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SINAI NEWS

Issue 18, Volume 1

A bi-monthly publication

January-February 2014 • Tevet-Adar 5774
Scholar-in-Residence: Rabbi Richard Address February 28 - March 2
"Sacred Aging - Exploring the Impact of the Longevity Revolution." What does it mean for you? Rabbi Richard F. Address is the Senior Rabbi at Congregation M’kor Shalom in Cherry Hill, NJ. Called to the congregation after 33 years with the Union for Reform Judaism, he previously served as the specialist and congregation consultant for the North American Reform Movement in the program areas of Caring Community and Family Concerns. His work has been based on the belief that a congregation, to be a true “caring community”, must be founded on a theology of sacred relationships. A major part of Address’s work has been in the development and implementation of the project on Sacred Aging. This project has been responsible for creating awareness and resources for congregations on the implication of the emerging longevity revolution with growing emphasis on the aging of the baby boom generation. This aging revolution has begun to impact all aspects of Jewish communal and congregational life.

In this issue
Rabbi’s Corner Cantor’s Notes Shabbat Schedule Reflections, Presidents’ Message Adult Sinai Connections Lifelong Jewish Learning What’s Happening Women at Sinai Brotherhood Israel Committee Membership Committee, Green Team Social Action Committee Chesed, Mitbach Sinai “Scene” at Sinai Supporting Sinai 2 2-3 4 5 6 7-12 13-19 20 21 22 23 24-25 26 27-28 29-30

Schedule for Scholar in Residence * Rabbi Richard Address * Friday, February 28th
6:15 pm KABBALAT SHABBAT SERVICE
"Judaism's Approach to Health, Wholeness & Growing Older" Judaism has always stressed a "holistic" approach to medicine and healing. Why is that so and what does it mean for us today in our journey of aging? 7:30 pm Dinner (adult only by reservation) and continuing conversation w/ Rabbi Address. Register by Feb. 23 at: http://scholarinresidencedinner.eventbrite.com

Saturday, March 1st
11:00 am Brunch (following minyan) "Aging Baby Boomers: Impact & Ideas for Communities"
Register at: http://scholarinresidencebrunch.eventbrite.com

4:00 pm "Go Forth: Healthy Aging in Life’s Third Stage"
An examination of Torah texts that provide a guideline for how to pursue a life of healthy aging based on the "theology of relationships". What role does community play in our own search for meaning and purpose?

Sunday, March 2nd
10:00 am “The Art of Care Giving”
How can we best support and care for our loved ones as they age? As the Jewish family changes over time, what meaning do the Torah’s commands to “honor” and “respect” parents hold for us today? What wisdom in particular does Judaism offer when we face issues like dementia and Alzheimer’s? How can we best navigate these myriad issues – and their effects, psychological, economic, and spiritual?

January/February Calendars 31-32 In the Sinai Family Those We Remember Contributions 31-32 34 35

Rabbi David B. Cohen • Cantor Lauren Phillips • Rabbi Emeritus Jay R. Brickman Director of Youth Education Barb Shimansky, MSW • Director of Administration Karen Lancina • Program Coordinator Jen Friedman Assistant to Rabbi and Cantor Karen Hintz• School Administrator Jeri Danz • Bookkeeper Ilene Wasserman • Sinai News Nicole S ether Congregation Sinai • 8223 N. Port Washington Road• Fox Point, WI 53217 414.352.2970• 414.352.0944 (fax)• www.congregationsinai.org

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Rabbi’s Corner
A Special Evening Vigil on Immigration
You could have heard a pin drop. Surrounded by her four young children, Jennifer Martinez explained how her husband of fourteen years, Jaime, had been deported the month before, despite an Obama administration policy to scale back deportations of undocumented workers without criminal records. She spoke to a crowd of over a hundred participants at Congregation Sinai’s Immigration Seder, where Sinai members played host to families from Milwaukee’s Latino and Hispanic community. "They wouldn't even let us hug him," said Martinez, holding the youngest of her four children, an infant, who had begun to cry. Attorneys had worked for his release, to no avail. The next week he was deported to Mexico. Several months later, Jennifer and her children moved to Mexico. She said: "It's that or not have a family," she said. We Jews have always had a connection to issues surrounding immigration. From Canaan, to Egypt, to Israel to exile; our master narrative of sojourns and exiles explains why we are called the wandering Jews. It is why we know what it means to be “a stranger in a strange land.” Our experience of being the “other” in Egypt and elsewhere become a basis for empathy towards those who are “other” today, those who suffer for their economic station, their skin color, their religious beliefs or their sexual orientation. It is why the Torah is very clear about how we ought to treat immigrants. On no less than thirty-six occasions it reminds us that we “were strangers in the land of Egypt” and that our historical experience should serve as a deep well of empathy. If our people’s ancient origins were not sufficient, our own families’ experience as immigrants to America should lead us to identify with, and work on behalf of, immigrants. America provided for our families a chance to set roots in a land of infinite opportunity. Should we offer those who followed any less? Some feel that, yes, we owe very little to today’s immigrants. They say that if immigrants are undocumented they should have no protections from the avarice of employers, who regularly underpay and provide little benefits to workers. Our tradition’s book of Mysticism, the Zohar, explains why this approach is morally bankrupt. It says that when Noah emerged from the ark he opened his eyes and saw the world completely destroyed. He began crying and said: “God! If you destroyed your world because of human beings then why did you [bother to] create them? One or the other You should do: either do not create humanity, or do not destroy the world.” How did God respond? “[Noah, before the flood] I gave you ample time to ask for mercy for the world! But as soon as you heard that you would be safe in the ark, the evil of the world did not touch your heart and you built the ark to save yourself. Now that the world has been destroyed you open your mouth to utter questions and pleas?” Pulling up the ladder behind us, leaving those who followed stranded below, is simply not a Jewish option. We’ve participated in the once a month, vigil outside the Immigration Control and Enforcement office (I.C.E.). It’s contingent on weather, which at this time of year is iffy; what’s more, standing outside the I.C.E. office is not a pleas ant place to be for those whose status with I.C.E. is currently under review. Sinai’s Social Action committee continues to work with Voces de la Frontera, a group that works on behalf of immigrants in our area. We have sponsored speakers at Sinai – on Friday, January 17th the Director of La Voces, Christine Neumann-Ortiz, will speak to us….. In addition, on Tuesday night, March 4th, we are fortunate to be hosting the monthly prayer vigil. We’ll be joined by our teenagers, as well as families and individuals from the Latino and Hispanic communities. Through bilingual prayer and song we will offer comfort for those who are themselves or have loved ones who are currently in the immigration system. Come and let your voice of support be heard! Rabbi David B. Cohen

Cantor’s Notes
With Much Gratitude
It was a joy to see so many of you at my installation in November. I am still kvelling from the warm welcome that I have received from the Sinai family and I continue to be grateful to be part of this community. Rabbi Cohen and I were especially honored to share the bima with one of my teachers, Cantor Benjie Ellen Schiller. We were also joined by Zach Meyer on drums, Cantor David Barash, our accompanist, Karen Horwitz and our wonderful choir. For those of you who were unable to unable to attend, I wanted to share some of the words of Torah that I offered during the service: I am overwhelmed with gratitude to see so many people here – faces that have become so familiar to me that it’s hard to believe that I’ve only been at Sinai for a few months, not to mention the added bonus of having my parents and Benjie able to celebrate with us as well. Benjie, thank you for your beautiful words and melodies. It is a real treat for Rabbi Cohen and me to share the bima with you tonight! I am honored to be formally installed as Congrega-

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Cantor’s Notes (continued)
tion Sinai’s cantor. I look forward to getting to know all of you even better as we worship, celebrate, and share life’s milestones together. This is an especially fitting week for my Installation because our Torah portion, Vayeshev, and my journey to becoming a cantor both begin with the story of Joseph. When I was in eighth grade, my congregation required me to be registered for religious school up until the completion of my Bat Mitzvah. With a date in late October, I was less than thrilled with the idea of signing up for my synagogue’s Hebrew High School program. My attitude changed once I was cast as the Narrator in the youth group production of “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat”. The show kept me returning to the synagogue months after my Bat Mitzvah was over and enabled me to develop what have become lifelong relationships with my peers and teachers. Those of you who have performed in shows or played on a sports team know about the bond that tends to develop between cast mates and teammates. I was lucky that the connections I made during this production of Joseph were furthered through Jewish learning and social activities. At first my participation was mainly because I liked spending time with the other teens. Soon, I developed a real thirst for Jewish learning and knowledge. I learned to lead services and worked closely with my cantor to learn the special trope we use for the Megillot on festivals. I met regularly with a woman in my congregation who survived the Holocaust and heard her firsthand account as a hidden child in Germany. During these teenage years, the seeds for my path towards becoming a cantor were planted. In this week’s Torah portion, Joseph displays a remarkable talent for interpreting dreams. His brothers mock him for this skill, but his father, Jacob – “Shamar et hadavar“ – he kept the matter in mind – he had a feeling that Joseph’s dreams would amount to something. This is not unlike what happened in my own family. Back then, my dreams were Broadway – and yes, my brothers got annoyed (probably with good reason) by my incessant singing through entire soundtracks at a time. But my parents, like Jacob, believed in me – they kept the matter in mind. They were among the first people to suggest that I channel this energy into becoming a cantor. Though it took me several years to come to this decision for myself, my vision as a cantor is deeply intertwined with the fact that I have been fortunate to be part of many sacred and supportive communities. I feel compelled to “pay it forward” by creating ways to give others a chance to feel like they belong to something – an opportunity to express their Judaism in a way that holds personal meaning within the context of a larger, shared community. Even if they don’t know what they want their Jewish life to look like, it is my hope that people at least take the time to explore it and figure out where they fit. I consider myself extremely lucky that my late Bat Mitzvah date allowed me to do this in spite of my initial resistance. I feel particularly blessed to begin my career here at Sinai, a place that is small enough to allow for the development of close relationships between congregants and clergy, but large enough to produce creative and dynamic programing across all demographics. This is a community that thinks before it acts; a community that looks at the bigger picture and strives to create meaning through every service, class, or program. These are just some of the reasons why Congregation Sinai is much more than a house of worship – it is a home. I want to express my deepest gratitude to the many people who have helped to make Sinai a home for me. Thank you to the Cantor Search committee and its chairs, Jen Moglowsky and Rick Meyer. The process they used allowed me to see firsthand the ways in which Sinai thinks of the little things. Printing a pamphlet with bios of all of the committee members enabled me to see Sinai as a place where individuals matter. It also enabled me to get to know the committee members long before travelling to Milwaukee. Thank you to Pam Scheferman for helping me make a smooth transition to life in Milwaukee and for planning several programs upon my arrival here in town that enabled me to meet lots of different members of the Sinai community. Thank you to Larry, Juan Carlos, and Dick, our tireless custodial staff, for all of their hard work in preparing for tonight and always. To Tracy and Cheryl, our kitchen coordinators - for making everything look so beautiful. I am looking forward to the Oneg celebration provided by the Women of Sinai, Mitbach Sinai and the Brotherhood. Thank you to all of the musicians who added your talents tonight – to our fantastic choir, to Karen, our accompanist extraordinaire, to Zach, to Cantor David Barash for coming over after his own services at Emanu-El – I am so grateful that you were able to be here tonight. Thank you Marc Cohen, who sadly, was unable to join us tonight, but has been supportive and instrumental in my transition. I must also thank our phenomenal staff – Andrew, Barb, Ilene, Jeri, Jen, Karen, Karen, and Rabbi Cohen – for making three hour staff meetings go by in the blink of an eye. I love working with all of you. An extra special thanks to Jen Friedman and Karen Lancina for going above and beyond in everything that you do, not just for tonight, but always. And to Rabbi Cohen, David: Thank you for being an incredible clergy partner and for constantly making me laugh. I knew from the moment you stepped in to accompany me for my audition that we would work extremely well together. It is a joy to work with you, both on and off the bima. Lastly, I want to thank Cantor Benjie Ellen Schiller for traveling here to be here tonight and for her beautiful words and wisdom; as well as my parents, for always encouraging me to follow my dreams – for “keeping the matter in mind,” so to speak. With warmest wishes for continued blessings in 2014, Cantor Lauren Phillips

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January-February Shabbat Service Schedule
Shabbat Bo Exodus 10:1 - 13:16 Jan 3 Shabbat Service 6:15 pm Jan 4 Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am Shabbat Tetzaveh Exodus 27:20 - 30:10 Feb 7 Shabbat Service 6:15 pm Feb 8 Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am

Shabbat Beshallach Exodus 13:17 - 17:16 Jan 10 Rockin’ Shabbat 6:15 pm Congregational Dinner 7:30 pm Jan 11 Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am

Shabbat Ki Tissa Exodus 30:11 - 34:35 Feb 14 Shabbat ShaPizza 5:30 pm Shabbat Unplugged 6:15 pm Feb 15 Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am Shabbat Vayakhel Exodus 35:1 - 38:20 Feb 21 Shabbat Service 6:15 pm Feb 22 Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am Shabbat Pekudei Exodus 38:21 - 40:38 Feb 28 Shabbat Service 6:15 pm Scholar-in-Residence Dinner 7:30 pm March 1 Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am March 2 Scholar-in-Residence Brunch 11 am Scholar-in-Residence 4 pm March 3 Scholar-in-Residence 10 am

Shabbat Yitro Exodus 18:1 - 20:23 Jan 17 Shabbat Service 6:15 pm Jan 18 Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am Shabbat Mishpatim Exodus 21:1 - 24:18 Jan 24 Shabbat Service 6:15 pm Jan 25 Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am Zachary Yopps Bar Mitzvah 10 am Shabbat Terumah Exodus 25:1 - 27:19 Jan 31 Shabbat Service 6:15 pm Feb 1 Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am

Young-at-Hearts Senior Singles Group
Young-at-Hearts is a social group for those looking to connect and make new friends in a social setting. This is not a grief group, or matchmaking group, but a social group intended to bring together people who may be divorced, lost a spouse or just want to regain the fun in life! Young-at-Hearts conducts monthly meetings and then often go to lunch together at Maxfield’s. Outings and activities include: card games, lunches, dinners, sporting events, mah jongg, theater etc. Young-at-Hearts is open to all Jewish seniors in the community. Meetings are held at Congregation Shalom, 7630 N. Santa Monica Blvd., Fox Point.

Next meetings:
Wed, January 8, 10:00-11:30 am followed by lunch at Maxfield’s Wed, February 12 , 10:00-11:30 am followed by lunch at Maxfield’s To sign up for a meeting contact Jen Friedman at jfriedman@congregationsinai.org or call 352-2970.

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Reflections
A Single God
The motivating concept that gave birth to Reform Judaism in the middle of the last century was that we were a religious and not an ethnic community. Recent opinion surveys indicate that most non-Orthodox Jews today identify themselves as non-religious members of a Jewish “peoplehood”. They do not believe in the God portrayed in our traditional literature. Many would acknowledge belief in the God of Aristotle, a deity devoid of personality, represented as a universal force or principle. This concept was introduced to our tradition in Maimonides’ classic work, “Guide to the Perplexed”, and finds contemporary expression in the writings of Mordecai Kaplan, founder of Reconstructionism. As one who believes in God, I find myself out of step with contemporary Jewish thought. Tracing back to the origin of my belief, I think it has to do with my keen interest in mythology when I first began to read. By the time I entered Sunday School in the third grade, I was a firm believer in many gods. Our teacher (Mrs. Kaufman) explained that Abraham’s father believed in many gods, but his son realized there was only one. I had sufficient faith in Abraham, and in Mrs. Kaufman, to be satisfied with a single God, and have believed in Him ever since. If contemporary religious school teachers wish to inculcate a God belief in their students, I suggest they follow a similar course of action. Teach belief in a multiplicity of gods in the first and second grades! Break the news in the third grade that there is only one God, and I believe the majority of your students will "buy in." Rabbi Jay R. Brickman

Presidents’ Message
As we write this letter, we are celebrating Thanksgivukkah, the convergence of Thanksgiving and Chanukah, which I understand will not happen again for 79,000 years. This unusual convergence allows us time to stop and reflect on all that we are thankful for. On a personal level, after our delicious family Thanksgiving meal, we lit the Chanukah candles, and it made our celebration especially meaningful! Over the last few weeks, the Board of Trustees made outreach phone calls to select congregants wishing them a sweet year and asking or surveying whether or not they felt engaged in the Sinai community. The most common reply received was that most members are happy with their involvement in Sinai and feel informed by either the weekly Sinai Enews, the bi-monthly Sinai newsletter (which you are reading now, Mazel Tov), housekeeping updates communicated at Religious School for Shabbat services, and updates on our website. For those that mentioned they would like to get more involved, more engaged, you can expect to receive a call or email. One area we plan to focus on, is getting our post B’nei Mizvah teens more engaged. As a matter of fact, the Union of Reform Judaism (URJ) is making this a major priority at the upcoming Biennial Meeting in San Diego next month. The URJ has developed a Youth Engagement Initiative, in an effort to quadruple the number of teens involved in URJ programs by 2020. The belief is that Teens that are involved in youth groups, camps, and other programs are more likely to join and become involved in congregational life as adults. We are very fortunate to have Milwaukee’s own Andrew Keene, NFTY National President, work with us as we develop these activities and programs. A few weeks ago, we celebrated the installation of our new cantor, Lauren Philips and were treated to some wonderful music provided by Lauren’s teacher, Cantor Benjie Ellen Schiller (who travelled in from upstate New York), Congregation Emanu-El B’ne Jeshurun’s Cantor David Barash (also a student of Cantor Benjie Ellen Schiller) and some select members of our Sinai Choir. It was a beautiful evening and Cantor Lauren really k’velled with pride and joy. On behalf of the other officers, and your fellow Sinai members who serve on our Board of Trustees, we wish you and yours a festive Thanksgiviukkah and a sweet and Happy New Year. B’Shalom, Dan Elias, Co-President Andrew Gollin, Co-President

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January-February 2014

Sinai Adult Connections

So you are finished with the carpooling, kids are out of the house…now what? Sinai Adult Connections is where mature adults (ages 50 and over) can enjoy interesting and informative talks and entertainment, become involved in a variety of community activities, and take the opportunity to socialize at Congregation Sinai. We would love to hear your ideas for opportunities and even a name for this particular segment of our community. Contact Jen Friedman at jfriedman@congregationsinai.org to share your ideas and lend a hand!

Just for Adults!

Shabbat Dinner and Conversation with Rabbi Address
Friday, February 28th
6:15 PM Shabbat Service with Rabbi Address 7:30 PM Shabbat Dinner & continuing conversation with Rabbi Address. Adults only. Registration required, please RSVP by February 23rd at: http://scholarinresidencedinner.eventbrite.com $18 per person Join us for the weekend too!

Conversations on Sacred Aging
"Adding to the Lifecycle: Jewish Rituals as We Age" with Cantor Lauren Phillips Sunday, January 26, 2013 10:30 am- Noon
For more information on the Sacred Aging Committee, contact Sally Moskol at 414-228-6371, skmoskol@gmail.com
Should we consider leaving an Ethical Will? Is there a Jewish “Bucket List”? Do you need help for yourself as you age, or for someone you love? These types of questions and more can be discussed in our Caring Coffee Hours.

Lend a Hand!
KOACH Thursday, January 30, 2014 This widely popular adult program brings together everyone from Milwaukee area newcomers, to semi-retired and retirees, to members of synagogues, and the Harry & Rose Samson Family Jewish Community Center. Chaverim Purim March 4, 2014 Join us in preparing and serving a light meal to the members of Haverim, the adult special needs Holiday Program. Interested in these important mitzvahs? Contact Jen Friedman at jfriedman@congregationsinai.org. See page 18 for more details!

Purim like you’ve never experienced it!
Whodunnit!
A night of adults only entertainment, celebration, intrigue, mystery, and forensic science!

Social Action Shabbat
January 17, 2014 at 6:15 PM
Christine Neumann-Ortiz will speak on immigration reform. Ms Ortiz is the founding Executive Director of Voces de la Frontera, a low-wage and immigrant workers center with chapters in Milwaukee and Racine, including a student chapter called Students United for Immigrant Rights with members from 3 high schools. Voces de la Frontera is increasingly recognized as Wisconsin’s leading voice for immigration reform.

Saturday, March 15th
7:30 pm - Megillah with desserts and spirits to follow (poisons will be screened) 8:00 pm – Whodunnit?

See page 15 for more information!

“A funny thing happened on the way to Sinai…”
Saturday, February 1, 2014 at 7:30 PM
Sinai Brotherhood will host an evening of stories and comedy with Marvin Berkowitz. This is an adult only event so mark your calendar and get your self ready for an evening of fun!

See page 21 for more info!

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Lifelong Jewish Learning
The Tribes of Israel: A Shared Homeland for a Divided People With Rabbi David Cohen & Rabbi Jacob Herber
Tuesdays, 7:30 - 9:00 PM January 7, 14, 21, 28 at Congregation Beth Israel Ner Tamid February 4, 11, 18, 25 at Congregation Sinai The second installment of the Hartman Institute’s iEngage series confronts the challenges of creating a Jewish and democratic public space in the modern State of Israel – a shared common space for a citizenry divided among tribal affiliations: religious, ideological, national (Israeli/Palestinian) and geographic. Co-taught by Senior Rabbinic Fellows of the Hartman Institute, Rabbi David Cohen (Sinai) and Rabbi Jacob Herber (CBINT), this class explores the relationships between orthodox, conservative and reform Jews in Israel, as well as the connections and challenges between Israel’s tribes and the North American Jewish tribe. RSVP at: http://tribesofisraelclass.eventbrite.com

Parent Education Sunday Morning Series Mishpacha: Raising a Jewish Family
10:00 AM Sundays, January 12, March 9
In tandem with the chairs of our Youth Education Committee, Rabbi Cohen will present a series of conversations on topics relating to Jewish parenting. Topics will include: How to talk to your children about God and spirituality; Death; The problem of evil and the Holocaust; Love, intimacy and sex; Who is a Jew – Jewish identity; Interfaith dating, and others. The first step in preparing to discuss these topics with our children is figuring out how we think about them. This class is open and available to all; children not required!

“In the Rabbi’s Study” with Rabbi Cohen and Guests
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM Sundays, February 9, May 4
February Special Guest, Elana Kahn-Oren Elana Kahn Oren is the Director of the Jewish Community Relations Council (JCRC). The JCRC speaks as the representative of the Jewish community on issues of public affairs and public policy. An example: The JCRC mobilized the Jewish community to stand in solidarity with the Sikh community after the shootings. In many respects, the JCRC stands at the crossroads of Jewish and American values. The Council implements a coordinated program of education, action, and advocacy for the Jewish community. It operates by consensus and is its deliberations are living proof that for every two Jews there are three opinions. Despite the range of feelings and opinions, the JCRC tries to represent the Jewish community in all of its complexity. Issues the JCRC has worked on recently include: The anti -semitic incident in Algoma Wisconsin last July; coordinating opposition to a proposed boycott at the Riverwest Public House, last August; issuing a statement of support for the proposed mosque in Brookfield; joining the Interfaith Conference in issuing a statement on religious intolerance; appearing on WUWM’s Lake Effect show on the topic of civility in discourse. Join us as Rabbi Cohen interviews Ms. Kahn Oren about the work she does, the passions and the disappointments it engenders, and how she sees the state of the Milwaukee’s Jewish community’s relations with the wider community.

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Lifelong Jewish Learning
Ongoing Adult Learning
HAZAK
Day: Tuesdays, January 28, February 25, March 25, April 22, May 20 Time: 1:00 PM Facilitator: Rabbi David B. Cohen HAZAK is an acronym: the het is for hokhma – wisdom, the zayen for zikna – maturity, and the kuf for kadima – looking ahead. Our mature congregants represent cumulative knowledge, the ability to judge as zakeyn in a mature fashion and the aspirations to move ahead. The HAZAK program is intended to engage our senior members by providing programs to address their interests, talents, and passions.

Lunch & Learn
Day: Mondays Time: 12:00 PM Facilitator: Rabbi David B. Cohen Pirke Avot (Sayings of our Ancestors) presents nuggets of wisdom from the most famous rabbis of the Talmud. Rabbi Akiva, Rabbi Hillel and many more teach such essential texts as "If I am not for myself who will be for me? If I am only for myself, what am I? And if not now, when?" Bring a bag lunch and join us as we begin learning Pirke Avot!

A Modern Rabbi’s Approach to the Bible
Day: Wednesdays Time: 9:30 AM Facilitator: Rabbi Jay Brickman Rabbi Brickman is a trained Jungian, a philosopher, and a practitioner of Tai Chi. If you haven’t studied with him now is the time!

Through the Eyes of Women
Day: Fridays Time: 9:30 AM Facilitator: Dr. Sherry Blumberg Using the Torah: A Woman's Commentary as a text, we are discussing the Torah, verse by verse using critical questions, feminist readings, modern midrash, traditional commentaries and women's poetry.

Acheinu (Men’s Spirituality Group)
Day: Sundays: January 5 (following Pancake Breakfast), February 23, March 30, April 27 Time: 8:30 - 10:00 AM With: Joe Glassman, Mitch Colton, and Rabbi David B. Cohen Acheinu is sponsored by Sinai’s Brotherhood. Share nosh & discuss spiritual & practical matters concerning God, work, family & more.

Shabbat Morning Torah Study
Day: Saturdays Time: 8:00 AM Facilitator: Rabbi Jay Brickman, Rabbi David B. Cohen Verse by verse, line by line, word by word, the Torah comes alive!

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Lifelong Jewish Learning
School News
Be happy, it’s Adar – twice! You are likely familiar with the system of leap years in our “regular” calendar – an extra day is added once every four years to account for the extra six or so hours it takes beyond 365 days for the earth to rotate around the sun. The Jewish calendar also has a leap year system, though it is a bit more complicated. This calendar is mainly lunar-based, and months are based on the cycles of the moon. However, there is a solar component to this calendar as well, since the festivals need to occur in particular seasons. Before this system was standardized, two witnesses would need to alert the Sanhedrin (Rabbinical Assembly) in Jerusalem that they had observed a new moon; the Sanhedrin would then decree that a new month had begun. However, every few years, when the new month of Adar began, the Rabbis would notice that the weather, crops, and growth on the trees were not quite right for the approach of Pesach, which fell in the following month of Nisan. When this occurred, they would insert an additional month of Adar as a means of “righting” the calendar. During the fourth century, a fixed calendar was created using mathematical and astronomical calculations, and this is the calendar still in use today. In this formulation, there is an extra month added seven times in each 19 year cycle – once every two or three years. As it turns out, 5774 is one of those years! Perhaps adding a second Adar to the calendar was initially a matter of convenience – so that Pesach would be celebrated according to the Torah, in the spring. But Adar is also a month when we are told to be happy. During Adar, we celebrate Purim, a holiday full of fun and silliness. Purim falls in the middle of the month, but our joyfulness is supposed to last all month long. So what happens when we add a second Adar? To paraphrase the old Wrigley’s commercial – we double our pleasure and double our fun! The “real” Adar, the one in which we celebrate Purim and which occurs every year, is actually the second one in a leap year. There is nothing particularly “special” that occurs in this second Adar – no holidays or extra celebrations. In the fall, the month of Cheshvan also has no holidays (other than Shabbat, of course!), and we refer to it as “Mar Cheshvan,” meaning that the month is considered bitter and sad. But this additional Adar carries no such burden – in fact, we are meant to have a full additional month of joy and celebration in our lives! So while it may have started as a matter of convenience, I do not think it is an accident that of all the months we could double, the winner is Adar. Judaism is a religion that promotes the appreciation of all that is good in the world. We say blessings to give thanks for all the wonders around us. The birth of a new child, a young adult becoming Bar or Bat Mitzvah, a wedding – we are commanded to rejoice with our community when these simchas happen in the lives of our families and friends. We use wine in our celebrations, not as a symbol of sacrament but rather as one of joy. Even some of our more somber moments are meant to end with feelings of thankfulness and wholeness. During Pesach, we recall our time as slaves so that we can truly celebrate our freedom. On Yom Kippur, our fast ends with a sense of promise for a good year ahead. Our religion is filled with ways to help us see the good in life and to enjoy all that we have. So as we begin our extra month of Adar – this year starting on the secular date of February 1st – I encourage you to think about all the ways in which you can add a little joy to your life. Every day, talk with your children about the good things that have happened, and acknowledge all the sweet things in life, no matter how small. This is not to say that we should ignore anything troublesome or fail to be upset over things that are, in fact, upsetting. But instead of dwelling on all of the bad things, be sure to appreciate all of the good things. Bringing more joy into our lives can only make our homes, our communities, and the world better. Besides – the Jewish calendar commands it! Barb Shimansky, MSW Director of Youth Education

Any questions about Youth Education Program activities? Contact Barb: bshimansky@congregationsinai.org or Jeri: jdanz@congregationsinai.org, or call the Sinai office.

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January-February 2014

Lifelong Jewish Learning

Welcome back to school!
Please be sure to join us after Winter Break for our Pancake Breakfast on

Sunday, January 5th at 9:30 am.
Bring your smiles and your appetites!
Kivun News
We WILL be holding Kivun sessions each Tuesday throughout the month of January. However, in order to accommodate the finals schedules of many of our high school students, we will be holding a series of programs rather than our typical classes. We look forward to seeing you when you can be with us, and when you need to study… Good luck! We will continue with regular Kivun classes in February.

2nd Grade Families
“A Taste of Tu B’Shevat,” on Sunday, January 12th from 10:00 am -12:00 pm (following Tefillah). Please join us for our 2nd Grade Family Learning Program!

5th Grade Families
Sunday, January 26th from 10:00 am – 12:00 pm (following Tefillah).

Please join us for our 5th Grade Family Learning Program, “Reform American Prayer”

Be sure to join us as our 2nd and 3rd grade classes help lead us in worship on Friday, February 14th during Shabbat Unplugged!

The Day of Discovery at the JCC will be held on Sunday, February 16th. Please note that there are NO CLASSES at Sinai that day!

February 17-20
Mitkadem “midwinter break” No Mitkadem classes will be held that week!

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January-February 2014

Lifelong Jewish Learning
What's New in Youth Engagement?
The last two months have been full of very successful youth engagement initiatives at Sinai. Here are a few highlights. 1. JuSTY (Junior Sinai Temple Youth) had its first event of the year, an amazing race and latke making. The event was well-attended and sparked conversation for future JuSTY events being open to a wider age range. 2. We heard many great suggestions during our parent coffee series. Stay tuned for emerging initiatives based on some of these suggestions. 3. We are starting to look at how we engage teens leading up to and just beyond B’nei Mitzvah. Many teens are very talented in specialized areas and we would love to find ways for them to share their skills and talents with Sinai. Additionally, many Sinai teens attended NFTY-Northern Fall Kallah and one teen attended Nashir, NFTY’s Song Leading Institute. As always, please feel free to contact me with suggestions and feedback! L’hitraot, until next time, Andrew Keene Sinai Youth Engagement Specialist akeene@congregationsinai.org

CoSY Jump Around - Jump Up and Get Down with CoSY!
Sunday, February 23rd we're going to Helium Trampoline Park in New Berlin. More info coming soon!

Game Night!
Friday, February 14th at 7:15 pm
All Sinai youth in 2nd grade and above - stick around after Shabbat Unplugged on Friday, February 14th for a special JuSTY Oneg and game night! Come on down to the youth lounge for an ice cream sundae bar, and board game extravaganza! Feel free to bring your favorite board game to play with friends old and new! We will end by 8:30 pm. Please RSVP to Jeri by Thursday, February 13. Parents - while your children enjoy their Oneg, please enjoy one of your own! Join other Sinai ADULTS for a chocolate and wine Oneg in the Worship and Learning Space. Relax and spend some time together with YOUR peers while your kids have fun with theirs!

JuSTY

JuSTY is going bowling!

January 19th 12:00 - 3:00 pm All 4th-8th graders are invited to join us on Sunday, January 19th from noon until 3pm. We will have a pizza lunch at Sinai and then head to iPic at Pinstrikes (in the Bayshore Town Center) for bowling and fun! $20 gets you lunch, bowling, and shoe rental. RSVP to Jeri by Thursday, January 16th. Hope to see everyone there!

Questions about any of our youth group programming? Contact Barb: bshimansky@congregationsinai.org

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January-February 2014

Lifelong Jewish Learning
Family Programming

(Birth - 3)

Sunday, January 19 & February 23 at 10:00 AM
Join us for Shabbat Shira in the sanctuary with our school at 9:30 AM

Itsy Bitsy Sinai!

We value every member at Congregation Sinai – even our youngest! Our preschool age program (birth-3) is called “Itsy Bitsy Sinai”. It includes Sunday morning fun with the rabbi and the cantor. Activities will include:  Songs  Stories  Instruments  Craft & holiday projects We want to make coming to synagogue something that our youngest children look forward to – a place of joy and laughter and fun. We strive to help parents connect to others with similar aged children, to develop bonds that will enable them to share their Jewish journeys together.

RSVP to: https://itsybitsysinaijan.eventbrite.com by January 15th https://itsybitsysinaifeb.eventbrite.com by February 19th

Join us for an afternoon of fun and skating with Sinai families. Did you know Cantor Phillips is quite the skater! Come show off your moves! All ages welcome!

Sinai Skates!
Sunday, January 26th
Public Skate: 1-3pm
Ozaukee Ice Center 5505 Pioneer Rd, Mequon

Cost: $3.00/skate rental, $2.00/skater Concession stand open before hand for lunch. So go there immediately following Sunday School!

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January-February 2014

What’s Happening

Shabbat Unplugged
A Camp-like Shabbat experience for families of ALL AGES. Join us as we sing and pray together with Rabbi Cohen and Cantor Phillips. We’ll break out the instruments! Family oriented, beginning with a 5:30 pm Shabbat Shapizza followed by what we are calling Shabbat Unplugged!

Friday, February 14, 2014
6:15-7:00 pm
Parents and Grandparents alert! This Shabbat will be hosted by the 2nd & 3rd Grade. They will help lead us in song and prayer. A memorable moment for the family!

Join us for Shabbat ShaPizza too!
Come with the family at 5:30 pm and let’s start Shabbat together with a simple and easy pizza dinner for anyone who wants to join us. Just $10.00 for a family (up to 4 people and an additional $2.00 each additional person). Register at http://shabbatshapizzafebruary2014.eventbrite.com by February 11th.

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January-February 2014

What’s Happening

Rockin' Shabbat and Roll into
Dinner!
Friday, January 10
6:15 pm: Rockin' Shabbat Service 7:15 pm: Congregational Dinner
Join us for Rockin' Shabbat filled with song and music. You won't want to miss this Shabbat experience. Great for all ages! Roll into Dinner for a delicious meal! Conversation for adults, with activities for kids! This will allow for a leisurely dinner for all. Feel free to bring a bottle of wine to share!

Cost: Adults: $10.00, Children 12 and under: $7.00, Children 3 and under: Free

RSVP by January 6th at: http://rockinshabbatdinnerjan.eventbrite.com

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January-February 2014

What’s Happening
Purim

Congregation Sinai's 2014 Family Purim Megillah Reading & Carnival
When: Sunday, March 16th
Family Purim Service and Carnival 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Where: Congregation Sinai What: Come in costumes! Come with noisemakers! Come with an appetite for
food and games! Silent Basket Auction with terrific items!

Who: Children of all ages! Everyone is welcome to join in on the fun. Bring your
friends and introduce them to Congregation Sinai!

Purim like you’ve never experienced it!
Whodunnit!
A night of adults only entertainment, celebration, intrigue, mystery, and forensic science!
So bring your megillah, ‘twill be quite a thrillah. A Haman whodunnit? Hmmm… Don’t count on it!

Saturday, March 15th
7:30 pm - Megillah with desserts and spirits to follow (poisons will be screened) 8:00 pm – Whodunnit?
$18 per person. Please RSVP by March 10th at: http://sinaipurimwhodunnit.eventbrite.com

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January-February 2014

What’s Happening

Purim Basket Silent Auction
Over 20 fantastic baskets at terrific affordable prices will be auctioned between February 28th and March 16th!
Starting bids are affordable with minimum bid increases of just $5.00! Baskets include, but are not limited to: Art, Yoga, Barbie, Dance, Legos, Games, Chocolate, Cooking, Sports, Books, Movies, Experiences with the Rabbi, and much more! Stay tuned for a complete listing of baskets: visit our website at www.congregationsinai.org. To make a bid simply stop in February 28th - March 16th and make a bid or give us a call in the office and we’ll be happy to do it for you. Auction will close at 11:45 am on Sunday, March 16th at the Purim Carnival. You do not need to be present to win!

Baskets Needed!
In order for the Purim Basket Silent Auction to be successful – we need baskets. We would like to offer a variety of items for everyone to consider bidding on that are creative, fun and vary in value. They are really fun to put together and they make the room come alive! Two options are available for contributing:

AUCTION BASKET IDEAS

Book theme Movie theme Beach Wine and Cheese Gardener Spa Gift Basket Option 1: Choose a great idea from our list. You can copy the ideas provided or Chocolate Lover basket create your own themed baskets. You can create the gift baskets by yourself or Picnic for Two with a group of friends. The value of the basket should be no less than $50.00. This does not mean you need to spend $50.00 to make the basket, but the value Sports Lover should be a minimum of $50.00. Feel free to go over! Basket or container should Sports Theme Golf Theme be included. The Cookie Baker's Basket I Love to Cook! Basket Option 2: Give $75.00 and we will create a basket in your name. Andi Rabenn Barbeque theme has graciously offered to help us create baskets on your behalf. Easy! Coffee theme Cake Boss or Ace of Cakes Basket All baskets are due to Jen Friedman by February 14th. All monetary contributions The Beer Lover are due by January 24th as we need time to make the baskets. Margarita Madness Martini Lovers For more information contact Jen Friedman at 414 -352-2970 or Who Needs to Cook Basket jfriedman@congregationsinai.org or Joan Becker Friedman at jbf427@live.com. Kids Indoor Get Ready for Spring (Kids outdoor fun) Lego Mania! Barbie Bonanza! Polly Pockets! Awesome Art Crazy Crafts Play-doh Basket

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January-February 2014

What’s Happening

“Art & Conflict” is co-sponsored by: UWM’s Center for 21st Century Studies, Center for International Education, College of Letters & Science, History Department, Peck School of the Arts, and the UWM Libraries, as well as the Coalition for Jewish Learning, the Harry and Rose Samson Jewish Community Center, Hillel Milwaukee, Jewish Museum Milwaukee, and the Milwaukee Jewish Federation present:

Jonathan Freedman - Transformations of a Jewish Princess: Salomé and the Remaking of the Jewish Female Body
Thursday, March 6th, 7:30 pm
Congregation Sinai, 8223 N. Port Washington Road, Fox Point
Oscar Wilde's play Salomé was written about a Jewish woman, and for the Jewish actress Sarah Bernhardt, who never played the part; the play was banned before she could appear in it. A number of Jewish women later took on the role in theatre or dance, including silent film star Alla Nazimova, Yiddish actress Bessie Thomashefsky, and even comedienne Fanny Brice. Like the Salomé in the paintings that inspired Wilde, many of these figures were famed for their thinness at a time when an ampler frame was taken as a model of feminine beauty in the culture at large, and among many Jewish women in particular. Jonathan Freedman uses these representations in order to examine the emergence of a new type of Jewish female beauty, in the context of the modern world these Jews were entering into by means of their spectacular public performances. Jonathan Freedman was recently named the Marvin Felheim Collegiate Professor of English, American Studies, and Jewish Studies at the University of Michigan. He has also taught at Yale University, Oxford University, Williams College and the Bread Loaf School of English and is currently a Fulbright fellow at Tel Aviv University. He's the author of three books-Professions of Taste: Henry James, British Aestheticism and Commodity Culture (1991); The Temple of Culture: Assimilation, Anti-Semitism and the Making of Literary Anglo-America (2001), and Klezmer America (2008).

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January-February 2014

What’s Happening

How you can help!
KOACH
Thursday, January 30, 2014
Volunteers Needed! Interested in doing a Mitzvah? Contact Jen Friedman at jfriedman@congregationsinai.org.

The word KOACH means strength in Hebrew. This widely popular adult program brings together everyone from Milwaukee area newcomers, to semi -retired and retirees, to members of synagogues, and the Harry & Rose Samson Family Jewish Community Center. Strength is an appropriate word because KOACH reflects the vigor of this region's Jewish community by representing the J and six Milwaukee synagogues including: Congregation Beth Israel Ner Tamid, Congregation EmanuEl B'ne Jeshurun, Temple Menorah, Congregation Shalom and Congregation Sinai. In this unique partnership, programs rotate monthly between the J and the synagogues. The program provides a delicious lunch and a stimulating and entertaining program designed for this special audience.

Chaverim Purim
March 4, 2014
Join us in preparing and serving a Volunteers light meal to the members of Needed! Haverim, the adult special needs Holiday Program. Congregation Sinai always looks forward to hosting Chaverim. Interested in this important mitzvah? Contact Jen Friedman at jfriedman@congregationsinai.org. The Chaverim Adult Special Needs holiday program is a program of The Harry and Rose Samson Family Jewish Community Center in cooperation with the Milwaukee Jewish Federation.

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January-February 2014

What’s Happening

A Sinai Collaborative Effort!
B’rit Nashim, Social Action Committee, Women of Sinai and The Fifth Grade Class and Their Families make a difference at The Women’s Center

Congregation Sinai has had an ongoing relationship with The Women's Center . It was initiated and nurtured by Lisa Phillips, z”l, a passionate, energetic, creative and active member of Congregation Sinai, the Social Action Committee and B'rit Nashim. She also inspired many other worthwhile projects both at Sinai and throughout the Milwaukee community. Part of the collaboration was a " Fall Activity Day at The Women's Center" (formerly the SDC Family Shelter) where many Sinai volunteers spent a day doing a variety of activities. These Sinai groups have tried to continue this worthwhile project, in part to honor Lisa's memory. In recent years, the scope of the project is smaller, but still impactful on a number of levels. The Social Action committee coordinates the Fall Activity Day. This year, Sinai’s fifth graders, and their families went to the center and created cookies, decorated pumpkins with paint, glue and yarn, made masks, face painted, and interacted with the children and mothers currently residing at the center. In addition, because of a generous contribution from the Kaufmann family, toiletries were purchased and packed into 40 kits. Karen Hintz knitted piles of washcloths and hats which were given to the families.

January-February 2014

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Women at Sinai
Women of Sinai
Thank you and welcome to the first 70 women who sent in their 2013-14 Women of Sinai membership dues (received as of 12/1/13). We look forward to welcoming the rest of our members in the coming weeks. Please keep Women of Sinai in mind as you plan your end-of-year giving.
WOS MEMBERS Davida Amenta Barbie Blutstein Jean Bromley Jayne Butlein Marcia Cherniack Melissa Chudnow Elyse Cohn Bernice Fagan Pamela Finberg Janet Fine Barbara Friedlander Jen Friedman Francine Glusman Jennifer Goldbaum Anne Golding Ruth Goldmann Sharon Goldstein Deborah Gollin Idy Goodman Marisa Grossman Rachel Hafemann Toots Hassel Robin Hoffman Stefanie Jacob Lori Jacobson Mari Katz Wendy Kramer Karen Lancina Dannette Lank Sheri Levin Susan LeVine Michelle Lewis Joan Lieberman Sharon Madnek Bettie Meltzer Dorothy Meyers Donna Neubauer Janet Padway Bobbi Rector Jan Rosenberg Linda Ross Lauri Roth Mary Runge Roberta Schaalman Mildred Schapiro Mimi Schechter Pamela Scheferman Beth Shapiro Jill Sheer Doje Sherman Michelle Silverman Naomi Soifer Susan Stuckert Kim Temkin-Taylor Marian Teplin Lisa Waisbren Merle Wasserman Mary Wurzburg WOMEN OF VALOR Nancy Balcer Barbara Bradbury Sarah Hwang Marlene Lauwasser Julie Lookatch Madeleine Lubar Marianne Lubar Joan Lubar Jennifer Moglowsky Nita Soref Laura Waisbren Jill Weinshel

TODAH RABAH
Belated thanks to everyone who donated or participated in the Break-The-Fast meal that was served after Yom Kippur services. Special thanks to Judy Shor for taking on this important mitzvah! Thank you also to all of our bakers that made sure our Cantorial Installation Oneg was a sweet ending to such a wonderful simcha.

PARTNERSHIPS
Women of Sinai was proud to provide financial assistance for B'rit Nashim's blanket making social action project this fall. *Blankets were donated to The Women’s Center. Does your Sinai group or committee have an idea for a program that directly serves women and children, and you need a grant to make it happen? Contact Julie Lookatch at juliloo@sbcglobal.net to have an opportunity to present your plan and talk about how Women of Sinai may be able to help. Please be sure to join us for our next Women of Sinai event

LASHON HARAH IN THE INFORMATION AGE
January 19 - 10am-12pm
Sinai Worship & Learning Space Where do we draw the line between sharing information and spreading gossip? Social media has changed the landscape for how we communicate with and about each other. Join us for this important discussion to help guide you on how to live a Jewish life online.

We officially welcomed Cantor Lauren into our sisterhood on November 7 at Art Trooper in Fox Point. While not everyone wanted to make a menurkey, there were many other pieces of judaica to choose from, and the art of conversation was the hit of the night.

January-February 2014

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Brotherhood

Brotherhood Coffee
Sunday, February 2, 2014
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Dr. Marv Berkowitz
The Sanford N. McDonnell professor of Character education at the University of Missouri, St. Louis campus, will speak on the vital importance of ethical education in a world that increasingly seems to embrace a mentality of "no blood, no foul"! Marvin is a humorist, an avid soccer player, and most importantly an ethics educator. If you think you might want to make the world a better place for future generations, you need to start here.

Sunday, January 5th, 8:30 AM
Come give us a hand and flip pancakes for the Back to School Pancake Breakfast! Interested? Contact Jim Stillman at jstillman963@msn.com. Following the breakfast – stay for Acheinu (men’s spirituality)

Milt Hwang & Andy Gollin

Dr. Ramona Tenorio speaking at Brotherhood Coffee.

“A funny thing happened on the way to Sinai…”
Saturday Night, February 1, 2014
7:30 PM
Marvin Berkowitz Live! Some of you may remember Marvin as a member of Congregation Sinai, and one of the original members of Comedy Sportz. Sinai Brotherhood will host an evening of stories and comedy with Marvin Berkowitz. This is an adult only event so mark your calendar and get yourself ready for an evening of fun! Cost: $10.00 per person. Wine, Fruit and Nosh! Please rsvp by January 27: https://sinaicomedynight.eventbrite.com

January-February 2014

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Sinai Committees
Israel Committee
Back to Basics This is the second in a series of articles on The state of Reform Judaism, (also known as Progressive Judaism) in Israel. In 1948 when the new Israeli government formed, Prime Minister David Ben Gurion gave to the Orthodox parties control of the Religious Services portfolio and Chief Rabbinate. The Rabbinate presides over Jewish life cycle observances, determines 'who is a Jew' (i.e. for legal rights in marriage/burial), or who is a Rabbi. To date, Conservative and Reform Rabbis are not recognized by the Rabbinate. Only Orthodox Rabbis and synagogues receive government subsidies. Despite a high court ruling to allow it, non-Orthodox conversion is not accepted, and women of all sects of Judaism still may be granted a divorce only if the husband signs a 'get'. Today, largely as a result of the Israel Movement for Reform and Progressive Judaism (IMRPJ) and their affiliate, the Israel Religious Action Center (IRAC), both supported by ARZA, the Reform Israel Fund (a URJ affiliate), the acceptance and practice of Progressive Judaism is on the rise. No longer is Orthodoxy the only way to practice Judaism. It has taken a long time (and there's still a long way to go) for Israelis to understand that the Orthodox influence over the last 65 years, and stronghold over the Parliamentary government needs to change; that there is more than one way to be Jewish. Despite opposition from the Chief Rabbinate, the current Israeli government is supporting initiatives (like creating a space at the Western Wall for egalitarian prayer, making separation of men and women on religious bus routes illegal, allowing subsidies to build Progressive synagogues) to create a democratic and religiously pluralistic society. You can read more about this at www.arza.org. Here are some details on the growth of Progressive Judaism in Israel from reformjudaism.org: “In its practice, Progressive Judaism in Israel is in some ways more traditional than in the Diaspora. Hebrew is used exclusively in worship services. Classical Jewish texts and Rabbinic literature play a more prominent role in Reform education and synagogue life. A Progressive Beit Din (religious court) regulates procedures of conversion and offers guidance in other ritual matters. This fast-growing segment of Israeli society is establishing a network of Reform/Progressive congregations, schools and community centers across the country as described in these statistics:  35 congregations and community centers throughout Israel (our sister congregation, Emet veShalom, is the only Progressive congregation in the Western Galilee)  50 kindergartens established in 12 cities, teaching values of the Progressive movement.  70 Reform rabbis ordained in Israel  100 Reform rabbis in Israel  500 young people have participated in pre-army (mechina) programs  800 weddings have been performed by movementaffiliated rabbis  1000 campers participate annually in summer camps (Noar Telem) programs  3000 bar and bat mitzvah ceremonies were held during 2010  10,000 families are affiliated with Reform/Progressive communities and educational institutions  40,000 Israelis define themselves as Reform Jews based on data collected by the Central Bureau of Statistics  500,000 NIS (New Israeli Shekel) has been allocated by the Government of Israel for conversion classes between 2006-2010  2.5 million NIS has been invested by the Israeli government in building reform synagogues over the last 4 years (which pales in comparison to Orthodox subsidies, but it's a start). My next article will describe some of the challenges and triumphs IMRPJ and IRAC have experienced in campaigning for a democratic and pluralistic society, and how becoming an ARZA member will help support their efforts. Bobbi Rector Israel Committee

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January-February 2014

Sinai Committees
Membership Committee
New Year’s Resolution: Find your niche One of the things that we love so much about Congregation Sinai is that no matter your age or your interest, you can find a niche—an activity that you enjoy, an experience to learn with others who share your interests, an opportunity to explore something new. And if you can’t find it… well, you can create it yourself, opening an entirely new experience to your fellow congregants! As the New Year rolls in, it is customary to make one (or several!) New Year’s resolutions. We are going to ask you to put one extra resolution on your list: Resolve to find one activity at Sinai to try out in 2014. You have a handy guidebook right here! As you page through our Sinai News, pay attention to all that is going on in our congregation. Here is just a small sample…  ongoing classes and discussion groups in Lifelong Jewish Learning  women’s groups like B’rit Nashim and Women of Sinai     Sinai Brotherhood for men Our very active social action committee Sinai Outside for those who love the great outdoors Sinai Cooks! (Mitbach Sinai) for aspiring Barefoot Contessas

If you don’t see a committee or activity that you were hoping to get involved in, please contact one of us, or contact Jen Friedman. We would be happy to help you start up your own new “something” at Sinai! With wishes for a happy, healthy and involved New Year, Elyse Cohn (ecohn@wi.rr.com) and Carrie Ellerbrock (sellerbrock@wi.rr.com) Membership Co-chairs

The Green Team
Kermit the Frog once said, “It’s not easy being green.” And he was right. Doing the right thing environmentally speaking (i.e., being green) is very often not the easiest, or least expensive, route. Our efforts to “green up” the congregation-wide dinners have proven this point. Each year, there are typically five congregational meals: four Friday night dinners, and a Hanukkah “Latke Lunch.” Over the years, these meals have been served on disposable goods: paper plates, plastic utensils and plastic tablecloths. These items made for easy clean up, but created a large contribution to our landfills. Those of you who attended a congregational dinner last year, or the two we have had so far this year may have noticed that Sinai’s dishes and silverware were used in place of disposables and the tables were covered with our lovely white linens. Congregants were asked to bus their own dishes, we added kitchen staff to handle the clean up, and the linens were sent out to the cleaners. A little more work, a lot more expense, but a cleaner, greener (and homier) atmosphere for sharing community meals. At the close of last year, it was determined that the Social Action Committee’s Tzedakah Fund was able to continue to contribute the funds needed to cover the cost of the kitchen staff so that we can continue to share meals in this more environmentally sound manner. However, the cost of laundering the linens is not something the synagogue budget is able to absorb. After much discussion about how to deal with this cost and avoid going back to disposable plastic tablecloths, it was decided that for this year, members of the Social Action Committee would launder the linens themselves. A menial task for sure, but quite do-able, especially if the task is shared. Total expense of laundering linens following the Rockin’ Shabbat Friday night dinner:  cost of 2 bottles of pre-treating stain remover: $9.58  cost of 3 large capacity commercial washers: $10.50  cost of not creating a mound of plastic landfill: priceless Though having members of the Social Action Committee wash the linens is a do-able plan for this year, it is not a long-term solution. We invite any and all ideas and suggestions for how to have re-usable table covering for our congregational meals without incurring a large laundry bill. Please send your thoughts, ideas and suggestions to Deb Schermer at deb.schermer@gmail.com. And stay tuned for new developments. We look forward to our Sukkah garden planting in the spring. Until then, stay warm. Deb Schermer & Naomi Cobb The Green Team

The Green Team and the Social Action Committee have taken one more step toward making Sinai a sustainable facility and continuing to be environmentally conscious. Soon you will be seeing biodegradable plates on the Friday night Oneg table. These plates are Cradle to Cradle™ certified, tree-free, compostable packaging that is safe for people and healthy for the planet.

January-February 2014

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Sinai Committees
Social Action Committee
The Social Action Committee of Sinai has decided to start a supportive relationship with the agency call Pathfinders. Pathfinders’ mission is "to empower youth in crisis to make positive life choices." BACKGROUND There are many young people in Milwaukee who face severe crisis and trauma without positive role models to show them a way to seek a successful future. It is estimated that 600 young people have no place to go in Milwaukee EVERY night, 150 0f them were evicted for gay and lesbian issues. Without access to supportive, healthy resources, these young people face horribly difficult choices on how to stay alive; many could end up in the criminal system. Pathfinder's services, which are offered at little or no cost, include housing in an emergency youth shelter, treatment group homes as well as Q-BLOK: safe housing and mentoring for LGBT youth. Pathfinders also runs a drop-in center that is open 2pm-9pm which provides resources for basic needs, emotional support and tangible tools for a fresh start. This is a temporary oasis for young homeless people. Pathfinders provides education through the Southeastern Education Center for at-risk youth. I know Pathfinders well, I spent my first decade as a Social Worker in Milwaukee as an employee and Program Director at Pathfinders. I met frightened, vulnerable, resilient and inspiring young people whose families could no longer support them; these young people felt they were entirely on their own. The teens still carried dreams of a positive future, but their trauma, lack of resources, sadness, and confusion blocked their way. Pathfinder staff did everything they could to keep these sparks of hope alive and to find doors to open for a more positive future. This niche in service is their strength. In the past few months since the Social Action Committee met with staff from Pathfinders, I have personally brought warm clothing, laundry detergent and produce from our garden to the drop-in center. As I was driving south on Holton Street, I spotted many young people walking towards the center and witnessed their arrival. Staff greeted them warmly, knew many by name. Behind the entry desk there is the homey lounge for clients to regenerate and receive help, a full-sized kitchen, showers, computers and a clothes pantry. These physical supports provide nutrition and hygiene needs, but the emotional nurturing by staff and volunteers that shows these homeless young people they are welcome, valued, believed in, cared for and protected, is the essential light of hope. So how can we help? Many ways. We have ample supplies to share; we can donate goods, funding, perhaps resources through our own networks, tutoring for reading and writing, filling out job applications. Most of all, we can open our hearts as we provide meals and connections. Invest in one person and you will be inspired. Some of us at Sinai may want to get personally involved, others participate as a Sinai community member. Let Idy Goodman know of your interest, and watch for announcements from Social Action Committee for our supportive actions. Help be a path finder for Milwaukee youth. Naomi Cobb Social Action Committee *If you'd like to receive a monthly text with the collection item for the month, text PATHFINDER to (414) 737-1005.

Our entry hall barrels will now be holding items collected for Pathfinders. (see article above). Please donate used or new outdoor wear and packets of fresh under wear for teenaged youth at Pathfinder's.

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January-February 2014

Sinai Committees
Social Action Committee
Would you like to make a difference in a youngster’s life? Do you want to make a difference to a family who is in need? You can!
HOW? Become an active participant in our interfaith meal program at the Mother Scott Youth Fellowship Center. The Mother Scott Youth Fellowship Center provides hot meals, an emergency food pantry, and nutrition for babies. They also provide a bread ministry (bread is put out daily for people to take), clothing bank, and programs for children. WHAT CAN YOU DO? Your commitment to this interfaith meal program would be for you to donate a specific food item every other month and drop it off at Congregation Sinai during the week we are assigned. That’s it...we will deliver it to the Mother Scott Center. Please take advantage of this opportunity to make a difference. Join many of your friends at Sinai and other families in the Milwaukee community who are already active members of our program. Please contact Donna Neubauer at Red1Neubs@sbcglobal.net or (414) 354-5961 so she can send you the 2014 schedule and you can be part of our wonderful charitable undertaking.

Social Action Shabbat
January 17, 2014 at 6:15 PM
Christine Neumann-Ortiz will speak on immigration reform. Ms Ortiz is the founding Executive Director of Voces de la Frontera, a low-wage and immigrant workers center with chapters in Milwaukee and Racine, including a student chapter called Students United for Immigrant Rights with members from 3 high schools. Voces de la Frontera is increasingly recognized as Wisconsin’s leading voice for immigration reform.

Immigration Events
New Sanctuary Movement Prayer Vigil
Tuesday, March 4 6:30 PM.
Sinai is hosting this month’s event, in which families and loved ones of those in deportation proceedings, and their friends and allies, come together to worship and reflect. There will be a short service, led by Rabbi Cohen, and an oneg afterwards. This event is open to all.

Your contributions make a difference: Much of the financial support comes through the

Sinai Tzedakah Fund
Please consider this Fund when making your next contribution in honor or memory of someone.

January-February 2014

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Sinai Committees
Chesed
The Chesed Committee has opportunities to connect with our Sinai community in small and easy ways. *Funeral House Watch - when there is a death in the Sinai community, we offer house watching during the funeral. We will email our list of house watching volunteers to see if someone is available to help. *Soup Delivery - when Sinai is notified of an illness, we like to bring soup to our congregant. We will email the request to see if someone is available to deliver soup. *Making soup - we are always appreciative of members who come to Sinai to pick up our new quart containers, fill with soup, and bring the quarts back to the synagogue freezer, ready to deliver to a congregant in need. Please contact Amy Newman at dinajn@msn.com if you can help our community in any of these areas. *Sacred Aging - Sally Moskol is using her skills, knowledge and experience to create meaningful programs for our older congregants. Please contact her at skmoskol@gmail.com if you would like to be a part of this engaging group. *Caring Connections - When we are notified of a member needing a phone call, a connection, or a helping hand, we will email the request to see if someone is available to make that contact. Andee Bram, LCSW (Licensed Clinical Social Worker) andeebram@wi.rr.com, 414-351-6189 Marc Cayle, Owner of Comfort Keepers marccayle@comfortkeepers.com, 262-376-7510 Barbara Friedlander, LCSW (Licensed Clinical Social Worker) bfriedlander@wi.rr.com, 262-238-8590 John Pereles (Jewish Cemeteries) jrpereles@gmail.com, 414-332-3464 Bobbie Unger Rector,PT (Physical Therapist) burpt@wi.rr.com, 414-540-0284 Sally Moskol (Activity Coordinator, Chai Point) skmoskol@gmail.com, 414-228-6371

Conversations on Sacred Aging
" Adding to the Lifecycle: Jewish Rituals as We Age" with Cantor Lauren Phillips
Please join us for Coffee & Conversation with Cantor Phillips, as we explore ideas of ritual and aging.

Sunday, January 26, 2013 10:30 am- Noon
For more information on the Sacred Aging Committee, contact Sally Moskol at 414-228-6371, skmoskol@gmail.com
Should we consider leaving an Ethical Will? Is there a Jewish “Bucket List”? Do you need help for yourself as you age, or fo r someone you love? These types of questions and more can be discussed in our Caring Coffee Hours.

Mitbach Sinai (Sinai Cooks)
Do you enjoy cooking for fun with friends? Come have a glass of wine with Sinai Cooks! During the course of the year we will gather in the Sinai kitchen to cook and bake for Sinai events and ourselves. We promise laughter, great conversation and friendship! Please look to your eNews for cooking dates and times. Looking forward to seeing many new faces! Have a great Sinai Cooks! Idea? Contact Jill Weinshel at: jillgw2@gmail.com
Jill Weinshel & Nancy Stillman prepare for the Sukkot BBQ

January-February 2014

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“Scene” at Sinai

Cantor Phillips Installation Shabbat Dinner

Cantor Benjie Ellen Schiller, Cantor Lauren Phillips and Rabbi David Cohen

“In the Rabbi’s Study” with Jody Hirsch Dancing away at Itsy Bitsy Sinai!

Making handprint “Menurkeys” at Itsy Bitsy Sinai

Sinai’s Mitzvah Menorah Project brought in over 150 gifts for families in need.

January-February 2014

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“Scene” at Sinai

1st place Chanukiyah Contest winners: Danielle, David & Amanda Jacobs

2nd place winner: David Rector

3rd place winner: Sammy and Rachel Scheferman

A festive Chanukkah celebration!

The Hiebs enjoy the Latka Lunch!

Making Chanukkah window decorations Wrapping Mitzvah Menorah presents for the Catherdral Center holiday party

January-February 2014

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√ Check out Sinai’s library
The new book, Like Dreamers: the story of the Israeli paratroopers who united Jerusalem and divided a nation ( 953.5 Hal) by Yossi Klein Halevi has been widely and positively reviewed in the New York Times and in the Jewish Forward. Halevi tracked down seven members of the brigade of paratroopers who in 1967 reunified Jerusalem and restored the sovereignty to the Holy City. In the years since, this band of brothers has great ideological differences in modern Israel. Very interesting reading. Amy Ehrlich has adapted the Torah, with harmonious art by David Nevins in With a Mighty Hand (222 Her). Written for readers of all ages, based on the biblical text, Ehrlich tells the Torah’s stories as a lyrical narrative. This is a wonderful book to read and/or to page through. For those who enjoy fiction and are fans of Naomi Ragan, her newest book The Sisters Weiss (F Rag) about two sisters growing up in ultra-orthodox Brooklyn in the 1950’s will not disappoint. Why Religion Matters (200 Smi) by Huston Smith, while not necessarily a Jewish book, is fascinating reading because it opens a dialog about the appropriate place of religion in human experience and society. Smith gives a passionate and balanced perspective on the undeniable primacy of religion. If any of you have young adults/teens/preteens we have a pretty good selection of books in their category. What I like to tell them is if they read one of these books, they get a two-fer. They can write a book report for school or use the book for their outside reading, AND they learn something about their Jewish heritage. A brand new book is The Ninth Day (T F Fel) by Ruth Tenzer Feldman. (My granddaughter Eve, age 11 is planning to read this over winter break). It is the story of a 60’s Berkeley, CA teenager who is visited by a Serakh woman from 11th century Paris. Using her grandmother’s prayer shawl the two travel back and forth in time and space. Enjoy the library! Happy Reading! -Jayne Butlein

Stay informed about all the happenings at Congregation Sinai!
Each week you should receive a Sinai Enews about the upcoming events at Sinai. Be sure to open and read your Sinai Enews. All kinds of exciting things are happening at Sinai and you won’t want to miss any of them! If you are not currently receiving the Enews, please email office@congregationsinai.org or call Congregation Sinai at 414-352-2970 so we can update our distribution list. Also, visit our website at www.congregationsinai.org.

Supporting Sinai

Bubbe says…

Support Sinai
Gift Shop

Shaina Shops!
Such gorgeous mezuzahs, B’nei Mitzvah gifts, Kiddush cups and jewelry! I’m telling you there is no better place to shop for that perfect piece of Judaica (as if you would go anywhere else knowing your purchase is a mitzvah at Congregation Sinai)! Come by and see what my Shaina has done! Oh, and if you know any nice boys…my Shaina is quite the catch! -Your Bubbe

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January-February 2014

Supporting Sinai
Sponsor an Oneg or Bima Flowers
If you are looking for a wonderful way to honor or remember someone, or recognize a special occasion, you can do so by: • sponsoring the flowers on the Bima • an Oneg Shabbat after a Friday night service Congregation Sinai typically provides these items for Friday evenings when there is no Bar or Bat Mitzvah. Simply let us know that you would like to sponsor and we will do the rest. All sponsorships will be acknowledged in the Sinai Shabbat Pamphlet and the Sinai News. We will also send a note of congratulations or thanks to the honorees. The cost of sponsoring bima flowers is $60.00 and an Oneg Shabbat is $260.00. Please email Jen Friedman at jfriedman@congregationsinai.org or call (414) 352-2970.

Shop & Support Sinai!
Support Sinai whenever you shop on-line at amazon.com.
•Go to the Sinai homepage: www.congregationsinai.org. •Click on the amazon.com banner. You’ll be linked directly to amazon.com.

By using the website link, your purchase will support Congregation Sinai.

Support Sinai While Shopping at SENDIK’S!
Purchase your Scrip card at times that are convenient! January 5th & 19th February 2nd & 9th
Scrip cards can ALWAYS be purchased during regular Sinai office hours.
What is Scrip? Scrip means “substitute money”. Through Sendik’s Food Market Scrip program 5% of what you pay for your Scrip card is donated to Sinai. Questions? Contact: Leigh Maxon: lmaxon@wi.rr.com

January 2014
O N U E E D R I

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New Years Day Office Closed No Mitkadem Executive Committee Meeting 7 pm

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Through the Eyes of Women 9:30 am Shabbat Service 6:15 pm

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Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am

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Scrip Sunday Religious School 9:30 am Back to School Pancake Breakfast 9:30 am Acheinu 10:30 am CoSY Board Meeting 2:15 pm

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Mitkadem 4 pm CoSY Lounge 6 pm Kivun 6:30 pm The Tribes of Israel 7:30 pm (at CBINT) Bible Study w/ Rabbi Brickman 9:30 am Young at Hearts 10 am (at Shalom) Mitkadem 4 pm B’nei Mitzvah Family Education #2 7 pm

Lunch & Learn 12 pm Mitkadem 4 pm

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Through the Eyes of Women 9:30 am Social Action Committee Meeting 12 pm Rockin’ Shabbat 6:15 pm Congregational Dinner 7:30 pm

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Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am

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Religious School 9:30 am 2nd Grade Family Learning 10 am Parent Education Series 10 am Finance Committee Meeting 7:30 am Mitkadem 4 pm CoSY Lounge 6 pm Kivun 6:30 pm The Tribes of Israel 7:30 pm (at CBINT) Erev Tu Bish’va Bible Study w/ Rabbi Brickman 9:30 am

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Lunch & Learn 12 pm Mitkadem 4 pm B’rit Nashim 7:15 pm

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Tu B’sheva Mitkadem 4 pm Board Meeting 7 pm

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Through the Eyes of Women 9:30 am Social Action Shabbat Service 6:15 pm

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Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am

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Scrip Sunday Religious School 9:30 am Women of Sinai Speaker 10 am Itsy Bitsy Sinai 10 am JuSTY 4th-8th grade bowling at Ipic 12 pm (begin at Sinai)

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Mitkadem 4 pm CoSY Lounge 6 pm Kivun 6:30 pm The Tribes of Israel 7:30 pm (at CBINT)

Martin Luther King Day Lunch & Learn 12 pm Mitkadem 4 pm

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Bible Study w/ Rabbi Brickman 9:30 am

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Mitkadem 4 pm

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Through the Eyes of Women 9:30 am Shabbat Service 6:15 pm

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Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am Zachary Yopps Bar Mitzvah 10 am

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Religious School 9:30 am 5th Grade Family Learning 10 am Conversations on Sacred Aging 10 am Teachers Staff Meeting 12:15 pm Sinai Skates 1 pm

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Lunch & Learn 12 pm Mitkadem 4 pm

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HAZAK 1 pm Mitkadem 4 pm CoSY Lounge 6 pm Kivun 6:30 pm The Tribes of Israel 7:30 pm (at CBINT)

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Bible Study w/ Rabbi Brickman 9:30 am

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KOACH Lunch 11:30 am Mitkadem 4 pm

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Through the Eyes of Women 9:30 am Shabbat Service 6:15 pm

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February 2014
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Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am Adult Comedy Night 7:30 pm

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Scrip Sunday Religious School 9:30 am Brotherhood Coffee 10 am Teachers Staff Meeting 12:15 pm CoSY Board Meeting 2:15 pm

2
Mitkadem 4 pm CoSY Lounge 6 pm Kivun 6:30 pm The Tribes of Israel 7:30 pm (at Sinai) Bible Study w/ Rabbi Brickman 9:30 am Mitkadem 4 pm Executive Committee Meeting 7 pm

Lunch & Learn 12 pm Mitkadem 4 pm

3

4

5

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Through the Eyes of Women 9:30 am Shabbat Service 6:15 pm

7

Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am

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Scrip Sunday Religious School 9:30 am Madrichim Meeting 10:15 am “In the Rabbi’s Study” 10 am

9
Finance Committee Meeting 7:30 am Mitkadem 4 pm CoSY Lounge 6 pm Kivun 6:30 pm The Tribes of Israel 7:30 pm (at Sinai) Bible Study w/ Rabbi Brickman 9:30 am Young at Hearts 10 am (at Shalom)

Lunch & Learn 12 pm Mitkadem 4 pm B’rit Nashim 7:15 pm

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Mitkadem 4 pm

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Through the Eyes of Women 9:30 am Social Action Committee Meeting 12 pm Shabbat ShaPizza 5:30 pm Shabbat Unplugged 6:15 pm JuSTY Youth Group Game Night 7:30 pm

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Torah Study 8 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am

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No Religious School Day of Discovery @ JCC No Mitkadem CoSY Lounge 6 pm Kivun 6:30 pm The Tribes of Israel 7:30 pm (at Sinai)

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President’s Day Office Closed No Lunch & Learn No Mitkadem

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Bible Study w/ Rabbi Brickman 9:30 am

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No Mitkadem Board Meeting 7 pm

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Through the Eyes of Women 9:30 am Shabbat Service 6:15 pm

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Torah Study 8 am B’rit Nashim Retreat 9 am Morning Minyan 9:30 am

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Acheinu (Men’s Spirituality) 8:30 am Religious School 9:30 am Itsy Bitsy Sinai 10 am CoSY Event to Helium 12 pm (begin at Sinai)

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Lunch & Learn 12 pm Mitkadem 4 pm

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HAZAK 1 pm Mitkadem 4 pm CoSY Lounge 6 pm Kivun 6:30 pm The Tribes of Israel 7:30 pm (at Sinai)

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Bible Study w/ Rabbi Brickman 9:30 am

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Mitkadem 4 pm

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Scholar-in-Residence Through the Eyes of Women 9:30 am Shabbat Service w/ Scholar-inResidence 6:15 pm Scholar-in-Residence Dinner 7:30 pm Purim Basket Auction Begins

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January-February 2014

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In the Sinai Family
B’nei Mitzvah Bios
Zachary Lawrence Yopps
Zachary Lawrence Yopps will become a Bar Mitzvah on January 25, 2014. He is the son of Melissa Chudnow and John Yopps, brother of Benjamin, Sydney and Elena and grandson of Marlene and Marvin Lauwasser, Liz and Tom Yopps and the late Lawrence Chudnow. Zachary is a 7th grader at Bayside Middle School. He is active in baseball and football and is a 1st degree Black Belt in Tae Kwon Do. He enjoys playing the drums and spending time with friends. For his Mitzvah project, Zachary raised money and helped collect items for the wish list at Ronald McDonald House. This is in honor of his young cousin Sam, whose family stayed at the Ronald McDonald House while he underwent treatment for leukemia. Zachary and his family would like to thank Rabbi Cohen, Cantor Phillips and Marilyn Kraar for their support and guidance in helping him prepare for this special day.

Mazel Tov to:
Sammy Fielkow collected more than 100 children’s books for Next Door Foundation for her Bat Mitzvah Project and was interviewed by TMJ4 when she delivered them.

Condolences to:
Hamakon Y’Nachem—May God Comfort Steve Green on the death of his sister, Sandy Kessler. Susan LeVine on the death of her father, Edward LeVine. Marilyn Goldman on the death of her father, Phil Merker.

Life Cycle Events
Jen Friedman was honored December 7th by Wisconsin Region BBYO celebrating 36 years of professional leadership. Karen Hintz (Administrative Assistant to Rabbi Cohen and Cantor Phillips) on reaching her 5th year and Ilene Wasserman (Bookkeeper) on reaching her 6th year anniversary working at Congregation Sinai. May your time at Sinai continue for many more years! Dorothy and Al Meyers have two new great grandchildren. Helene Charlotte Azose was born Aug. 21st and Michel Benjamin Marcus was born Sept. 6th. Jerry Salinsky on his recent retirement. Dr. Jeffrey & Mrs. Pamela Shovers on their daughter, Elizabeth’s engagement to Joshua Weinman. Anita and Bob Stone on the Bar Mitzvah of their grandson Eli Stone. Naomi and David Cobb, on their daughter and step-daughter, Sonja Cohn’s engagement to Willis Niederfrank. If you learn of any events - births, engagements, marriages, ordinations - that should be included in our “In the Sinai Family” page, please notify the congregation office at khintz@congregationsinai.org or by telephone (414) 352-2970. When there is a death in our immediate family, please notify the synagogue office, even if the funeral is out of town. The clergy and the Sinai community would like the opportunity to express sympathy for your loss.

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January-February 2014

Those We Remember
January Yarhzeits
January 3, 2014 Avrum Adadi Max Adler Stuart Berman Helen Cobb Sidney Cohen Charley Coplin Manley Frisch Sam Gordon Anna Hurvitz Phyllis Jagiello Eva Kaplan Max Laserson Clara Lebow Charlotte Lerner David Miringoff Dr. David S. Paset Albert Razeper Roman Ross Elizabeth Weber Bertha Whiteman January 10, 2014 Shirley Aaron Ida Cohen Bremer Linda Dinkes Florence Eiseman Marjorie Elkind Minna Regina Feld William Grodin Joseph G. Kahn Nancy Kaplan Hirsh J. Kravit Frances J. Lipshultz Alma Meissner Dorothy Shensa Miller Vita Serak Saul Siegel Milton Strauss Anne Tobias Perry Urich January 17, 2014 Betsy Bell Mildred Belzer James Bern Alice Coplin Milton Aaron Epstein Janet Fishman Nancy Frank Rosemary Kealy Bruce Klein Dorothy Laserson Max Luck Lillian Oddy Jean Polacheck Roger V. Resek Abraham Rice Audrey Ross Ralph Sherman Ruth Yotter Thomas Jay Werber January 24, 2014 Irving H. Armour Sonia M. Dulka Samuel Fensin Eldred Fishbein Gloria Fishkin Pam J. Green Dorothy Heilbronner Dorothy Hindin Walter Hoar Janice Weiss Kahn Lee Mishlove Gerald Muchin William Orenstein Reuben Reuter Harlow Sanderson Rebecca Schwartz Milton Smuckler Theodore Stern Marcus Taitelman Blair “Bud” Temkin Burton “Bud” Armin Waisbren Sybil Weinstein Merle Werner Ida Winick Nannette Winter January 31, 2014 Margaret Adelstein Ben Berger Rae Blutstein Lawrence Brill Hannah Ripps Cheplin Anna Chutkow Louis Chutkow Meyer Halprin Joseph Kaplan Dodie Freschl Rose Henkin Yetta Herman David Jacobs Rony Klein Saul Aaron Levine Margery Melcher Sidney Mendelsohn Allan R. Polacheck Theodore Pories Nathan Schwartz Elliot Shafton Jeanne Stark Harry Stein

February Yarhzeits
February 7, 2014 Helen Bram Joseph Grotta Harry Herman Harry Hurvitz Sarah Ikenn Robert N. Kartman Fred Landis Dr. Werner Loewenstein Rose Ottenstein Renee Rieselbach Phillips Joseph Shaiken Max Shapiro William Sidon Sherwood Earl Temkin Richard Werner Albert Whiteman Louise Wilson Gary Winter Ruth Zeligs February 14, 2014 Clarence J. Becker David Brickman Belle Fried Bessie Frisch Jacqueline L. Kravit Dr. Hazel Loewenstein Joseph Rochford Lubar Rose May Hazel Mishelow Margaret Schlossmann Marcia Segal Tessie Stemerman Josephine Usow Abram Warschauer Jack Winter Sr. Minna Wurzburg February 21, 2014 Lorraine Hersch Armour Beatrice Chudnow Alex Cooper Mollie Cutler Sylvia Fishbach Dr. Leon Gilman Warren Goldstein Frank Ikenn David Levy Clarissa Lore Charles Lubotsky Alta Merkel Edward Mishelow Clarence Schmidt David W. Seymour Harvey Simon Joseph Weiss February 28, 2014 Ida Beckerman Harry Blesser Milton H. Doyle Fred A. Eckman Rose F. Feld Karen Lynn Flesch Leo Hiken Jean Hoar John Miles Beatrice Padway Harold Primakow Lillian Stone Sadie L. Weiner

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January-February 2014

Contributions
Donations received from 10/15/13-11/30/13

Adult Programming & Education Fund In Appreciation Mimi Schechter & David Weissman In Memory of Lew Goldstein Donna & Bob Neubauer In Memory of William A. Padway Helen Padway In Memory of Peter Pumpian Ida Pumpian In Memory of Bessie Weiss Merle Wasserman Tzedakah Fund In Memory of Helen W. Fisher Ann Abele In Memory of Fanny Goodman In Memory of JoAnn Mann Idy & Bill Goodman In Memory of Harry Luck Dr. Allan & Shari Luck Rabbi’s Discretionary Fund In Honor of Rabbi Cohen’s Chai Anniversary In Memory of JoAnn Mann Eileen & Glenn Graves In Memory of Lee Cherniack Gerry & Marcia Cherniack In Memory of Jack Fagan Bernice Fagan & Family In Memory of Mary Kaufman Jody Kaufman Loewenstein & Paul Loewenstein In Memory of Edward LeVine Bede Segal In Memory of Dorothy Lubotsky Barbara Shafton & Family In Memory of William A. Padway Nick & Janet Padway & Family In Appreciation Paul Loewenstein & Jody Kaufman Loewenstein Gerald & Louise Stein Charles & Laura Waisbren In Memory of Edwin”Ted” Ostermann Nancy Ostermann, Linda Jorve, & Ellen Ostermann Cantor’s Discretionary Fund In Honor of Cantor Phillips’ Installation Jeanne Jacobs

Floral and Oneg Fund In Memory of Dorothy Brickman In Memory of Cecilia Warschauer In Memory of Irene Warschauer Rabbi Jay & Rita Brickman In Memory of Dr. John Silbar In Memory of Anita Silbar Dr. Muriel Silbar Chesed (Caring) Fund In Memory of Herbert Danto Ellen, Jay, Jeffrey & Sara Nocton In Memory of Ruth Diamond Goldmann Joni Ansfield & Family In Memory of Harry Luck Elyse & BJ Cohn & Family In Memory of Laurence Luff Dorothy & Al Meyers In Memory of Zelda Margolin In Memory of Anna Sherman Doje Sherman In Memory of Arnold Miller Shari Cayle & Family In Memory of Howard James Seesel, Jr. Shelley & Dick Seesel In Memory of Julia E. Siegel Barbara Bradbury In Memory of Carol Siegel-Zdatny Barbara S. Bradbury Ketten/ Miringoff Simcha (Celebrations) Fund In Honor of Sammie Fielkow’s Bat Mitzvah In Honor of Jen Friedman being honored by BBYO In Honor of the marriage of Harry & Sari Waisbren Judi & Michael Ketten In Memory of Harry Schwartz In Memory of Lillian Schwartz Peter & Stacy Schwab Music Fund In Memory of Jack Marcus Mindy Marcus, Peter Graskamp, & Family In Memory of Joanne Mendeloff Misaqi Alan Mendeloff In Memory of Lillian Peck Emmett Peck Passport to Israel Fund In Memory of Arthur Levin In Memory of Ardis Zarem Lloyd & Sheri Levin

In Memory of Edith Meyer Gail Hoffman & Rick Meyer In Memory of Elayne Staller Lloyd & Sheri Levin Jacob M. Fine & Family Library & Technology Fund In Memory of Joann Weber Jayne & Eric Butlein In Memory of Theodis Wiggins Phyllis-Marie Wiggins Janet Greenebaum Scholarship Fund In Memory of Margaret “Peggy” Juda Janet Greenebaum Landscape Fund In Memory of Ed LeVine Toots Hassel In Memory of Charles Wiggins Phyllis-Marie Wiggins Youth Engagement Scholarship Fund In Honor of Jack Glusman’s Bar Mitzvah Zachary Yopps Congregation Sinai Operating Fund In Appreciation Kelly Goodman In Appreciation of Marcia Cherniack Carmel Karas In Memory of Ed LeVine Polly Siegel In Memory of JoAnn Mann Seth & Beth Klarman In Memory of J. Neil Raudabaugh Emily Epstein In Memory of Bessie Becker Margery Becker Barbara Eiseman Memorial Fund for Spiritual Growth In Memory of Margaret Federlin Idy & Bill Goodman

Those making donations will receive recognition for their generosity in the Sinai News. Those honored or the family of someone remembered will receive notice in the mail from Congregation Sinai.

Congregation Sinai
8223 N. Port Washington Road, Fox Point, WI 53217
Member of the Union for Reform Judaism
ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

Board of Trustees, 2013-2014
Dan Elias, Co-President Andy Gollin, Co-President Craig Johnson, Vice President Tom St. John, Treasurer Sandy Saltzstein, Vice President Judy Flegel, Secretary Marc Kartman, Past President Judi Ketten, Past President Marlene Lauwasser, Past President Davida Amenta, Social Action Andrea Bernstein, Young Families Rachel Buff Mitch Colton, Brotherhood Larry Glusman Toots Hassel Hugh Hoffman, Finance Terry Jacobs Marvin Lauwasser Julie Lookatch, Women of Sinai Amy Newman, Chesed Nick Padway Jimmy Schulhof, Building & Grounds Michelle Silverman, Ritual Mark Sweet Jill Weinshel, Celebrations

The form below may be used when submitting your donation. Those remembered will be promptly informed of your thoughtfulness. Please return form to the Sinai office. Please make checks payable to Congregation Sinai.
Note: Suggested minimum donations is $10.00.

□Adult Programming & Education Fund □Andy Brickman Museum Fund □Barbara Eiseman Memorial Fund for Spiritual Growth □Cantor’s Discretionary Fund □Chesed (Caring) Fund □Congregation Sinai Endowment (@ the Jewish Community Foundation) □Congregation Sinai Operating Fund □Floral & Oneg Fund □Jacob M. Fine & Family Library & Technology Fund □Janet Greenebaum Scholarship Fund □Landscape Fund

□Lieberman Memorial Arts Fund □Ketten/Miringoff Simcha (Celebrations) Fund □Music Fund □Passport to Israel Fund □Prayerbook Fund □Rabbi’s Discretionary Fund □Robert Grant Marks Youth Fund □Tzedakah Fund □Youth Engagement Scholarship Fund □Youth Education Scholarship Fund □Other_________________

Enclosed is a $________________ contribution

□In honor of □In memory of □Other
Send acknowledgement card to: Name:_______________________________________ Address:_____________________________________

________________________________________________________ From: Name:___________________________________________ Address:_________________________________________ City:____________________ State:_____ Zip:__________ Phone:__________________________________________

City:___________________ State:_____ Zip:________

Do not include my contribution in the Sinai News.