You are on page 1of 34

PA Environment Digest

An Update On Environmental Issues In PA
Edited By: David E. Hess, Crisci Associates
Winner 2009 PAEE Business Partner Of The Year Award                                                                                                                                                          Harrisburg, Pa                                                                                              December 30, 2013 Thanks To Everyone Contributing Stories To PA Environment Digest In 2013! We want to thank everyone who contributed stories to the PA Environment Digest during 2013! Without sharing your accomplishments, events and award­winning performances, the Digest would have never reached our milestone of over 5,000 email subscribers! Have a Happy and Healthy New Year! ­­ David E. Hess, Editor DEP Will Continue Chapter 78 Oil & Gas Regulation Update After Court Opinion The Department of Environmental Protection Monday said it would continue with the Chapter 78 oil and gas regulation update now out for public review in response to questions about how the rulemaking will be affected by last Thursday’s PA Supreme Court opinion on Act 13. Scott Perry, DEP Deputy Secretary for Oil and Gas Management, told members of the Environmental Quality Board in an email, while DEP is still evaluating the Court opinion, “the majority of the Supreme Court’s opinion focused on the preemption of municipal zoning ordinances in Title 33 of Act 13.  This issue is not a component of the proposed regulations.” The full text of the email follows­­ “Although DEP is still reviewing the recent Supreme Court decision, it is apparent that the ruling affects very little of the proposed revisions to 25 Pa. Code Chapter 78 Subchapter C.  The majority of the Supreme Court’s opinion focused on the preemption of municipal zoning ordinances in Title 33 of Act 13.  This issue is not a component of the proposed regulations. “For our purposes, the only component of the regulation affected by the ruling pertains to the Department’s authority to issue waivers.  The proposed regulation cross references this authority (58 Pa. C.S  § 3215(b)) in three locations.  This cross referencing can easily be addressed before finalizing the regulation. “It is important to note that much of the proposed regulation is being promulgated pursuant to statutes other than Act 13.  For example, aspects of the regulation pertaining to pre­hydraulic fracturing review, centralized wastewater and freshwater impoundments, rock pits, brine spreading and spill reporting and clean­up are promulgated pursuant to the Clean Streams Law, Solid Waste Management Act, Act 2 and the Dam Safety and Encroachments Act. “As such, the vast majority of Subchapter C is not implicated by this decision or even future decisions on the constitutionality of Act 13.

“Finally, I would note that both Title 32 of Act 13 and the proposed regulation approved by the Board substantially improve the regulatory environment in which the oil and gas industry operates. “Title 32 of Act 13 and these regulations are, in my opinion, a model for other states and countries to follow if their goal is to ensure long term protection of public health and the environment while allowing for oil and gas development within their jurisdictions. “I very much appreciate your concerns with the potential effect of the Supreme Court’s ruling on this regulation but given the very limited scope of the ruling on Subchapter C, DEP feels that it is important to continue with the rulemaking process in order to realize improved environmental performance in Pennsylvania.” For more information on when and how to submit comments on Chapter 78 proposed regulation changes, visit DEP’s Oil and Gas Surface Regulations webpage. NewsClips: Letter: Act 13 Ruling Hurts Business Climate Op­Ed: PA Supreme Court Strikes A Blow For Environment Editorial: Use Gas Ruling For Further Improvement Pennsylvania’s Environment ­ 2013 Year In Review 2013 ended with a bang as the PA Supreme Court issued a landmark opinion on the Act 13 Marcellus Shale drilling law and the application of the Environmental Rights Amendment that is likely to have implications far beyond the oil and gas industry. But there were other major milestones, anniversaries, changes and actions in 2013 as well covered by the PA Environment Digest. 2013 saw a change in leadership at the departments of Environmental Protection and Conservation and Natural Resources with the resignation of Richard Allan at DCNR and his replacement with Ellen Ferretti.  Chris Abruzzo replaced Michael Krancer at DEP in April.  Both Ferretti and Abruzzo were confirmed by the Senate in December. The Executive Directors of both the Susquehanna River Basin Commission and the Delaware River Basin Commission also announced their retirements.  Long­time SRBC Executive Director Paul Swartz retired and was replaced by Andrew Dehoff.  DRBC’s Executive Director Carol Collier announced her retirement in 2014. Both Commissions have a significant role in regulating water withdrawals by the Marcellus Shale drilling industry and in the case of DRBC, managing the drilling moratorium that has been in place since December of 2011. Carl Roe, who for 8 years served as Executive Director of the Game Commission, announced he would retire in January 2014. Changes in leadership were also announced by several non­profit environmental groups, including Harry Campbell taking over at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation­PA, Cindy Dunn at PennFuture and the retirement of David Mazza in the PA Resources Council’s Pittsburgh office. In August, Caren Glotfelty, a long­time leader in Pennsylvania’s environmental community, announced her departure from the Heinz Endowments after serving 13 years as the head of environmental programs.  She has been a significant force in supporting Pennsylvania non­profit environmental groups. Another long­time leader in state parks and forests, Patrick J. Solano, was honored for his lifetime of service by having the Environmental Education Center at Frances Slocum State Park in

Luzerne County named after him. Pennsylvania’s environmental community also lost a number of environmental pioneers including Dr. Ruth Patrick, William M. Heenan, Bruce Leavitt, Jim Holden and Walter Lyon. Anniversaries Pennsylvania celebrated the 45th anniversary of Project Scarlift and mine reclamation in the Commonwealth, a York County homeschool group won with 30th Pennsylvania Envirothon and we celebrated the 25th anniversary of both the Recycling Program and the Farmland Preservation Program and the Keystone Fund marked its 20th anniversary. Other anniversaries and milestones commemorated during 2013 include­­ ­­ 11th anniversary of Quecreek Mine Rescue; ­­ 100th anniversary of the 1913 flood in Sharon; ­­ Titusville remembers 40th anniversary of oil embargo; ­­ 80th anniversary of Civilian Conservation Corps; ­­ Golden anniversary of Pine Grove Furnace State Park; ­­ Pinchot Institute’s 50th anniversary; and ­­ A century of elk in Pennsylvania. Environmental Funding 2013 was the eleventh year in a row environmental funding has been cut, starting with the 2003­04 budget under Gov. Rendell.  So far $1.9 billion in environmental funding has been cut or diverted over the last 11 years to balance the general state budget or to support programs that could not get funding on their own. On the positive side of the ledger, the $2.3 billion transportation funding plan signed into law in November included a $30 million increase in funding for the Dirt and Gravel Road Program and an increase in dedicated funding for the Fish and Boat Commission. In addition, the Public Utility Commission distributed $102.6 million in drilling impact fees to local governments and another $94.7 million to state agency programs. Program Initiatives/Changes/Actions There were other significant environmental program milestones, changes and actions in 2013, some of which are outlined here. DEP published a comprehensive update to Chapter 78 drilling regulations in December required by Act 13 laying out new environmental protection and permitting requirements and fundamentally changing the Marcellus Shale regulatory program. DEP also announced the first comprehensive study in the country to look at the naturally occurring levels of radioactivity in by­products associated with oil and gas development. The DEP Citizens Advisory Council made a series of recommendations to DEP on improving public participation in the agency, including asking the public directly for ideas on improving the process for developing regulations and policy development. In response to the Council’s recommendations, DEP established an online Public Participation Center to make it easier for the public to learn about what issues are in front of the agency and how they can get involved. DEP also started a biweekly online newsletter distributed by email, something the agency had not done for at least 8 years. In another important court decision, Commonwealth Court ruled the City of Reading may no longer charge a recycling fee to support its city­run recycling program putting in doubt the fees charges by other municipalities and counties, including the cities of Pittsburgh and Philadelphia.

Other milestones, changes and actions of note­­ ­­ A Federal Court turns back a challenge to Chesapeake Bay cleanup standards, but decision was appealed; ­­ DEP finalizes air quality permit criteria for Marcellus gas well sites; ­­ An Independent review of DEP’s Oil and Gas Program says the program well managed; ­­ The Center For Sustainable Shale Development is  formed to provide independent certification of drilling best practices; ­­ Drilling fees fund more than $28.5 million in environmental, recreation projects; ­­ Attorney General files criminal charges against XTO Energy drilling company; ­­ Gov. Corbett urged DRBC to finalize drilling rules; ­­ The William Penn Foundation announced the creation of a new vision for the Delaware Watershed. ­­The Stroud Water Research Center forms Watershed Restoration Group to ensure water quality; ­­ The Academy Of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia leads regional watershed protection efforts; ­­ REAP farm conservation tax credit reduces over half million pounds of nitrogen; ­­ PA’s biggest Chesapeake Bay cleanup challenge: 609 million pounds of sediment; ­­ EPA agrees Lower Susquehanna River is not impaired at this time; ­­ DEP proposes Nutrient Trading Program changes; ­­ Rediscovered technology makes mine drainage treatment more effective, less costly; ­­ DCNR, CONSOL agreement to repair mining damage to Ryerson Station State Park; ­­ Corbett urges EPA to take action to protect Pennsylvania Air Quality; ­­ DEP Secretary takes steps to end 10­year information drought; ­­ 18 States, PA: EPA cannot dictate greenhouse gas standards for existing power plants; ­­ The update of Pennsylvania’s Climate Change Plan moves to completion; ­­ EQB accepted a petition from a 19­year old on setting greenhouse gas reduction goals in PA; ­­ Coal production is projected to drop 25 percent and gas production to increase 800 percent in Pennsylvania by 2017; ­­ 95 percent of DEP permits reviewed on time, backlog of permits cleared; ­­ Keep PA Beautiful completes statewide county illegal dump survey; ­­ Lancaster County preserves 100,000th acre of farmland; and ­­ Game Commission film celebrates Bald Eagle restoration success. Analysis And Opinion In 2013 The PA Environment Digest published a number of articles and op­ed pieces on environmental issues in 2013.  Here is a sampling­­ ­­ Mid­Year Budget Briefing Will Shape Future Decisions ­­ Commitment To Restoring PA Watersheds Changed Fundamentally Before, After 2003 ­­ Have You Thought About How State Government Spends Your Money? ­­ Growing Leaner: Shrinking Commitment To The Environment Over Last 10 Years ­­ Ironic Statement By Former DEP Secretary Hanger On Krancer’s Leaving ­­ Landmark Court Opinion Turns Environmental Regulation In PA Upside Down ­­ Why Do We Need To Protect Endangered Species And Wild Trout? ­­ Striking The Appropriations Balance With The Endangered Species Coordination Act ­­ PA Chamber, Industry Coalition Urge Passage Of Endangered Species Changes ­­ Legal Experts Support Attorney General’s Action Against XTO Energy ­­ Road to Recovery Isn’t A Road, It’s A River, West Branch Sees Big Improvements ­­ Climate Change And The Chesapeake Bay Watershed

­­ Pennsylvania Must Shift To Renewables ­­ Keep Pennsylvania Moving On Rail Trails NewsClips: Letter: Act 13 Ruling Hurts Business Climate Op­Ed: PA Supreme Court Strikes A Blow For Environment Editorial: Use Gas Ruling For Further Improvement Top 10 Stores Of 2013, Pooling Law, Major Layoffs 2013’s Ups, Downs In Drilling Boom StateImpact: Top 10 Stories Of 2013 Part II StateImpact: Top 10 Stories Of 2013 Part III StateImpact: Top 10 Stories Of 2013 Part IV 115 Stories About Hundreds Of PA Environmental Stewards Honored In 2013 Here are 115 stories about hundreds of individuals, businesses, farmers, schools, local governments, students of all ages, nonprofit groups and organizations just like you honored for  doing great things to protect and restore our environment in every corner of the Commonwealth during 2013.  Will we find YOU on this list in 2014? Philadelphia Housing Authority Wins Sustainability Award Winners Of Cleanup Your Turf For Supplies Contest In Pittsburgh PennDOT Receives National Recognition for Litter Cleanup Efforts Fish & Boat Commission Presents Inaugural Resource First Award, Other Annual Awards DCNR Bureau Of Forestry Applauded For Hurricane Sandy Efforts Rainforest Alliance Recertifies Management Of Pennsylvania’s State Forests PA Parks & Forest Foundation Recognizes Award Winners At May 7 Dinner FirstEnergy Awards $110,000 To PA Schools In Ways 2 Save Electricity Video Contest PRC Announces 2012 Lens On Litter Contest Winners Friends Of The Wissahickon Announces Winners Of 2012 Photo Contest Online Voters Choose Monongahela 2013 River Of The Year From Votes 25,450 Cast Keep PA Beautiful Brings Home Gold At National Conference Aqua America Recognized By EPA For Green Power Purchase 2013 Park and Forest Award Winners Announced Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful Receives National Honors As KAB State Affiliate PA Education Secretary Nominates 4 For Green Schools Award PECO Receives EPA Energy Star Partner Of The Year Award Chatham University, 5 Other PA Colleges Recognized By Tree Campus USA Liberty Property Trust Recognized As EPA Energy Star Partner Philadelphia Ranks #11 In Number Of Energy Star Buildings Nationwide EPA Recognizes Brownfields Progress In Norristown Sewickley Creek Watershed Association Presents Annual Awards

SRBC Presents Goddard Award To James Brozena, Acts On Water Withdrawal Requests PA Environmental Educators Present Annual Awards Sen. Scarnati Honored By PA Recreation And Park Society Keystone Fund Champions Celebrate 20th Anniversary, Cite Benefits Corbett Announces 2013 Environmental Excellence Award Winners Help Celebrate The Father Of Pennsylvania Forestry Joseph T. Rothrock Peter Hausmann Honored With Lifetime Conservation Leadership Award Buckingham Township, Bucks County Honored By PA Land Trust Association Susquehanna Greenway Photo Contest Winners, Vote For Honorable Mention PA Wilds Announces Winners Of Champion Awards Penn Takes Top Honors In EPA's Green Power Challenge ECOvanta Achieves e­Stewards Certification For Electronics Recycling Riverside West Elementary Once Again Statewide Recycling Competition Champion DEP Presents Reforestation Awards April 22 To Schuylkill County, Pittsburgh Groups Five To Receive Western PA Environmental Awards May 23 Stroud Water Center Moorhead Environmental Complex Achieves LEED Platinum Aqua America President Receives Special Water Works Association Award Delaware County’s Haverford Township Wins DCNR/PRPS Green Park Award Alcoa Recycled Art CANtest Winners Announced By PA Resources Council Chester County District Receives Delaware Water Resources Association Award William C. Forrey To Be Honored By Central PA Conservancy May 18 Erik Ross Receives James McGirr Kelly Award From Water Industry Treasurer McCord Accepts National Award For KeystoneHELP Energy Loan Program Philadelphia SpokesDogs Needed To Take A Bite Out Of Pollution Chesapeake Bay Foundation Announces Save The Bay Photo Contest Winners Penn State Year 2 Winner Of EcoCAR Competition 10 Students Win PA American Water Stream Of Learning Scholarships PA American Water Announces Protect Our Watersheds Art Contest Winners Environmental Professionals Honor Dirt And Gravel Roads Center, Cindy Dunn Crisci’s David Hess Receives Shippensburg University’s Lifetime Achievement Award DCNR Salutes Employees' Award­Winning Efforts York County Homeschool Wins 30th Pennsylvania Envirothon Game Commission Honors Wildlife Conservation Pioneers Chatham University Receives Climate Leadership Award Katie Krause Winner Of Delaware Highlands Conservancy/Yeaman Scholarship PEC Honors Michael DiBerardinis, Joan Reilly With Winsor Awards CBF: Bradford's Lovegreen Receives Lifetime Achievement Award State Archives To Honor Ralph W. Abele July 16

Chatham University Receives International Award For Sustainability Efforts Keystone HELP Partners Win Energy Financing Award Weis Markets Receives Dupont Award For Packaging Innovation Sen. Rafferty Receives Conservation District Legislator Leadership Award 3 Pennsylvania Farms Recognized With Clean Water Farm Awards National Forestry Group Honors DCNR's Rachel Reyna 10,000 Friends: Gov. Ridge, Norristown Project Win Smart Growth Awards Governor Recognizes Agencies With Innovation Awards, Including DCNR/DPW Celebrate The Golden Anniversary Of Pine Grove Furnace State Park In Sept./October 2013 Waste Watcher Award Recipients Announced CONSOL Energy's Enlow Fork Mine Earns Mine Rescue Win Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful Recognizes PennDOT Adopt­A­Highway Coordinators PA Coal Alliance Announces Reclamation Award Winners Environmental Heritage: Happy 49th Birthday To The Federal Wilderness Act Of 1964 50th Anniversary Of The Pinchot Institute For Conservation Sept. 19­22 Dickinson University, Chatham University Named In Top 25 Greenest Universities Penn State Extension Educators Receive National Recognition Westmoreland County Conservation District Presents Awards, Dedicates Building Celebrating 25 Years Of Recycling, Looking At Changes For The Future Wildlife For Everyone Remembers 9/11 Thru State Game Lands 93 PA State Parks & Forests’ Goddard History Project Wins National Award BNY Mellon Wins EPA Energy Star Awards For 3.1 Million Square Feet Of Office Space Weis Markets Receives Top Honor For Supermarket Sustainability Efforts EPA Honors 24 Organizations For Green Power Leadership, 1 In PA Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful Announces 2013 Tire War Champion Schuylkill County Abandoned Mine Reclamation Project Receives National Recognition Northeast PA Environmental Partners Announce 2013 Award Winners Game Commission's Calvin DuBrock Receives National Recognition National, State Outdoor Writers Groups Honor DCNR's Terry Brady Corbett Administration Recognized With National Energy Efficiency Award Aqua Pennsylvania Receives Award For Electricity Demand Load Response Programs Philadelphia Housing Authority Recognized With National Sustainability Accreditation LandStudies Wins First Place In National StormTV Video Competition Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy To Honor 7 With Environmental Awards Stroud's Bern Sweeney Honored With Forest Champion Lifetime Achievement Award Growing Greener Coalition Marks 25th Anniversary Of Farmland Preservation Program American Farmland Trust Honors Franklin County Farmer With Local Hero Award

Pennsylvania Celebrates 25th Anniversary Of Farmland Preservation Program Ultra­Poly Corporation Honored By PA Recycling Markets Center Stroud Water Research Center Honors NOAA Scientists For Freshwater Excellence Jennings Environmental Center Mine Drainage Treatment System Celebration A Success Indiana County P&N Coal Project Wins National Coal Mine Reclamation Award Environment Erie Recognized By Friends Of Tom Ridge Environmental Center Aqua America Receives Energy Solutions Award EPA Recognizes Ahold USA, Giant, Shop­Rite For Food Recovery Challenge PA Resources Council Presents 2013 Environmental Leadership Awards Greg Phillips, Westmoreland Conservation District, Receives Honor, Educator Named EPA Recognizes 20 PA Colleges For Food Donation, Waste Diversion Efforts PA Resources Council Honors NOVA Chemicals With Innovative Recycling Award Environmental Education Center In Luzerne Named For Patrick J. Solano PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation Watershed Heroes Recognized Aqua Pennsylvania Among Finalists For Platts Global Energy Award Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful Recognizes Outstanding Volunteers For 2013 PA American Water: Winners Of Community Investment Grants PPG Glass Helps Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Gardens Center Win Green Award New Environmental Laws Enacted In 2013 2013 wasn’t exactly a banner year for environmental legislation, but one highlight was getting additional funding for the Dirt and Gravel Roads Program from the transportation funding package passed in November. Unfortunately, the General Assembly and the Governor also made another round of what has become routine, annual cuts to environmental program funding and positions in the regular state budget during 2013 as well. Here’s a quick list of other legislative highlights from this past year­­ General Fund Budget: House Bill 1437 (Adolph­R­Delaware) FY 2013­14 General Fund Budget was signed into law as Act 1A.  A summary and Senate Fiscal Note are available. Click Here for a summary of the environmental line items included in the budget.  Click Here for an “enhanced” FY 2013­14 budget fact sheet from the Governor’s office. Click Here to view a Senate Republican spreadsheet comparing FY 2012­13 and new FY 2013­14 appropriations.  Click Here for the agency­by­agency budget spreadsheet which compares current year funding, the Governor’s request and the agreed­to budget numbers.  Click Here for House Democratic FY 2013­14 budget spreadsheet.  Click Here for House Republicans budget spreadsheet.  The bill was signed into law as Act 1A. Transportation Funding: House Bill 1060 (Pyle­R­Armstrong) establishes a $2.3 billion transportation funding plan for highways, bridges and mass transit.  A summary and House Fiscal Note are available. The bill was signed into law as Act 89.  Click Here for a summary of the environmental

items included in the funding plan. Fiscal Code: Senate Bill 591 (Vulakovich­D­Allegheny) budget­related amendments to the Fiscal Code.  The bill includes provisions related to distributions from the Race Horse Development Fund. A summary and House Fiscal Note are available. The bill was signed into law as Act 72. With respect to environmental issues, the bill includes provisions related to eliminating General Fund appropriations to DEP for the Consumer Energy Program for FY 2012­13 and FY 2013­14, appropriates $150,000 for independent research regarding natural gas drilling to DEP, gives priorities to municipalities in counties of the sixth, seventh and eighth class with approved applications for Sewage Facilities Planning Grants, extends the payback of the Storage Tank Fund to July 2029, $3 million was appropriated to the Commonwealth Financing Authority for water and sewer projects costing between $50,000 and $150,000, directing DCNR to enter into an agreement to manage Washington Crossing Historic Park with the PA Historical and Museum Commission. Tax Code: House Bill 465 MacKenzie (R­Berks) amends the Tax Code was amended with a dozen new provisions, including: extending the Wild Resource Conservation Tax Checkoff until 2018, repeals the never used Coal Waste and Ultraclean Fuels Tax Credit.  A summary and House Fiscal Note are available.  The House amended the bill and returned it to the Senate which concurred in House amendments.  The bill was signed into law as Act 52. Agricultural Easements: House Bill 84 (Miller­R­York) requiring the inspection of all agricultural conservation easements.  A summary and Senate Fiscal Note are available.  The bill was signed into law as Act 19. On­lot Septic System Reviews: House Bill 1325 (Maloney­R­Berks) amending Act 537 to provide that on­lot septic systems approved by DEP meet anti­degradation requirements­­ summary.  The bill was signed into law as Act 41. Stormwater: Senate Bill 351 (Erickson­R­Delaware) authorizing municipal authorities to undertake stormwater projects was signed into law as Act 68.  A summary and House Fiscal Note are available. Stormwater/Non­Point Funding: Senate Bill 196 (White­R­Indiana) further providing for funding stormwater management and non­point source control projects.  A summary and House Fiscal Note are available.  The bill was signed into law as Act 16. Permit Extensions: House Bill 784 (Evankovich­R­Armstrong) extending permit pending and approved in the Department of Environmental Protection and other agencies through July 2, 2016.  A summary and Senate Fiscal Note are available.  The bill was signed into law as Act 54. Oil & Gas Royalties: Senate Bill 259 (Yaw­R­Lycoming) further providing for the reporting of royalties from oil and gas wells and combining gas leases for horizontal drilling. A summary and House Fiscal Note are available.  The bill was signed into law as Act 66. Capital Budget: House Bill 493 (Gabler­R­Clearfield) further providing for the review and approval of Capital Budget projects and reduces the overall borrowing limit by $600 million.  A summary and

House Fiscal Note are available.  It was signed into law by the Governor as Act 77. Capital Budget Projects List: Senate Bill 680 (Corman­R­Centre), which provides for an itemized list of Capital Budget projects for FY 2012­13. A summary and House Fiscal Note are available.  The bill was signed into law and is now Act 85. Open Space: House Bill 1523 (Toepel­R­Montgomery) further providing for open space preservation by local governments.  A summary and House Fiscal Note are available.  It was signed into law as Act 115. Combining Commissions: House Resolution 129 (Causer­R­Forest) directing the Legislative Budget and Finance Committee to investigate combining the Game and Fish and Boat Commissions was reported from the House Game and Fisheries Committee and is now on the House Calendar for action. Environmental Legislation In Play For 2014 The second half of the legislative session starting January 7 will face lots of leftover issues from 2013. First and foremost, and the biggest issue the General Assembly and Gov. Corbett will face in 2014, is crafting the FY 2014­15 state budget and making up for a projected $1.7 billion deficit.  Budget Secretary Charles Zogby’s mid­year budget briefing December 18 demonstrated it won’t be all that easy. Here’s a rundown of where some significant environmental proposals stand and at the end of the list are links to the major House and Senate Committees showing bills pending in those committees. Senate Reuse Of Mine Drainage/Mine Pools: Senate Bill 411 (Kasunic­D­Somerset) providing for the reuse of water in abandoned mines for Marcellus Shale drilling was referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee.  A sponsor summary is available.  Click Here for more information. Abolishing Pittsburgh Clean Fuel: Senate Bill 1037 (Vogel­R­Beaver) to repeal summer RVP gasoline requirements was referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee.  A sponsor summary is available. Marcellus Health Advisory Panel: Senate Bill 555 (Scarnati­R­Jefferson) establishing the Health Advisory Panel on Shale Gas Extraction and Natural Gas Use was Tabled. A sponsor summary is available.  Click Here for more information. Capital­Intensive Nutrient Reduction: Senate Bill 994 (Vogel­R­Beaver) establishes a system to put in place expensive, taxpayer funded capital­intensive nutrient reduction technology  The bill was Tabled.  Click Here for more information. State Green Buildings: House Bill 34 (Harper­R­ Montgomery) setting green building standards for state­owned or leased buildings was Tabled.  A summary and House Fiscal Note are available.

Endangered Species: Senate Bill 1047 (Scarnati­R­Jefferson) fundamentally changing the process in law for designating and considered endangered species in the permit review process­­ sponsor summary­­ is in the Senate Game and Fisheries Committee.  Click Here for more information. Geospatial Council: House Bill 1285 (Cutler­R­ Lancaster) establishing the State Geospatial Coordination Board­­ summary and House Fiscal Note­­ was referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee. State Forest Wind Farms: Senate Bill 684 (Wozniak­D­Cambria) relating to leasing state forest land for wind farm development was Tabled.  A sponsor summary is available. Wind Power Easements: House Bill 920 (Sonney­R­Erie) amending the Agricultural Area Security Law to define wind power generation system and clarifying an agricultural conservation easement shall not prevent granting an easement for a wind power system­­ sponsor summary­­ was referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee. Testing Energy Technologies: House Bill 1672 (Miller­R­York), authorizing state agencies to test energy saving technologies was referred to the Senate State Government Committee.  A summary and House Fiscal Note are available. Slag Recycling: House Bill 1527 (Evankovich­R­Armstrong) providing for the reuse of steel blast furnace slag was referred to the State Government Committee.  A summary and House Fiscal Note are available. Emissions Inspection Exemptions: Senate Bill 332 (Vogel­R­Beaver) intends to exempt vehicles of up to 10 years old from the emissions inspection program was Tabled.  A sponsor summary is available. Marcellus Works Natural Gas Conversions: House Bill 301 (Saylor­R­York) providing for $25 million in natural gas vehicle fleet tax credits (House Fiscal Note), House Bill 305 (Denlinger­R­ Lancaster) providing for $5 million in natural gas corridor tax credits (House Fiscal Note), House Bill 309 (Grove­R­York) providing for $30 million in natural gas vehicle tax credits (House Fiscal Note) are in the Senate Finance Committee.  House Bill 307 (Evankovich­R­ Armstrong) amending the Air Pollution Control Act to eliminate duplication of certification for natural gas vehicles (House Fiscal Note) is in the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee.  Click Here for background on the Marcellus Works package of bills. Natural Gas Competition: House Bill 1188 (Payne­R­Dauphin) providing for a schedule of truing up natural gas prices to increase competition was referred to the Senate Consumer Protection and Professional Licensure Committee.  A summary and House Fiscal Note are available.  The bill now goes to the Senate for consideration. Waste To Energy To Tier I: Senate Bill 1568 (Folmer­R­Lebanon) moving waste­to­ energy facilities into Tier I of the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards is in the Environmental Resources and Energy Committee.

Increasing Renewables: Senate Bill 1171 (Leach­D­Montgomery) would amend the Pennsylvania Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard Act to require Pennsylvania electric distribution companies to obtain 15 percent of their electricity from renewable sources by 2023. The requirement is currently 8 percent by 2021. A sponsor summary is available.  The bill is in the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee. Municipal Fees: House Bill 1052 (Freeman­D­Lehigh) further providing for the use of local recreation and land development fees was referred to the Senate Local Government Committee.  A summary and House Fiscal Note are available. EQB Counsel: Senate Bill 164 (Yudichak­D­Luzerne) appointing independent counsel for the Environmental Quality Board was Tabled.  A sponsor summary is available. Water Use Fees: Senate Resolution 39 (Alloway­R­Franklin) directing the Legislative Budget and Finance Committee to study the establishment of fees for the consumptive use and degradation of water­­ sponsor summary­­ is in the Environmental Resources and Energy Committee. House Endangered Species: House Bill 1576 (Pyle­R­Armstrong) making fundamental changes in the way threatened and endangered species are listed and protected was amended and reported out of the House Game and Fisheries Committee and Tabled.  Click Here for more background. Water Well Standards: House Bill 343 (Miller­R­York) setting construction standards for drinking water wells­­ summary, was reported from the House Rules Committee and Tabled.  Click Here for more background. Eliminating Riparian Buffers: House Bill 1565 (Hahn­R­Northampton) eliminating the riparian buffers as a best management practice to minimize pollution from erosion and sedimentation­­ summary­­ is in the House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee.  Click Here for more background. Stream Cleaning: House Bill 443 (Causer­R­Cameron) establishing guidelines for removal of flood­related hazards and related stream clearing activities­­ sponsor summary­­ is in the House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee.  Click Here for more information on the identical bill from last session. Repealing AEPS: House Bill 1912 (Sankey­R­Clearfield) that would repeal the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards ­ sponsor summary­­ is in the House Consumer Affairs Committee.   Click Here for more information. Natural Gas Distribution Expansion: Senate Bill 738 (Yaw­R­Lycoming) providing for the expansion of natural gas distribution systems and Senate Bill 739 (Yaw­R­ Lycoming) providing funding through the Commonwealth Financing Authority for natural gas infrastructure expansion (a summary and Senate Fiscal Note are available) are in the House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee.

Click Here for more information. Marcellus Works: House Bill 302 (Moul­R­Adams) transferring funds from the Oil and Gas Lease Fund to DEP for a competitive grant program to convert small mass transit bus fleets to natural gas (amended to change the source of funds to the Gross Receipts Tax), House Bill 303 (Moul­R­Adams) transferring funds from the Oil and Gas Lease Fund to DEP for a competitive grant program to convert large mass transit fleets to natural gas (amended to change the source of funds to the Gross Receipts Tax), House Bill 306 (Pickett­R­ Bradford) redirecting the Alternative Fuels Incentive Fund to create the Keystone Fuel Incentive Program to fund conversions of vehicles to natural gas (amended to keep the Alternative Fuels Incentive Fund intact), House Bill 308 (Saylor­R­York) redirecting $6 million annually from the Clean Air Fund to finance vehicle conversions to natural gas (amended to change the source of funds to the Gross Receipts Tax) were Tabled.  Click Here for background on the Marcellus Works package of bills. Waste­To­Energy To Tier I: House Bill 1151 (Miller­R­York) amending the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards Act to move waste­to­energy facilities from Tier II to Tier I is in the House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee.  A sponsor summary is available. Increasing Renewables: House Bill 100 (Vitali­D­Delaware) would amend the Pennsylvania Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard Act to require Pennsylvania electric distribution companies to obtain 15 percent of their electricity from renewable sources by 2023. The requirement is currently 8 percent by 2021. A sponsor summary is available.  The bill is in the House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee. Agency Performance: House Bill 35 (Saylor­R­York) establishing an agency program performance program was Tabled.  A sponsor summary is available. Lyme Disease: Senate Bill 177 (Greenleaf­R­Montgomery) establishing a task force on Lyme Disease and related diseases is in the House Human Services Committee.  A sponsor summary is available. Bills Pending In Key Committees Here are links to key Standing Committees in the House and Senate and the bills pending in each­­ House Appropriations Education Environmental Resources and Energy Consumer Affairs Gaming Oversight Human Services Judiciary Liquor Control Transportation Links for all other Standing House Committees

Senate Appropriations Environmental Resources and Energy Consumer Protection and Professional Licensure Community, Economic and Recreational Development Education Judiciary Law and Justice Public Health and Welfare Transportation Links for all other Standing Senate Committees Add Us To Your Google+ Circle PA Environment Digest now has a Google+ Circle called Green Works In PA.  Just go to your Google+ page and search for DHess@CrisciAssociates.com, the email for the Digest Editor David Hess,  and let us join your Circle. Google+ now combines all the news you now get through the PA Environment Digest, Weekly, Blog, Twitter and Video sites into one resource. You’ll receive as­it­happens postings on Pennsylvania environmental news, daily NewsClips and links to the weekly Digest and videos. Also take advantage of these related services from Crisci Associates­­ PA Environment Digest Twitter Feed:  On Twitter, sign up to receive instant updates from: PAEnviroDigest. PA Environment Daily Blog: provides daily environmental NewsClips and significant stories and announcements on environmental topics in Pennsylvania of immediate value.  Sign up and receive as they are posted updates through your favorite RSS reader.  You can also sign up for a once daily email alerting you to new items posted on this blog. PA Capitol Digest Daily Blog to get updates every day on Pennsylvania State Government, including NewsClips, coverage of key press conferences and more. Sign up and receive as they are posted updates through your favorite RSS reader.  You can also sign up for a once daily email alerting you to new items posted on this blog. PA Capitol Digest Twitter Feed: Don't forget to sign up to receive the PA Capitol Digest Twitter feed to get instant updates on other news from in and around the Pennsylvania State Capitol. Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule Here are the Senate and House Calendars and Committee meetings showing bills of interest as well as a list of new environmental bills introduced­­

Session Schedule Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House­­ House ­ 2014 January 7 (Non­Voting), 13, 14, 15, 27, 28, 29 February 3, 4, 5 March 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 31 April 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 28, 29, 30 May 5, 6, 7 June 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 19, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 Senate ­ 2014 January 7, 13, 14, 15, 27, 28, 29 February 3, 4, 5 March 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 31 April 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 28, 29, 30 May 5, 6, 7 June 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 19, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 Bill Calendars House (January 7): House Bill 302 (Moul­R­Adams) transferring $5 million to DEP for a competitive grant program to convert small mass transit bus fleets to natural gas; House Bill 303 (Moul­R­Adams) transferring $7.5 million to DEP for a competitive grant program to convert large mass transit fleets to natural gas; House Bill 304 (Marshall­R­Beaver) funding conversions of transit buses to natural gas; House Bill 306 (Pickett­R­Bradford) redirecting $5.3 million from the Alternative Fuels Incentive Fund to create the Keystone Fuel Incentive Program to fund conversions of vehicles to natural gas and provide a 10 cent per gallon biofuels production subsidy; House Bill 308 (Saylor­R­York) redirecting $6 million annually from the Clean Air Fund to finance vehicle conversions to natural gas.  <> Click Here for full House Bill Calendar. Senate (January 7):  <> Click Here for full Senate Bill Calendar. Committee Meeting Agendas This Week House:   <>  Click Here for full House Committee Schedule. Senate:   <>  Click Here for full Senate Committee Schedule. Bills Pending In Key Committees Here are links to key Standing Committees in the House and Senate and the bills pending in each­­

House Appropriations Education Environmental Resources and Energy Consumer Affairs Gaming Oversight Human Services Judiciary Liquor Control Transportation Links for all other Standing House Committees Senate Appropriations Environmental Resources and Energy Consumer Protection and Professional Licensure Community, Economic and Recreational Development Education Judiciary Law and Justice Public Health and Welfare Transportation Links for all other Standing Senate Committees

Bills On Governor's Desk                                                                                   
The following bills were given final approval by the Senate and House and are now on the Governor's desk for action­­ Open Space: House Bill 1523 (Toepel­R­Montgomery) further providing for open space preservation by local governments.  A summary and House Fiscal Note are available.  It was signed into law as Act 115.

News From The Capitol                                                                                    
Senate Committees Set Jan. 10 Hearing On Threatened, Endangered Species Bills The Senate Game and Fisheries Committee and Senate Republican Policy Committee are scheduled to hold a hearing on January 10 on threatened and endangered species­­  Senate Bill 1047 (Scarnati­R­ Jefferson) and House Bill 1576 (Pyle­R­Armstrong). The legislation pending in the Senate and House would fundamentally change the way threatened and endangered species are designed and protected in Pennsylvania and eliminate hundreds of rare and species of special concern from evaluation during environmental permit reviews. The bills would also set additional public review requirements for designating Wild Trout

Streams. In November the House Game and Fisheries Committee amended and reported out House Bill 1576 by a largely party­line vote.  The bill has been Tabled since November 13.  There has been no action on the Senate bill. Hunting and angling groups, the Game and Fish and Boat Commissions and environmental groups have opposed the legislation. The hearing will be held in the Eberly College of Business and Information Auditorium, 664 Pratt Dr. on the Indiana University campus in Indiana, Pa starting at 10:00 a.m. Sen. Richard Alloway (R­Adams) serves as Majority Chair of the Game and Fisheries Committee, and Sen. Richard Kasunic (D­Somerset) serves as Minority Chair.

News From Around The State                                                                          
Ohio River Asian Carp Task Force Releases Draft Management Plan For Comment On December 10 the Ohio River Asian Carp Task Force released a draft management plan for comment outlining steps to prevent the Asian Carp from spreading up the Ohio River from its confluence with the Mississippi River to its headwaters in Pittsburgh. The Plan involves the efforts of resource agencies in 15 states, including Illinois, Indiana, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, New York, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia. In late November, tests by officials in West Virginia have confirmed DNA (eDNA) from Asian Silver Carp has been found in two water samples collected from the upper Ohio River between Wheeling, VW and Pittsburgh. The tests found eDNA in one Pennsylvania sample taken from the Ohio River in Aliquippa, Beaver County, about six miles upstream of the confluence with the Beaver River.  A second positive eDNA result was found in a West Virginia sample near Chester in Hancock County. None of the samples tested positive for bighead carp. Researchers use eDNA analysis as a tool for the early detection of Asian carp, which include silver and bighead carp. The findings indicate the presence of genetic material left behind by the species, such as scales, excrement or mucous. But eDNA does not provide physical proof of the presence of live or dead Asian carp. The Draft Plan The introduction to the Plan says, “Immediate, coordinated, and systematic actions are needed to impede the continued spread of Asian carp and to minimize their impacts on aquatic resources, resource users, and economies dependent upon a health Ohio River basin ecosystem. “The Ohio River Basin Asian Carp Management Plan will emphasize communication, research, and implementation of Asian carp removal efforts at their leading edges and where they are currently established. “The Plan will be essential not only as management tool, but also as a notice to our congressional leadership that there is a large contingency of agencies and non­governmental organizations that are working together to address the Asian carp issues. “The Task Force has developed an Action Plan with specific recommendations for Early

Detection, Rapid Response, Prevention and Deterrence, Population Control, and Communication and Coordination to achieve long­term success.” Click Here for a copy of the draft management plan.  Comments on the Plan are due to Jeff Ross, Assistant Director Fisheries Division, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources by February 1.  Comments may be email to: jeff.ross@ky.gov or he can be contacted by calling 502­564­7109 ext. 4466. Federal Action In May the U.S. Senate has passed bipartisan legislation supporting the implementation of an Asian Carp management plan offered by Sen. Pat Toomey (R­PA), but the U.S. House has yet to consider similar legislation. Impact Of Asian Carp Dr. Tim Schaeffer, Director of Policy and Planning at the Fish and Boat Commission, told DEP’s Citizens Advisory Council last year it was not a question of if, but probably when, Asian Carp are found in Pennsylvania waters if strong steps are not taken to prevent their entry into the Commonwealth.  Click Here for a copy of his presentation. He said Asian carp have had a devastating impact in the Mississippi River system and now pose this threat to the Great Lakes basin. As an aquatic invasive species, these fish do not naturally occur in Pennsylvania waters and would only occur if transported and released. These carp species are a threat due to their large size­­ some can grow to more than 100 pounds and five feet in length,  reproductive success, habitat damage and large, year­round food consumption. In additon, silver carp, when startled, can jump up to 10 feet out of the water striking boaters, causing severe injury. Schaeffer said in rivers where Asian Carp have taken hold up to 80 percent of the biomass of the aquatic environment is made up of these invasive species which would destroy much of the progress the state and watershed groups have made in restoring Pennsylvania streams. A video teaching people how to identify bighead and silver carp is available from the USFWS on YouTube. Anglers and boaters are urged to contact the PFBC or WVDNR if they suspect the presence of Asian carp. Both agencies maintain a website for easy communication: PFBC Asian Carp and WVDNR Asian Carp. Additional information is available on the national Asian carp website.  More information about the Clean Your Gear educational campaign is available online. Recycle Your Christmas Tree As You Un­Deck The Halls As the holiday season draws to a close, you may be searching for options for how to get rid of your real Christmas tree. Luckily, there are some eco­friendly options that can reduce landfill waste, and even contribute to habitat improvement! According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, approximately 33 million real Christmas trees are sold in North America each year. Luckily, about 93 percent of those trees are recycled through more than 4,000 available recycling programs nationwide. If you are unsure of where your nearest facility is, the Earth911.com website offers a search feature to help you find a local recycling center or organization where trees can be recycled. A good rule of thumb is once you flip the calendar to January, start packing up the lights and ornaments and get your tree ready to recycle. Most tree recycling programs will end mid­January and

you don’t want to miss the window of opportunity. Before recycling, trees should stripped down to their original form, which means removing all the lights, ornaments and tinsel. When choosing where to recycle your tree, be sure that it is not just going to be taken away and deposited into a landfill – thus negating the importance of recycling in the first place! In cities such as New York and Denver, Christmas trees are mulched, and the remaining material is made available to the public free of charge. Your community may also offer to redistribute the mulch to residents, saving you money on garden supplies in the spring. If no tree recycling facilities exist in your area, you do have some other options that you can do on your own: — Chop it into firewood and kindling—A standard Noble Fir tree can be turned into more than 13 pounds of firewood to keep you warm this winter. The needles can be used for art projects or as mulch in your backyard. — Improve water quality—If you have a pond or other body of water in the backyard, tossing in your Christmas tree actually helps the fish by providing shelter and nutrients. Many communities have drop­off locations near bodies of water for this purpose. If you do not officially own the body of water (such as beach­front properties), you must get permission before disposing of your tree in this way. Information from an article by Trey Granger on Earth 911.com (Written By: Susan Boser, Water Resources Educator, Renewable Natural Resources Team, Penn State Extension, Beaver County,, and reprinted from Penn State Extension’s Watershed Winds newsletter.) PA Environmental Educator Award Nominations Due January 14 Each year the PA Association of Environmental Educators recognizes individuals and organizations for the contributions they make to the field of environmental education.  The awards are given out at their annual conference which this year is on March 14­15 in Ligonier, PA. Nominations are due January 14. Awards are given out in seven categories­­ ­­ Keystone Award: The Keystone Award is the most prestigious award. It is presented to someone who has successfully dedicated their time to advancing the quality and opportunities of environmental education in Pennsylvania. ­­ Outstanding Environmental Educator: To be considered, the nominee must be "an individual who made a significant teaching contribution to the environmental education field in a formal or non­formal setting, through either curriculum development or teaching." ­­ Daisy S. Klinedinst Memorial Award: The award recipient should be "an educator, new (less than five years) to the field, who is involved in environmental education and who seeks to continue to expand his/her involvement in environmental education." ­­ Outstanding Environmental Education Program: This award recognizes an exemplary environmental education program which could be used as a model program. ­­ Business Partner Award: This award recognizes a member of the business community that has made significant contributions to promote environmental education within the Commonwealth of PA. ­­ Government Partner Award: This award recognizes a government official who serves on a local,

state or national level and has demonstrated significant support for environmental education within the Commonwealth of PA. ­­ Outstanding Contribution to the Environmental Field: This award is presented to someone who has contributed to environmental education in a non teaching area, such as publishing or research. Click Here for the nomination form and more details. Penn State Offers Free Open Online Environmental Course You may not have heard of MOOC before, but it stands for “Massive Open Online Course.” Universities across the country are offering this free opportunity for anyone to learn from higher education. At Penn State University you can go to the website and find what is being offered, as well as, register for MOOC classes. On January 6 an eight week course entitled “Energy, the Environment, and Our Future” begins. The course is being taught by internationally­acclaimed researcher and award­winning Professor Richard Alley. Dr. Alley is the Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences at Penn State University. To take this course, all you need is an Internet connection and the time to watch lectures, read course content, complete lab assignments, and discuss some assignments with your peers. Students who successfully complete the class will receive a statement of accomplishment signed by the instructor. Again this is a free course and your opportunity to interact with a leading expert, and other students from across the world, about energy, the environment, and our future. (Written By: Jim Clark, Extension Educator, Water Resources, Renewable Natural Resources, Penn State Extension, McKean County, and reprinted from Penn State Extension’s Watershed Winds newsletter.) Shell Extends Land­Option For Ethane Cracker Plant In Beaver County Gov. Tom Corbett commented on Thursday’s announcement Horsehead Corporation has extended its land­option agreement with Shell Chemical LP for a site near Monaca, Beaver County and has contracted to begin demolishing select buildings at the site early next year. “Pennsylvania’s world class energy industry, our skilled and productive workforce and our ideal location are attracting companies like Shell to invest in our commonwealth and create thousands of family­sustaining jobs,” Corbett said. “Today’s announcement is another positive indication for Shell’s proposed plant in Beaver County and I am committed to working in a bipartisan way to keep this multi­billion dollar project moving forward.” Last month, Shell narrowed its short list of major capital projects in North America, following the announcement that the company will not move forward with the proposed Gulf Coast gas­to­liquids (GTL) project in Louisiana and will suspend any further work on the project. In August, Shell announced it has secured ethane commitments and is seeking additional ethane suppliers to feed the proposed facility. Securing ethane supply is one of the key components of Shell’s ongoing site evaluation process. “Just six years ago, Pennsylvania imported 75 percent of our natural gas needs. Today, we are competing with the Gulf Coast, a long established energy hub, for major energy capital projects,” Corbett said. “New manufacturers are arriving and building plants and companies with deep histories in

the field are expanding and branching out to the energy supply chain. The potential for growth is endless and we are making Pennsylvania a key player in the conversation.” Additional terms of the extension beyond statements provided by Horsehead and Shell were deemed confidential. For more information, visit Shell’s U.S. Appalachian Petrochemical Project webpage. NewsClips: Shell, Horsehead Agree To Extension For Cracker Plant Site Shell Takes Final Extension On PA Cracker Site DEP Offers Rebates For Alternative Fuel Vehicles The Department of Environmental Protection is now accepting applications for rebates under the PA Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebate Program.  Applications are due by June 30. (formal notice) The rebates available vary with the type of vehicle­­ — $2,000 rebate for a plug­in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (battery system capacity equal/greater than 10 kWh) or battery electric vehicle (EV) (battery system capacity equal/greater than 10 kWh) (does not include electric motorcycle, scooter, all­terrain vehicle (ATV) or low speed electric vehicle); — $1,000 rebate for a PHEV or EV (battery system capacity less than 10 kWh) (does not include electric motorcycle, scooter, ATV or low speed electric vehicle); — $1,000 rebate for a natural gas fueled vehicle. OEM/certified retrofit only; — $1,000 rebate for a propane fueled vehicles. OEM/certified retrofit only; — $1,000 rebate for a hydrogen vehicle or fuel cell vehicle, or both; and — $500 rebate for an electric motorcycle, scooter, ATV or other low speed electric vehicle if registered in this Commonwealth. There are only a limited number of rebates left at $3,000. Upon payment of the first 500 rebates at $3,000, the rebate amount for PHEVs and EVs (battery system capacity equal/greater than 10 kWh) will be reduced to $2,000 for the next 500 qualified applicants or until June 30, whichever occurs first. The rebate amount offered in the future will be reassessed at that time. To qualify for the rebate, the alternative fuel vehicle must be registered in this Commonwealth and be operated primarily within this Commonwealth. The rebate will be offered on a first­come, first­served basis in the order in which they are received. Rebate request forms and required documentation must be submitted to the Department no later than 6 months after the vehicle is purchased. For more information, visit the DEP PA Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebate Program webpage. PUC Urges Customers To Call Now To Restore Utility Service, 19,653 Without Heat The Public Utility Commission Monday released the results of its annual Cold Weather Survey, which showed that about 19,653 households will enter the winter season without heat­related utility service compared to 15,975 this time last year. “With the coldest months of the year are still ahead, it remains critically important for consumers without heat­related utility service to learn about the options available to allow them to reconnect service,” said Commission Chairman Robert F. Powelson. The PUC encourages consumers without utility service to know their rights and responsibilities. Consumers should obtain information about programs available to help them restore and maintain utility

service. Consumers with a seriously ill resident in the household or a protection from abuse order may have additional options for service restoration. Consumers should call their utility first to make arrangements to pay their bill. If they are unable to reach an agreement with the utility, the PUC may be able to provide assistance. The PUC can be reached toll­free at 1­800­692­7380. In accordance with the Pennsylvania Public Utility Code, the state’s electric and natural gas distribution companies under the PUC’s jurisdiction must survey residential properties where service has been terminated in 2013 and has not been reconnected during the course of this calendar year. The survey assesses the number of households without heat­related service entering the winter months. Some households may be without both electric and natural gas service, resulting in a double­counting of some households. Every December, the PUC releases those cold weather survey results. As part of the survey, the utility or its representative must make four attempts to contact consumers who are known to be without heat­related utility service. The attempts may include telephone calls, letters and personal visits to the residence and are done on different days of the week and different times of the day. If the first three contacts are unsuccessful, the PUC requests that the fourth attempt be an in­person visit to the residence. Homes using potentially unsafe heating sources also are counted separately because the home is not relying on a central­heating system. According to the National Fire Protection Association, potentially unsafe sources of heat include kerosene heaters, kitchen stoves or ovens, electric space heaters, fireplaces and connecting extension cords to neighbors’ homes. An additional 1,628 residences are using potentially unsafe heating sources, bringing the total homes not using a central­heating system to 21,281 according to the 2013 survey. The total number was 18,116 in 2012. The 2013 survey results also show that as of December 16: — 6,716 residential households remain without electric service; 12,693 residences where service was terminated now appear to be vacant; and 99 households are heating with potentially unsafe heating sources. The total electric residences without safe heating are 6,815. — 12,937 residential households that heat with natural gas are without service; 6,070 residences where service was terminated now appear to be vacant; and 1,529 households are heating with potentially unsafe heating sources. The total natural gas residences without safe heating are 14,466. — PGW reported that 9,049 households that heat with natural gas are without service ­ the highest number of all utilities. A total of 13,508 or 63 percent of the total off accounts that have no service live in the Philadelphia area. The charts attached to the report show the number of residential properties without service for each of the major, regulated electric and natural gas distribution companies in the Commonwealth. Prepare Now In an October 15, 2013 letter sent to electric and natural gas utilities under its jurisdiction, the PUC asked utilities to join it in reaching out and educating consumers as part of the PUC’s “Prepare Now” initiative. In its 11th year, the message is simple: “Prepare Now” for high energy costs this winter. Learn about changes in the law related to utility shut­offs and know your rights. Save money by learning how to conserve energy. Heat your home safely. Explore budget billing options. Look into programs that help low­income customers restore and maintain service. Visit the PUC’s Prepare Now webpage or call the PUC at 1­800­692­7380. Heating Assistance

Every major utility offers a Customer Assistance Program, under which qualifying low­income customers pay discounted bills. Qualification in CAP is based on household size and gross household income. Low Income Usage Reduction Programs help consumers lower the amount of electricity or natural gas used each month. The company may install energy­saving features in your home to help reduce bills. In addition, the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) may have funds available to help eligible customers have service restored. For more information, please contact your local County Assistance Office or contact the LIHEAP hotline at 1­866­857­7095. An informational brochure also is available. NewsClips: PUC: Over 19,000 Without Heat Service Utility Shut­Offs Surge, Leaving Households Without Heat Number Of Pennsylvanians Without Heat Up LIHEAP Crisis Grants Available January 2 Philadelphia Housing Authority Recognized For Energy Efficiency The U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Tuesday announced the expansion of the President’s Better Buildings Challenge to include multifamily housing. DOE and HUD recognize the energy efficiency commitment that the Philadelphia Housing Authority is making as a Better Buildings Challenge Partner. In his recent Climate Action Plan, President Obama called for leading multifamily housing owners to join the Better Buildings Challenge. About a quarter of U.S. households live in multifamily housing units and spend about $40 billion on energy costs each year. Making these housing units 20 percent more energy efficient would save more than $7 billion per year and cut greenhouse gas emissions by 430 million tons. As part of the Better Buildings Challenge, DOE and HUD are partnering with leading private and affordable buildings owners and public housing agencies to cut energy waste and help families save money. These leaders also broadly share successful strategies that maximize energy efficiency in multifamily housing, contributing actual energy data to verify the energy savings of implemented energy upgrades. Through the Better Buildings Challenge expansion, 50 multifamily partners – representing roughly 200,000 units and over 190 million square feet –have committed to cutting their energy use by 20 percent in 10 years. “PHA is committed to preserving affordable housing in Philadelphia and sustainable practices –like reducing energy consumption and costs – is a key factor in helping us accomplish our mission,” said PHA President & CEO Kelvin A. Jeremiah. “I am excited to join the Better Buildings Challenge and to work with our partners at HUD and DOE to ensure that we are creating healthier, more sustainable communities for future generations.”  “By committing to the energy efficiency goals of the Better Buildings Challenge, PHA has taken a significant step towards reducing long term energy costs, supporting innovative technologies, and creating good jobs,” said HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan. “Working together, we will increase housing affordability for owners and residents and foster healthier communities and neighborhoods.” “Partners in the Better Buildings Challenge are leading by example, demonstrating their

commitment to providing more efficient and comfortable homes for their tenants that save money and energy,” said Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman. “We applaud these partners for joining in this leadership initiative and we look forward to working with them as they make their communities more energy efficient and foster greater economic growth.” Click Here to learn more about PHA’s Better Buildings Challenge commitment to reducing its energy intensity by 20 percent by 2020. Click Here to learn more about the Philadelphia Housing Authority. PA Housing Finance Agency House Affordability And Rehabilitation Draft Plan Released The PA Housing Finance Agency published notice of the 2014 draft Plan for the PA Housing Affordability and Rehabilitation Program funded by Marcellus Shale drilling impact fees. ClearWater Conservancy Recognizes Volunteers At Annual Meeting ClearWater Conservancy in Centre County held its board election and honored its volunteers at its annual meeting November 21at Mountain View Country Club. Incumbent Board Candidates Brad Chovitand Kathleen Yurchak were re­elected to serve from 2014­2016. Lynn Hutcheson, the PA Senior Environment Corps liaison, was elected to a one­year appointment. New candidates Steve Maruszewski and Rob Veronesi were elected to serve from 2014­2016. (Photo: Rod Stahl of Stahl Sheaffer Engineering, Kristen Saacke Blunk, Judi Sittler, Jennifer Shuey and Ford Stryker) The George Harvey Memorial Spring Creek Heritage Award, given jointly by ClearWater Conservancy and the Spring Creek Chapter of Trout Unlimited, was awarded to Kristen Saacke­Blunk in recognition of her 20 years of passionate, creative, and inspirational service to the Spring Creek Watershed. The Community Conservation Commendation went to Stahl Sheaffer Engineering in recognition of their generous donation of over $50,000 of in­kind engineering and construction oversight services to the Musser Gap Greenway Project. The Donald Hamer Leadership Award was Awarded to Ford Stryker in recognition of his representation of Penn State University on the Board of Directors for 12 years and his dedicated personal leadership on ClearWater's Executive Committee and the Otto's Golf­Fest committee. The Barbara Fisher Volunteer of the Year Award went to our Legends of Flyfishing: Mark Belden, Joe Humphreys, Greg Hoover and the late Vance McCullough in recognition of their team effort to raise awareness, support, and money for ClearWater's work in riparian conservation and restoration. For more information, visit the ClearWater Conservancy website. Appalachian Trail Museum Accepting Nominations For Hall Of Fame The Appalachian Trail Museum Society is now accepting nominations for its class of 2014 Hall of Fame to recognize those who have made a significant contribution toward establishing and maintaining the

2,185 mile footpath that passes through 14 states from Maine to Georgia. Nominations are due February 28. "The fourth class to the Appalachian Trail Hall of Fame will be inducted in 2014, and nominations are open for Hall of Fame nominees," said Larry Luxenberg, president of the Appalachian Trail Museum Society ­ the organization that oversees the Appalachian Trail Hall of Fame. "Nominees should be people who have made a significant positive contribution to the Appalachian Trail and who have unselfishly devoted their time, energy and resources toward making the Appalachian Trail a national treasure." The 16 Hall of Fame inductees named in the first three years include Myron Avery, Gene Espy, Ed Garvey, Benton MacKaye, Arthur Perkins, Earl Shaffer, Emma "Grandma" Gatewood, David A Richie, J. Frank Schairer, Jean Stephenson, William Adams Welch, Ruth Blackburn, David Field, David Sherman, David Startzell, and Everett (Eddie) Stone. Without their efforts, Luxenberg said the Appalachian Trail probably would not even exist. Visit the Appalachian Trail Museum Society Hall of Fame Nominations webpage for more information. NewsClip: Appalachian Trail Museum Searches For Hall Of Famers Opportunity To Bid On Orphan Well Plugging Projects In Washington, Armstrong The Department of Environmental Protection published notice of an opportunity to bid on orphan gas well projects in Washington County and Armstrong counties.

Your 2 Cents: Issues On Advisory Committee Agendas
This section gives you a continuously updated thumbnail sketch of issues to be considered in upcoming advisory committee meetings where the agendas have been released NOTE: The Department of Environmental Protection published a schedule of 2014 advisory committee and board meetings in the December 21 PA Bulletin starting on page 7503. January 3­­ DEP informational webinar on proposed Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. 9:30  to 10:30 a.m.  Click Here for more information or to register. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 7­­ Environmental Quality Board hearing on Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. Tunkhannock High School Auditorium, 135 Tiger Drive, Tunkhannock, Wyoming County. 6:00 p.m. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 8­­ DEP Technical Advisory Committee on Diesel­Powered Mining Equipment meeting. Fayette County Health Center, Uniontown.  10:00. January 9­­ DEP Mining and Reclamation Advisory Board meeting.  Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.  10:00. January 9­­ Environmental Quality Board hearing on Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes.

West Chester University of Pennsylvania’s Sykes Student Union Theater, 110 West Rosedale Avenue, West Chester, Chester County. 6:00 p.m. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 10­­ NEW. Senate Game and Fisheries Committee and Senate Republican Policy Committee hearing on threatened and endangered species­­ Senate Bill 1047 (Scarnati­R­ Jefferson).  Eberly College of Business and Information Auditorium, 664 Pratt Dr., Indiana University, Indiana. 10:00. January 13­­ Environmental Quality Board hearing on Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. Pennsylvania College of Technology’s Klump Academic Center, One College Avenue, Williamsport, Lycoming County. 6:00 p.m. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 14­­ DEP public hearing on proposed repeal of the portable fuel container regulation from the state Air Quality Implementation Plan.  DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg.  1:00.  (formal notice) January 15­­ DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee meeting.  Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.  9:30. January 15­­ DEP Coastal Zone Advisory Committee meeting.  10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 9:30. January 15­­ Environmental Quality Board hearing on Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. Meadville Area Senior High School Auditorium, 930 North Street, Meadville, Crawford County. 6:00 p.m. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 16­­ Environmental Quality Board hearing on Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. Good Hope Middle School Auditorium, 451 Skyport Road, Mechanicsburg, Cumberland County. 6:00 p.m. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 21­­ Environmental Quality Board meeting.  Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.  9:00. January 21­­ DEP Citizens Advisory Council meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.  11:00. January 21­­ DEP hearing on Regional Haze State Implementation Plan revisions related to the Cheswick Power Plant, Allegheny County. DEP Southwest Regional Office, 400 Waterfront Dr., Pittsburgh. 1:00. (formal notice) January 21­­ DEP hearing on Regional Haze State Implementation Plan revisions related to the Cheswick Power Plant, Allegheny County. DEP Southcentral Office, 909 Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 1:00. (formal notice) January 21­­ DEP hearing on Regional Haze State Implementation Plan revisions related to the Cheswick Power Plant, Allegheny County. DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main St., Norristown. 1:00. (formal notice)

January 22­­ Environmental Quality Board hearing on Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. Washington and Jefferson College’s Rossin Campus Center / Allen Ballroom, 60 South Lincoln Street, Washington, Washington County. 6:00 p.m. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 22­­ DEP Chesapeake Bay Management Team meeting.  DEP Southcentral Office, 909 Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg.  9:30. January 22­­ DEP Small Business Compliance Advisory Committee meeting.  12th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. January 23­­ Environmental Quality Board hearing on Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s Convention and Athletic Complex, 711 Pratt Drive, Indiana, Indiana County. 6:00 p.m. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 23­­ DEP public hearing on proposed revisions to the state Air Quality Implementation Plan for motor vehicle emissions budgets in Allentown­Bethlehem­Easton 8­hour ozone maintenance area. DEP Northeast Regional Office, 2nd Floor Little Schuylkill Room, 2 Public Square, Wilkes­Barre. 10:00.  (formal notice) Visit DEP’s new Public Participation Center for information on how you can Be Informed! and Get Involved! in DEP regulation and guidance development process. Click Here for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages. DEP Calendar of Events Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle

Grants & Awards                                                                                              
This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other recognition programs.  NEW means new from last week. December 31­­ DEP PA Sunshine Rebates (or before if funds run out) January 6­­ PA Section AWWA Student Scholarship For PA Colleges January 6­­ DEP Environmental Education Grants January 10­­ DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Grants January 14­­  Governor’s Awards For Environmental Excellence January 14­­ West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund January 14­­ NEW. PA Environmental Educator Award Nominations January 15­­ Sustainable Energy Fund 0% Energy Efficiency Financing January 20­­CFA Alternative And Clean Energy Program January 20­­ CFA High Performance Building Program January 25­­ Sinnemahoning Creek Watershed Grants February 1­­ Susquehanna Greenway Photo Contest

February 4­­ EPA Environmental Education Grants February 14­­ PHMC Historic Preservation Local Government Grants February 19­­ PennVEST Water Infrastructure Financing February 28­­ Presidential Innovation Award For Environmental Educators February 28­­ NEW. Appalachian Trail Hall Of Fame Nominations March 1­­ SW PA Air Quality Partnership Let's Clear The Air Poster Challenge March 3­­ PHMC Keystone Historic Preservation Grants March 5­­CFA Alternative And Clean Energy Program March 5­­ CFA High Performance Building Program April 16­­ DCNR Community Conservation Partnership Grants May 7­­CFA Alternative And Clean Energy Program May 7­­ CFA High Performance Building Program May 14­­ PennVEST Water Infrastructure Financing June 30­­ NEW. DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebate Program July 7­­ CFA Alternative And Clean Energy Program July 7­­ CFA High Performance Building Program September 19­­CFA Alternative And Clean Energy Program September 19­­ CFA High Performance Building Program ­­ Visit the DEP Grants and Loan Programs webpage for more ideas on how to get financial assistance for environmental projects. Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle

Budget/Quick NewsClips                                                                                 
Here's a selection of NewsClips on environmental topics from around the state­­ Top 10 Stores Of 2013, Pooling Law, Major Layoffs Editorial: Apollo 8’s Gift Budget Pennsylvania Budget Sees Big Shortfall Transportation Bill’s Economic Impact Will Be Mixed Editorial: Tapping Brakes On Natural Gas Giveaways Other Recycling Takes Guilt Out Of Christmas Trees South Abington Twp. To See Single­Stream Recycling South Side Flats Company Accepts Foam For Recycling Pros Weigh In On Best Way To Dispose Of Batteries HBG Incinerator Sold, Parking Assets Leased For $400M Finding A Solution For A Sinking Road, 200K Tires State Program Provides Way To Safely Dispose Of Pesticides Era Of Incandescent Bulbs Near End Work Begins Soon On Berks Superfund Site PUC: Over 19,000 Without Heat Service

Utility Shut­Offs Surge, Leaving Households Without Heat Number Of Pennsylvanians Without Heat Up LIHEAP Crisis Grants Available January 2 DEP Climate Plan Doesn’t Set Goal To Reduce Emissions Editorial: Biofuel Foolishness Bird Enthusiasts Across NE Tally Species 3rd Landmark Forest Hit By Invasive Pest Asian Insect Threatens Survival Of Hemlocks State Grants Support Phipps Conservatory Other Projects Presque Isle, Pymatuning First Day Hikes Webcam Captures Eagles In Nest Along Monongahela River Appalachian Trail Museum Searches For Hall Of Famers In Memorium: Ken Hess Game Commission ­­ DEP’s NewsClips webpage ­ Click Here Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle

Marcellus Shale NewsClips                                                                   
Here are NewsClips on topics related to Marcellus Shale natural gas drilling­­­ Top 10 Stores Of 2013, Pooling Law, Major Layoffs 2013’s Ups, Downs In Drilling Boom StateImpact: Top 10 Stories Of 2013 Part II StateImpact: Top 10 Stories Of 2013 Part III StateImpact: Top 10 Stories Of 2013 Part IV Editorial: Tapping Brakes On Natural Gas Giveaways Editorial: Use Gas Ruling For Further Improvement Letter: Act 13 Ruling Hurts Business Climate Op­Ed: PA Supreme Court Strikes A Blow For Environment Grant Funding Available From Marcellus Shale Impact Fees Shell, Horsehead Agree To Extension For Cracker Plant Site Shell Takes Final Extension On PA Cracker Site Unconventional Gas Wells’ Impact Increasing 5 Fire Companies Battle Blaze At Drilling Services Company Natural Gas Fill­Ups Coming to Trucking Company Financial/Other States New Gas Pipeline From PA Stirs Controversy In KY Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle

Flooding/Watershed NewsClips                                                                        

Here are NewsClips on watershed topics from around the state­­ Schuylkill River Leads River Of The Year Balloting, 5 Days Remain Which Waterway Will Win River Of The Year? Lititz To Receive $300K Grant For Watershed Improvements Lancaster Conservation District’s McNutt Retiring, But Not Really Editorial: Water Policy Boosts Sprawl Hunting Clubhouse Restored For Johnstown Disaster Settlement Reached On Sewer Overcharges In HBG Debt Deal Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle

Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits                                           
No new regulations were published this week.  Pennsylvania Bulletin ­ December 28, 2013 Proposed Regulations Open For Comment ­ DEP webpage Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods ­ DEP webpage DEP Regulatory Agenda ­ DEP webpage

Technical Guidance & Permits
The Fish and Boat Commission published notice of changes to the Mentored Youth Fishing Day Program. The PA Housing Finance Agency published notice of the 2014 Plan for the PA Housing Affordability and Rehabilitation Program funded by Marcellus Shale drilling impact fees. The Governor’s Budget Office published notice of 2014 cost of living salary increases for the Governor and other cabinet officials in the December 27 PA Bulletin. Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines ­ DEP webpage Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance ­ DEP webpage Technical Guidance Recently Finalized ­ DEP webpage Copies of Final Technical Guidance ­ DEP webpage Visit DEP’s new Public Participation Center for information on how you can Be Informed! and Get Involved! in DEP regulation and guidance development process. Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle

Calendar Of Events                                                                       
Upcoming legislative meetings, conferences, workshops, plus links to other online calendars.  Meetings

are in Harrisburg unless otherwise noted.  NEW means new from last week.  Go to the online Calendar webpage. Click on Agenda Released on calendar entries to see the NEW meeting agendas published this week. NOTE: The Department of Environmental Protection published a schedule of 2014 advisory committee and board meetings in the December 21 PA Bulletin starting on page 7503. January 2­­ Agenda Released. Chesapeake Bay Commission meeting.  Governor’s Reception Room, State House, Annapolis, MD. 9:00 a.m. January 3­­DEP informational webinar on proposed Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. 9:30  to 10:30 a.m.  Click Here for more information or to register. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 7­­ Environmental Quality Board hearing on Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. Tunkhannock High School Auditorium, 135 Tiger Drive, Tunkhannock, Wyoming County. 6:00 p.m. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 8­­ DEP Technical Advisory Committee on Diesel­Powered Mining Equipment meeting. Fayette County Health Center, Uniontown.  10:00. January 9­­ DEP Mining and Reclamation Advisory Board meeting.  Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.  10:00. January 9­­ Environmental Quality Board hearing on Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. West Chester University of Pennsylvania’s Sykes Student Union Theater, 110 West Rosedale Avenue, West Chester, Chester County. 6:00 p.m. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 10­­ NEW. Senate Game and Fisheries Committee and Senate Republican Policy Committee hearing on threatened and endangered species­­ Senate Bill 1047 (Scarnati­R­ Jefferson).  Eberly College of Business and Information Auditorium, 664 Pratt Dr., Indiana University, Indiana. 10:00. January 13­­ Environmental Quality Board hearing on Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. Pennsylvania College of Technology’s Klump Academic Center, One College Avenue, Williamsport, Lycoming County. 6:00 p.m. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 14­­ DEP public hearing on proposed repeal of the portable fuel container regulation from the state Air Quality Implementation Plan.  DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg.  1:00.  (formal notice) January 15­­ DEP Water Resources Advisory Committee meeting.  Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.  9:30. January 15­­ DEP Coastal Zone Advisory Committee meeting.  10th Floor Conference Room, Rachel

Carson Building. 9:30. January 15­­ Environmental Quality Board hearing on Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. Meadville Area Senior High School Auditorium, 930 North Street, Meadville, Crawford County. 6:00 p.m. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 16­­ Environmental Quality Board hearing on Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. Good Hope Middle School Auditorium, 451 Skyport Road, Mechanicsburg, Cumberland County. 6:00 p.m. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 21­­ Environmental Quality Board meeting.  Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.  9:00. January 21­­ DEP Citizens Advisory Council meeting. Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.  11:00. January 21­­ DEP hearing on Regional Haze State Implementation Plan revisions related to the Cheswick Power Plant, Allegheny County. DEP Southwest Regional Office, 400 Waterfront Dr., Pittsburgh. 1:00. (formal notice) January 21­­ DEP hearing on Regional Haze State Implementation Plan revisions related to the Cheswick Power Plant, Allegheny County. DEP Southcentral Office, 909 Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 1:00. (formal notice) January 21­­ DEP hearing on Regional Haze State Implementation Plan revisions related to the Cheswick Power Plant, Allegheny County. DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main St., Norristown. 1:00. (formal notice) January 22­­ DEP Chesapeake Bay Management Team meeting.  DEP Southcentral Office, 909 Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg.  9:30. January 22­­ DEP Small Business Compliance Advisory Committee meeting.  12th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00. January 22­­ Environmental Quality Board hearing on Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. Washington and Jefferson College’s Rossin Campus Center / Allen Ballroom, 60 South Lincoln Street, Washington, Washington County. 6:00 p.m. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 23­­ Environmental Quality Board hearing on Chapter 78 Oil and Gas Regulation Changes. Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s Convention and Athletic Complex, 711 Pratt Drive, Indiana, Indiana County. 6:00 p.m. (formal notice­PA Bulletin, page 7377) January 23­­ DEP public hearing on proposed revisions to the state Air Quality Implementation Plan for motor vehicle emissions budgets in Allentown­Bethlehem­Easton 8­hour ozone maintenance area. DEP Northeast Regional Office, 2nd Floor Little Schuylkill Room, 2 Public Square, Wilkes­Barre. 10:00.  (formal notice)

February 5­­ DCNR Community Conservation Partnership Grants Workshop. Camp Hill, Prosser Hall, Camp Hill Borough Building. 9 to noon.  Click Here to register. February 6­­ DCNR Community Conservation Partnership Grants Workshop. Conshohocken, Fire Academy, Montgomery County Public Safety Training Campus. 9 to noon.  Click Here to register. February 19­­ DCNR Community Conservation Partnership Grants Workshop. Nanticoke, Educational Conference Center, Luzerne County Community College. 9 to noon. Click Here to register. February  20­­ DCNR Community Conservation Partnership Grants Workshop. Boalsburg, Pennsylvania Military Museum. 9 to noon.  Click Here to register. February 25­­ DCNR Community Conservation Partnership Grants Workshop. Wexford, Pine Township Recreation Center. 9 to noon.  Click Here to register. February 26­­  DCNR Community Conservation Partnership Grants Workshop. Clarion Clarion Holiday Inn. 9 to noon.  Click Here to register. Visit DEP’s new Public Participation Center for information on how you can Be Informed! and Get Involved! in DEP regulation and guidance development process. Click Here for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages. DEP Calendar of Events Note: The Environmental Education Workshop Calendar is no longer available from the PA Center for Environmental Education because funding for the Center was eliminated in the FY 2011­12 state budget.  The PCEE website was also shutdown, but some content was moved to the PA Association of Environmental Educators' website. Senate Committee Schedule                House Committee Schedule You can watch the Senate Floor Session and House Floor Session live online. Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle

Stories Invited                                                                                     
Send your stories, photos and links to videos about your project, environmental issues or programs for publication in the PA Environment Digest to:  DHess@CrisciAssociates.com. PA Environment Digest is edited by David E. Hess, former Secretary Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, and is published as a service of Crisci Associates, a Harrisburg­based government and public affairs firm whose clients include Fortune 500 companies and non­profit organizations.

Did you know you can search 10 years of back issues of the PA Environment Digest on dozens of topics, by county and on any keyword you choose?  Just click on the search page. PA Environment Digest weekly was the winner of the PA Association of Environmental Educators' 2009 Business Partner of the Year Award. Also sign up for these other services from Crisci Associates­­ Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle PA Environment Digest Twitter Feed:  On Twitter, sign up to receive instant updates from: PAEnviroDigest. PA Environment Daily Blog: provides daily environmental NewsClips and significant stories and announcements on environmental topics in Pennsylvania of immediate value.  Sign up and receive as they are posted updates through your favorite RSS reader.  You can also sign up for a once daily email alerting you to new items posted on this blog. PA Capitol Digest Daily Blog to get updates every day on Pennsylvania State Government, including NewsClips, coverage of key press conferences and more. Sign up and receive as they are posted updates through your favorite RSS reader.  You can also sign up for a once daily email alerting you to new items posted on this blog. PA Capitol Digest Twitter Feed: Don't forget to sign up to receive the PA Capitol Digest Twitter feed to get instant updates on other news from in and around the Pennsylvania State Capitol.

Supporting Member PA Outdoor Writers Assn./PA Trout Unlimited        
PA Environment Digest is a supporting member of the Pennsylvania Outdoor Writers Association, Pennsylvania Council Trout Unlimited and the Doc Fritchey Chapter Trout Unlimited.