By Mike Dunn

GAYLORD – Before the
start of the new year, it’s
always appropriate to look
backward one final time to
remember and celebrate
some of the chief highlights
of the year that is passing.
In sports, there were plen-
ty of candidates for the top
story of 2012. The
Mancelona baseball team,
the Petoskey boys soccer
team, the Pellston boys bas-
ketball team, the St. Mary
girls basketball team and the
Onaway volleyball team all
had major achievements, as
did the Johannesburg-
Lewiston football and base-
ball teams.
Individually, longtime J-L
baseball coach Rick Guild
surpassed 700 wins. Pellston
senior Chris Hass was
named the Class D Player of
the Year by the Associated
Press. Gaylord senior golfer
Alex Dombrowski had a stel-
lar year on the links.
Picking the top 10 stories
is always a subjective task.
Most of the time, I pick
team achievements over
individual achievements
because it requires more
things to go right for teams
to make their mark.
This year I’m picking the
Mancelona baseball team
advancing to the Final Four
for the first time in school
history as the top sports
story. The Ironmen of coach
Jim VanWagoner repeated as
Div. 3 regional champions
with a compelling perform-
ance at Charlevoix, defeating
quality opponents Benzie
Central and Whittemore-
Prescott.
Then they edged state-
ranked and heavily favored
S
SECTION B
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One
Gaylord
Mancelona baseball in Final Four tops the list
Petoskey boys soccer in state final is runner-up
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Weekly ChoiCe file photo
Top SporTS
STorieS 2012
L
L
* Grayling coach Rich Moffit
reaches 300 career wins January 3
with 80-38 win at Houghton Lake
* Onaway girls coach Marty Mix
reaches 100 wins as Molly Cleaver
buzzer-beater beats Forest Area in
January
* Senior Chris Hass passes 2,000
points as Pellston beats Central Lake
83-54 on Jan. 10
* Pellston senior Andy Hamlin
passes 1,000 points Jan. 24 in 81-45
win over Forest Area
* SMH senior Karli Jacob
becomes eighth Snowbird gal to sur-
pass 1,000 points in school history
* Grayling junior Brandon
Handrich (152) and Onaway senior
Trey Leach (140) win regional
wrestling championships
* Trey Leach of Onaway earns
fourth place in D-4 state wrestling
finals at Auburn Hills, Handrich of
Grayling takes fifth in D-3 state meet
* Mackinaw City girls of coach
Adam Stefanski come from behind to
edge Pellston 62-53 and win Class D
district hardwood title for second
time in school history
* Gaylord grad Will Weber signs
entry-level pro contract with
Columbus Blue Jackets after com-
pleting college career at Miami of
Ohio
* Mancelona boys of coach Rick
Duerksen are Academic All-State
champions with 3.75 GPA
* Mancy shortstop Dakota Derrer
sets state softball record with 20
triples in a season as she helps
Mancy earn school record 25 wins
* Mancy softball falls in D-3
regional semifinal 4-3 to T.C. St.
Francis after winning first-ever dis-
trict title behind pitching of junior
Kallie Derrer
* J-L baseball sets school record,
improving to 32-5 while beating
Atlanta 11-1 and Hillman 14-2 to
repeat as district champs at Gaylord
* Dynamic duo Andy Triebold and
Steve LaJoie repeat for fifth time as
AuSable River Canoe Marathon
champs in 14:42:43
* Grayling sophomore big-play
machine Scout Tobin throws for one
TD and runs twice for 95 yards as
Vikings beat T.C. St. Francis 28-20
for first time ever
* Grayling puts lock down on
unbeaten Boyne City in 21-0 victory
to capture first-ever LMC gridiron
title and first-ever perfect 9-0 regular
season, Ty Jensen scores all 3 TDs
* Mancelona repeats as unbeaten
SVC gridiron champ, defeats
Whittemore-Prescott 38-24 in home
playoff opener, advancing to district
title game at Ishpeming
* Gaylord senior harrier Charlend
Howard is third Blue Devil to win
BNC medalist honors; Charlend
earns All-State with 24th overall in
D-2 state finals, 15:54.8
* Gaylord boys cross country team
of coach Jeff Kalember is Academic
state champ in D-2 with 3.9555 GPA
Some Sports
Milestones of 2012:
Top
Sports Stories of
2012
Mancelona baseball (29-5)
repeats as Division 3 regional
champ, beating Benzie Central 5-
2 and Whittemore 8-3 behind the
stellar pitching of Craig Conway
and Brandon Dingman. The
Ironmen then beat Newaygo 2-1
in quarterfinals at Traverse City
to reach the Final Four at Battle
Creek.
Petoskey boys soccer (17-9-2)
captures eighth regional title with
thrilling 1-0 victory over East
Lansing as senior Evan Altman
scores lone goal in OT, senior
Drew Smith posts shutout in
nets. Northmen reach D-2 state
title game vs. Hudsonville Unity
Christian and play well in 3-0
loss.
Pellston boys (23-2) capture the
first regional title since 1944
behind the stellar play of senior
scoring aces Chris Hass and
Andy Hamlin. Hornets beat 71-
53 in title game, advance to
quarterfinals against rugged U.P.
foe Carney-Nadeau.
St. Mary girls (23-2) capture
district and regional hardwood
titles, fall to rugged U.P. foe
Forest Park 59-57 in quarterfi-
nals. The Snowbirds defeat
unbeaten, state-ranked Posen
64-50 to win first regional title
since 2002.
Onaway volleyball team (48-5-3)
of coach Steve Watson captures
first-ever Class D regional title
with back-to-back wins over
perennial rival Pellston and tal-
ented U.P. foe Rudyard, then
sweep past Forest Park in quar-
terfinals at Manistique to
advance to the Final Four in
Battle Creek.
Longtime Johannesburg-
Lewiston baseball coach Rick
Guild surpasses 700 wins in his
remarkable coaching career as
the Cardinals edge Rogers City
3-2 on April 10.
Pellston senior Chris Hass
repeats as Class D Player of the
Year in basketball after averaging
31 points per game and reaching
a remarkable 2,492 points for his
career, the third highest total in
state history.
Gaylord senior Alex Dombrowski
shoots a school record round of
65 at Mistwood on April 25 in
T.C., takes third in region and
third in D-2 state finals at Katke
with rounds of 67 and 73 for
two-day total of 140.
Louis Lamberti of Petoskey, a
remarkable four-sport scholar
athlete for the Northmen, cap-
tures the D-2 state title in the
high hump, clearing 6-foot-8.
The Johannesburg-Lewiston
football team of coach John
Bush wins back-to-back
home playoff games on the
gridiron to advance to the
Div. 8 regional finals at the
field of eventual state finalist
Beal City.
1
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1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
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continued on page 2-B...
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a
s k o o l l e e h
By Mike Dunn
MOUNT PLEASANT –
Former Petoskey standout
Kerby Tamm continues to do
a pretty good job handling
the hardwood at the next
level.
After a sterling four-year
prep career with the
Northmen, Kerby joined the
Central Michigan University
program following her 2011
graduation.
The 5-foot-10 Tamm, who
starred as a wing for Petoskey
but was adept at every posi-
tion on the floor, employs her
ball-handling skills in the
backcourt at CMU along with
her shooting and passing
abilities. She played in 33
games last year as a true
freshman, including one
start, and she’s been a steady
force off the bench for the
Chips so far in her sopho-
more season.
Through 10 games, Kerby
has averaged 5.1 points and
nearly 20 minutes of floor
time as CMU has posted a 5-
5 record. Tamm has tamed
the twine for a season-high
total of 15 points in two dif-
ferent games. In the 88-62
win over South Dakota State
in the home opener back on
Nov. 23, Kerby canned five
from downtown to account
for all 15 of her points.
Kerby has been sharp as a
barber’s blade in her shoot-
ing and smart in her shot
selection as she has drained a
highly respectable 40 percent
of her attempts from the
floor.
Anyone familiar with
Kerby’s colossal prep career
is probably not surprised at
well she is acclimating to life
at the Div. I collegiate level.
Kerby was twice named the
Top Choice Player of the Year
in girls basketball following
her junior and senior seasons
at Petoskey, where she was a
four-year starter and a team
captain three of those years.
Kerby was a first-team All-
State pick in Class B as a jun-
ior and a first-team selection
in Class A in her senior year
as well. She also earned the
prestigious BCAM “Best of
the Best” award after her sen-
ior season ended. In addition
to being the Top Choice
Player of the Year twice, she
was also the Player of the Year
in the Big North Conference
twice in a row.
Kerby left for CMU with
her shoe prints all over the
school record book. She
holds Petoskey’s single-sea-
son records for points (360),
rebounds (246) and free
throw percentage (85.9). She
finished her senior year as
the all-time career scoring
leader with 1,356 total points
and the career rebounding
leader with 802 rebounds.
Oh, and she does pretty
good in the classroom, too.
The cerebral Kerby earned
Academic All-State honors as
a junior at Petoskey and she
is carrying an outstanding
3.63 GPA so far at CMU.
Former Petoskey standout is making her mark for Chippewas
in second year
Page 2-B • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! January 3, 2013
LOCAL SPORTS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Ke+b2 Ta&&
Manton grad Thompson
shines for Albion
ALBION – Manton gradu-
ate Katie Thompson contin-
ues to shine for the Albion
College women’s basketball
team.
The rawhide-tough
Thompson, known as
“Tornado” Thompson for her
fierce, frenetic play during
her notable four-year varsity
career with the Rangers, has
started nine of 11 games to
date as a true freshman for-
ward and center for the
Britons.
Katie is the team’s third
leading scorer thus far, aver-
aging 7.5 points per game,
and she is also casting a long
shadow under the glass
where she’s the second-lead-
ing rebounder, averaging 6.4
caroms per game.
In a recent two-game win-
ning streak, Thompson went
6-for-6 from the charity
stripe with a team-high eight
rebounds and three steals in
a 63-48 win over Alma
College and she also helped
spark a 61-51 victory over the
University of Michigan-
Dearborn, scoring six of her
nine points during an 11-1
run where the Britons rallied
from a 16-6 deficit to tie the
score at 17. Katie finished
with eight boards and played
32 minutes in the win.
Albion (3-8) was scheduled
to play Mount Union on
Friday, Dec. 28, in the first
round of the Zimmerman
Memorial Holiday Basketball
Classic in Springfield, Ohio.
Newaygo by a razor-thin 2-1
margin in the quarterfinals
as mound ace Craig Conway
twirled his third complete-
game victory of the playoffs,
going all eight innings.
The Ironmen were the first
team from Mancelona to
advance to the Final Four in
any sport.
The Petoskey boys soccer
team of third-year coach
Zach Jonker had a 3-7-1
record after the first 11
matches of the 2012 cam-
paign. After that, the
Northmen were virtually
unbeatable, however, posting
a 14-2-1 record over the last
17 games and not stopping
until they reached the D-2
state finals against
Hudsonville Unity Christian.
The top 10 stories for 2012
are listed elsewhere on this
page. Some of the milestone
accomplishments from the
year are also listed separately
on this page.
Here are nutshells of the
top five stories:
Mancelona baseball
repeats as Division 3 regional
champ, beating Benzie
Central 5-2 and Whittemore
8-3 behind the stellar pitch-
ing of Craig Conway and
Brandon Dingman. The
Ironmen then beat Newaygo
2-1 in quarterfinals at
Traverse City to reach the
Final Four at Battle Creek,
where the Ironmen lost to
Lansing Catholic in semifi-
nals to close with a 29-5
record.
This is from the June 14
issue of the Weekly Choice:
TRAVERSE CITY – The
Mancelona baseball team
added to its 2012 laurels with
an extra-inning victory
Tuesday in the quarterfinals
against Newaygo. The
Ironmen prevailed 2-1 in
eight innings to advance to
the Final Four at Bailey Park
in Battle Creek for the first
time in school history.
Senior ace Craig Conway
turned in another stellar per-
formance, scattering six hits
and not allowing an earned
run. He struck out seven.
The Ironmen scored in the
bottom of the sixth to tie the
game at 1 and then scored in
the bottom of the eight to
win in walk-off fashion. In
the sixth, junior Wyatt Derrer
drilled a clutch two-out dou-
ble to chase home Cole
VanWagoner with the tying
run.
In the eighth, first base-
man Damion Decker reached
base on an error and
advanced to second on a
passed ball. Logan Borst then
put the ball in play with a
perfectly executed bunt and
Decker came all the way
around to score when the
ball was thrown away.
“This is the first time ever
for a Mancelona team to be
in the Final Four,” said
Mancelona coach Jim
VanWagoner. “I couldn’t be
happier for the kids. It’s a
great accomplishment for
them, for the school and for
the whole Mancelona com-
munity.”
2. Petoskey boys soccer
(17-9-2) captures eighth
regional title with thrilling 1-
0 victory over East Lansing as
senior Evan Altman scores
lone goal in OT, senior Drew
Smith posts shutout in nets.
Northmen reach D-2 state
title game vs. Hudsonville
Unity Christian and play well
in 3-0 loss.
3. Pellston boys (23-2) cap-
ture the first regional title
since 1944 behind the stellar
play of senior scoring aces
Chris Hass and Andy Hamlin.
Hass hits for 30 with 11
boards and seven assists and
Hamlin tallies 21 with 15
boards as Hornets beat 71-53
in title game, advance to
quarterfinals against rugged
U.P. foe Carney-Nadeau.
4. St. Mary girls (23-2) cap-
ture district and regional
hardwood titles, fall to
rugged U.P. foe Forest Park
59-57 in quarterfinals as Lexi
Gussert hits a clutch shot at
buzzer. The Snowbirds defeat
unbeaten, state-ranked
Posen 64-50 to win first
regional title since 2002. Kari
Borowiak scores 18 in region-
al title game. Karli Jacob jams
the nets for 15 and long-
armed Mary Spyhalski comes
off the bench to hit for 12.
5. Onaway volleyball team
(48-5-3) of coach Steve
Watson captures first-ever
Class D regional title with
back-to-back wins over
perennial rival Pellston and
talented U.P. foe Rudyard,
then sweep past Forest Park
in quarterfinals at
Manistique to advance to the
Final Four in Battle Creek.
Mariah Ehrke is a monster at
the net, establishing a record
with more than 400 kills in
the season and super senior
setter Megan Estep earns Top
Choice Player of the Year
honors.
2012 Continued...
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McNamara Insurance Agency, Inc.
114 North Court, Gaylord - 989-732-6471
Open 9-5 Daily; 9-12 Saturday
Tamm contributes for CMU women
Rob DefoRge of RDspoRtsphoto.CoM
CHEBOYGAN -- The
Department of Natural
Resources office in
Cheboygan is among the
locations open to successful
hunters and trappers to bring
their catch to be examined.
Many DNR office locations
are offering furbearer regis-
tration hours for during the
2012-2013 furharvester sea-
sons.
Anyone taking a bobcat,
river otter, fisher, marten or
incidental catch must bring
the animal to a designated
furbearer check station for
examination.
DNR staff members collect
biological data from the har-
vested animals, including
sex, age and physical condi-
tion of the specimen. The
skull of each specimen will
also be retained for tooth and
DNA samples. An official seal
is then attached to each pelt
to show it has been inspect-
ed.
"Registration for these
furbearers is mandatory, as
the information gathered
helps us determine proposed
bag limits and season struc-
ture for the future," said DNR
furbearer specialist Adam
Bump. "Cooperation from
trappers and hunters in this
effort is greatly appreciated."
The following DNR offices
are open for furbearer regis-
tration during regular busi-
ness hours: Please note, due
to field staff limitations, all
fur harvesters are encour-
aged to call ahead to ensure
someone is available to assist
with furbearer registration.)
•Baraga, Bay City, Cadillac,
Gaylord, Marquette and
Newberry operations service
centers
•Cheboygan, Crystal Falls,
Escanaba, Gwinn and
Norway field offices
DNR offices with specially
designated furbearer regis-
tration dates and hours are as
follows:
•Wakefield: 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. (Central Time) on Jan. 9
& 23; Feb. 6 & 20; March 6 &
20; and April 17
•Stephenson: 4 to 6 p.m.
(Central Time) on Jan. 4, Feb.
7, March 7 and May 4
DNR ffices that offer
furbearer registration by
appointment only:
Approximately 40 addi-
tional DNR locations (includ-
ing operations service cen-
ters, field offices, state game
areas and state parks) offer
furbearer registration during
normal business hours by
appointment only.
Trappers and hunters must
call ahead to ensure staff
availability at locations that
require an appointment. For
a full list of locations, includ-
ing contact information, visit
www. mi chi gan. gov/trap-
ping.
Non-DNR locations open
for furbearer registration
include:
•U.S. Forest Service Office
in Manistique, by appoint-
ment only
•U.S. Forest Service Office
in Rapid River, 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. M-F
•Settler's Co-op in Bruce
Crossing, by appointment
only
Trappers and furbearer
hunters are reminded that
they must register their own
take and cannot register for
others. Complete details and
instructions for furbearer
registration can be found in
the 2012 Michigan Hunting
and Trapping Guide, which is
available online at
www.michigan.gov/hunting,
at DNR operations service
centers, and at authorized
license vendors statewide.
For more information
about furbearer registration,
contact Adam Bump at 517-
373-1263, or call one of the
DNR offices listed above.
Successful trappers and hunters must bring catch to DNR furbearer check station for
examination
Ice Fishing is a Very Cool Sport!
Hockey
LOCAL SPORTS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
January 3, 2013 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 3-B
Furbearer registration open at Cheboygan
By Doug Derrer
TRAVERSE CITY -- In their
first game of the Scott Miller
Memorial Holiday
Tournament the Bay Reps fell
to the Traverse City Central
Trojans 7-2.
The Trojan special teams
did most of the damage,
scoring three power play
goals and a short-handed
goal to lead their team to vic-
tory. After Central scored a
pair of goals 11 seconds apart
in the opening period, Zach
Hill scored a short-handed
goal for the Reps to get Bay
Area within a goal.
The Trojans would add two
more goals in the opening
period before Hill scored his
second goal with 8 seconds
left in the period to make the
score 4-2 in favor of Central.
The second period would
be costly for the Reps as the
Trojans added two more
goals and they lost Hill as the
result of a controversial
check from behind call which
disqualified him for the rest
of this game and the next two
games. A third period short-
handed goal by the Trojans
made the final score 7-2 in
favor of Central.
In the consolation bracket
the Reps faced Midland and
Bay Area goalie Claire Huhta
saw her first action in net
after returning from a knee
injury she suffered during
soccer season. The Reps and
Chemics skated to a 0-0 tie
after one period as both
teams played strong defense.
Midland came out strong
in the second period and
scored three goals to take a 3-
0 lead in the second inter-
mission. Midland scored
another goal in the third
period before Travis Kirk
scored a power play goal for
the Reps with an assist from
Andrew Dzierwa, but two
more Chemic goals would
make the final score 6-1 in
favor of Midland.
The Reps would face
Traverse City West in their
final game of the tournament
and after a scoreless first
period the fireworks would
erupt in the second period.
Nick Sicinski put the Reps
up 1-0 when he scored an
unassisted power play goal
with 13:33 to go in the period.
Three minutes later Kirk gave
the Reps a two-goal lead with
help from Trevor Apsey and
Mark Mol. The Titans scored
two goals to even the score at
2-2 before Josh Hill scored a
power play goal with 7 sec-
onds left in the period to give
the Reps a 3-2 lead. That goal
would be the game winner as
the Reps defense and goalie
Jay Jones stymied the Titan
offense in the third period
and Bay Area held on for a 3-
2 win.
The Reps will take their 3-7
record in the road as they
travel to Cadillac on January
2, Tri Valley on Jan. 4 and
Mid-Michigan on Jan. 5.
For many people, fishing is
the most relaxing way to
spend the day. And in the
winter months the most pop-
ular angling activity is ice
fishing. To those who have
never tried it, ice fishing is
sometimes looked upon as
an oddity, but for others, ice
fishing is the best kind of
fishing.
Although it doesn't appeal
to all, many anglers actually
prefer fishing through the ice
to open-water fishing. For
one thing, anglers can get
just about anywhere on the
lake during ice fishing sea-
son, something they can't do
without a boat during the
open water season. Virtually
every fish that's available to
anglers in the summer can be
caught through the ice -
some are even caught more
frequently in the winter.
Once you've spent a little
time on the ice, you'll soon
see a different picture. Ice
fishing is more than just a
way to fill the long days of
winter. It's a chance to
breathe the cold, clean win-
ter air, to spend quiet time
outdoors with family and
friends, and to relax and col-
lect one's thoughts away
from the hustle and bustle of
a busy world.
Just walking on the ice can
be a unique experience,
especially when no snow
obscures the view of the
water below. However, as
with any outdoor activity,
safety should be your top
concern. When it comes to
ice safety, you should steer
clear of dark spots or places
where the snow looks discol-
ored.
Some other good rules to
follow include: 1. Never fish
alone, 2. Tell someone where
you are going and when you
expect to return, 3. Always
test the ice with a spud
(described later), 4. Take the
appropriate emergency
items, such as a lifejacket and
ice picks, and 5. Take a cell
phone with you in case you
need to call for help. Dress in
your warmest winter clothes;
fill a thermos with hot coffee,
chocolate or tea; and bring
an empty bucket or old lawn
chair to sit on.
To get started ice fishing,
you'll need the basics: some-
thing to make a hole in the
ice, something to clear the
hole and keep it open and ice
free, and something to fish
with, or equipment.
The two basic tools used to
make holes in the ice are
spuds and augers. A spud
features a long-shank with a
chisel-like end that's used to
chip a hole in the ice. A spud
is a tool you use when the ice
isn't too thick. An auger is a
corkscrew-like device with a
cutting blade that operates
like a hand drill to make a
hole in the ice. For extremely
thick ice, power augers that
run on batteries or small
gasoline engines are avail-
able and make creating holes
much easier.
Once the hole is created it
needs to be cleared of ice
chips or slush. A skimmer (or
a slush scoop) is a small cup
with holes in it (to let the
water run out) on a long han-
dle. It is inexpensive and per-
fectly suited for the job. A
skimmer is used to clear the
hole right after it's made, as
well as throughout the day if
it's particularly cold and if
additional ice forms.
Please note the size of the
hole is important. The hole
must be big enough that you
can get a fish out, but not too
large of a hole that it may
endanger someone's life.
Anglers are recommended to
keep their holes to a maxi-
mum of eight to 10 inches in
diameter which would
accommodate the size of
most fish species. When
abandoning fishing holes,
anglers should mark them
with a tree branch, sticks or
chunks of ice to alert others
of their presence.
Ice fishing equipment can
be divided into three basic
categories: hook-and-line,
tip-ups and spears.
Most hook-and-line
anglers use short, limber
rods with reels or simple
spring-tension spools to hold
the line. Sometimes they may
use something as simple as a
couple of pegs on the rod
handle used to wrap the line
around. Limber rods allow
the use of light line, which
usually results in better fish-
ing and absorbs more of the
shock when fighting fish.
Hook-and-line anglers use
live bait, artificial lures or
sometimes both to catch
many different species of
fish. Anglers often use small
lures, such as teardrops or
flies, with live bait - such as
wax worms (bee moth larva),
spikes (fly larvae), wigglers
(mayfly larvae) or minnows -
attached to the hook for bet-
ter action. The bait can be
fished without movement or
jigging can be used to attract
the fish. Jigging is most suc-
cessful if a lure of any kind is
used.
Hook-and-line anglers
have the choice of using a
bobber on the line, just as
they would while fishing in
the summer. Some may also
fish with a tight line and use a
spring bobber, which is a
small strip of metal or wire
that extends off the rod tip
like an additional eye on the
rod. Any motion alerts
anglers to the bite, a bonus
for small fish or light-biters.
Generally, anglers begin by
fishing near the bottom and
work their way up in the
water column until they
locate the fish, then continue
to fish at that same depth.
Anglers can use bobbers to
set their baits at a preferred
depth or fish a tight line,
either fishing without move-
ment or jigging.
For bigger fish, anglers use
heavier gear with larger lures
or bigger hooks which allows
them to use larger baits -
minnows, smelt, salmon eggs
or spawn bags. Anglers gen-
erally start at the bottom and
gradually move up in the
water column when jigging,
while those fishing with live
bait, spawn bags or salmon
eggs generally fish right off
the bottom.
Some anglers prefer to fish
with tip-ups, which are
devices set on the ice above
the hole that dangle the bait
(most often minnows)
beneath them. Tip-ups,
which feature small reels
submerged in the water, get
their name from a flag that's
bent over and attached to the
reel. When a fish takes the
bait, the reel turns and
releases not only line, but the
flag as well. The flags' "tip
up" action alerts the angler
to the fish taking out line.
Tip-ups are usually spooled
with heavy, braided line.
Often an angler who is fish-
ing with a rod will also set a
tip-up in a different hole, giv-
ing them two ways to catch a
fish and giving them an
opportunity to fish for differ-
ent species, or more than one
fish, or at two different but
close by locations.
Spearing is another form of
ice fishing that is a more spe-
cialized but traditional sport.
Anglers who spear cut large
holes in the ice, usually with
an ice saw or chain saw. They
fish from tents or small shel-
ters commonly called
shanties that can be portable
or more permanent (or at
least as permanent as the ice
is). The shanty blocks the
light, allowing anglers to see
down more clearly in the
water in order to spear the
fish. This has given rise to the
term dark-house spearing.
Spearing anglers generally
dangle decoys or large live
baits (such as suckers) in the
water to attract their target
fish. They utilize spears that
typically have a substantial
weight to them and have
seven to nine tines on the
end of a seven-foot handle.
The most common species
hook-and-line ice fishermen
are looking for are panfish:
bluegill, sunfish, perch and
crappie. Tip-ups are general-
ly used for larger game fish,
such as northern pike, wall-
eye and various trout species.
In Michigan, spear fishermen
are allowed to target north-
ern pike, muskellunge, lake
sturgeon and many other
species. There are many
restrictions associated with
spear fishing and anglers
should read the annual
Michigan Fishing Guide for
more information.
A basic tip for all three ice
fishing methods is that the
most success is seen around
dawn until mid-morning and
again from late afternoon
until sundown. This is espe-
cially true for panfish and
walleye. Some species can be
more aggressive at other
times during the day, such as
northern pike. It's also
important to understand that
fish are more sluggish during
the winter and move around
less, especially during the
middle of winter when ice
thickness and snow cover is
the heaviest. The more holes
anglers cut and try, the better
their chances are for locating
aggressive fish.
One common piece of
equipment nearly all types of
anglers who ice fish utilize
are electronic fish finders.
These help anglers locate
both aggressive and non-
aggressive fish and make it
easier to determine if your
holes will be active and how
present fish are reacting to
your fishing methods.
It's important to be pre-
pared to face the elements
when you go ice fishing by
including these items: shelter
and apparel.
Ice fishing can be a fairly
cold activity, especially on
those windy days when it
doesn't seem fit to be out-
doors. On such days, a shan-
ty is almost a requirement.
Many portable shanties are
available at your local sport-
ing goods store, although
some anglers, especially in
northern Michigan where the
ice fishing season can last for
many months build elabo-
rate but removable shanties
on the ice. These may have
insulated walls and many of
the comforts of home.
Propane heaters can keep
them warm and help keep
the fishing holes from freez-
ing. But even a simple wind-
break, made of plywood or
particle board, can help. A
sheet of plywood, cut in half
and hinged, makes a simple
windbreak. If skis or runners
are added to one side, then it
can easily be pulled across
the ice.
Reps rally from two losses to edge T.C. West in final game; Josh Hill hammers home game winner
Bay Reps compete in T.C. tourney
photomichigan.com
Your photos on the web
Bob Gingerich
bob@danishlanding.com
989-348-5355
1923 Dansk Lane, Grayling, MI 49738
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
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CLASSIC AUTO
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*8FGBE4G<BA 231-348-7066
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348-7066
1349 S. Otsego,
GayIord, MI 49735
(989) 732-2477 www.SmithReaItyGayIord.com
45’ OF SANDY BEACH
All Sports Otsego Lake!! Super Cute
log interior with cathedral ceiling,Great
room,huge deck and fenced area!2
Bedroom 1 Bath 2 Car garage Call
today for your preview!!
$149,000. MLS #278223
ENJOY THE BIG LAKE
SUNSETS
from your screened in porch or the hot
tub! But the one of a kind view isn't all this
beautiful home has to offer! It boasts with
Hardwood floors, Finished walk-out lower
level,Stainless appliances, Large rooms,
Huge yard, Custom built in cabinets and
bed in master bedroom, extensive decking
and landscaping, sugar sand beach on an
all sports lake. Must see to believe!
$389,500. MLS #281242
12,000 SQ. FT.
total including 1,400 sq. ft. exec-
utive offices. Building is easily
divided. Has floor hoists in serv-
ice bay(s). 16' ceilings with infra-
red heating. Ideal location in Air
Industrial Park. Sale-Lease-Op-
tion.
$199,000. MLS #279171
LARGE & SPACIOUS HOME
On the beautiful Gaylord Country
Club. Upstairs master suite with
jacuzzi tub & separate shower with
french doors opening up to a private
porch looking out over the 5th Tee
Box and fairway. Formal dining, large
family room as well as breakfast nook
and den with fireplace on main level
will give you plenty of space to
spread out and relax.
$174,900. MLS #281979
PEACEFUL SETTING
Across from Otsego Lake with sea-
sonal views. Tucked up on top of the
hill on 6 private lots, this log/stone
cabin is a nice summer retreat or year
round home. Close to State Park and
snowmobile trails. A home in need of
some handy work, yet a nice buy.
Owner may consider land contract if
terms are favorable.
$59,900. MLS #281777
daIe j. smith
Associate Broker
CRS, RAM, ABR
Wendie Forman
Associate Broker GRI,
Property Manager
Heather Guss
ReaItor Associate
Mike Perdue
ReaItor Associate
GREAT FAMILY RETREAT!!
1 home and 3 cabins all newly re-
modeled and completely turn key
furnished. 120' of frontage on All-
sports Otsego Lake. Sugar sand
beach and 2 boat docks. Amazing
Value!!
$575,000. MLS #281006
Page 4-B • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! January 3, 2013
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FREE GAS!
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RENT-TO-OWN
1999 SONOMA
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www. tailoredenterprises.com
Located in Petoskey 1-888-774-2264
Automotive
Review
photo CopyRight 2012 ChRysleR gRoup llC.
T!e 2013 Jee)4 W+a'%e+ U'%"&"-ed M(ab Ed"-"(', ,!(0' !e+e 0"-! -!e 'e0 R(c$
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Now
AUTO SALES
& Petoskey RV USA
Jeep
®
wins third
consecutive
“Four Wheeler of
the Year” Award
from Four Wheeler
Magazine
The 2013 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited
Moab Edition is the winner of the
respected “Four Wheeler of the Year”
award from the editors of Four Wheeler
magazine. Paying homage to Jeep enthu-
siasts’ favorite off-roading destination,
the Wrangler Unlimited Moab includes
Goodyear Silent Armor off-road tires,
winch-capable steel bumpers, and an
available locking rear differential for
increased capability.
“The Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Moab is
an extremely versatile vehicle, and was a
hands-down trail favorite of the Four
Wheeler judges,” said John Cappa, Four
Wheeler editor. “The improved interior
comfort, amenities, power and overall
performance both on- and off-road
make it worthy of being our 2013 Four
Wheeler of the Year.”
To qualify for the competition, entries
had to be entirely new or have substan-
tial mechanical revisions from a previous
model year. Testing was conducted over
more than a thousand miles on a variety
of terrain, including pavement, gravel,
dirt, sand, rocks and mud.
“The new Jeep Wrangler Moab edition
is a perfect example of listening to our
loyal Wrangler owners, who appreciate
new levels of capability in a unique
package,” said Mike Manley, President
and CEO – Jeep Brand, Chrysler Group
LLC. “The Moab edition recognizes a
die-hard off-roading destination Jeep
owners love, while providing even more
capability, including winch-capable steel
bumpers, upgraded rock rails and a rear
locker. We’re especially pleased that the
influential Four Wheeler editors put our
latest Jeep Wrangler to the test and clear-
ly recognized its capability.”
The 2013 Jeep Wrangler Moab Edition’s
“Four Wheeler of the Year” award comes
a year after the new- for-2012 Jeep
Wrangler Rubicon earned the award, two
years after Jeep Grand Cherokee did so,
and less than three years after the Jeep
Wrangler Rubicon was named the Best
4x4 vehicle of the 2000-2009 decade by
Four Wheeler magazine.
Jeep Wrangler continues to enjoy sig-
nificant momentum in the marketplace,
with sales up 17 percent in 2012.
To kick off the 2013 model year, Jeep
Wrangler debuts a limited-edition model
named after one of the most popular off-
road destinations in the world – Moab,
Utah. The Jeep Wrangler Moab is based
on the Wrangler Sahara model and is
equipped with hardware popular with
off-roading enthusiasts.
Official upgrades include 17-inch
Rubicon alloy wheels painted gloss black
running new 245/75R17 Goodyear Silent
Armor off-road tires and standard Trak-
Lok anti-spin rear differential with an
available electronic rear locking differen-
tial. When equipped with a manual
transmission and a 3.73 rear axle ratio,
Wrangler Moab has a crawl ratio of 45:1.
Unique exterior features on the
Wrangler Moab include a Mopar power
dome hood, premium rock rails, black
fuel filler door and tail lamp guards and
matching premium black front and rear
off-road bumpers. Other exterior touch-
es include the new premium soft top,
black wheel arches, a matte black Jeep
grille badge and “Moab” decals on the
hood. A body-color three-piece hard top
is optional.
Interior modifications include black or
saddle premium leather seats with black
stitching, “Moab” embossed instrument
panel grab handle, Mopar slush mats
and Iron Gray trim on the vent rings,
grab handles and steering wheel spokes.
The Jeep Wrangler Moab is available as
a two-door Wrangler or four-door
Wrangler Unlimited model available in
Crush, Dozer, Rock Lobster, Gecko, Black
and Bright White.
Like all 2013 Jeep Wrangler models, the
Moab edition features Chrysler Group’s
3.6-liter Pentastar V-6 engine, delivering
benchmark capability, excellent every-
day on-road driving dynamics, and fuel
economy up to 21 miles per gallon.
Sponsored by
COMPUTERS & OFFICE
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#A/A+A#!: 21-900, #2900, #21000,
21*, #4J4F4>< ,E<C?8F, G,380,
G+400, CB750, (1969-75) C4F;
C4<7, &4G<BAJ<78 C<6>HC, 800-772-
1142, 310-721-0726. HF4@6?4FF<-
6EHAA8EF.6B@
NATIONAL CLASSIFIEDS
9 %!$$!'& C!*C-$A,!'& 46EBFF G;8
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C4?? C8AGHE4 800-495-5085
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BG;8E B<? & :4F <AG8E8FGF. +8A7 78G4<?F
(.'. BBK 13557, D8AI8E, CB 80201
PETS
2 /!*E #E&&E$+. 'A8 22K13, $20,
BA8 37K27, $40. 989-939-8819
D'G ,*A0 G*''%!&G. DBJAGBJA
G4L?BE7, 220 %<6;<:4A AI8. C4?? 9BE
LBHE 4CCB<AG@8AG GB74L, 989-705-
,*A0 (8729)
SERVICES
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*898E8A68F 4A7 <A9BE@4G<BA 4G
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732-3933
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(8GBF>8L, BBLA8 C<GL, C;4E?8IB<K, E4FG
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4A7 7E<A>F <A6?H7<A: 4 ?<A8-HC B9
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BC8E4G87. CBAG46G HF 4G 989-350-
9238, 989-732-8160 BE 8-@4<? HF 4G
G4L?BE7.8A7<A:@G@4<?.6B@.
SNOW REMOVAL
2001 C;8IL +<?I8E47B 2500 4K4 J/
(?BJ. $B64? 1 BJA8E, 7 1/2 9G BBFF
(B?L B?478 CBJ8E 4A:?8 (?BJ,
B87?<A8E, 6;EB@8 4??BLF, J;88? BC8A-
<A: F?4E8F, *847L GB G4>8 BA J<AG8E,
$10,949. D4I8 #E<A: C;8IEB?8G-
C47<??46, 1861 -+ 31 &BEG;,
(8GBF>8L, %! 231-347-2585.
+&'/($'/!&G, G4L?BE7 4E84.
CB@@8E6<4? BE E8F<78AG<4?. C4?? 9BE
9E88 8FG<@4G8. 989-745-5184
STORAGE
A(+ %<A<-/4E8;BHF8 B9 G4L?BE7 ;4F
5K10 HA<GF 4I4<?45?8 9BE =HFG $30 4
@BAG;. &B ?BA: G8E@ 6BAGE46G A868F-
F4EL. !A GBJA, F498 FGBE4:8. $4E:8E
HA<GF 4?FB 4I4<?45?8. C4?? 989-732-
8160.
B-C# (A, %<A< /4E8;BHF8F FG4EG-
<A: 4G $15 @BAG;. 989-732-2721 BE
989-370-6058
84G87 BE CB?7 FGBE4:8 4I4<?45?8 9BE
/<AG8E, +CE<A:, +H@@8E, F4??, 989-
732-0724
SUV
2002 FBE7 EKC?BE8E. 4K4. $84G;8E,
3E7 EBJ F84G, GBJ C>:. (4L@8AGF 4F
?BJ 4F $249 4 @BAG;. DE<I8 &BJ AHGB
+4?8F, 2215 -+ <:;J4L 31 &
(8GBF>8L, %! 49770. (;BA8 231-347-
3200
2003 FBE7 EKC?BE8E 0$+. 4K4, 6 6L?,
GBJ C>:. (4L@8AGF 4F ?BJ 4F $199 4
@BAG;. (8GBF>8L AHGB GEBHC, &B5B7L
+8?? FBE $8FF 2215 &. -+-31,
(8GBF>8L, %! 231-347-6080.
JJJ.C8GBF>8L4HGB:EBHC.6B@
2003 FBE7 EKC?BE8E 0$+. 4K4, 6 6L?,
GBJ C>:. (4L@8AGF 4F ?BJ 4F $199 4
@BAG;. (8GBF>8L AHGB GEBHC, &B5B7L
+8?? FBE $8FF 2215 &. -+-31,
(8GBF>8L, %! 231-347-6080.
JJJ.C8GBF>8L4HGB:EBHC.6B@
2004 C;8IEB?8G ,E4<?B?4M8E E0, $, 4
DE. 6 6L?, CBJ8E 8I8ELG;<A:, 7 C4FF8A-
:8E, ?84G;8E, GBJ C>:. (4L@8AGF 4F
?BJ 4G $199 4 @BAG;. (8GBF>8L AHGB
GEBHC, &B5B7L +8?? FBE $8FF 2215 &.
-+-31, (8GBF>8L, %! 231-347-6080.
JJJ.C8GBF>8L4HGB:EBHC.6B@
SUV
2004 "88C $<58EGL. 4K4, 6 6L?, CBJ8E
FHAEBB9, CBJ8E 8I8ELG;<A:. (4L@8AGF
4F ?BJ 4F $199 4 @BAG;. (8GBF>8L
AHGB GEBHC, &B5B7L +8?? FBE $8FF
2215 &. -+-31, (8GBF>8L, %! 231-
347-6080. JJJ.C8GBF>8L4HGB-
:EBHC.6B@
2006 C;8IL EDH<ABK. A/D, CBJ8E
FHAEBB9, CBJ8E 8I8ELG;<A:. (4L@8AGF
4F ?BJ 4F $224 4 @BAG;. (8GBF>8L
AHGB GEBHC, &B5B7L +8?? FBE $8FF
2215 &. -+-31, (8GBF>8L, %! 231-
347-6080. JJJ.C8GBF>8L4HGB-
:EBHC.6B@
2008 G%C A647<4 A/D +$,-1. 1
BJA8E! (8E986G 4AL J84G;8E, A$$
/EE$ D*!.E!, EBB@ 9BE 7, ;84G87
?84G;8E, E8@BG8 FG4EG, 2 FHAEBB9F,
788C GE847 G<E8F., 8I8ELG;<A: <A 584H-
G<9H? 6BA7<G<BA! $18,949. D4I8 #E<A:
C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 -+ 31
&BEG;, (8GBF>8L, %! 231-347-2585.
2009 FBE7 EF64C8 $<@<G87. 26 %(G
JL! !A J;<G8 FH878 J<G; 6;4E6B4?
;84G87 ?84G;8E, AB+, ,E46G<BA 6BAGEB?,
6HEG4<A 4<E54:F, 5E<:;G 6;EB@8,
A??BLF, B?H8GBBG; 4A7 @BE8! $14,949.
D4I8 #E<A: C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861
-+ 31 &BEG;, (8GBF>8L, %! 231-347-
2585.
2011 #<4 +BE8AGB $0 4K4. 1 BJA8E <A
"4I4 BEBJA, 27 %(G JL! %4AL
+498GL F84GHE8F, B?H8 GBBG;, +4G8??<G8
*47<B, CD, FB: ?4@CF, 58FG B9 4?? ;4F
58> @<?8F. $18,949. D4I8 #E<A:
C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 -+ 31
&BEG;, (8GBF>8L, %! 231-347-2585.
TRAILERS
&8J F?4G587 C4E 4H?8E. 8 3 9BBG K 16
9BBG. 2 GB 6;BBF8 9EB@. +4?8 (E<68,
$2,295. (8GBF>8L *. -+A. , 2215 -+
<:;J4L 31 & (8GBF>8L, %! 49770.
(;BA8 231-347-3200
&8J -+ C4E:B 5K8 -G<?<GL ,E4<?8E. 5K8,
3,500 ?5. 4K?8. $1,395. (8GBF>8L *.
-+A. , 2215 -+ <:;J4L 31 &
(8GBF>8L, %! 49770. (;BA8 231-347-
3200
&8J -+ C4E:B 5K8 -G<?<GL ,E4<?8E. 5K8,
3,500 ?5. 4K?8. $1,395. (8GBF>8L *.
-+A. , 2215 -+ <:;J4L 31 &
(8GBF>8L, %! 49770. (;BA8 231-347-
3200
TRUCKS
2001 C;8IL +<?I8E47B 2500 4K4 J/
(?BJ. $B64? 1 BJA8E, 7 1/2 9G BBFF
(B?L B?478 CBJ8E 4A:?8 (?BJ,
B87?<A8E, 6;EB@8 4??BLF, J;88? BC8A-
<A: F?4E8F, *847L GB G4>8 BA J<AG8E,
$10,949. D4I8 #E<A: C;8IEB?8G-
C47<??46, 1861 -+ 31 &BEG;,
(8GBF>8L, %! 231-347-2585.
2003 FBE7 F-150 $4E<4G. 4 7BBE, 6E8J
645, 9<58E:?4FF GBCC8E, GBJ C>:.
(4L@8AGF 4F ?BJ 4F $199 4 @BAG;.
(8GBF>8L AHGB GEBHC, &B5B7L +8?? FBE
$8FF 2215 &. -+-31, (8GBF>8L, %!
231-347-6080. JJJ.C8GBF>8L4HGB-
:EBHC.6B@
2003 FBE7 F-150 $4E<4G. 4 7BBE, 6E8J
645, 9<58E:?4FF GBCC8E, GBJ C>:.
(4L@8AGF 4F ?BJ 4F $199 4 @BAG;.
(8GBF>8L AHGB GEBHC, &B5B7L +8?? FBE
$8FF 2215 &. -+-31, (8GBF>8L, %!
231-347-6080. JJJ.C8GBF>8L4HGB-
:EBHC.6B@
TRUCKS
2008 C;8IL +<?I8E47B 1500 $,2 4K4.
B84HG<9H?! 1 'JA8E! $B4787! 84G87
85BAL ?84G;8E, 18 A??BL /;88?F, 2-71
'99 *B47 (>:., FB: $4@CF, *8@BG8
FG4EG, C;EB@8 EHAA<A: 5B4E7 & @BE8!
$19,949. D4I8 #E<A: C;8IEB?8G-
C47<??46, 1861 -+ 31 &BEG;,
(8GBF>8L, %! 231-347-2585.
2011 C;8IEB?8G +<?I8E47B 1500 $, 4
DE, CE8J C45. 'A?L 23,145 @<?8F. 8
6L?, 'A+G4E, CBJ8E 8I8ELG;<A:.
B87?<A8E, GBAA84H 6BI8E. (4L@8AGF 4F
?BJ 4F $269 4 @BAG;. (8GBF>8L AHGB
GEBHC, &B5B7L +8?? FBE $8FF 2215 &.
-+-31, (8GBF>8L, %! 231-347-6080.
JJJ.C8GBF>8L4HGB:EBHC.6B@
VANS
2007 C;ELF?8E ,BJA & CBHAGEL $0.
+GBJ-A-GB F84G<A:, F84GF 7, E8@BG8
>8L?8FF 8AGEL, 4<E. (4L@8AGF 4F ?BJ 4F
$199 4 @BAG;. (8GBF>8L AHGB GEBHC,
&B5B7L +8?? FBE $8FF 2215 &. -+-31,
(8GBF>8L, %! 231-347-6080.
JJJ.C8GBF>8L4HGB:EBHC.6B@
2007 C;ELF?8E ,BJA & CBHAGEL $0.
+GBJ-A-GB F84G<A:, F84GF 7, E8@BG8
>8L?8FF 8AGEL, 4<E. (4L@8AGF 4F ?BJ 4F
$199 4 @BAG;. (8GBF>8L AHGB GEBHC,
&B5B7L +8?? FBE $8FF 2215 &. -+-31,
(8GBF>8L, %! 231-347-6080.
JJJ.C8GBF>8L4HGB:EBHC.6B@
2008 DB7:8 GE4A7 C4E4I4A 6/I.
C4E:B .4A, 6 6L?, 4<E, 6EH<F8, 24 %(G.
(4L@8AGF 4F ?BJ 4F $199 4 @BAG;.
(8GBF>8L AHGB GEBHC, &B5B7L +8?? FBE
$8FF 2215 &. -+-31, (8GBF>8L, %!
231-347-6080. JJJ.C8GBF>8L4HGB-
:EBHC.6B@
2008 DB7:8 GE4A7 C4E4I4A 6/I.
C4E:B .4A, 6 6L?, 4<E, 6EH<F8, 24 %(G.
(4L@8AGF 4F ?BJ 4F $199 4 @BAG;.
(8GBF>8L AHGB GEBHC, &B5B7L +8?? FBE
$8FF 2215 &. -+-31, (8GBF>8L, %!
231-347-6080. JJJ.C8GBF>8L4HGB-
:EBHC.6B@
2010 DB7:8 GE4A7 C4E4I4A +E.
+GBJ-A-GB F84G<A:, F84GF 7. (4L@8AGF
4F ?BJ 4F $225 4 @BAG;. (8GBF>8L
AHGB GEBHC, &B5B7L +8?? FBE $8FF
2215 &. -+-31, (8GBF>8L, %! 231-
347-6080. JJJ.C8GBF>8L4HGB-
:EBHC.6B@
WANTED
/4AG87: '-,B'A*D %','*+, 4AL
F<M8, EHAA<A: BE ABG. A?FB F8??<A:
'HG5B4E7 %BGBEF. C4?? 231-546-
6000
January 3, 2013 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 5-B
CLASSIFIEDS
Delivered to 40
Towns Each Week!
Run for
As Low
As
$
2
00
CALL: 989.732.8160 | EMAIL: classifieds@weeklychoice.com | ORDER ONLINE: www.weeklychoice.com
APS
Mini-Warehouse
Storage Units
are Available
NOW!
Our fenced storage area provides safe and
secure storage of your belongings.
Easy access with our in-town location.
112 E. Sixth St, PO Box 1914, Gaylord
989-732-5892
1 MILE NORTH ON OLD 27
GAYLORD
989.732.5136
HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 7:30AM TO 5:30PM;
SATURDAY 8AM TO 2PM; CLOSED SUNDAY
PRO-Build
Looking for a highly experienced certified Big Boat
DieseI/Gas DC/AC Mechanic with a good mechanical
background in Big boat trouble shooting and repair.
Need to have good working knowledge of larger boat
electrical systems including 12/24 V and AC with gen-
erator. Also must be proficient in diagnosing engine
and drive component problems for both diesel and gas
engines. Experience with boat yard handling of larger
boats for storage with CDL and/or boat hauling expe-
rience helpful. Only looking for energetic growth
minded persons that are self motivated and profes-
sional.
SEND RESUMES TO:
sunburstmarine@yahoo.com or Sunburst Marine, Ìnc.,
974 E Division St., Boyne City, MÌ 49712
MARINA MECHANIC
- Position AvaiIabIe -
Page 6-B • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! January 3, 2013
By Jim Akans
This is a gorgeous real estate offering, and it has recently
undergone a huge price reduction. Located just a few miles
northeast of the town of Johannesburg, and near the new
Groen Nature Preserve, this Northern Michigan country
estate features a gorgeous two-story home and a huge pole
building set upon 160 acres of rolling terrain that features a
mix woodlands and open areas.
From the arrival at the gated entry located off a paved
country road, its just a short way down the winding driveway
to the vistas that open into a panorama of rolling hills, open
grazing lands, woodlands of hardwoods and pines, and a
beautiful two-story traditional style home beyond. With a quarter section of
land, this is a setting that not only offers incredible beauty and abundant
wildlife, it could easily provide a lifestyle of self-sufficiency with a limitless
supply of wood for heating, ample areas for grazing livestock and horses
(the property is fenced), and plenty of room left over for vegetable garden-
ing.
The home, which was custom built in 1998, offers over 2,700 square feet
of living space on the main two levels, plus a huge walkout basement, with
extra height 13-block walls, that could be finished into additional living
area. There are four bedrooms on the upper level, including a large master
bedroom suite with walk-closet and adjoining bath featuring a garden style
tub and separate shower. Each of the remaining three bedrooms are gener-
ously sized, and there is an additional full bath on the upper level as well.
The main floor is highlighted by a family room with wood stove, a formal
living room with a gas fed fireplace and hardwood flooring that extends into
the adjoining dining area. The kitchen is open to the dining area, and fea-
tures cabinetry and appliances with pristine white finishes, and a conven-
ient main level laundry and utility area located adjacent to the kitchen
space. The main level also includes a full bathroom.
Other highlights of this home include beautiful, solid wood six-panel
doors throughout the interior, energy efficient Pella brand windows, a cen-
tral alarm system, and a covered wrap-around porch the leads to a huge
wrap-around open deck area.
The pole building is absolutely enormous, with plenty of space to store an
RV, vehicles, grounds maintenance equipment, and more.
What an amazing country estate, and it even comes with furnishings! As
mentioned, this beautiful home and expansive property has recently under-
gone a substantial reduction in price and is now listed at $680,000.
Call Ed Wohlfeil or Brian Jergenson today for a private showing. (989)
732-1707 or email brian@northernrealestate.com or ed@northern-
realestate.com.
weeklychoice
.com
www.NorthernRealEstate.com
Office: 989-732-1707 Toll Free: 800-828-9372
1738 S. Otsego Ave., P.O. Box 641 Gaylord, MI 49735
JUST REDUCED $80K!
A Square 160 Acres with Trees, Hills,
Trails,Water, Grazing Land,A Pole
Building and a Gorgeous 2 Story
Country Home. Need I Say More?
Okay, How About 4 Bedrooms, 3
Baths, Master Suite, Hardwood
Floors, Fireplace,Woodburner, Zoned
Radiant Heat,Full Walkout Basement,
Huge Deck on One Side of Home,
Covered Wrapped Around Deck on
Two Other Sides, Huge Pole Bldg
with 14 Foot Doors for RV
Storage.$680,000. MLS
#272584
PEACEFUL UP
NORTH
Custom Built 3 Bed, 3
Bath Home on 10
Wooded Acres. Private
Setting Flourishing
with Wildlife (see Elk-
Deer in back yard).
New Maple Flooring,
Field Stone Fireplace,
T&G Vaulted Ceiling,
Built In Appliances,Wet Bar, Jet Tub, Sauna. Large Deck, Naturally
Landscaped, 2 1/2 Car Attached Garage, Car Port and Additional 24x24 Out
Building. Close to Gaylord, Petoskey, Boyne Falls. $335,000. MLS #280633
MANY RECENT
UPGRADES WITH
THIS CONDO
Laminate and Tile Floors,
Newer Lighting, Oak
Trim, Newer Slider,
Stainless Steel
Appliances, Newer
Washer-Dryer in Unit (no
sharing with neighbors).
All Close to Town and all
the Action.
$46,000.
MLS #278793
GREAT UP
NORTH
GETAWAY
Quaint Log Cabin
on the Lake.
Charming Inside
and Out with nearly
100 Feet of
Frontage on
Arrowhead Lake.
Turn Key and
Completely
Furnished.
$54,500.
MLS #277807
UP NORTH CABIN
APPEAL!
Cozy 2 Bed, 1 Bath Cabin on Large
Lot with Access to All Sport Otsego
Lake. Clean, Move In Condition
with Wood Sided Interior Appealing
to Your Get Away Nature. Newer 5
Inch Well, Plumbing, and Septic
Field. Recently Upgraded Bathroom
and Most Windows Upgraded as
well. Steel Roof and Vinyl Siding for
Easy Maintenance. Shed on Large
Concrete Pad Giving You Head Start
on Potential Garage. $54,900.
MLS #280198
G
R
E
A
T
G
E
T
A
W
A
Y
!
P
R
I
V
A
C
Y
!
SK
IER
S
R
ETR
EAT - CLO
SE
TO
B
O
YN
E M
T.
160 ACRES OF
SKI/SNOW
M
OBILE
HEAVEN
GORGEOUS
CUSTOM FULL
LOG HOME
Deep in the Woods.
Stone Perma Log
Fireplace. Huge Deck
Out Front. Loft Balcony
Out Back. Jet Tub. Full
Basement, Steel Roof,
and Full Log Garage with
Rear Door. Backs Up to
1000s of Acres of State
Land. $199,000.
MLS
#276669
"Þ+-. + Þ.+::/,
+-« Þ--:e.--«:
ë^!ö/"
Featured Home
On the Market
Is the New
Neighborhood
Right for You?
Test Drive It!
Compliments of Ed Wohlfiel
When seeking out new
areas, check them out, live and
in person. If you have a vaca-
tion coming up, pick a region,
rent a car, and drive around to
take a look. Spend some time
in the area and ask yourselves
these questions.
Do people have home pride?
Houses that aren’t kept up
can either signal an area full of
renters or a town on the
decline. But if people are clear-
ly investing in their properties,
it’s a great sign that they’re
staying put because they like
the town and believe that their
homes are good investments.
Who’s hanging out?
Do people spend time out-
side? And are they the right
kind of people? Do you feel
comfortable saying hi to any-
one? Are firefighters present at
the local firehouse? Do packs
of teenagers hang out on the
corner? Depending on your
observations, that town may or
may not be a good fit.
What’s the downtown vibe?
Walk through the downtown
area. Visit and shop at the
locally owned businesses.
What does it look like at
night?
A cute neighborhood can
look a lot different at night. You
should walk or drive around
town when the sun goes down.
Who are my future neigh-
bors?
Make sure that your trip
takes place during a weekend
because that’s when people are
more likely going to be out and
about. If there’s a local coffee
shop, get a cup and sit and lis-
ten because, chances are,
some of these people will be
your neighbors. Don’t be afraid
to ask them some questions.
Is the police report positive?
Ask the police department
to give you a crime log. You’ll
see exactly what’s going on,
and where.
What’s rush hour like?
Take the route to work when
traffic is at its heaviest to find
out what both of your com-
mutes would be like during the
morning and evening rush
hours. Even if your dream
neighborhood is 10 miles away
from work, it could take much
longer in traffic, and that does-
n’t make any homecoming
welcoming.
Can we rent before we buy?
If you’re still not sure and
need to move ASAP, consider
renting. This lets you really get
to know the neighborhood
before forking over a down
payment.
1949 Gingell Road, Johannesburg, MI
Listed by Ed Wohlfeil and Brian Jergenson of Keith Dressel Realty (KDR) (989) 732-1707
Huge price reduction on
gorgeous Northern
Michigan country estate
Real Estate
REAL ESTATE SALES STATISTICS
Provided to you by and based on information from the Water Wonderland MLS, Inc. for
the period December 16, 2012 to December 23, 2012.
(RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES ONLY)
DAYS DOLLAR VOLUME NUMBER OF NUMBER OF
COUNTY ON MARKET SOLD UNITS SOLD UNITS AVAILABLE
Alcona 0 $0 0 37
Alpena 193 $527,801 8 278
Antrim 55 $25,050 1 49
Cheboygan 113 $1,011,750 4 450
Crawford 99 $133,855 2 147
Mackinac 316 $122,000 1 72
Montmorency 200 $32,000 1 183
Oscoda 102 $235,000 1 168
Otsego 156 $647,000 6 352
Presque Isle 52 $145,000 1 178
Brought to you by:
If you would like
additional
information please
contact your local
REALTOR.

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