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Conrad Grebel University College at the University of Waterloo HIST 110 Syllabus A History of the Western World 1 Fall

2013 Mondays and Wednesdays 3:00 - 4:20 CGR 1111 Instructor and Information
Instructor: Dr. K. Walker Office: STJ 3010C Office Hours: Thursdays, 1:30-3:20 Email: k8walker@uwaterloo.ca Please note that the instructor does her best to reply to e-mail within 48 hours, Monday through Friday. Email is, therefore, a convenient way to communicate during the week but it should not be relied upon in an emergency or when deadlines are pressing. Please be certain to include your first and last name, student number, and course code in the subject line of all e-mail correspondence. Students are advised to check the syllabus for course policies before emailing the instructor. It is often more useful and productive to visit the instructor during her office hours (or by appointment, if necessary).

Course Description
This course will survey the emergence and development of the western world, from prehistory to 1715. The course will consider key events and developments in this overview of western culture, beginning with the emergence of early western civilizations. The course narrative will continue by progressing through the so-called fall of the Roman Empire, the evolution of medieval Europe, and the beginnings of early modern society. The course will also explore key cultural, political, social, and religious developments in the history of the pre-modern western world.

Course Goals and Learning Outcomes


Develop an understanding of the social, cultural, political, and economic history of the premodern western world. (Achieved through lectures, discussions, readings, and written assignments). Study primary historical documents as a way to understand long-ago culture. (Achieved through assignments, tutorial readings, and discussions). Research through the librarys print and electronic resources. Develop written and oral communication skills and critical thinking skills. (Achieved through assignments and discussions). Learn to research, construct, and edit a scholarly essay in the discipline of History. (Achieved through the essay writing week of tutorial discussion and assignments).

Required Text
Clifford B. Backman, The Cultures of the West: A History, Volume 1: To 1750 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013). Clifford B. Backman and Christine Axen, eds., Sources for The Cultures of the West: Volume 1: To 1750 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013).

Course Requirements and Assessment


Attendance in HIST 110 is mandatory. Students who do not attend the lectures and scheduled discussion sessions will find it very difficult to achieve success in this course. Students, moreover, must fulfill all the course requirements in order to receive credit for HIST 110. This 1

includes weekly attendance, all written and oral assignments, tests, quizzes, and examinations. History 110 is an introductory university history course. It covers a lengthy and significant period in History. In short, the course is heavy on data. The instructor moves quickly to touch upon all this material. Students who do not participate in weekly lectures, or who fall behind on weekly readings, will find it a challenge to catch up. The best way to avoid this difficulty is to keep up to date with the workload. This means, each week, reading carefully and making meticulous notes. Students should come to discussion sessions armed with questions or opinions and be prepared to voice them. Assessment Tutorial Participation Primary Source Analysis In Class Midterm Research Essay Final Examination Total Date of Evaluation Ongoing Monday, September 30 Wednesday, October 16 Monday, November 18 During the Examination Period Weighting 15% 15% 20% 25% 25% 100%

Tutorial Participation
There are two weekly scheduled lectures for the course. Due to the large size of the course, students will also be assigned on the first week of class to one of two tutorial groups: A or B. Group A students will remain in class following the 50 minute lecture on Mondays, whereas Group B students will remain following the 50 minute lecture on Wednesdays. Students will not be able to hop between tutorial groups, although the instructor may reassign students if there appears to be an imbalance in the distribution of the two groups. Tutorials begin on Week 2 of the course and they run through Week 12 (with the exception of the week of the midterm examination when there are no tutorials but the lecture component will run for the full time). Tutorial participation grades are based on a combination of attendance and participation in the discussion. Students must do the tutorials readings and come prepared with questions and remarks to contribute to the class discussion. Assessment of discussion participation is based on a combination of attendance and active contribution, in the form of regularly asking questions, demonstrating an understanding of the readings, and contributing insightful comments while adhering to appropriate, professional conduct. The readings in the tutorial participation will also form part of the final examination material. Absences from tutorial will only be excused for unforeseen circumstances (such as an illness or emergency) and require documentation. In general, absences due to work commitments, other coursework, etc. will not be excused.

Primary Source Analysis


Students are to submit a short paper (approximately 1,200 words). The purpose of this writing assignment is to investigate and critically examine a piece of primary source material. Students must 2

respond to one of the assigned questions related to primary sources chosen by the instructor from Clifford B. Backman and Christine Axen, eds., Sources for The Cultures of the West: Volume 1: To 1750 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013).

Research Essay
Students will write a research paper (approximately 1,500 words) based on a pre-determined list of topics compiled by the instructor. Arguments must be based on secondary and primary material related to the course, including the geographical constraints and the time period under study.

Midterm Examination
There will be an in-class midterm examination, which is scheduled on Wednesday, October 16. The midterm examination will cover course material, including both primary and secondary source readings and lectures, from Week One through Week Five.

Final Examination
The final examination will be cumulative. Students will be required to answer both short answer questions and longer essay questions. A final examination study guide will be provided to students during the last class of the term. The Final Examination will take place during the scheduled final examination period, which begins on Thursday, December 5 and ends on Friday, December 20.

Written Assignment Guidelines


Include an appropriate title page, with your name, the title of your assignment, the course information (title, course code, and instructors name), and the date on all of your assignments. Extensions will be granted based on appropriate documentation. Written assignments that are late will be awarded a 5% late penalty per day, including weekend days. Email submissions will not be accepted. Paper copies of all assignments will be handed in on the due date during class time. Please Note: All written assignments in this course should be submitted in typed twelve-point, Times New Roman font, and double-spaced with one-inch margins. Failure to comply with these guidelines may lead to a request for resubmission with an associated late penalty. It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that written assignments utilizing secondary and primary sources properly cite all relevant material consistent with the Turabian (Chicago) style guide. Students must use footnotes or endnotes and a bibliography and may not use in-text citation. Kate Turabians style guide and The Chicago Manual of Style are excellent sources of information. A quick Fast Facts guide to Chicago citation is available online at the following location: http://www.lib.uoguelph.ca/assistance/writing_services/resources/components/documents/chicago.pd f Encyclopaedias and Wikipedia are not appropriate secondary sources. Using these sources will not count towards the required number of secondary sources, and therefore students who rely on them will receive grade penalties. Internet sources are not acceptable sources for the assignments submitted for this course. Students using internet sources will receive a grade penalty, and those whose assignments primarily rely on these sources will receive a zero. The exception is peer-reviewed academic journal 3

articles accessible through the Library website, which are considered appropriate for academic use. An explanation of peer-reviewed journals and the differences between these sources and popular magazines is available online through the University of Waterloo Library, at the following location: http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/usered/howdoi/scholarly.html

Course Outline
Week 1 Date Monday, September 9 and Wednesday, September 11 Monday, September 16 and Wednesday, September 18 Monday, September 23 and Wednesday, September 25 Monday, September 30 and Wednesday, October 2 Topic Concepts and Methods Writing Workshop during Wednesdays lecture instead of tutorial. The Greeks and Persians ** Tutorials begin this week ** Readings Due Backman, Cultures of the West, 3-67. Backman and Axen, eds., Sources, 1-28. Backman, Cultures of the West, 97-169. Backman and Axen, eds., Sources, 42-69. Backman, Cultures of the West, 171-203. Backman and Axen, eds., Sources, 70-78. Backman, Cultures of the West, 237-282. Backman and Axen, eds., Sources, 91-103.

The Romans

The So-Called Fall of the Roman Empire, the Germanic Migrations, and the Early Church ** Documentary Analysis is due on Monday, September 30 at the beginning of lecture ** Reform and Renewal in the Middle Ages

Monday, October 7 and Wednesday, October 9 Wednesday, October 16

Backman, Cultures of the West, 283-325. Backman and Axen, eds., Sources, 104-119. No Assigned Readings this Week due to Midterm Examination. Backman, Cultures of the West, 327-371. Backman and Axen, eds., Sources, 120-129. Backman, Cultures of the West, 373-392; 400-402. Backman and Axen, eds., Sources, 130-145.

(Monday, October 14 is Thanksgiving No Classes) ** Midterm Examination is in Class on Wednesday, October 16 ** The Fourteenth Century Crisis

Monday, October 21 and Wednesday, October 23 Wednesday, October 30

The Renaissance and Humanism Class on Monday, October 28 is cancelled due to a room scheduling conflict. Students are still responsible for the readings, although neither tutorial will meet separately.

Week

Date

Topic

Readings Due

Monday, November 4 and Wednesday, November 6 Monday, November 11 and Wednesday, November 13 Monday, November 18 and Wednesday, November 20 Monday, November 25 and Wednesday, November 27 Monday, December 2 (Last Day of Classes)

The Protestant Reformation and the Catholic Reformation

Backman, Cultures of the West, 392-400; 402-413. Backman and Axen, eds., Sources, 145-149. Backman, Cultures of the West, 465-501. Backman and Axen, eds., Sources, 170-183. Backman, Cultures of the West, 441-463; 503-551. Backman and Axen, eds., Sources, 184-197. Backman, Cultures of the West, 415-428. Backman and Axen, eds., Sources, 157-159. No Assigned Readings this week.

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The Scientific Revolution, Medical Knowledge, and Gender in Early Modern Europe The Wars of Religion, Absolutism, and Constitutionalism ** Final Essay is due on Monday, November 18 at the beginning of lecture ** The Atlantic World

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The Course Conclusion ** Examination Study Guide will be distributed in class **

Late Work
The instructor imposes a five per cent late penalty for each day after the due date on all assignments. This includes weekends and holidays. Please note that the instructor does not receive assignments through email. The instructor will also not accept an emailed copy as a place-holder for a hard-copy substituted at a later date.

Electronic Device Policy


In order to prevent a disruption to other students, please silence or turn off all cell phones during the class period. As word processing software can be a useful tool to take notes, the use of laptops and tablets is permitted in the classroom for this purpose only. Students are asked to silence the sound on these devices. Students who are disrupting others with their electronic devices will be asked to turn them off for the duration of the class.

Copies of Assignments
Students are required to keep paper and/or other reliable back-up copies of all out-of-class assignments. The instructor may require them to resubmit work at any time.

Grade Posting
Final grades for any course may not be posted until the end of the final examination period. 5

Attendance Policy
Attendance is mandatory. The instructor takes attendance each class. Students who do not attend 80% of the classes have not adequately participated in the course and may, consequently, be denied the credit. If you cannot attend class due to personal reasons, it is your responsibility to obtain missed lecture material from other students in the class.

Academic Integrity
In order to maintain a culture of academic integrity, members of the University of Waterloo community are expected to promote honesty, trust, fairness, respect and responsibility. See the UWaterloo Academic Integritity Webpage (https://uwaterloo.ca/academic-integrity/) and the Arts Academic Integrity Office Webpage (http://arts.uwaterloo.ca/current-undergraduates/academicresponsibility) for more information.

Discipline
A student is expected to know what constitutes academic integrity to avoid committing academic offenses and to take responsibility for his/her actions. A student who is unsure whether an action constitutes an offense, or who needs help in learning how to avoid offenses (e.g., plagiarism, cheating) or about rules for group work/collaboration should seek guidance from the course professor, academic advisor, or the undergraduate associate dean. For information on categories of offenses and types of penalties, students should refer to Policy 71, Student Discipline (http://www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infosec/Policies/policy71.htm). For typical penalties check Guidelines for the Assessment of Penalties (http://www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infosec/guidelines/penaltyguidelines.htm).

Grievance
A student who believes that a decision affecting some aspect of his/her university life has been unfair or unreasonable may have grounds for initiating a grievance. Read Policy 70, Student Petitions and Grievances, Section 4 (https://uwaterloo.ca/secretariat/policies-procedures-guidelines/policy-70). When in doubt please be certain to contact the departments administrative assistant who will provide further assistance.

Appeals
A decision made or penalty imposed under Policy 70, Student Petitions and Grievances (other than a petition) or Policy 71, Student Discipline may be appealed if there is a ground. A student who believes he/she has a ground for an appeal should refer to Policy 72, Student Appeals (http://www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infosec/Policies/policy72.htm).

Note for Students with Disabilities


The Office for Persons with Disabilities (OPD), located in Needles Hall, Room 1132, collaborates with all academic departments to arrange appropriate accommodations for students with disabilities without compromising the academic integrity of the curriculum. If you require academic accommodations to lessen the impact of your disability, please register with the OPD at the beginning of each academic term.

UW Policy Regarding Illness and Missed Tests

The University of Waterloo Examination Regulations: www.registrar.uwaterloo.ca/exams/ExamRegs.pdf state that: A medical certificate presented in support of an official petition for relief from normal academic requirements must provide all of the information requested on the University of Waterloo Verification of Illness form - uwaterloo.ca/health-services/student-medical-clinic/services/verification-illness - or it will not be accepted. This form can also be obtained from Health Services. In cases of illness resulting in a missed examination, moreover, students who obtain a University of Waterloo Verification of Illness form from Health Services, in accordance with Examination Regulations from the Registrars office, must note: The instructor only accepts UW Verification of Illness forms that indicate a Severe illness. Students who obtain Verification of Illness forms that indicate Moderate, Slight, or Negligible illness will under no circumstances be permitted to write a make-up examination and will receive a grade of zero for that examination. If a student has a test/examination deferred due to acceptable medical evidence, he/she normally will write the test/examination at a mutually convenient time, to be determined by the course instructor. The University acknowledges that, due to the pluralistic nature of the University community, some students may on religious grounds require alternative times to write tests and examinations. Elective arrangements (such as travel plans) are not considered acceptable grounds for granting an alternative examination time.

Grading Scale
Courses in the Faculty of Arts are graded according to the following scale: Letter Grade Numeric Value Description A+ A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DF+ F F90-100 85-89 80-84 77-79 73-76 70-72 67-69 63-66 60-62 57-59 53-56 50-52 42-49 35-41 0-34 Exceptional Excellent Excellent Very good Good Good Competent Fairly Competent Fairly Competent Passing Barely passing Barely passing Marginally failing Failing Failing

According to this system, a grade of C-, C, or C+ indicates that the evaluated work meets the basic requirements of the assignment. In order to achieve a mark above C+, the assignment must demonstrate superior characteristics such as a sophisticated understanding of the topic, an awareness or ability to use more advanced methodologies, a creative approach, etc.

Course Modifications
The instructor and university reserve the right to modify elements of the course during the term. The university may change the dates and deadlines for any or all courses in extreme circumstances. If either type of modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given.

Recordings
Audio, visual, or cellular recordings or transmissions of the course are only allowable with the express permission of the instructor.

Some of the University of Waterloos Other Services The Student Success Office
The Student Success Office is designed to help students achieve success by fostering and supporting a full university experience. Their resources include success coaches, a writing centre, and Peer Connect, a program to connect students with a peer tutor. Consult the Student Success Office: https://uwaterloo.ca/student-success/about-student-success Academic Advisors The University of Waterloo has academic advisors who are available to discuss course selections and questions about academics at the University of Waterloo. For more information about academic advisors, see: https://uwaterloo.ca/registrar/current-students/advisors.

Health Services
The Student Medical Clinic aims to provide convenient, confidential and comprehensive medical care to registered students at Waterloo. The phone number for Health Services is 519-888-4096. For more information about Health Services, see: https://uwaterloo.ca/health-services/

Counselling Services
Counselling Services provides free assessment and counselling for students in order to facilitate personal growth, assist with life difficulties, and intervene in times of crisis. Client registration is located in Needles Hall, Room 2080. To book an appointment: 519-888-4567, ext. 32655. Visit the Counselling Services Website at https://uwaterloo.ca/counselling-services/

HIST 110 Primary Source Analysis Feedback


Format: Weak Fairly Competent /Competent Good

Name: __________________________

Very Good

Excellent

Line spacing Cover Page including your name, the assignment title (reflecting a description of your argument), course number and course name, instructors name, and date submitted. Page numbers Font size Margin size Length Footnotes (Chicago Manual of Style) Bibliography (Chicago Manual of Style) Syntax & Grammar: Weak Fairly Competent /Competent Good Very Good Excellent Spelling, contractions, homophones (e.g., bear / bare; its / its; their / there / theyre) Apostrophes Subject-verb agreement Noun-pronoun agreement Split infinitives Convoluted syntax Sentence fragments Adjectival hyphens (e.g., fourteenth-century people) Style: Weak Fairly Competent /Competent Good Very Good Excellent Passive voice Dangling modifiers Run-on sentences Weak or missing topic sentences at start of every paragraph Analysis: Weak Fairly Competent /Competent Good Very Good Excellent What is this document? Who created it and how? When was it created? Why was it created? Where was it created? Contextualization Engages with the overall driving force of the assignment, which is to answer what does this document contribute to the study of the history of the Western World before circa 1750? What is the historical significance of the document? Research: Weak Fairly Competent /Competent Good Very Good Excellent Engages with the primary source? Engages with secondary sources? Adequate and appropriate secondary sources? Other Comments:

HIST 110 Final Essay Feedback


Format: Weak Fairly Competent /Competent Good

Name: _________________________________

Very Good

Excellent

Line spacing Cover page including your name, the assignment title (reflecting a description of your argument rather than Assignment 1 or Research Essay), course number and course name, instructors name, and date submitted. Page numbers Font size Margin size Length (1,500 words) Footnotes (Chicago Manual of Style) Bibliography (Chicago Manual of Style) Weak Fairly Competent /Competent Good Very Good Excellent

Syntax & Grammar: Style: -

Spelling, contractions, homophones (e.g., bear / bare; its / its; their / there / theyre) Apostrophes Subject-verb agreement Noun-pronoun agreement Split infinitives Convoluted syntax Sentence fragments Adjectival hyphens (e.g., fourteenth-century people) Weak Fairly Competent /Competent Good Very Good Excellent

Passive voice Dangling modifiers Run-on sentences Weak or missing topic sentences at start of every paragraph

Quality of Thesis: Weak Fairly Competent / Competent basic argument Good Very Good Excellent / Exceptional

lacks focus; unclear argument

solid argument

strong argument

argument shows awareness of historical methodologies Excellent

Structure: -

Weak

Fairly Competent /Competent

Good

Very Good

Development (exposition) of argument (is the argument logically structured?) Persuasiveness of argument (does the argument convince?) Is the research question clear to the reader (implicitly or explicitly)? Is the thesis clearly stated along with a demonstration of how the essay will develop its argument (a road-map for the reader)? Use of historical evidence such as names, dates, events as proof

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Quality of Research: -

Weak

Fairly Competent /Competent

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Located an appropriate mixture of monographs (books) and articles (journals, chapters) Used appropriate scholarly sources and not popular ones (i.e. Wikipedia, personal websites, etc.) Located at least five secondary sources and one primary source

Other Comments:

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