG Application status flag AUTH Authorization string CMPC Completion code DMANAGER Distributed manager name ETIME Job end time EVENT Event name HC Hold count HWCM High water cart mounts HWRM High water reel mounts JAFLAG Job attribute flag JOBNAME Job name JOBNO Job number

JSFLAG NETID NSCM NSRM PNODE

QUAL SADFLAG

Qualifier SAD flags

SCBCYCLE Scoreboard cycle SCBENTRY Scoreboard entry # SCBTOKEN Scoreboard token SCHED STATUS STIME SUBAPPL TAG TRSLOT USTATUS WOBTYPE Scheduled time Status Job start time SubApplication name Tag Trakfile slot # User status 2-character workload object type for non-MVS
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Freeform Filtering, Continued

TIME function as comparison

For any of the time fields, (i.e. ETIME, SCHED, and STIME), you need to use the TIME function in a comparison. For example:
STIME > TIME(11AM TODAY)

You can compare against any time in a format that ESP recognizes.

Specifying relational operators

Relational operators include the following standard operators: >= <= > < = = GE LE GT LT EQ NE greater than or equal less than or equal greater than less than equal not equal to

Specifying Values

You may need to refer to portions of a value, rather than its full contents. The filter string uses substring notation to allow you to specify which characters of a value you need. Substring notation consists of specifying 1 or 2 numbers in parentheses immediately following the value name, as follows:
VALUE(v1[,v2])

where: v1 and v2 are whole numbers v1 refers to the starting position, the first character position is 1. If v1 is negative, the starting position is relative to the last non-blank character of the variable. For example, -1 refers to the last character. If v2 is omitted, it defaults to the remaining length of the variable. If v2 is positive, it specifies a number of characters required. If v2 is negative, it represents the remaining length less v2.
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Freeform Filtering, Continued

Example

For example, assume that JOBNAME contains the string PRODJOB. The following table demonstrates the outcome that results when you specify certain substring notations:
Specification JOBNAME JOBNAME(1,4) JOBNAME(5) JOBNAME(5,1) JOBNAME(-1,1) JOBNAME(1,7) JOBNAME(1,-3) PRODJOB PROD JOB J B PRODJOB PROD Result

Conditions for filter string

Condition ALL APPL_COMPLETE BYPASSED COMPLETE CRITICAL_PATH EXTERNAL INCOMPLETE INTERVENTION_REQUIRED INTVRQ LINK MANUAL_TASK NOT_APPL_COMPLETE NOT_BYPASSED NOT_CRITICAL_PATH NOT_EXTERNAL

Description All objects Application execution is complete Object execution has been bypassed Object execution is complete Object is on a critical path Object is External to an Application Object execution is not complete Object execution requires manual intervention Object execution requires manual intervention Object is a LINK Object is a manual task Application execution is not complete Object execution has not been bypassed Object is not on a critical path Object is not an External
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Freeform Filtering, Continued

Conditions for filter string (continued)

Condition Description NOT_INTERVENTION_REQUIRED Object execution does not require manual intervention NOT_INTVRQ Object execution does not require manual intervention NOT_LINK Object is not a LINK NOT_ON_REQUEST Object is not defined as REQUEST NOT_OVERDUE_END Object execution end time has not been exceeded NOT_OVERDUE_START Object execution start time has not been exceeded NOT_REQUESTED Object has not been specifically requested NOT_RESTART_STEP_PRESENT Object does not have a restart step NOT_TASK Object is not a TASK ON_REQUEST Object is defined as REQUEST OVERDUE_END Object execution end time has been exceeded OVERDUE_START Object execution start time has been exceeded REQUESTED Object has been specifically requested RESTART_STEP_PRESENT Object has a restart step TASK Object is a TASK Note: Common conditions are available on the Filter Specifications panel and may not require a freeform filter.

Example Filter Strings

The following table lists example filter strings and what they reveal:

Enter the following filter


CRITICAL_PATH

To see... Critical path jobs


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Freeform Filtering, Continued

Example Filter Strings (continued)

Enter the following filter


ON_REQUEST AND REQUESTED APPL EQ 'PAYROLL' AND RESTART_STEP_PRESENT JOBNAME(1,1) EQ 'P' AND JSBYTE EQ 'F' CMPC EQ 'S222' AND SUBAPPL EQ 'PAYJOBS' JOBNAME(1,3) EQ 'PAY' OR JOBNAME(1,3) EQ 'ACC'AND APPL EQ 'FINANCE' JOBNAME(1,4) EQ 'TEST' OR APPL EQ 'TESTAPPL' AND INCOMPLETE APPL EQ 'CYBER' AND OVERDUE_START AND REQUEST JOBNAME(1,3) EQ 'CYB' AND STIME> TIME(11AM TODAY) WOBTYPE EQ 'HP' AND APPL EQ 'BILLING' JOBNAME(1,1) EQ 'X' AND APPL EQ 'MYAPPL' AND NOT_REQUESTED (JOBNAME EQ 'TESTJOB' OR JOBNAME(1,2) EQ 'A' OR JOBNAME(1,2) EQ 'BC') AND (APPL EQ 'MYAPPL' OR APPL (1,2) EQ 'PA') AND OVERDUE_START

To see ... On-request jobs that have been requested Jobs in the PAYROLL Application that have a restart step Failed objects that start with P Jobs with a completion code of S222 in the PAYJOBS subApplication Objects that start with PAY or ACC and belong to an Application called FINANCE Objects in Application TESTAPPL that start with TEST and are not complete Objects in Application CYBER whose execution start time is overdue Objects whose names start with CYB that started later than 11 a.m. today All HP jobs in the BILLING Application Objects that start with X in Application MYAPPL that have not been requested Objects called TESTJOB and whose names start with the characters A or BC and are contained within Application MYAPPL or any Application whose name starts with PA and whose execution start time is overdue

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50

51

ESP Applications Overview

Introduction

An ESP Application is a group of related jobs where dependencies are controlled at the submission level. A job in an Application is submitted to JES when all its dependencies (e.g. time, job and resource dependencies) are met.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics: Topic An Example ESP Application Application Generations Common ESP Application Statements Resources Controlling Applications Controlling subApplications Controlling Jobs in an Application See Page 53 56 57 64 66 67 69

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An Example ESP Application

Overview

An ESP Application is made up of a series of statements to: Identify the Application Tells ESP where the JCL is located Identify the jobs to run Describe job relationships Describe when ESP should select the jobs to run Tell ESP where to copy the JCL Identify the documentation library Describe other dependencies, such as time and resources.

APPL1

Consider the following example. In ESP Application APPL1, the flow chart depicts the relationship between the jobs:
A

Daily

Daily

Daily

Friday Last Workday of Month

The flow chart shows the following job dependencies: Job B and C depend on Job A to finish before they can start. Similarly, Job E depends on Job D, which depends on Jobs B and C. Job F depends on Job E.
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An Example ESP Application, Continued

The Application

This is what the Application looks like:


APPL PAYROLL JCLLIB CYBER.JCL.CNTL JOB A RUN DAILY RELEASE (B,C) JOB B RUN DAILY RELEASE D JOB C RUN DAILY RELEASE D JOB D RUN DAILY RELEASE E JOB E RUN FRIDAY RELEASE F JOB F RUN LAST WORKDAY OF MONTH ENDJOB

Application duration

An Application does not have to complete within a 24 hour period it may span days or weeks. It is also possible to schedule an Application many times daily.
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An Example ESP Application, Continued

Inheriting job relationships

Jobs in an Application may not require the same run frequency. ESP automatically checks for relationships among jobs in the Application.
A DAILY

FRIDAY

DAILY

For example, Job B runs only on Fridays. On the other days of the week, when Job B is not selected to run, Job C inherits Bs relationships, and is released by Job A. You can choose not to inherit relationships with the NOINHERIT option on the JOB statement, Job C is eligible for submission at the same time as Job A.

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Application Generations

Overview

Each time an Application is generated, a new generation of the Application exists. The generation number increments with each new generation. Multiple generations of an Application may process at the same time. Generation numbers allow ESP to identify the particular generation of an Application to which a job belongs.

Contents of a generation

The specific contents of a generation of an Application depend upon the circumstances at the time the Application is generated. For example, if Job E in Application PAYROLL runs only on Fridays, the generations of APPL1 created Monday through Thursday do not contain Job E.

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Common ESP Application Statements

Overview

As an operator monitoring workload as it processes on ESP, you may be required to understand some Application statements. Some of those you may see are: DELAYSUB EXTERNAL ON REQUEST TAG DSTRIG LINK RESOURCE DUEOUT MANUAL SUBAPPL

DELAYSUB

The DELAYSUB statement is used to delay the submission of a job until a specific time or date. The DELAYSUB statement looks like the following:
JOB BILL99 DELAYSUB 11PM RUN WORKDAYS AFTER (BILL01,BILL02) ENDJOB

On CSF, BILL99 appears as follows:


Jobname Qual Jobno Appl Gen ___BILL99 1895 BILLING 12 ___BILLUPDT - BILLING 12 ___PAYBKUP5 1855 PAY1 73 CCode Status WAITING UNTIL 11:00 WAITING, HC=1 EXECUTING S1

DUEOUT

The DUEOUT statement is used to identify a due-out time for a job from one or more processing nodes (P-Nodes), such as INPUT, EXEC and OUTPUT. The DUEOUT statement looks like the following:
JOB PAYBKUP5 RUN LAST FRI OF MONTH DUEOUT INPUT 3AM DUEOUT EXEC 6AM ENDJOB

DUEOUT statements provide a vehicle to flag overdue jobs on CSF. On CSF, PAYBKUP5 appears as follows if it is late finishing execution:
Jobname Qual Jobno Appl Gen CCode Status ___BILL99 1895 BILLING 12 - WAITING UNTIL 11:00 ___BILLUPDT - BILLING 12 - WAITING, HC=1 ___PAYBKUP5 1855 PAY1 73 - EXECUTING S1, OVERDUE

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Common ESP Application Statements, Continued

TAG

The TAG statement is used to tag jobs in an Application with a character string. The TAG statement looks like the following:
JOB PAYCHQ05 RUN FIRST MONDAY MONTHLY RELEASE TESTJOB9 TAG HIGH-PRIORITY ENDJOB JOB PAYCHQ10 RUN FIRST MONDAY MONTHLY RELEASE TESTJOB9 TAG HIGH-PRIORITY ENDJOB JOB PAYREPRT RUN FIRST MONDAY MONTHLY ENDJOB

On CSF, PAYCHQ05 and PAYCHQ10 appear as follows:


Jobname TAG Jobno Appl ___PAYCHQ05 HIGH-PRIORITY 2007 CHQS ___PAYCHQ10 HIGH-PRIORITY - CHQS Gen 12 12 CCode Status 16 ENDED,CCFAIL - WAITING, HC=1

Identifying a job as ONREQUEST

Certain jobs can be specified to run only when requested by a user. This is accomplished with the use of the REQUEST parameter on the JOB statement. An ON-REQUEST job is considered part of the schedule when it is selected. If the job is not selected for submission, it is bypassed, and ESP responds as if it completed normally. For information on requesting a job, see Requesting a Job on page 108.
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Common ESP Application Statements, Continued

EXTERNAL

An External job is a job that is actually part of another Application, called its home Application. The EXTERNAL keyword on the JOB statement identifies a job as External to this, the distant Application.

Home - APPL1
JOB A RELEASE B ENDJOB

Distant - APPL2
JOB A EXTERNAL RELEASE Y ENDJOB

In the above example, Job A exists in APPL1 but is referred to in APPL2 as an External job. APPL1 is the home Application and APPL2 is the distant Application.

Displaying an External job

You can use the LAX command to display External jobs in an active Application. For example:
lax WKLYPAYS.9: PAYJOB1,BILL010 REPORTS.1: JOB99 PGMS.7: PGM424 --- 3 APPLS DISPLAYED

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Common ESP Application Statements, Continued

MANUAL

A manual job is a job that is submitted outside an ESP Application. A manual job is identified by the MANUAL keyword on the JOB statement. ESP does not look for JCL or try to submit the job. Manual jobs can be used as predecessors or successors to ESP jobs, but cannot have job qualifiers. The following is an example of an Application that contains a manual job:
APPL ABC JCLLIB ..... JOB PAYXMIT MANUAL RELEASE PAY001 RUN DAILY JOB PAY001 SEND PAYJOBS NOW STARTING U(*) RELEASE PAY002 RUN DAILY JOB PAY002 RUN DAILY ENDJOB

TASK

A task is a manual job, defined within the Application, but still requiring manual completion. A task may be used to represent a manual or automated process, such as: Balancing reports Input tapes Data set triggering at the job level Any other special handling jobs. A task is identified by the TASK keyword on the JOB statement. ESP does not try to submit JCL for a task, and the task must be marked complete using the AJ command or CSF.
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Common ESP Application Statements, Continued

LINK

A link is a task that does not require manual completion. A link is identified by the LINK PROCESS keyword on the JOB statement. ESP does not try to submit JCL, and automatically marks a link complete as its dependencies are met. You can use a link when you need to take an action, such as issue a command or send a message. You use a link in an Application to simplify complex dependencies. For example, in the following diagram, LINKJOB is used to simplify the successor relationships for jobs A, B and C:
A B C

LINKJOB

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Common ESP Application Statements, Continued

Example Links

You can use a link to issue a command. For example:


JOB OPEN.INITS LINK PROCESS VS $SI1-10 RUN DAILY ENDJOB

You can use a link to keep an Application active. For example:


JOB KEEPOPEN LINK PROCESS DELAYSUB 23:59 RUN DAILY ENDJOB

SUBAPPL

An Application can consist of one or more subApplications. A subApplication is used to break up large Applications into smaller, more manageable groups of jobs. You can display, manipulate and report on subApplications. A subApplication is identified by the SUBAPPL statement in an ESP Procedure. The subApplication name must be unique it cannot be the same as any job name in the Application. You can use the WAIT keyword to prevent processing of concurrent generations of the subApplication, if the WAIT keyword is not used on the APPL statement.
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Common ESP Application Statements, Continued

DSTRIG

You can define a data set trigger workload object as part of an ESP Application. This allows you to set up data set dependencies at the job level. A data set trigger workload object can be completed by the successful creation, closure or renaming of a data set by another job, started task, or TSO user. A data set trigger workload object is identified by the DSTRIG statement, instead of a job statement. For example:
DSTRIG BIGFILE DSNAME PROD.FILE.CICS1602 RUN DAILY RELEASE ABCJOB ENDJOB

RESOURCE

You use the RESOURCE statement to identify real or abstract resources required by a job. For information on the RESOURCE statement, see Resources on page 64.

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Resources

Overview

A resource can be an item of hardware or software, or it can be an abstract condition. Common examples of resources include: Scratch tapes Execution time An entity to control mutually exclusive jobs On-line system availability Time periods Tape drives CPU absorption.

A RESOURCE statement is used to specify that a job has a requirement for a given number of units of a specific resource before job submission.

RESOURCE statement

The following is an example of a job definition containing RESOURCE statements:


JOB BILL010 RUN MON WED FRI RESOURCE (1,IMS) ENDJOB JOB BILL020 RUN MON WED FRI RESOURCE (1,IMS) ENDJOB

In the above example, BILL010 and BILL020 each require 1 unit of IMS in order to be submitted.
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Resources, Continued

What it looks like on CSF

The following example shows what CSF looks like when a job is waiting for resources:
Jobname Tag Jobno Appl Gen Pnode 32 32 Status EXEC EXECUTING, S1 RESWAIT WAITING FOR RESOURCES

___ BILL010 BILLING LR BILL020 BILLING

2007 BILL - BILL

To see what resource a job is waiting for, type LR beside the job name, and press Enter. The Extended Resource List panel appears:
ESP Consolidated Status: Extended Resource List ---Row 1 of 1,

You may enter an L in front of any resource to display more information on that specific resource, or enter an X in front of any resource to get additional information on all the resources. X 1 IMS

Type X beside a resource to see additional information about the resource:


---------------------------------- TOP OF DATA---------Resource IMS TORONTO * Global Renewable 1 needed by BILL020, Appl BILLING.8 Max=1 Avail=0 1 used by BILL010, Appl BILLING.8

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Controlling Applications

Overview

As an operator, you may be required to display an Application. You can display an Application after it is generated. You can display all instances (generations) of the Application, or specific generations of the Application. Normally, you use CSF or ESP Workstation to control Applications.

Displaying an Application using LISTAPPL command

Once an Application is generated, you can display it. You can display it through CSF, ESP Workstation, or using the LISTAPPL command. The short form of the command is LAP. You can use the command with the ALL keyword to give a structured view of an active Application (i.e. one with incomplete jobs) or with other keywords, to give a summary of active or completed Applications. The display can be limited to specific generations if required. For more information on displaying an Application, see List Application (LAP) Command on page 140.

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Controlling subApplications

Overview

An ESP subApplication is a grouping of jobs within an Application. Large Applications may be broken into smaller, easier to manage groups of jobs. An Application may contain multiple subApplications. You can display, control and report on subApplications.

Defining a subApplication

You define an ESP subApplication using a SUBAPPL statement in an ESP Procedure. Choose a name that is unique it cannot be the same as any job name within the Application.

Controlling a subApplication

You can control a subApplication using CSF commands, or the APPLJOB (AJ) command. You control a subApplication similar to the way you control jobs. You can: Bypass or unbypass a subApplication Request or unrequest a subApplication Hold or release a subApplication Complete a subApplication Un-wait a subApplication.
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Controlling subApplications, Continued

Example of a subApplication definition

The following is an example of an ESP Application that contains subApplications:


APPL ACCOUNTS JCLLIB ..... JOB ACCTG1 SUBAPPL ACCTSREC RUN DAILY RELEASE ACCTG2 ENDJOB JOB ACCTG2 SUBAPPL ACCTSREC RUN DAILY RELEASE ACCTG3 ENDJOB JOB ACCTG3 SUBAPPL ACCTPAY RUN DAILY ENDJOB JOB ACCTG5 RUN WORKDAYS ENDJOB JOB ACCTG6 RUN WORKDAYS ENDJOB

Example2 of a subApplication definition

The following example shows another method of coding subApplications:


APPL ACCOUNTS JCLLIB ..... SUBAPPL ACT1 JOB JOB1 RUN DAILY RELEASE JOB2 ENDJOB JOB JOB2 RUN DAILY RELEASE JOB3 ENDJOB SUBAPPL ACT2 JOB JOB3 RUN DAILY ENDJOB

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Controlling Jobs in an Application

Overview

As an operator, you may be required to: Hold or release a job in an active Application Bypass or unbypass a job in an active Application Mark a job or manual task complete in an active Application Request a job Reset a time dependency Resubmit a job in an Application Remove predecessor relationships from a job.

You can control jobs using CSF, ESP Workstation, or using the APPLJOB command.

Using CSF

You control jobs from CSF by typing a command next to the jobname on the CSF display:

When you control jobs on CSF, it is the APPLJOB command you are invoking in the background. For more information on controlling workload, see Controlling the Work on page 100.
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Controlling Jobs in an Application, Continued

Using APPLJOB command

You can control the jobs in an Application using the APPLJOB command. The short form of this command name is AJ. A jobname or job number is all you need to identify the job if it is submitted and has a JES number assigned. The Application is located via the tracking files. If the job is not yet submitted, augment the job name with the Application name. If more than one generation of the Application is active, you must also specify the relative or absolute generation of the Application. For more information on the APPLJOB command, see APPLJOB (AJ) Command on page 139. For the syntax of the APPLJOB command, see the ESP Command Reference or the ESP Command Quick Reference.

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71

ESP Events Overview

Introduction

If you want to run an ESP Application at a certain time every day, you need a way to tell that to ESP. The object you use is called an Event. An Event defines: When ESP must perform the work What actions ESP must take to perform the work.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics: Topic Functions of an Event Defining an Event Data Set Triggering Scheduling an Event Displaying the Schedule Displaying When an Event Will Execute Postponing Event Execution Bypassing Event Execution Triggering an Event Manually Simulating an Event Simulating the Next Occurrence Simulating a Specific Day See Page 73 75 77 78 79 80 81 83 84 88 89 92

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Functions of an Event

Overview

An Event can be used to: Invoke an ESP Application: Scheduled or data set triggered Submit a job or group of jobs Send a message Issue an MVS operator command.

Sending a message

You can use an Event to send a message. The following example sends a good morning message to user USER01:
EVENT ID(CYBER.MESSAGE) SYSTEM(ES51) SCHEDULE 8AM DAILY SEND GOOD MORNING U(USER01) ENDDEF

Submitting JCL

You can use an Event to submit JCL. The following example submits member PROD001 from the JCL library CYBER.ESP.CNTL:
EVENT ID(CYBER.SUBMIT) SYSTEM(ES51) SCHEDULE 8AM DAILY SUBMIT CYBER.ESP.CNTL(PROD001) ENDDEF

Invoking an ESP Procedure

You can use an Event to invoke an ESP Procedure. The following example invokes the TESTPROC procedure in CYBER.ESP.PROC:
EVENT ID(CYBER.PROC) SYSTEM(ES51) SCHEDULE 8AM DAILY INVOKE CYBER.ESP.PROC(TESTPROC) ENDDEF

Issuing an MVS You can use an Event to issue an MVS command. The following example command issues the VS command:
EVENT ID(CYBER.COMMAND) SYSTEM(ES51) SCHEDULE 8AM DAILY VS $TI1-15,C=A ENDDEF

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Functions of an Event, Continued

Data set triggering

You can trigger an Event based on data set activity. For more information, see Data Set Triggering on page 77.

Trigger diagram

The following diagram illustrates what happens when an Event is triggered:

Trigger

Scheduled date and time Data set trigger Manual trigger Job monitor trigger Alert trigger

Event

Send a Message

Submit JCL

Invoke ESP Procedure

Operator Command

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Defining an Event

Overview

When you define an Event, you define what you want ESP to do, where and when you want it done. Use one of the following methods to create an Event: ESP panels Edit an existing Event and give it a new Event name ESP Page mode commands The LOAD command to copy an Event from a data set.

Creating an Event using the ESP panels

Step 1

Action Name the Event. An Event name has two parts: Prefix name of a user or group, up to 8 characters in length Descriptive name up to 16 characters in length including national characters and underscore. ESP verifies security requirements when the Event is triggered. Specify when the Event will execute. The trigger for the Event can be: A scheduled date and time A data set trigger A manual trigger (the default) A job monitor or Alert trigger. Schedule criteria looks like:
SCHEDULE 8PM THIRD FRIDAY OF MONTH SCHEDULE 22.00 LAST DAY OF MONTH LESS 1 WORKDAY SCHEDULE 3PM DAILY NOSCHED 3PM FRIDAY Continued on next page

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Defining an Event, Continued

Event definition

An Event definition is made up of the following: EVENT command ID field, which identifies the name of the Event SYSTEM field, which identifies the ESP subsystem on which the Event executes SCHEDULE command, which tells ESP when to trigger the Event What ESP is to do INVOKE a Procedure, SEND a message, and so on ENDDEF command, which indicates the end of the definition.

Event definition example

The following is an example of an Event definition:


EVENT ID(CYBER.PAYROLL) SYSTEM(ES51) SCHEDULE 5PM MONDAY INVOKE CYBER.PROD.PROC(PAYROLL) ENDDEF

Eventset

Events are stored in a VSAM data set called an Eventset.

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Data Set Triggering

Overview

You can use a data set trigger to trigger an Event automatically on data set activity. A data set trigger can be used on: The creation of a data set (this is the default) The closure of a data set after an update The renaming of a data set.

ESP supports data set triggering with multiple data sets and multiple closures. Data set triggering can be restricted to data sets created by a specific job or group of jobs.

Example of data set triggering on creation

In the following example, the Event triggers on the creation of the data set PROD.ACCT.BKUP99:
EVENT ID(CYBER.BKUP99) SYSTEM ES51 DSTRIG PROD.ACCT.BKUP99 INVOKE ACCT.MONTHLY.PAYROLL(PAY1) ENDDEF

Example of data set triggering on update or creation

In the following example, the Event triggers on the update or creation of the data set PROD.ACCT.BKUP99:
EVENT ID(CYBER.BKUP99) SYSTEM ES51 DSTRIG PROD.ACCT.BKUP99 ANYCLOSE INVOKE ACCT.MONTHLY.PAYROLL(PAY1) ENDDEF

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Scheduling an Event

Overview

An Event can be triggered manually, or automatically, by telling ESP when to do so (for example, 6 pm daily). An Event can also be triggered by data set activity.

Scheduling an Event once

To schedule an Event to execute only once followed by the deletion of the Event, use the ONCE keyword with the SCHEDULE command. This is useful for one-time Events. If you do not specify ONCE, ESP assumes the Event runs daily. The following example schedules an Event only once:
EVENT ID(CYBER.TEST) SYSTEM(ES51) SCHEDULE 8AM SATURDAY ONCE SUBMIT CYBER.JCLLIB.CNTL(ONETIME) ENDDEF

Event data set

At regular intervals (e.g. 6 a.m. each day), ESP scans the Event data set (EVENTSET) and builds a schedule of work to be executed during that schedule cycle. A schedule cycle is the time between successive scans of an Event data set. The schedule cycle can be set according to the requirements of your installation when ESP is installed. A message is issued at the start and end of each scan through the data set. As ESP scans the data set, it also takes a backup copy.

Displaying the schedule

Once the schedule is built, it can be displayed using the LISTSCH (list schedule) command. This command allows the display to be limited to: A certain time range, or A generic Event name specification.

If an Event is to execute more than once during the current schedule cycle, only the first scheduled execution is displayed. This is because ESP stores an Event entry only once in the schedule. When the scheduled time arrives, ESP then calculates and stores the next execution time.

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Displaying the Schedule

Overview

You can display the schedule using the LISTSCH command. It displays the names of the Events and their scheduled execution times. The names of any jobs to be submitted are not displayed; one Event can submit several jobs. Job names are displayed by generating a scheduled activity report. For information on the Scheduled Activity Report, see Scheduled Activity Report on page 132.

The LISTSCH command

The following LISTSCH command lists the entire current schedule between one schedule scan and the next:
LISTSCH

The following example displays all Events with names beginning GR that are scheduled between 11 pm and 1:30 am:
LISTSCH LEVEL(GR-.-) FROM(23.00) TO(01.30)

In many cases, the LISTSCH command may not provide an operator with sufficient information to be of use. If you want a forecast of the schedule at the job level, you need to produce a scheduled activity report. For more informaton see Scheduled Activity Report on page 132.

79

Displaying When an Event Will Execute

Overview

You can display when an Event will execute using option 5 (NEXT) from the Event Management panel (E.5 option). The Display Next Execution Times panel appears:

You can enter a number (up to a maximum of 99) of next scheduled execution times for the Event in question. The Event must contain at least one SCHEDULE or EXPECT command.

80

Postponing Event Execution

Overview

You can postpone Event execution by placing an Event on hold until such time as you want it to execute. You use the HOLD and RELEASE commands respectively to hold and release an Event. If an Event is in the hold state, it is placed in an overdue condition. When the Event is finally released, the overdue count is checked to see whether execution should proceed. The Event is checked immediately for every occurrence missed while in the held state, up to the overdue limit count specified when the Event was defined. If an Event is in both a suspended and held state when due for scheduling, the hold state is ignored, and the Event is considered suspended.

HOLD command

The HOLD command postpones execution of an Event until you RELEASE it. Specify the name of the Event to be held and the Event has its hold count incremented immediately. While the hold count of an Event is greater than zero, it does not execute. Missed executions of the Event while in the held state are processed up to the overdue count of the Event. The following is an example of the HOLD command:
HOLD PROD.BIGEVENT

The above example increments the hold count of the Event PROD.BIGEVENT by 1.

RELEASE command

The RELEASE command is used in conjunction with the HOLD command and decrements the hold count of an Event. When the hold count reaches zero, the Event is eligible for execution.
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81

Postponing Event Execution, Continued

Overdue Events

An Event can miss its scheduled execution time for many reasons. Some of these are: System trouble Event was held Events class was held ESP was quiesced No Event initiators were available Eventset (Event data set) was suspended.

OVERDUE count

An Event is marked OVERDUE if it is held at its scheduled execution time. You use the OVERDUE count with the SCHEDULE command to tell ESP how many times the Event can execute if it misses more than one scheduled execution. When it is RELEASED, an Event executes once for every missed occurrence, up to the overdue count. The default is 1. The following is an example where the Event is not allowed to execute if it misses its scheduled execution time:
SCHEDULE 10AM WORKDAY OVERDUE(0)

82

Bypassing Event Execution

Overview

You can bypass Event execution by suspending the Event until such time as you want it to execute. You use the SUSPEND and RESUME commands respectively to suspend and resume an Event. If the scheduled time for an Event arrives while it is in the suspended state, the Event execution is bypassed, and it is not considered overdue. If an Event is in both a suspended and held state when due for scheduling, the hold state is ignored, and the Event is considered suspended.

SUSPEND command

The SUSPEND command bypasses execution of an Event until you RESUME it. Specify the name of the Event to be suspended and the Event has its suspend count incremented immediately. While the suspend count of an Event is greater than zero, it does not execute. The following is an example of the SUSPEND command:
SUSPEND PROD.BIGEVENT

The above example increments the suspend count of the Event PROD.BIGEVENT by 1.

RESUME command

The RESUME command is used in conjunction with the SUSPEND command and decrements the suspend count of an Event. When the suspend count reaches zero, the Event is eligible for execution at its next scheduled time.

83

Triggering an Event Manually

Overview

An Event can be triggered manually in the following ways: From the ESP panels Using the TRIGGER command.

From the ESP panels

To trigger an Event using the ESP panels, start at the ESP Main Menu and do the following: Step 1 Action Choose to work with Events. At the Main Menu, choose option E (Events):

Press Enter. ESP displays the Event Management Menu.

At the Event Management Menu, select option 3, Control an existing Event. Press Enter.
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84

Triggering an Event Manually, Continued

From the ESP panels (continued)

Step 2

Action Control an Event. The next panel is the Event Control Menu:

Press Enter. The List Events panel appears. Choose the Event from the list and trigger it. The List Events panel lists the Events belonging to your user id. It looks like this:

Type t next to the Event you want to trigger and press ENTER. ESP displays the Trigger An Event panel.
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85

Triggering an Event Manually, Continued

From the ESP panels (continued)

Step 4

Action Add the Event to the schedule. On the Trigger An Event panel, type ADD in the REPLACE/ADD field. ADD results in an additional execution of the Event. Leave all other fields blank:

Press Enter. You return to the List Events panel. Note the ESP message Event Triggered in the top right corner of the panel.
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86

Triggering an Event Manually, Continued

ADD option

The ADD option executes the Event in addition to the Events normal scheduled execution date and time.

REPLACE option

The REPLACE option executes the Event in place of the Events normal execution date and time. This is the default.

TRIGGER command

You can trigger an Event manually using the TRIGGER command. Specify the name of the Event and either the ADD option or the REPLACE option. If you specify ADD, the Event is scheduled for execution as if a SCHEDULE statement was processed and consequently adds an extra execution to the normal schedule for the Event. A TRIGGER ADD always causes the execution of an Event. The REPLACE option merely brings forward the next scheduled execution for that Event. If the next statement in the Event is a HOLD statement, that statement is processed by the TRIGGER, rather than an execution of the Event. Before issuing a TRIGGER REPLACE, you should be aware of the next action to be processed for that Event. The AT keyword allows you to specify a future time and date for the trigger to occur, overriding the default of NOW. If you specify REPLACE, the trigger replaces the next scheduled execution on or after the specified time. To change the default used when an Event is triggered manually, use the TRDFLT command. The option you specify applies until the next time ESP is initialized.

Example 1

The following example creates an additional execution of FIRST_EVENT:


F ESP,TRIGGER FIRST_EVENT AT(19:00) ADD

Example 2

The following example replaces the next scheduled execution of LAST_EVENT:


F ESP,TRIGGER LAST_EVENT AT(NOW PLUS 10 MINUTES)

87

Simulating an Event

Overview

You can simulate the execution of an Event to see: What would happen if an Event was triggered on a certain day If any syntax errors or successor loops occur Which workload objects ESP submits.

You can simulate the next occurrence of an Event, or the actions of the Event at a specific date or time. Refer to the examples on the following pages to simulate the next occurrence of an Event, or to simulate a specific date and time.

88

Simulating the Next Occurrence

Overview

The following example steps you through the simulation of an Event using the Event panels.

Procedure

To simulate the next occurrence of an Event, begin at the Main Menu, and follow these steps: Step 1 Action Choose to work with Events. At the Main Menu, select option E (Events). Press Enter. Selecting this option takes you to the Event Management Menu. Control an existing Event. At the Event Management Menu, select option 3 (Control an existing Event). Press Enter. ESP takes you to the Event Control Menu. Leave the option blank and press Enter. At the Event Control Menu, leave the option blank and press Enter to see a list of Events.
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89

Simulating the Next Occurrence, Continued

Procedure (continued)

Step 4

Action Simulate the Event. Type M next to payroll:

Press Enter. The Simulate Event Execution panel appears:

Press Enter. ESP starts the Event simulation and presents the results.
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90

Simulating the Next Occurrence, Continued

The simulation results

The following panel shows the results of the simulation:

The following line indicates the name of the simulated Event (USER01.PAYROLL) and the time and date:
SIMULATION OF Event USER01.PAYROLL AT hh.mm.ss ON dddddd...

The next two lines name the jobs and give the total number of jobs simulated to run. The remaining lines list each simulated job, its hold count, and the job it was simulated to release. The hold count associated with a job indicates the number of immediate predecessors. For details on hold count, refer to the ESP Users Guide. Scroll through the results and check for any errors. Press End twice to return to the Event Control Menu and continue to the next simulation. (If you want to return to the Main Menu, press End twice more.)

91

Simulating a Specific Day

Overview

In this example, you simulate triggering the Event on the next Friday. You can assume both of the following: The next Friday is not the last workday of the month You are at the Event Control Menu. Refer to steps 1 and 2 of the previous topic if you are at the Main Menu.

The simulation

Follow these steps: Step 1 Action Leave the option blank and press ENTER. At the Event Control Menu, leave the option blank and press ENTER to see a list of Events. Simulate the Event Type M next to payroll, and press ENTER. The Simulate Event Execution panel appears.
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92

Simulating a Specific Day, Continued

The simulation (continued)

Step 3

Action Enter the day to be simulated. Type the schedule criteria:


SCHEDULE TIME ==> friday

The panel looks like this:

Press Enter. ESP starts the Event simulation and presents the results in a panel like this:

Press End twice to return to the Event Control Menu and to continue to the next simulation. (If you want to return to the Main Menu, press End twice more.)

93

Scheduling Workload

Overview

You can schedule workload in a variety of ways using ESP. This chapter discusses scheduling criteria and ESP calendars.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics: Topic Schedule Criteria Calendars See Page 95 97

94

Schedule Criteria

Overview

ESP recognizes scheduling criteria specified in plain English. Schedule criteria can be used in: Events ESP Procedures and Applications Symbolic variables ESP Built-in functions Calendar definition panels Various ESP commands Reporting criteria.

Specifying schedule criteria

Schedule criteria can consist of: Days of the week Month names Time zones Time of day Days of months Julian dates

Examples of schedule criteria

The following are examples of schedule criteria:


6AM DAILY MON WED FRI DAILY EXCEPT HOLIDAYS 19.00 WEEKENDS EVERY 2 WORKDAYS STARTING FRIDAY LAST WORKDAY OF WEEK 7PM FIRST WORKDAY OF MONTH 8:00 LAST SAT OF MONTH STARTING OCT 1995 15TH DAY OF MARCH JUNE AUGUST LAST DAY OF MONTH LESS 1 WORKDAY

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95

Schedule Criteria, Continued

Testing schedule criteria

Use the TEST command (option E.4 of the ESP panels) to test schedule criteria. This tests any date or schedule specification. ESP responds to the test with the actual date and times the criteria resolves to. For example:
TEST (5) LAST WORKDAY OF MONTH ! 00.00.00 TUESDAY JANUARY 31ST, 1995, DAY 031 00.00.00 TUESDAY FEBRUARY 28TH, 1995, DAY 059 00.00.00 FRIDAY MARCH 31ST, 1995, DAY 090 00.00.00 FRIDAY APRIL 28TH, 1995, DAY 118 00.00.00 WEDNESDAY MAY 31ST, 1995, DAY 151

96

Calendars

Overview

ESP uses one or more calendars to store definitions of scheduling elements some general and some unique to your installation. Your ESP Administrator defines any calendars to meet your installations requirements, and controls the access to those calendars.

What they identify

Calendars identify workdays, the first day of the week, the start time for a day, special days, holidays and so on. You do not need to define calendar terms to ESP in order to use them.

Holidays

Holidays are defined in your calendar, and you refer to them as you would any other scheduling term: 16:00 HOLIDAY 10PM CHRISTMAS BANK_HOLIDAY LESS 1 WORKDAY

Special days

Special days are defined similarly to holidays and referenced in the same manner: 5PM BALANCE_DAY 3PM BALANCE_DAY LESS 2 WORKDAYS 16:00 BALANCE_DAY PLUS 1 WEEK

Special periods

A Special period is the time between two like-name Special days: LAST DAY OF PAYROLL_PERIOD FIRST WORKDAY OF PAYROLL_PERIOD
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97

Calendars, Continued

Example calendar

The following is a display of calendars:


ESP ------------------------------ CALENDARS -------------------------COMMAND ===> Enter D against holidays or special days to delete, then press ENTER NAME QUARTER QUARTER GOOD_FRIDAY MONTH_END VICTORIA_DAY QUARTER PAYDAY MONTH_END PAYDAY PAYDAY QUARTER PAYDAY PAYDAY CHRISTMAS_HOL PAYDAY FISCAL_YEAR FISCAL_YEAR FISCAL_YEAR START DATE 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 00.00 FRI SAT FRI FRI MON SAT FRI FRI THU FRI SUN TUE THU MON FRI THU FRI SAT 1 1 14 7 24 1 30 4 31 29 1 31 30 25 29 1 1 1 JAN APR APR MAY MAY JUL JUL AUG AUG SEP OCT OCT NOV DEC DEC AUG AUG AUG 1995 1995 1995 1995 1995 1995 1995 1995 1995 1995 1995 1995 1995 1995 1995 1996 1997 1998 END DATE CALENDAR SYSTEM SYSTEM SYSTEM SYSTEM SYSTEM SYSTEM PAY1 SYSTEM PAY1 PAY1 SYSTEM PAY1 PAY1 SYSTEM PAY1 BILLING BILLING BILLING

00.00 SAT 15 APR 00.00 TUE 25 MAY

00.00 WED 27 DEC

98

99

Controlling the Work Overview

Introduction

This chapter discusses some of the typical operator tasks you may be required to perform. Most commonly, you control workload using the Consolidated Status Facility (CSF), or ESP Workstation.

CSF commands

Many CSF commands exist that allow you to control workload objects on the CSF display. For more information on these commands, refer to CSF Commands on page 27.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics: Topic Holding a Job Completing a Job Bypassing a Job Resubmitting a Job Requesting a Job Inserting a Job Dropping Dependencies Resetting a Time Dependency Holding an Application See Page 101 103 105 107 108 109 111 114 115

100

Holding a Job

Overview

You can place a job on hold until such time as you want it to run. The Consolidated Status Facility (CSF) is one method used to hold a job.

Example

The following illustrates holding a job from CSF: Step 1 Action At the Main Menu, select option C (CSF). Press Enter. Selecting this option takes you to the Consolidated Status Facility display:

Place the job on Hold. Type H next to the job you want to place on hold. Press Enter. The status of the job is updated to show the job is waiting, and its hold count is increased by one:

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101

Holding a Job, Continued

Holding a job with a reason

You can specify a reason when you place a job on hold. The reason you type appears in the CSF User Status field, and can be used for a variety of purposes. For example, you can use it to indicate the job is waiting until a programmer makes a last-minute change. If you want to specify a reason when you place the job on hold, begin at the Main Menu and do the following: Step 1 2 Action At the Main Menu, select option C (CSF). Press Enter. Selecting this option takes you to the Consolidated Status Facility display. Place the job on Hold with a reason. Type HR next to the job you want to place on hold. Press Enter. The status of the job is updated to show the job is waiting, and displays the reason you entered. The hold count is increased by one.

102

Completing a Job

Overview

You can complete a job from CSF. You may want to do this if a job is waiting for a dependency to be met, and its successor job can no longer wait before running. If you force the job complete, its successor can run.

Example

The following illustrates how to force a job complete from CSF: Step 1 Action At the Main Menu, select option C (CSF). Press Enter. Selecting this option takes you to the Consolidated Status Facility display:

Force the job complete. Type C next to the job you want to complete. Press Enter. The status of the job is updated to show the job Completed (F):

Completing a job in Page mode

To complete a job from Page mode, you issue the AJ command. For example:
AJ JOB3 APPL(PAYROLL.12) COMPLETE

In the above example, JOB3 in generation 12 of the PAYROLL Application is forced complete.
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103

Completing a Job, Continued

Completing external jobs

If you complete a job in the distant Application, it affects only that Application. It has no effect on the home Application. If you complete a job in its home Application, it posts it complete in the distant Application. (Your installation may override this behavior by setting USERMOD 30 on.)

Complete or bypass?

If you are uncertain if you want to force a job complete or bypass it, refer to Difference between bypassing and completing on page 106.

104

Bypassing a Job

Overview

You can bypass a job from CSF. You do this when you do not require this job to run. If you bypass a job, its successor can run.

Example

The following illustrates how to bypass a job from CSF: Step 1 Action At the Main Menu, select option C (CSF). Press Enter. Selecting this option takes you to the Consolidated Status Facility display:

Bypass the job. Type BY next to the job you want to bypass. Press Enter. The status of the job is updated to show the job Bypassed:

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105

Bypassing a Job, Continued

Difference between bypassing and completing

When you complete a job, ESP decreases the hold count of its successors by 1. In the following diagram, if you complete B, C runs, even if A is still running. There is no way to reverse this action.
A

However, if you bypass B, you are indicating you are not going to run B it is the same as canceling the job off the schedule. ESP does not bypass the job until it would normally be submitted. You can unbypass the job up to its normal submission time.

106

Resubmitting a Job

Overview

You can resubmit a job, if it fails to complete successfully. The job is rerun from its first job step, unless you specify otherwise. You can resubmit a job from a different library, such as the COPYJCL library.

Example

The following illustrates how to resubmit a job from CSF: Step 1 Action At the Main Menu, select option C (CSF). Press Enter. Selecting this option takes you to the Consolidated Status Facility display:

Resubmit the job. Type R next to the job you want to resubmit. Press Enter. The Resubmit an Object display appears:

Enter a library name if you want to resubmit the job from a different library, specify the start and end steps, and any other values. Press Enter. The job is eligible for submission again.

External jobs

You must resubmit a job in its home Application.

107

Requesting a Job

Overview

Certain jobs are defined as REQUEST jobs. These are jobs that must be requested manually before they can run. A typical request job might be one that must be ready to run if requested, but a user may not require it every day. Building it into an Application ensures that any predecessor or successor dependencies are met in case the job is run. A REQUEST job is considered part of the schedule when selected, but is only selected on request. If the job is not requested prior to its scheduled submission time, it is bypassed, and treated as a normal completion.

Example

The following illustrates how to request a job from CSF: Step 1 Action At the Main Menu, select option C (CSF). Press Enter. Selecting this option takes you to the Consolidated Status Facility display:

Request the job. Type RQ to request the job. The status is updated to indicate the job is requested.

108

Inserting a Job

Overview

You can use the INSERT JOB (IJ) command to insert a job into an active Application. The inserted job runs immediately unless you define a predecessor or insert the job on hold.

Inserting a job

When an Application is displayed on CSF, you can insert a job into that Application. To insert a job, do the following: Step 1 Action Type IJ next to the Application. The Insert an Object panel appears. Type the name of the job you want to insert, and if there are any predecessors or successors to the job. Specify any other conditions, such as if this is a conditional or request job, or if you want the job inserted on hold:

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109

Inserting a Job, Continued

Inserting a job (continued)

Step 2

Action Press Enter. If you specified Y to predecessors, the Define Predecessors panel appears. Define the predecessors to the job:

Press Enter. The job is inserted.

110

Dropping Dependencies

Overview

You can drop one or more dependencies when you want a job to run in spite of an unfulfilled dependency. You can drop one or more predecessors, or you can drop all resource dependencies of a job.

Dropping resources

Before you drop a jobs resources, you may want to display the jobs resource dependencies. To display and then drop the jobs resource dependencies, begin at the Main Menu and follow these steps: Step 1 Action At the Main Menu, select option C (CSF). Press Enter. Selecting this option takes you to the Consolidated Status Facility display:

Display the jobs resource dependencies. Type LR next to the job whose resources you want to display, and press Enter. The Extended Resource List display appears:

The Extended Resource List display lists the resource dependencies for a job, and allows you to obtain more information about the resource dependencies.
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111

Dropping Dependencies, Continued

Dropping resources (continued)

Step 3

Action Typing L displays more information about a specific resource:

Press End to return to CSF. Drop the resource dependencies. Type DR to drop all of the resource dependencies, and press Enter. All resource dependencies for the job are dropped.

Drop all predecessors

The following illustrates how to drop all of a jobs predecessors:

Step 1

Action At the Main Menu, select option C (CSF). Press Enter. Selecting this option takes you to the Consolidated Status Facility display:

Drop all predecessors. Type DD next to the job whose predecessors you want to drop, and press Enter. The job becomes eligible for submission.
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112

Dropping Dependencies, Continued

Drop one or more predecessors

The following illustrates how to drop one or more of a jobs predecessors:

Step 1

Action At the Main Menu, select option C (CSF). Press Enter. Selecting this option takes you to the Consolidated Status Facility display:

Display the job. Type L next to the job for which you want to drop a predecessor, and press Enter. The Extended Job List display appears.

Delete the predecessor(s). Type D next to the predecessor(s) you want to delete, and press Enter.

113

Resetting a Time Dependency

Overview

You can reset a time dependency if a job is waiting until a particular time to run, and you want to run it sooner, or if you want the job to wait until a later time to run.

Example

The following illustrates how to reset a time dependency: Step 1 Action At the Main Menu, select option C (CSF). Press Enter. Selecting this option takes you to the Consolidated Status Facility display:

Reset the time. Type RT next to the job whose time dependency you want to reset, and press Enter. The Reset Object Times display appears:

Enter the new values or simply edit existing values and press Enter. The time is reset.

114

Holding an Application

Overview

You can place an entire Application on hold by issuing a command next to any job in that Application.

Example

The following illustrates how to hold an Application: Step 1 Action At the Main Menu, select option C (CSF). Press Enter. Selecting this option takes you to the Consolidated Status Facility display:

Hold the Application. Type HA next to any job in the Application you want to hold, and press Enter. The Application is placed on hold APPLHOLD is displayed:

115

Working with Delayed Events Overview

Introduction

Several circumstances can cause the execution of an Event to be delayed. The more common ones are: System outage Data set contention Event data set unavailability.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics: Topic System Outage Data Set Contention Event Data Set Unavailability Extended Outages Restarting ESP in Phases See Page 117 118 119 120 122

116

System Outage

Overview

If the system is down because of software or hardware outages, some Events cannot execute at the scheduled time. When ESP is restarted, it processes all overdue Events.

Overdue count

When an Event is considered overdue, an attribute in the Event definition is examined to determine how to process it. This attribute is called the overdue count, which is specified in a schedule statement in an Event definition. The overdue count specifies how many overdue occurrences of the Event are to be executed once the system is re-instated. For example, if an Event is scheduled to execute once an hour, and the system is down for three hours, the Event misses three scheduled executions.

Overdue count of zero

An overdue count of zero (0) indicates that the Event should only execute at its scheduled time. If the system is down at that time, the Event does not execute.

117

Data Set Contention

Overview

If one or more data sets required for a job are allocated exclusively to another user or job, a message is issued and the Event is delayed for up to five minutes. This process is repeated until all the data sets are available for shared allocation.

118

Event Data Set Unavailability

Overview

An Event data set may become unavailable for several reasons: If a severe I/O error occurred on the data set, an error message is issued and the data set may be placed in the suspended state. It might be necessary to suspend the data set manually for other reasons, such as problems with the catalog, disk recovery, etc.

Data set is suspended

If the data set where an Event resides is in the suspended state, a warning message is issued and the Event is placed on the deferred queue.

Displaying the deferred queue

You can display the deferred queue by using the LISTSCH command with the DEFERRED option, and specifying the identifier of the Event data set. For example:
LISTSCH DEFERRED(EVENT1)

where EVENT1 is the Event data set id.

When data set is available again . . .

Once the data set is made available again, take the data set out of the suspended state by issuing the EVENTSET command and specifying the OPEN option:
EVENTSET EVENT1 OPEN

As a result of the above command, all the deferred Events in EVENT1 are placed on the OVERDUE queue. Once in the OVERDUE queue, the Events are processed as if they were overdue because of a system outage. The OVERDUE COUNT determines how they are to be processed.

Displaying the overdue queue

You can display the OVERDUE queue, by using the LISTSCH command, and specifying the OVERDUE keyword:
LISTSCH OVERDUE

In most situations, the OVERDUE queue is empty, because any Events in it are eligible for immediate execution. However, when ESP is quiesced, Events remain on the OVERDUE queue.

119

Extended Outages

Overview

In the case of an extended outage, the actions to be performed by the Events may already be done manually. In this case, you must prevent the deferred executions from taking place again when the data set is reinstated. You can do this in several ways: FLUSH the entire deferred queue HOLD or SUSPEND the Events by CLASS Open the affected Event data set and SUSPEND individual Events.

Flushing the deferred queue

You can flush the deferred queue without opening the Event data set. To flush the deferred queue, use the EVENTSET command, and specify FLUSH:
EVENTSET EVENT1 FLUSH

Where EVENT1 is the Event data set ID. The above command flushes the entire deferred queue for the EVENT1 data set.

Holding or suspending Events

If you do not want to flush all the Events in the queue for a data set, you can use the CLASS command to HOLD or SUSPEND Events. The EVENTSET OPEN command can then be used to take the data set out of the suspended state.

Classes of Events

When an Event is defined, it can be associated with a particular class. A class is a user-defined string of up to eight characters, which can be used to group Events logically together. If a class name is omitted, the prefix of the Event name is used by default in place of a class.

CLASS command

The CLASS command operates on classes of Events. You can use the CLASS command to SUSPEND one or more classes. When an Event is scheduled and its class is in the suspended state, the Event execution is bypassed. As soon as you remove the required Events from the deferred or overdue queue, the classes that were previously suspended can be resumed.
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120

Extended Outages, Continued

Suspending individual Events

During an extended system outage, if only a few Events were manually scheduled, and you do not want to flush the entire Event data set queue or to suspend entire classes, you can quiesce ESP. This temporarily stops all Event executions. Open the affected Event data set, and suspend specific Events, using the SUSPEND command.

Resuming normal scheduling

You can resume normal scheduling with the RESTART command. You can resume specific Events that were previously suspended.

121

Restarting ESP in Phases

Overview

At startup time, ESP can detect that a system outage occurred. An installation can define a system outage as any period that ESP or the operating system is inactive. The default is 60 minutes. When an outage is detected, ESP prompts the operator indicating the current time and last time of execution.

On notification of system outage . . .

When ESP notifies you of a system outage condition, you can use the following manual procedure to restart ESP in phases, or you can define a CLIST to automate a phased restart.

Manual, phased The following table shows how to manually restart ESP in phases: restart

Step 1

Action Start ESP in a quiesced state. Issue the following command:


S ESP,PARM=(QUIESCE)

Because you started ESP in a quiesced state, no new work is submitted. ESP continues to track jobs and respond to operators and users. Issue CLASS commands to hold or suspend low and medium priority Events, and to exempt high priority groups of Events by using explicit names or wildcard characters for generic specification. Remove ESP from its quiesced state using the RESTART command:
F ESP,RESTART or OPER RESTART

Processing of high-priority Events begins. As priority work completes, release medium and then low-priority classes in a staged manner as required.
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122

Restarting ESP in Phases, Continued

Automating a phased restart

The following table shows how to automate a phased restart:

Step 1

Action After startup, define the commands like the following in a CLIST:
CLASS SHOLD CLASS WHOLD CLASS S027 EXEMPT RESTART

where class S027 defines the high priority Events. After the high priority work is complete, specify the following:
CLASS S- RELEASE

where class S defines the medium priority Events. After the medium priority work is complete, specify the following:
CLASS W- RELEASE

where class W defines the low priority Events.

123

Working with ESP Classes Overview

Introduction

ESP Events can be grouped into classes. A class name can be assigned to an Event when it is defined. If a class name is omitted from an Event definition, the Event name prefix (the part before the period - either a userid or a group name) is used as the class name.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics: Topic Controlling Classes Hold Queues Masking Multiple Class Restrictors See Page 125 126 127 128

124

Controlling Classes

Overview

As an ESP operator, you can control multiple ESP Events by controlling the Event classes. To control Event classes, you use the CLASS command. The CLASS command places restrictions on the execution of an individual class, or a group of classes. The CLASS command can be used to perform the following actions on a class of Events: Suspend a class of Events Hold a class of Events Make a class of Events exempt from a particular action.

Before an Event is executed

Before an Event is executed, its class restrictors are examined to see if the class the Event belongs to is restricted. If the class is restricted, the action specified by the restriction for that Event is taken.

Suspend restrictor

The SUSPEND restrictor bypasses all Events in a specified class during the time the SUSPEND restrictor is in effect. A warning message is issued at the time the Event is scheduled to execute.

Hold restrictor

The HOLD restrictor places Event on hold as soon as they are scheduled to execute. The Events are held in queues by class name.

Exempt restrictor

The Exempt restrictor prevents the Events in a specified class from being held or suspended.

125

Hold Queues

Overview

Events that are on hold are held in queues by their class name.

Name of the hold queue

If the class name for an Event is GROUP1 and the hold restrictor is placed on the class GR-, a hold queue is formed for the class GROUP1. The Event, and any other Events with the same two characters (GR) at the beginning of their group name, is placed on the hold queue.

CLASS command

You can use the CLASS command to display the Events in a hold queue, as follows:
CLASS W LIST

The above example displays the hold queues for class W.

Releasing hold queues

You can release the Events in a class hold queue using the CLASS command as follows:
CLASS W RELEASE

In the above example, any Events in class W hold queue are released.

126

Masking

Overview

When you are specifying a class string, you can use asterisks or a hyphen for masking when you want to use a generic class name. An asterisk signifies that any character in that position is considered a match. A hyphen -, signifies that any character in that or subsequent character positions is considered a match.

Example Asterisks

The string **PR affects all classes with names consisting of four characters, which end with PR e.g. TAPR, A1PR, and so on.

Example hyphens

The string ACC1- affects all classes whose names begin with the string ACC1. The class name can have any number of characters.

Example hold all classes except those with PR

The following example holds all Event classes except for those whose names begin with the characters PR:
CLASS PR- EXEMPT /*THIS EXEMPTS ALL CLASSES */ /* BEGINNING WITH PR */ CLASS HOLD /*THIS HOLDS ALL CLASSES */

Displaying all restrictors and hold queues

The following example displays all current class restrictors, and the names of any hold queues in existence:
CLASS ESP0001 CLASS LIST FOLLOWING CLASSES EXEMPT(E), HELD(H), SUSPENDED(s) PR-(E), -(H) NO EVENTS CURRENTLY HELD

127

Multiple Class Restrictors

Overview

When multiple class restrictors exist, they are queued in ascending alphabetic sequence, with the more specific ones queued first. When an Event is executed, the restrictor queue is searched, and the first restrictor that applies takes effect.

Example

In the following example, imagine you use nine group names, all of which start with GR. You issue the following commands:
CLASS GROUP1- EXEMPT CLASS GR- HOLD

In the above example: You specified to exempt class names beginning with GROUP1 You also specified to hold class names beginning with GR Because GROUP1- is a more specific string than GR-, GROUP1 is queued first. The following illustration shows the nine group names, and the results of the above commands:

Group names
GROUP10 GRAM GROUP19 GROUP1 GROUP20 GROUP45 GREGORY

GRHOLD

GRAM GROUP20 GROUP45 GREGORY

GROUP1- GROUP19
GROUP1

GROUP10

EXEMPT

128

129

ESP Reports

Overview

Two types of reports are available for your use with ESP. These are: History reports Scheduled Activity Reports.

You use these reports to summarize historical statistics about a job and information about the workload objects in the schedule, respectively.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics: Topic History Reporting Scheduled Activity Report See Page 131 132

130

History Reporting

Overview

You can use a History Report to see certain statistics about a job as it ran in the past. History data is retained in the History file (HISTFILE) data set for a period of time. ESP uses this data to produce History Reports and to calculate average run times for a job. The History Report contains detailed historical data about each job. You can include many kinds of data in a History report. For information about the fields available, and creating the report, see the ESP Workload Manager Users Guide.

Obtaining a History Report

To obtain a History Report, enter the report commands in Page mode or in batch. For detailed information about the ESP reporting commands, see the ESP Workload Manager Command Reference. If you know what command you want to use, but simply want a syntax description, refer to the ESP Workload Manager Command Quick Reference. For detailed information on constructing a History report, see the ESP Workload Manager Users Guide.

Example History Report

The following is an example of the commands to generate a History Report (in bold) and the resulting report:
REPORT FROM 7AM YESTERDAY TO NOW CRITERIA JOBNAME EQ SWDISPLAY JOBNAME JOBNO APPLSYS CMPC EXECST LINES CPUTIME SORT APPLSYS JOBNAME ENDR JOBNAME SWJOB1 SWJOB2 SWJOB3 SWJOB5 SWJOB5 TOTAL (5) JOB APPLSYS NO 1750 1753 1755 1622 1620 DB2JOBS DB2JOBS DB2JOBS OVERDU OVERDU COMP EXEC PRINT CPU TIME CODE START LINES 0 0 S913 0 16 15.19 15.20 15.21 11.05 11.01 74 74 32 48 48 (276) 0:20 0:00 0:30 0:22 0:00 (1:12)

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Scheduled Activity Report

Overview

In many cases, the LISTSCH command may not provide an operator with sufficient information to be of use. If you want a forecast of the schedule at the job level, you need to produce a Scheduled Activity Report.

Generating the report

To produce a snapshot of the activity expected on the system in any specified future time frame, use one of the following methods: Issue the LSAR (List Scheduled Activity Report) command in batch. The LSAR command extracts data from the scheduled activity data set, and generates a standard format scheduled activity report. Choose option S from the ESP Main Menu. This runs the LSAR command for you. This is the method normally used.

In order to create this report, you need to know the name of the scheduled activity data set. Contact your ESP Administrator.

Data generated by LSAR

The LSAR command generates a standard scheduled activity report that includes the following useful data: Jobname Fully qualified Event identifier Scheduled submit time Job net ID Number of samples used for averages Averages of specific and non-specific tape mounts Tape drives required CPU time Number of print lines Elapsed execution time.
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Scheduled Activity Report, Continued

The report

The following shows the kind of output you can expect to generate using the LSAR command:

JOBNAME SUBMISSION TIME DATE PAYJOB1 PAYJOB2 PAYJOB3 DB2UPDT IMSRPT BILLNG1 BILLNG2 BILLNG3 HISTRPT BACKUP1 TOTALS: 10 4.07 0:25 22869 6 26 19.00 19.00 19.30 20.30 23.30 01.30 01.30 02.00 05.30 06.00 8FEB 8FEB 8FEB 8FEB 8FEB 9FEB 9FEB 9FEB 9FEB 9FEB

SAMPLES USED 9 0 10 10 10 10 10 10 5 1

------------------- AVERAGE ----------------EXEC TIME CPU TIME PRINT TAPE MOUNTS TAPE (MINS) (MINS) LINES SPEC NON-SP DRIVES 22.2 1:01 300 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0:00 00 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.5 0:00 1056 0.0 0.0 0.0 10.0 0:50 32 2.0 10.0 3.0 0.1 0:01 80 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0:00 92 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.5 0:00 91 0.0 0.0 0.0 120.0 9:00 21040 3.0 15.0 6.0 1.0 0:00 100 0.0 0.0 0.0 90.0 5:00 78 1.0 1.0 2.0

JOBS, 3 DID NOT HAVE STATISTICS AVAILABLE TOTAL INITIATOR TIME (HOURS:MINS) TOTAL CPU (HOURS:MINS) PRINT LINES SPECIFIC TAPE MOUNTS NON-SPECIFIC (SCRATCH) TAPE MOUNTS

133

ESP System Topology Overview

Introduction

Because ESP Workload Manager is so versatile, there are as many ways to configure ESP systems, as there are installations to do so. This chapter summarizes the possible configurations for multiple ESP systems.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics: Topic Multiple ESPs on a Single MVS Image Multiple Copies of ESP in a Shared Spool Environment Multiple Copies of ESP on Multiple JES Nodes See Page 135 136 137

134

Multiple ESPs on a Single MVS Image

Overview

You can run multiple copies of ESP on a single MVS image in two scenarios: Production and test copies Master and Slave copies.

Production and test ESPs

Your installation may require that you install new releases of ESP in a test environment prior to running ESP in production. If so, you need two copies of ESP on the same MVS image one for production and one for test. Each of these copies of ESP is a Master.

Master and Slave ESPs

If you run copies of ESP on multiple MVS images in a Master/Slave configuration, one copy of ESP is defined as the Master. It is very beneficial to also run a Slave copy of ESP on the same MVS image as the Master if you need to take the system down for an extended period of time, it is very simple to move the Master to another system. For more information on Masters and Slaves, refer to the ESP Workload Manager Installation Guide.

135

Multiple Copies of ESP in a Shared Spool Environment

Overview

If your installation runs multiple copies of ESP in a shared spool environment, you are using a Master ESP, and multiple Slaves.

Master and multiple Slaves

The copy of ESP that is defined as the Master is the ESP where you control workload. The Master is the only copy of ESP that has a CSF. If you require access to CSF from a Slave, you use a product called ESP CommServer. For more information on Masters and Slaves, refer to the ESP Workload Manager Installation Guide. In a Master/Slave configuration, the Master ESP performs the tracking of workload. Each Slave passes its tracking data to the Master via the shared QUEUE data set, as shown:

MASTER ESP

QUEUE FILE

SLAVE ESP

SLAVE ESP

136

Multiple Copies of ESP on Multiple JES Nodes

Overview

If your installation runs multiple copies of ESP across multiple JES nodes, you are using multiple Master copies of ESP. Each JES node requires an ESP Master. If you want tracking data managed at a single point of control, tracking data is transmitted between Masters via NJE or LU 6.2. For more information on Masters and Slaves, refer to the ESP Workload Manager Installation Guide.

Multiple Masters and Slaves

The following diagram illustrates the multiple JES node configuration:


LU 6.2 MASTER ESP MASTER ESP

QUEUE FILE

QUEUE FILE

SLAVE ESP

SLAVE ESP

SLAVE ESP

SLAVE ESP

137

Frequently Used Commands

Overview

This chapter discusses some of the more commonly used ESP Operator commands. These are the commands you likely use on a day-to-day basis.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics: Topic APPLJOB (AJ) Command List Application (LAP) Command List Job (LJ) Command List Tracked Job (LTJ) Command See Page 139 140 141 142

138

APPLJOB (AJ) Command

Overview

The APPLJOB command is used to control Applications, subApplications and jobs defined within Applications. The short form of this command is AJ.

AJ command

Using the APPLJOB (AJ) command, you can: Resubmit a job using the original data set using the RESUB keyword. Resubmit a job using an alternate JCL data set (COPYJCL library for instance) using the DATASET keyword. Bypass a job that is no longer required using the BYPASS keyword. As soon as its dependencies are met, the job is marked complete. Successor jobs are posted as in a normal job completion. Unbypass a job that is bypassed at any time up to the normal point of submission. Simulate normal completion of a job using the COMPLETE keyword. This immediately posts successor jobs. It can be used in a situation where the job failed, but a rerun is not necessary. The command can also be used prior to job execution. Remove predecessor relationships from a job using the DROPDEP keyword. This marks all the predecessor links as satisfied. Hold or release a job using the HOLD or RELEASE keywords respectively.

Examples of AJ command

The following example shows the use of the AJ command with the HOLD, COMPLETE, BYPASS and RESUB keywords:
AJ AJ AJ AJ 1234 HOLD REPORT.CHECK COMPLETE APPL(AP1) XYZJOB BYPASS APPL(ACJOBS) BADJOB RESUB DATASET(PROD.COPY.JCL) APPL(NIGHTLY.-1)

139

List Application (LAP) Command

Overview

The LAP command is used to list the information about an Application.

Issuing LAP

To issue the LAP command, type the following in Page mode:


LAP TEST1 ALL

The above command requests a display of the Application TEST1. The following example shows sample output from a LAP command1:
LAP TEST1 ALL APPL TEST1 GEN 2 CREATED AT 09:04 ON THURSDAY MARCH 19TH, 1998 JOB1, HC=0 PREDECESSORS: (NONE) SUCCESSORS: JOB2 JOB2, HC=1 PREDECESSORS: SUCCESSORS: JOB6, HC=1 PREDECESSORS: SUCCESSORS: JOB9, HC=1 PREDECESSORS: SUCCESSORS: JOB11, HC=1 PREDECESSORS: SUCCESSORS: JOB12, HC=2 PREDECESSORS: SUCCESSORS: JOB1 JOB6 JOB2 JOB11, JOB9 JOB6 JOB12 JOB6 JOB12 JOB9, JOB11 (NONE)

Output of LAP

HC indicates the number of immediate predecessors to a job.

140

List Job (LJ) Command

Overview

The LJ command is used to display the information about a job.

Issuing LJ

To issue the LJ command, type the following in Page mode:


LJ TESTJOB

The above command requests a display of the job TESTJOB.

Output of LJ

The following example shows the output of the command


LJ PAYD002A:

141

List Tracked Job (LTJ) Command

Overview

The LTJ command, on its own, displays the tracked job definition. If you want more information, issue the LTJ command with the Index option. It includes more information, such as the JES job number, Reader on time, date, status, execution time and CPU time. If you want more details about a job, generate a History Report.

Issuing LTJ

To issue the LTJ command, type the following:


LTJ jobname

Output of LTJ

The following example shows an LTJ command and the resulting output:
LTJ A

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List Tracked Job (LTJ) Command, Continued

Issuing LTJ Index

To issue the LTJ command with the Index option, type the following:
LTJ jobname I

Output of LTJ Index

The following example shows an LTJ command with the Index option, and the resulting output:
LTJ A I

143

Using ESP Operator Commands Overview

Introduction

ESP Workload Manager provides many operator commands for your use. This chapter contains a brief description of each command.

In this chapter

This chapter contains the following topics: Topic ESP Operator Commands ESP Backup Commands Distributed Processing Commands See Page 145 150 151

144

ESP Operator Commands

Overview

ESP Workload Manager provides many operator commands for your use. These commands are documented fully in the ESP Workload Manager Command Reference. However, they are listed here with a brief description of their purpose and when you might use them. You can also refer to the ESP Workload Manager Command Quick Reference for the syntax of the commands.

Authority required

OPER authority is required to issue any of the operator commands listed in this chapter.

Entering a command

To enter an ESP modify command, specify:


F ESP,command text

where ESP is the name of the started task procedure.

Issuing command from TSO

To issue a command from an authorized TSO userid, prefix all ESP operator commands with OPER. For example, from Page mode:
OPER LISTQ

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ESP Operator Commands, Continued

The commands

The commands listed here are those you probably use in your day to day work: Command ABENDLIM ALERTDEF APPLJOB (AJ) BACKOUT BUILDDTE CALLRTN CLASS CELLTRC CKPTRACE CLRSYSMS CMDPRFX CONSOLE CPU CRITPATH DAB DATEFORM DELAYINT DFPNODE DN DQ DSTRDLY DSTREXCL DSTRST EICLASS ESPCTR Description Displays or sets Abend queue size Displays or controls Alert definitions Controls jobs, subApplications or Applications Backs out this release of ESP to a specified earlier release (4.4 and up) Causes ESP to rebuild its list of data sets scanned for data set triggering Calls an external utility routine Displays and controls class queues Traces storage cell usage Traces all storage acquisitions and releases in checkpoint space Clears all system messages interception Allows you to substitute a single character for the string F ESP Displays or sets the primary console Displays the CPU definition Enables or disables Critical path analysis Displays all or selected jobs from the abend queue Sets the date format in schedule statements Sets the interval for re-triggering an Event when required data sets are not available Displays or sets the default P-Node Displays the names of jobs on the P-Node queues Displays the names of all or selected P-Node queues Used to delay data set triggered Events or data set trigger objects when data set activity occurs Flags an entry in the Data Set Trigger Exclude list as invalid Controls data set triggering activity Controls Event initiator class definition and manipulation Displays ESP internal activities relating to Events, Applications and jobs.
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ESP Operator Commands, Continued

The commands (continued)

Command EVENT EVENTSET HISTFILE INET JESCOMCH JOBINFO (JI) JTPEXCL LAX LCMDPRFX LDFLTU LDSN LDTREL LISTAPTF LISTCKPT LISTEVS LISTHIST LISTJTML LISTQ LISTSADL LISTSCH LISTTRAK LISTXMEZ LJ LOADJTDT LOADSCHF LOADUPDT LSYS

Description Starts Event definition mode Defines or alters the definition of an Event data set Specifies the identifiers of the History files to scan to generate a report Displays and controls TCP/IP attributes Specifies the JES command prefix Displays all or selected information from a job documentation entry for a job Provides a means to exclude a named program from affecting job tracking completion status Displays Application external linkages Displays the default command prefix Displays the default user id Displays system data sets allocated to ESP Displays the entries from the Data set Trigger Exclude list Displays information on the current status of the Application data set Displays statistics about the Checkpoint data set Displays the status of any or all Event databases Displays the status of the History data set Displays internal tracking model data Displays information about the Queue data set Displays the current SADLINKs Displays the current schedule Displays the status of the Trackfile data set Displays cross-memory tracking elements Displays job status Loads the job tracking definition table Copies schedule information from a sequential work file to a VSAM file that can be viewed from CSF Loads the User Profile Definition Table Displays system information
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147

ESP Operator Commands, Continued

The commands (continued)

Command LSYSMSGS MSG

MSGLIMIT MSGPRFX MSGTYPE

NODE NTRCLASS POST PREALLOC PURGSCHF QUIESCE QUPDATE RACROUTE RESTART RESDEF RESDFLT RESREFR SAFOPTS SHUTDOWN

Description Displays system message information Modifies the routing or descriptor codes of a message or range of messages. The error level of a message can also be modified. Allows you to limit the number of console messages generated by an Event Alters the message ID prefix for all messages generated by the subsystem Modifies the routing or descriptor codes of an entire class of messages. A class of messages is a group with the same error level i.e. information, warning, error and severe error. Together with CPU, defines the resource topology of your network Specifies a job execution class to exclude from tracking Posts a job as having completed processing at a P-Node Controls the use of pre-allocated data sets Purges the SCHDFILE Requests that ESP enter the quiesced state. Event execution is deferred. Forces ESP to do a JES status and update P-Node queue information Specifies whether ESP should issue a SAF RACINIT before Event execution Requests that ESP leave the quiesced state. Event execution can restart. Used to define, display, delete or update resources Identifies default resources Used in conjunction with real resources to refresh the device list if resources are added or deleted dynamically Controls processing options for the SAF interface Requests termination of ESP
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ESP Operator Commands, Continued

The commands (continued)

Command SPINLOG SPUSER STATUS SYSMSGS TRACE TRACEDEF TRACKING TRACKOPT TRDFLT TRIGGER UNALLOC USERMOD XMITMDL

Description Used to spin ESPs audit log to a sysout class Defines the name of a user who is to perform the initial definitions in the user definition data set Used to display the current ESP processing status Intercepts messages that are routed to the system message data set Activates the trace facility and allows trace options to be set Defines the data set(s) to be used for recording trace data Used to enable or disable the ESP tracking facility Sets tracking options Specifies an installation default to be used when an Event is triggered manually Requests the immediate execution of an Event Used to unallocate a data set from ESP Used to define the ESP user modification Tells ESP which tracking models are to be transmitted, and to which node

149

ESP Backup Commands

Overview

The commands listed here are those you use to back up ESP data sets: Command BKUPUDEF BKUPEVS BKUPINDEX BKUPJNDX BKUPHIST Backs up the . . . User Definition data set Event data set Index data set Job Index data set History data set

150

Distributed Processing Commands

Overview

The commands listed here are those you use when running off-MVS workload: Command AGENT Description Displays the contents of the Agent definition file (AGENTDEF) and controls the flow of messages to the Agent Defines the Managers receiver function for communication with non-MVS Agents Loads the Agent Definition file Identifies the program modules ESP uses to support nonMVS job types

AGENTRCV LOADAGDF WOBDEF

151

Glossary of Terms Glossary

Term Alert

Application Application Wait

Audit log

Authorization string Calendar

CCFAIL

CLANG

Explanation A mechanism you define to ESP to trigger ESP activity when specific actions take place in your Application. For example, you can use ESP to trigger an Event when a job fails. See ESP Application. A status in which the execution of an Application has to wait until a previous generation of the Application completes. An audit trail of ESP activity. It stores information on administration activities, operator commands, and Application and Event processing. One of four job related fields that is used to identify the ownership of a job. A collection of definitions of holidays, special days and special periods that are unique to your installation. Abbreviation for condition code fail. CCFAIL statements define conditions, which, if met, should cause the job to fail. Control language. This is a high level programming language developed for ESP.
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Glossary, Continued

Term Condition code COPYJCL Consolidated Status Facility Descriptor code

ESP Application ESP Procedure External job Event

Event data set Event group EVENTSET Group

HISTFILE

Explanation A code indicating the results of processing a job step. Location of a copy of the submitted JCL. An ESP facility for displaying and manipulating the workload. A one or more digit code used to describe the characteristics of a message to an MVS console. A group of related jobs and tasks. A collection of stored instructions to be executed by ESP when invoked by an Event. A job defined in an ESP Procedure that ESP submits from another Procedure. A basic unit of work to ESP. An Event starts an active function such as sending a message or invoking an ESP Procedure. A VSAM data set where ESP stores Event definitions. Group of ESP Events with the same Event prefix (first name). Event data set. A high-level index, to which specific users are allowed access. Normally a group is a collection of users with common access requirements. History file.
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153

Glossary, Continued

Term History file Job index data set Job monitor

Job tracking Job tracking definition table Link Manual job

Model Page mode P-Node

Post Predecessor job Qualifier Resource

Explanation A VSAM data set used to store historical information. A VSAM data set used to store an index to the most recent executions of a job. An ESP facility for monitoring a jobs progress at any stage of processing and for taking action at significant points. An ESP facility to track job data in real time as jobs are processed. A table used to specify the characteristics of jobs, STCs and TSUs you want to track. A task in an Application that does not require manual completion. A job that ESP does not submit as part of either an ESP Application or a DJC/JES3 job network. A definition of your environment (e.g. CPUs, initiators, resources). A method to communicate with ESP using ISPF, producing scrollable output from ESP. Processing node. A processing stage through which a job must pass during its time on the system. To mark complete. For example, you can post a job complete. Any job that must complete before another job can be released. An addition to the jobs name, used to uniquely identify similar jobs. An item of hardware, a software resource or an abstract condition.
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154

Glossary, Continued

Term REXX

Route code SAD file

SAF

Schedule Signal Special day Special period

SubApplication Subsystem Successor job

Explanation Restructured eXtended eXecutor. This is a high level, procedural language developed by IBM. You can invoke the REXX language interpreter from ESP to extend ESPs capabilities. A one or more digit code used to route a message to an MVS console. Scheduled activity data set file; a sequential data set ESP uses to store scheduled activity information on jobs. System Authorization Facility; a generic set of operating system interfaces that allows a security product to implement access control against the components of the operating system. Also used to refer to the use of the interface. A list of Events to execute, sorted in time sequence. A manual or automated task used for scheduling. A day with special significance for scheduling at your installation. A period of processing with special significance for scheduling at your installation. An example is a fiscal month. A group of jobs within an Application. An MVS facility that ESP uses to manage and control requests among its components. Any job that depends on the completion of another job before it can be released.
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155

Glossary, Continued

Term Symbolic variable

Explanation An integer or character string whose value ESP substitutes at processing time. SYMLIB Symbolic variable library: data set(s) or data set members used to store symbolic variables. System message interception A facility used to intercept system messages as they are written to the system message data set. System security product A product installed to implement system security. Also known as the host security system or product. Task An element of an Application that requires completion. For example, a task may represent the checking of a report. Tracking model A centralized definition of the attributes and processing phases of a group of jobs. TRAKFILE Tracking file; a non-VSAM data set used to store job-tracking data. userid A short (8 bytes or less) field used to identify a system user. It can represent an actual person or an active program, job or routine.

156

157

A AA........................................................................... 27 Agent commands................................................... 150 AJ command ......................................................... 138 altering default presentation field length ................. 35 altering default presentation titles ........................... 35 APPLHOLD............................................................ 25 Application statements ............................................ 56 Applications completing.......................................................... 27 description .......................................................... 11 displaying ..................................................... 27, 65 generations ......................................................... 55 holding................................................................ 27 overview............................................................. 52 releasing from hold............................................. 27 removing from wait ............................................ 27 statements ........................................................... 56 APPLJOB command ....................................... 69, 138 AS ........................................................................... 28 Asterisks for masking....................................................... 126 B backup commands................................................. 149 BE ........................................................................... 28 BP ........................................................................... 28 browsing an Event................................................... 28 browsing COPYJCL................................................ 29 browsing last executed JCL..................................... 29 BY........................................................................... 29 bypassing a job................................................ 29, 104 BYS......................................................................... 28 C CA........................................................................... 27 calendars ................................................................. 96 Checkpoint data set,cold start ................................. 18 CLASS command.................................................. 119 class name,assigning ............................................. 123 class restrictors,examples ...................................... 127 class,Event prefix as.............................................. 119 COLD START ........................................................ 20 color options,specifying in a view........................... 35 commands AJ 138 APPLJOB................................................... 69, 138 backup .............................................................. 149 distributed processing....................................... 150 for Agents......................................................... 150 LAP .................................................................. 139 LJ 140

LSAR................................................................ 131 LTJ ................................................................... 141 non-MVS.......................................................... 150 operator ............................................................ 144 TRIGGER .......................................................... 86 COMPLETE ........................................................... 25 completing a job.............................................. 29, 102 completing an entire Application ............................ 27 Consolidated Status Facility,description ................. 12 contention, data sets .............................................. 117 controlling multiple Events ................................... 124 CQFORMAT .......................................................... 18 CS............................................................................ 28 CSF changing colors .................................................. 42 defining a view ................................................... 34 deleting completed jobs...................................... 24 description .......................................................... 12 Extensions .......................................................... 31 filter criteria........................................................ 36 CSF commands AA...................................................................... 27 CA ...................................................................... 27 HA...................................................................... 27 HR ...................................................................... 29 IJ 29 IJA...................................................................... 29 IJB ...................................................................... 29 L 29 LA ...................................................................... 27 LI 29 LJ 29 LR....................................................................... 29 R 29 UWA .................................................................. 27 D data set contention................................................. 117 data set triggering.................................................... 76 DD........................................................................... 29 deferred Events,overdue queue....................................... 118 queue,flushing .................................................. 119 defining an Event .................................................... 74 delayed Events ..................................................... 115 DELAYSUB statement ........................................... 56 deleting completed jobs .......................................... 24 dependencies,dropping.......................................... 110 displaying Applications ................................................. 27, 65 dependencies ...................................................... 29 index entries ....................................................... 29 Info records ........................................................ 29

158

job resource waits............................................... 29 schedules ............................................................ 78 step-level statistics.............................................. 29 distributed,commands ........................................... 150 dropping all predecessors .................................................. 29 all resource dependencies................................... 29 dependencies .................................................... 110 individual dependencies ..................................... 29 resources........................................................... 110 DUEOUT statement ................................................ 56 E EE ........................................................................... 28 EP28 Event class,manipulating....................................... 123 Event data sets deferred queue.................................................. 118 respecifying after cold start ................................ 18 suspended ......................................................... 118 Events assigning class .................................................. 123 browsing ............................................................. 28 bypassing execution............................................ 82 class.................................................................. 119 controlling multiple .......................................... 124 delayed ............................................................. 115 description .......................................................... 11 editing................................................................. 28 hold................................................................... 119 overdue............................................................. 116 OVERDUE......................................................... 81 overdue count ................................................... 116 postponing execution.......................................... 80 RESUME............................................................ 82 sending a message .............................................. 72 simulating ........................................................... 87 stopping execution temporarily ........................ 120 suspend............................................................. 119 SUSPEND .......................................................... 82 suspending individual....................................... 119 to invoke an ESP Procedure ............................... 72 to issue an MVS command................................. 72 to submit JCL ..................................................... 72 triggering manually............................................. 83 EVENTSET ............................................................ 77 EVENTSET command,OPEN option ................... 118 Eventset suspension,reversing............................... 118 EXEC ...................................................................... 25 EXTERNAL ........................................................... 25 External job............................................................. 58 F FAIL........................................................................ 25 specifying freeform ............................................ 43

flush deferred queue.............................................. 119 freeform filtering..................................................... 43 examples............................................................. 48 keywords ............................................................ 45 G generation number................................................... 55 H HA........................................................................... 27 History Reports ..................................................... 130 Hold restrictor ....................................................... 125 hold with a reason ................................................. 101 holding Application................................................. 27, 114 job .................................................................... 100 jobs with a reason............................................... 29 holidays, defining.................................................... 96 HS ........................................................................... 28 I I/O error,Event data set ......................................... 118 INPUT..................................................................... 25 inserting a job.................................................. 29, 108 inserting a job after a selected job........................... 29 inserting a job before a selected job........................ 29 J JANCWAIT ............................................................ 25 JES nodes,multiple Masters .................................. 136 jobs bypassing.......................................................... 104 completing........................................................ 102 External .............................................................. 58 holding with a reason.......................................... 29 inserting...................................................... 29, 108 manual ................................................................ 59 ON-REQUEST................................................... 57 requesting ......................................................... 107 resubmitting...................................................... 106 K keywords,freeform filtering..................................... 45 L LA ........................................................................... 27 LAP command ...................................................... 139 links......................................................................... 60 listing Application.................................................. 27 LJ command .......................................................... 140 LS28 LSAR command.................................................... 131 LTJ command ....................................................... 141

159

M MANHOLD ............................................................ 25 MANSUB ............................................................... 25 manual job............................................................... 59 Master and Slave................................................... 134 multiple class restrictors........................................ 127 O ON-REQUEST job ................................................. 57 operator commands ............................................... 144 overdue count................................................................. 118 Events............................................................... 116 keyword............................................................ 118 queue ................................................................ 118 OVERDUE ............................................................. 81 P P-Nodes APPLHOLD ....................................................... 25 COMPLETE....................................................... 25 EXTERNAL....................................................... 25 FAIL................................................................... 25 INPUT................................................................ 25 JANCWAIT ....................................................... 25 MANHOLD ....................................................... 25 PREDWAIT ....................................................... 25 READY .............................................................. 25 RESWAIT .......................................................... 25 SANCWAIT....................................................... 25 SUBDELAY....................................................... 25 SUBERROR....................................................... 25 TASK ................................................................. 25 WAITING .......................................................... 25 postponing Event execution .................................... 80 PREDWAIT............................................................ 25 presentation fields ................................................... 40 presentation length .................................................. 40 presentation order.................................................... 39 presentation titles .................................................... 40 Procedures browsing ............................................................. 28 description .......................................................... 11 editing................................................................. 28 PURGSCHF command ........................................... 24 Q QFORM option ....................................................... 19 quiesced state,ESP ................................................ 120 quiescing ESP ......................................................... 17 R READY................................................................... 25 readying a job.......................................................... 30

releasing a job ......................................................... 29 releasing an Application from hold ......................... 27 RELOAD option ..................................................... 18 removing Application from wait status ................... 27 replying to an AS/400 message ............................... 30 reports History.............................................................. 130 History, description ............................................ 12 Scheduled Activity, description.......................... 12 requesting a job ............................................... 30, 107 resetting a time dependency .................................... 30 resetting time dependency..................................... 113 resetting User Status field ....................................... 30 RESOURCE statement............................................ 63 resources ................................................................. 63 resources,description............................................... 12 restart options QFORM.............................................................. 19 RELOAD............................................................ 18 restarting a job......................................................... 29 restarting after SMF problems................................. 18 restrictors examples........................................................... 127 searching queue ................................................ 127 resubmitting a job............................................ 29, 106 RESUME ................................................................ 82 RESWAIT............................................................... 25 RQS......................................................................... 28 running off-MVS workload................................... 150 S SANCWAIT ........................................................... 25 SCHDFILE ............................................................. 24 schedule criteria ...................................................... 94 Scheduled Activity Report .................................... 131 schedules Checkpoint data set ............................................ 18 displaying ........................................................... 77 rebuilding ........................................................... 18 reinitializing checkpoint ..................................... 18 scanning.............................................................. 18 system outages.................................................. 116 scheduling Event to execute once ........................... 77 selecting Filter information ..................................... 35 shared spool, Master and multiple Slaves ............. 135 simulating an Event.............................................................. 87 description of...................................................... 90 next occurrence .................................................. 88 SMF problems, restarting after................................ 18 sort order ................................................................. 41 sort order of presentation fields............................... 35 special days, defining .............................................. 96 special periods, defining.......................................... 96 specifying presentation fields.................................. 35

160

START command ................................................... 16 statements DELAYSUB....................................................... 56 DUEOUT ........................................................... 56 RESOURCE ....................................................... 63 TAG ................................................................... 57 status fields status................................................................... 26 system................................................................. 26 user ..................................................................... 26 STOP command ...................................................... 21 subApplications....................................................... 66 defining .............................................................. 66 bypassing............................................................ 28 completing.......................................................... 28 displaying ........................................................... 28 holding................................................................ 28 releasing from hold............................................. 28 removing from wait ............................................ 28 requesting ........................................................... 28 un-bypassing....................................................... 28 un-requesting ...................................................... 28 SUBDELAY ........................................................... 25 SUBERROR ........................................................... 25 SUSPEND............................................................... 82 suspended Eventset ............................................... 118 suspending Events................................................. 119

T TAG statement ........................................................ 57 TASK ...................................................................... 25 tasks ........................................................................ 59 time dependency, resetting .................................... 113 trigger an Event automatically on data set activity.. 76 TRIGGER command............................................... 86 U UBS......................................................................... 28 un-bypassing a bypassed job ................................... 30 un-requesting a requested job.................................. 30 un-waiting a job from job-ancestor wait.................. 30 updating an Info record ........................................... 30 URS......................................................................... 28 User status field....................................................... 26 UWA....................................................................... 27 UWS........................................................................ 28 V view,defining in CSF............................................... 34 viewing Encore panels ............................................ 30 W WAITING............................................................... 25 Workstation............................................................. 13

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Readers Comment Form


ESP v.5.2 OG-02

We want to hear from you!

Please use this form to communicate your comments about this publication, its organization or subject matter with the understanding that Cybermation may use or distribute whatever information you supply in any way it believes appropriate without incurring any obligation to you.

If your comment does not need a reply (for example, pointing out a typing error), check this box and do not include your name and address below. If your comment is applicable, we will include it in the next revision of the manual.

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164

Mail this form to: Cybermation Inc. 80 Tiverton Court Markham, Ontario L3R 0G4 Attn: Documentation Dept. or Fax it to: Documentation Dept. (905) 479-4614

165