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Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 • Vol XIII, Edition 115
SUICIDE BOMB
WORLD PAGE 8
NINERS WIN NO.
5 PLAYOFF SEED
SPORTS PAGE 11
MILLION SIGNUPS
FOR HEALTH MARKET
NATION PAGE 7
16 KILLED AT RUSSIAN TRAIN STATION
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The complex scientific data
behind the effects of projected sea
level rise can be hard for many to
accurately envision so the
California Coastal Commission is
seeking the public’s help illustrat-
ing vulnerability of the shoreline
including spots in San Mateo
County.
Starting today, the shoreline
will experience some of the year’s
highest tides, said Hilary
Papendick, program analyst for
the California Coastal
Commission which created the
California King Tides Initiative to
involve the public in future studies
of sea level rise.
“King tides are extreme high
tides that occur a couple times a
year when the sun and moon are in
alignment,” Papendick said.
Citizens can contribute to the
initiative’s efforts by chronologi-
cally photographing the coastline
during king tides and posting
them on the California King Tide
website, Papendick said.
King tides raise the sea level by
nearly a foot and can lead to
beaches, trails, roadways, wet-
lands and infrastructure becoming
flooded.
The effects of king tides can be
seen in the San Francisco Bay, at
Surfer’s Beach in Half Moon Bay,
at Rockaway Beach and the pier in
Pacifica and along the entire
California coastline. Parts of
Highway 1 are also known to flood
during king tides, Papendick said.
King tides typically arrive in
June during the evenings and dur-
ing the day in winter. The
California coast will experience
the winter king tides Dec. 30 to
Jan 2 and Jan. 29 to Jan. 31,
Papendick said.
Imagining sea level rise can be
abstract when only studying
numerical data or reading about the
effects. However it seems more
tangible when people see images
of flooded infrastructure or sub-
mersed wetlands, Papendick said.
“The images are very powerful
when it comes to talking about
what future conditions could look
like,” Papendick said. “Seeing
these photos today could help
Public photos assist coastal policies
King tides illustrate future sea level rise effects
COURTESY
Former Arbor Bay School student Jack Evans on his first day of fourth grade at Redwood Shores Elementary
School.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Every year, students with learn-
ing differences from Arbor Bay
School transition back into main-
stream schools with a better
chance of doing well both academ-
ically and socially because of the
school.
Jack Evans, now a fourth grader
at Redwood Shores Elementary
School, is one such student who
used the school as a stepping
stone. At age four and a half he was
diagnosed with high functioning
autism, attention deficit disorder
and possibly Asperger’s, said his
mother Tena Lawry.
His parents decided to send him
to Arbor Bay after noticing differ-
ences between him and his twin
sister, as well as him and other
preschoolers.
“There was something that
seemed different,” she said. “It
wasn’t so severe. He would play
with toys in a different way [than
other preschoolers]; he really
focused on the toy itself and would
look at himself in the mirror. His
speech was delayed and verb tens-
es were wrong. He would work
around vocabulary to explain
things.”
Lawry said the San Carlos
school, which serves children
Students excel with a little help
Arbor Bay transitions alumni into mainstream schools
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
When Beth Hunkapiller learned
she was named the 2013 San
Carlos citizen of the year, the for-
mer school board trustee was
shocked.
“I couldn’t remember half of
what they told me,” she said about
the day members of the Chamber
of Commerce landed at her
doorstep with the news. “There’s a
list of things they need from you
like a guest list for the upcoming
reception. Of course, the most
overwhelming is a good picture of
yourself.”
But the cham-
ber officials
who chose
Hu n k a p i l l e r
already seem to
have a pretty
good picture —
figuratively if
not quite a liter-
al snapshot —
of who the
longtime educa-
tor is and what she has done for the
city she’s called home for decades.
As a former middle school reading
and English teacher and adminis-
trator, Hunkapiller was “a natural”
San Carlos names
citizen of the year
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Readying students for college is
one of the core missions of
Summit Preparatory High School
in Redwood City and has helped
land it on the top of the list of
schools that prepare the highest
percentage of Latino students for
university.
Innovate Public Schools
released its second report, with
2012 data, on student achievement
in Santa Clara and San Mateo
counties, “Broken Promises: The
Children Left Behind in Silicon
Valley” in December. The report
shows many schools in Silicon
Valley are not meeting preparing
enough Latino and low-income
students to be eligible for college,
while Summit had the top percent-
age of Latino students with eligi-
bility for state universities, who
also graduate in four years.
Latinos make up 38 percent of K-
Summit Prep sends the highest
percentage of Latinos to college
Peninsula school preps tops
list for college readiness
See ARBOR, Page 19
Beth
Hunkapiller
See PREP, Page 5
See CITIZEN, Page 20
See TIDES, Page 20
Gambler rewards man who
returned $300K left in cab
LAS VEGAS — A poker player
who l eft $300, 000 i n t he back
seat of a Las Vegas taxi made good
on his promise this week, handing
over a $10,000 reward to the hon-
est cabbie who returned the stash.
Yellow Checker Star Cab
Company CEO Bill Shranko con-
firmed Friday that Gerardo Gamboa
had been paid by the poker player.
The cab company also honored the
driver’s good deed by naming him
employee of the year, awarding
him $1, 000 and giving him a gift
certificate to a Las Vegas steak-
house.
It’s unclear how Gamboa plans
t o spend t he bel at ed Chri st mas
gift. He did not immediately return
a call from The Associated Press
on Friday.
The tale, first reported by the
Las Vegas Review-Journal, started
Monday when Gamboa made a
pickup at the Bellagio casino. A
hot el doorman not i ced a brown
paper bag on the back seat and
handed it to him; Gamboa thought
it was candy.
The driver said he had another
passenger by the time he began
wondering what kind of choco-
lates were in the brown paper bag.
He peeked inside at a traffi c l i ght
and spotted the cash.
“I told my passenger, `You are
my witness on this, ’ "the 13-year
taxi driver told the Las Vegas Sun,
“and then I immediately called my
dispatcher. ”
Gamboa took the six bundles of
$100 bills to the company’s main
office, where Las Vegas police and
casino officials linked it to the
poker player.
It took several hours to verify
t he i dent i t y of t he owner and
return the cash. Authorities aren’t
identifying the poker player.
Before he learned about the
anonymous gambl er ’s gi f t ,
Gamboa said he wasn’t in it for the
money.
“If he doesn’t gi ve me anyt hi ng,
t hat ’s OK,” Gamboa told the Sun
earlier this week. “I’m not waiting
for any kind of return. I just want-
ed to do the right thing, and I
appreciate what the company did
for me.”
Police: No beer led to
cermaic squirrel stabbing
NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. —
South Carolina authorities say a
44-year-old woman angry at a man
for returning home without beer
on Christmas beat and stabbed him
with a ceramic squirrel.
The Charleston County Sheriff ’s
offi ce says i n a report t hat
deputies found a man covered with
blood when they arrived at Helen
Wi l l i ams’ North Charleston home
early Wednesday. She told investi-
gators the man fell and cut him-
self, but couldn’t explain why her
hands and cl ot hes were al so
bl oody.
Deput i es say t he man sai d
Williams was so angry when he
returned without beer because
stores were closed on Christmas
Eve that she grabbed a ceramic
squi rrel , beat hi m i n t he head,
then stabbed him in the shoulder
and chest.
Williams was in jail Friday and
charged wi t h cri mi nal domest i c
violence. It wasn’t known if she
had a lawyer.
New Year’s jam:
strawberry busted in test drop
HARRISBURG, Pa. — An 80-
pound i l l umi nat ed st rawberry
t hat ’s lowered every New Year’s
Eve in downtown Harrisburg has
ended up in a messy jam.
The berry fell three stories and
smashed during a practice run at
the Hilton Harrisburg on Friday.
Officials say a faulty harness clip
is to blame.
The Hilton is working to build a
new strawberry for revelers to ring
i n 2014 on Tuesday night.
The strawberry drop started in
1989. The berry that broke Friday
had been used for around 10 years.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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TV commentator
Sean Hannity is 52.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1813
British troops burned Buffalo, N.Y. ,
during the War of 1812.
“Work is a dull thing; you cannot get away from
that.The only agreeable existence is one of
idleness, and that is not, unfortunately, always
compatible with continuing to exist at all.”
— Rose Macaulay, English poet and essayist (1881-1958)
Meredith Vieira is
60.
NBA player LeBron
James is 29.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A man dressed up as Spiderman poses for photos as he takes part in the annual “air worthiness”test of confetti in Times Square
in New York.
Monday: Sunny. Highs in the lower
60s. East winds around 5
mph...Becoming south in the after-
noon.
Monday ni ght: Partly cloudy. Lows in
the mid 40s. South winds around 5 mph.
Tuesday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the
upper 50s. East winds around 5
mph...Becoming north in the afternoon.
Tuesday ni ght: Partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 40s.
New years day: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the lower 60s.
Wednesday ni ght: Mostly clear. Lows in the mid 40s.
Thursday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the lower 60s.
Thursday night through Fri day ni ght: Mostly clear.
Lows in the mid 40s. Highs in the lower 60s.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1853, the United States and Mexico signed a treaty
under which the U.S. agreed to buy some 45,000 square
miles of land from Mexico for $10 million in a deal known
as the Gadsden Purchase.
I n 1860, 10 days after South Carolina seceded from the
Union, the state militia seized the United States Arsenal in
Charleston.
I n 1903, about 600 people died when fire broke out at the
recently opened Iroquois Theater in Chicago.
I n 1922, Vladimir I. Lenin proclaimed the establishment
of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.
I n 1936, the United Auto Workers union staged its first
“sit-down” strike at the General Motors Fisher Body Plant
No. 1 in Flint, Mich. (The strike lasted until Feb. 11, 1937.)
I n 1940, California’s first freeway, the Arroyo Seco
Parkway connecting Los Angeles and Pasadena, was official-
ly opened by Gov. Culbert L. Olson.
I n 1948, the Cole Porter musical “Kiss Me, Kate” opened
on Broadway.
I n 1965, Ferdinand Marcos was inaugurated for his first
term as president of the Philippines.
I n 1972, the United States halted its heavy bombing of
North Vietnam.
I n 1993, Israel and the Vatican agreed to recognize each
other. Hollywood agent Irving “Swifty” Lazar died in
Beverly Hills, at age 86.
I n 1994, a gunman walked into a pair of suburban Boston
abortion clinics and opened fire, killing two employees.
(John C. Salvi III was later convicted of murder; he died in
prison, an apparent suicide.)
I n 2006, Iraqis awoke to news that Saddam Hussein had
been hanged; victims of his three decades of autocratic rule
took to the streets to celebrate.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
PRICE VALET SOOTHE PHOBIA
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: Sometimes, changing in the locker room is —
THE PITS
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SEDUO
CNARH
PUNOCE
SCEOHO
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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A:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Star,No.
2, in first place; Winning Spirit, No.9, in second
place;and Gorgeous George,No.8,in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:43.20.
6 6 5
4 15 35 48 49 11
Mega number
Dec. 27 Mega Millions
8 35 44 51 56 18
Powerball
Dec. 28 Powerball
4 27 29 32 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
1 6 4 1
Daily Four
0 7 4
Daily three evening
4 23 27 28 33 16
Mega number
Dec. 28 Super Lotto Plus
Actor Joseph Bologna is 79. Actor Russ Tamblyn is 79.
Baseball Hall-of-Famer Sandy Koufax is 78. Actor Jack Riley
is 78. Folk singer Noel Paul Stookey is 76. TVdirector James
Burrows is 73. Actor Fred Ward is 71. Singer-musician
Michael Nesmith is 71. Actress Concetta Tomei is 68. Rock
singer-musician Jeff Lynne is 66. Actress Sheryl Lee Ralph is
58. Actress Patricia Kalember is 57. Country singer Suzy
Bogguss is 57. “Today” show co-host Matt Lauer is 56.
Actress-comedian Tracey Ullman is 54. Rock musician Rob
Hotchkiss is 53. Sprinter Ben Johnson is 52. Actor George
Newbern is 50. Singer Jay Kay (Jamiroquai) is 44.
3
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
REDWOOD CITY
Armed robbery. Someone was robbed at
knifepoint while leaving in a taxi on
Linden Street before 9:52 p.m. Thursday,
Dec. 26.
Stolen vehicle attempt. A laptop was
taken from a white Ford truck that had its
ignition punched on Beech Street before
8:21 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 24.
Found property. Clothing, jewelry, per-
sonal hygiene products and a wallet were
found in bushes on Haven Avenue before
2: 11 p.m. Monday, Dec. 23.
Petty theft. Aman lent his mountain bike
to his brother-in-law who sold it to buy
drugs on E Street before 6:49 p.m. Sunday,
Dec. 22.
Robbery. Two men robbed four kids with
simulated weapons at the intersection of
Roosevelt Avenue and Cleveland Street
before 7:53 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 21.
San Bruno
Vandalism. Arock was thrown through the
front window of a house on the first block
of Pacific Avenue before 8:18 a.m.
Thursday, Dec. 26.
Residential burglary. A woman’s comput-
er, hard disc drive and computer case were
taken on the 1000 block of National
Avenue before 10:33 a.m. Wednesday,
Dec. 25.
Police reports
Fertilizing the neighbor’s yard
Two neighbors argued over a dog that
pooped on a lawn at the 1200 block of
Bellevue Avenue in Burlingame before
11:21 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 8.
T
he first half of the 1940s was a time
of great social upheaval in the
United States. The decade began with
two wars that were waged in the Pacific
Ocean and Asia and a war that was to stop the
march of fascism and Hitler’s dictatorship
in Europe.
All of our resources were thrown into
these conflicts because we deeply believed
that both were a threat to our young democ-
racy on the North American continent.
Millions of men were put into uniform to
confront the two fronts of war that would
take our men across the vast oceans on
either side of our country. The war machine
that was needed to fight these enemy forces
was formed and new social societies were
formed due to the upheaval of citizens who
were needed where the factories of weapon-
making were operating. Women were put on
assembly lines for the first time and blacks
from the South migrated to the factories in
the Midwest and the West Coast. This
migration of millions of men and women
put a strain on the local housing and buying
practices of the migrants. Gender discrimi-
nation and racial discrimination were
relaxed by the locals as everybody was busy
with the war effort.
When the wars were over in the mid-
1940s, a new type of fear arose in the gov-
ernment and had to be handled immediately
to prevent the sequence of events that
occurred after the first world war. The solders
serving in Europe and Asia wanted to leave
their posts immediately and return to the
United States and resume their “normal”
lives. Government officials immediately put
their heads together to seek a method of
handling all of these returning veterans on
the job market. They realized that the jobs
in the factories would evaporate as no more
guns, tanks, airplanes, ships and other
fighting materials would be needed in peace-
time. That meant that tens of millions of
men and women would have to be displaced
in the job market for the returning veterans
to resume the jobs they left before the war.
What to do?
In an effort to retool the working force of
the United States., the G. I Bill
(Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944)
was passed in 1944. With it was the G.I Bill
of Rights that allowed the returning soldiers
to get a start in the aftermath of the war by
purchasing a home with a loan at low inter-
est and no down payment that was guaran-
teed by the U.S. government. The next pro-
vision of the bill was to change the direc-
tion of our country because it didn’t just
Hope for the future: the G.I.Bill of World War II
DAROLD FREDRICKS/DAILY JOURNAL
The G.I. Bill spurred the U.S. into prosperity (Western San Bruno).
See HISTORY, Page 19
4
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
5
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
12 enrollment in the two counties’ public
schools, according to the report. In the
counties, just 20 percent of Latinos and 22
percent of blacks graduate in four years with
the credits to attend a University of
California or California State University
campuses, compared to 71 percent of Asians
and 53 percent of whites, the report states.
Three other Peninsula cities also
topped the list of schools which a large
percentage of the Lation population are
eligible for four years colleges. Aspire
East Palo Alto Phoenix Academy landed
at number four with 62 percent of its
Latino students eligible for state univer-
sities, while Capuchino High School in
San Mateo was number 9 with 35 percent
being eligible for these colleges. Half
Moon Bay High School landed at 10
with 32 percent being eligible for UC
and CSU.
With just more than 400 students, the
10-year-old Sequoia Union High School
District charter school’s small structure
is important so each student can be per-
sonally known, said Penelope Pak, exec-
utive director of the school.
Students are selected by blind lottery,
with 100 added per year and about 550
appl yi ng. The school is 49 percent
Latino, 12 percent are English language
learners and 38 percent are eligible for
free or reduced price meals. In 2012, 90
percent of the Latino students at the
school graduated in four years and were
eligible for the UC or CSU system. High
school graduates who aren’t UC or CSU
eligible can go to low-cost community
colleges, which offer job training and
general education courses that can be the
start of a bachelor’s degree. Almost 75
percent of college-going Latinos in
California and two-thirds of blacks
enroll in community colleges, but few
complete a vocational certificate or a
two-year degree, much less a bachelor’s
degree, the report states.
“We set those high college ready stan-
dards for every student,” Pak said.
“When you set those expectations, they
rise up to the occasion. Since it’s a small
student population, they have close per-
sonal relationships with mentors which
allows us to spend a lot of time under-
standing them individually as students.”
Every student is on an Advanced
Placement track, as each student is
required to take six of the college credit
garnering classes before graduation.
Each student must take at least one of the
accompanying Advanced Placement tests
as well.
“We fundamentally believe every stu-
dent should have a college preparatory
education,” Pak said.
Senior Leslie Aviles of East Palo Alto
is currently taking five Advanced
Placement classes and said she came into
the school really nervous.
“I really didn’t take education serious-
l y,” she said. “I struggled freshmen and
sophomore years and learned from that.
All the support from mentors and coun-
selors has been really helpful.”
Now, she says she is hoping to go to
University of San Francisco to study to
become a nurse.
“I have really big dreams now,” she
said. “I realized I love helping people
and I realized that through the Summit
community. ”
As a charter school, teachers try to
incorporate a lot of project-based learn-
ing. For example, 10th graders are now
working on a project to connect what
they’ve learned in history class about
World War II to English class by writing
their own dystopic novels. There’s then
a robust peer editing process.
Summit is one of six schools in a net-
work of small charter schools in
California called Summit Schools.
Everest is the next closest school geo-
graphically since it’s also in Redwood
Ci t y. Summit was the first school built
in the network, while next newest will
open in Richmond during the 2014-15
school year. The East Bay school will
house those in grades seven through 12.
In 2015, the Summit network will break
out of California with a school in
Seattle.
Pak said the school has the benefit of
giving teachers 40 professional devel-
opment days over just three days that
most other schools’ teachers receive.
Bobby Cupp, a 10th-grade world his-
tory teacher, is in his third year at
Summit and said the staff development is
definitely a perk and he believes the
vision of the school really helps stu-
dents succeed. He previoulsy worked at a
traditional comprehensive school and
said there wasn’t the core belief in the
school that every student could succeed.
“It really does make a difference,” said
Cupp, who is advisor to the 12th-
graders. “It allows us to improve our
craft ... College success starts with the
attitude of the school. It’s designed
around the idea that every student can go
on to college.”
Others schools lack the resources to
help students in the way Summit does, he
said. He also sees Aviles as a great exam-
ple of how a school can help a student
focus on academics.
“She had this attitude, or belief, that
school was just something she wasn’t a
thing for her,” Cupp said. “She avoided
scrutiny; it’s common in communities
without a college culture. Leslie dis-
covered her interest in helping other
people here.”
The full report can be downloadedat
i nnovat eschool s. org/ fi l es/ IPS_Report
- 2013_v10-ONSCREEN.pdf.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
PREP
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Students participated in a mock United Nations debate about contraceptives in Advanced
Placement environmental science.
6
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Charles Babington
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A world-
famous symbol of democracy is
going under cover, as workers
start a two-year, $60 million reno-
vation of the U.S. Capitol dome.
Curved rows of scaffolds, like
Saturn’s rings, will encircle it
next spring, enabling contractors
to strip multiple layers of paint
and repair more than 1,000 cracks
and broken pieces. The dome will
remain illuminated at night and
partly visible through the scaf-
folding and paint-capturing
cloths. But the Washington icon -
- and portions of the Rotunda’s
painted ceiling that lies below --
will be significantly obscured for
many months.
The project is beginning just as
the nearby Washington
Monument sheds scaffolding that
was used to repair damage from a
2011 earthquake.
Half-completed when Abraham
Lincoln stood beneath it to sum-
mon “the better angels of our
nature” in 1861, the Capitol dome
has since towered over
Washington, which limits build-
ing heights to 130 feet. Time,
however, has let water seep
through hundreds of cracks. The
water attacks cast iron, which
“continues to rust and rust and
rust,” said Stephen T. Ayers,
Architect of the Capitol.
This first major renovation in
more than 50 years should add
decades of structural integrity to
the dome, which Ayers calls per-
haps “the most recognizable sym-
bol across the globe.” The $60
million undertaking will heal
inner wounds, he said, without
changing the way the dome looks
from the ground.
Much of the work will be done at
night and on weekends. It won’t be as
flashy as the 1993 helicopter removal
and return of the 19-foot Statue of
Freedom from the dome’s top.
The Capitol’s crowning piece is
actually two domes, one nested
under the other like Russian dolls,
and separated by a web of cast iron
braces hidden from view. From the
ground it looks like a massive
structure that would be too heavy
for the building to support if it
were indeed made of the solid
stone it appears to be.
Instead, it is cast iron painted to
look like masonry. The lighter
material and open space between
the inner and outer domes create a
physically sustainable structure.
But it’s by no means puny.
The dome’s iron and masonry
weigh 14.1 million pounds, said
Kevin Hildebrand of the Capitol
architect’s office. He led reporters
up narrow, spiraling stairs that
reach the Rotunda’s top, and then
give access to the in-between
world of girders separating the two
domes. Ultimately the steps lead
outdoors, to a panoramic walkway
beneath the 12-columned lantern,
or tholos, topped by the Statue of
Freedom.
After a 1990 rainstorm left pud-
dles on the Rotunda’s stone floor,
workers found that bird nests had
clogged gutters atop the Capitol,
helping water penetrate outer
walls and streak interior surfaces.
Then they found bigger problems.
Hundreds of cracks and pinholes in
the cast iron exterior added to the
seepage.
Pans now capture the water.
Congress finally agreed to spend
$60 million for a better, more
lasting solution.
Two-year renovation starts for Capitol’s famous dome
REUTERS
Constantino Brumidi's painting “The Apotheosis of Washington”is shown
on the “eye”or ceiling of the U.S. Capitol’s rotunda in the capitol dome on
Capitol Hill in Washington.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — December
has been one of the driest months
in one of the driest years ever
recorded in California, which is
spurring some cities and counties
in the Sacramento-San Joaquin
Delta region to issue water conser-
vation orders earlier than usual.
The city of Folsom on Monday
imposed a mandatory 20-percent
water conservation order, while
Sacramento County has also asked
residents in unincorporated areas
to reduce water use by 20 percent.
The cities of Roseville and
Sacramento are also likely to con-
sider similar measures in early
January, according to the
Sacramento Bee.
If no rain falls in the remaining
days of 2013, it could rank as the
driest calendar year in state histo-
ry. The northern
Sierra Nevada,
an area where
snowpack is
key to the
state’s water
picture, has
received only
10 percent of its
average snow-
fall this month
While a drought has not been
declared by Gov. Jerry Brown, he
has assembled a task force to
monitor and advise him on the
issue.
It would take a series of big
storms in 2014 to reduce the
threat, leading most water experts
to believe a drought declaration
imminent.
“Even if we pick up with normal
weather conditions in January,
soil moisture is so low that runoff
will be low because the soil will
just suck up a lot of that precipita-
tion,” Jeanine Jones, interstate
resources manager at the state
Department of Water Resources,
told the Bee.
The issue of low water supply in
reservoirs is not only bad news
for people, but for fish too.
Folsom Lake dropped below 20
percent of its capacity last week,
an historic low.
That means the U.S. Bureau of
Reclamation is planning to
reduce water releases from the dam
into the American River, which
could kill Chinook salmon eggs
if the river’s levels drop too low.
“From a fishery perspective,
it’s a really tough balancing act,”
Tom Gohring, executive director
of coalition of local water agen-
cies and environmental groups
called Water Forum in
Sacramento. “It’s not a stretch to
say people are on alert.”
Dry year spurs new water
conservation orders in 2014
Jerry Brown
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — The family of a
California girl declared brain dead
after complications from tonsil
surgery was running out of time
Sunday to find a new facility to take
her in and keep her on a ventilator.
A judge’s ruling will allow
Children’s Hospital Oakland to
remove 13-year-old Jahi McMath
from life support at 5 p.m. Monday
unless her family appeals.
The family is now pinning its
hopes on a New York facility after
two California care homes with-
drew offers to accept the teen.
Chris Dolan, the family’s attor-
ney, said he was waiting to hear
from the New York hospital after its
facility director and medical direc-
tor speak. He wouldn’t provide the
hospital’s name, saying the media
attention could hurt Jahi’s chance
of being transferred there.
On Sunday, the hospital said it
had not heard from the New York, or
any other, facility about a transfer.
“We need to be able to talk to the
other facility to understand what it
is they are capable of doing,”
Cynthia Chiarappa, a hospital
spokeswoman, said Sunday.
The hospital also said it would
need to confirm there is “lawful
transportation” included in any
plan to transfer Jahi, and written
permission from the coroner.
“This is not transferring an indi-
vidual in a vegetative state, but a
dead body. ”
Dolan did not return multiple
messages seeking comment on
Sunday, but said previously that
the family views the New York site
as it’s “last, last hope.”
Time short to find new
facility for Jahi McMath
NATION 7
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Josh Lederman
ASSOCIATED PRESS
HONOLULU — A December surge pro-
pelled health care sign-ups through the
government’s rehabilitated website past the
1 million mark, the Obama administration
said Sunday, reflecting new vigor for the
problem-plagued federal insurance
exchange.
Of the more than 1.1 million people
now enrolled, nearly 1 million signed up
in December, with the majority coming
days before a pre-Christmas deadline for
coverage to start in January. Compare
that with a paltry 27,000 in October, the
federal website’s first, error-prone month
— or 137,000 in November.
“We experienced a welcome surge in
enrollment as millions of Americans seek
access to affordable health care cover-
age,” Marilyn Tavenner, the head of the
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid
Services, said in a blog post.
The figures don’t represent a full
accounting for the country. They don’t
include December results from the 14
states running their own websites.
Overall, states have been signing up more
people than the federal government has.
But most of that has come from high per-
formers such as California, New York,
Washington, Kentucky and Connecticut.
Some states continue to struggle.
Still, the end-of-year spike suggests that
the federal exchange serving 36 states is
starting to pull its weight. The windfall
comes at a critical moment for President
Barack Obama’s sweeping health care law,
which becomes “real” for many Americans
on Jan. 1 as coverage through the exchanges
and key patient protections kick in.
The administration’s concern now shifts
to keeping the momentum going for sign-
ups, and heading off problems that could
arise when people who’ve already enrolled
try to use their new insurance.
“They’ve got the front end of the system
working really well,” said insurance indus-
try consultant Robert Laszewski. “Now we
can move on to the next question: Do peo-
ple really want to buy this?”
The fledgling insurance exchanges —
online markets for subsidized private cover-
age — are still likely to fall short of the
administration’s own targets for 2013.
That’s a concern because Obama needs mil-
lions of mostly younger, healthy
Americans to sign up to keep costs low for
everyone. Officials had projected more than
3.3 million overall would be enrolled
through federal and state exchanges by the
end of the year.
Tavenner said fixes to the website,
overhauled to address widespread techni-
cal problems, contributed to December’s
figures. But things haven’t totally cleared
up. Thousands of people wound up wait-
ing on hold for telephone help on
Christmas Eve for a multitude of reasons,
including technical difficulties.
“We have been a little bit behind the
curve,” acknowledged Rep. Joaquin
Castro, D-Texas, whose state has the
highest proportion of uninsured resi-
dents. Nonetheless, the strong December
sign-ups send a message. “The Affordable
Care Act is something that’s good for the
country,” said Castro.
“Obamacare is a reality,” conceded one
of the law’s opponents, Rep. Darrell Issa,
R-Calif., who as House oversight commit-
tee chairman has been investigating the
rollout problems. However, he predicted it
will only pile on costs.
“The fact that people well into the mid-
dle class are going to get subsidies is
going to cause them to look at health-
care...sort of in a Third World way of do we
get subsidies from the government for our
milk, for our gasoline and, oh, by the way,
for our healthcare,” said Issa.
For consumers who successfully selected
one of the new insurance plans by Dec. 24,
coverage should start on New Year’s Day.
That’s provided they pay their first month’s
premium by the due date, extended until Jan.
10 in most cases.
Federal health market surpasses 1 million signups
REUTERS
U.S.President Barack Obama listens as First Lady Michelle Obama makes remarks to mothers
after a meeting to discuss how the Affordable Care Act can help families plan their health
care in the Oval Office of the White House.
By Lolita C. Baldor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Four U.S. military
personnel investigating potential evacu-
ation routes in Libya were taken into cus-
tody at a checkpoint and then detained
briefly by the Libyan government before
being released, U.S. officials said Friday
ni ght .
These four military personnel were
operating in an area near Sabratha as part
of security preparedness efforts when
they were taken into custody, State
Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said
in a statement.
No one was injured. The military per-
sonnel were taken to the U.S. Embassy
after their release, a Defense Department
official said. The official was not author-
ized to discuss the incident by name and
requested anonymity.
The four were supporting U.S. Marine
security forces protecting the American
Embassy, the official said. They were
likely U.S. special operations forces,
which have been deployed to Libya.
An altercation apparently took place at
the checkpoint, the Defense Department
official said. Reports of gunfire could not
be confirmed.
After they were detained at the check-
point, the Americans were transferred to
the Ministry of the Interior and held for a
few hours, the official said.
“We value our relationship with the new
Libya,” Psaki said. “We have a strategic
partnership based on shared interests and
our strong support for Libya’s historic
democratic transition.”
The U.S. Embassy in Tripoli includes a
security detail. The embassy’s personnel
are restricted in their movements in
Libya.
In September 2012, terrorists attacked
the U.S. diplomatic mission at Benghazi,
Libya, killing U.S. Ambassador Chris
Stevens and three other Americans.
Libya releases four U.S. military personnel
WORLD 8
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Vladimir Isachenkov
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOSCOW — A suicide bomber
struck a busy railway station in
southern Russia on Sunday,
killing at least 15 other people
and wounding scores more, offi-
cials said, in a stark reminder of
the threat Russia is facing as it
prepares to host February’s
Olympics in Sochi.
No one immediately claimed
responsibility for the bombing in
Volgograd, but it came several
months after Chechen rebel leader
Doku Umarov called for new
attacks against civilian targets in
Russia, including the Sochi
Games.
Suicide bombings have rocked
Russia for years, but many have
been contained to the North
Caucasus, the center of an insur-
gency seeking an Islamist state in
the region. Until recently
Volgograd was not a typical tar-
get, but the city formerly known
as Stalingrad has now been struck
twice in two months — suggest-
ing militants may be using the
transportation hub as a renewed
way of showing their reach outside
their restive region.
Volgograd, which lies close to
volatile Caucasus provinces, is
900 kilometers (550 miles) south
of Moscow and about 650 kilome-
ters (400 miles) northeast of
Sochi, a Black Sea resort flanked
by the North Caucasus Mountains.
The bombing highlights the
daunting security challenge
Russia will face in fulfilling its
pledge to make the Sochi Games
the “safest Olympics in history. ”
The government has deployed
tens of thousands of soldiers,
police and other security person-
nel to protect the games.
Through the day, officials issued
conflicting statements on casual-
ties. They also said that the sus-
pected bomber was a woman, but
then reversed themselves and said
the attacker could have been a
man.
The Interfax news agency quoted
unidentified law enforcement
agents as saying that footage
taken by surveillance cameras
indicated that the bomber was a
man. It also reported that it was
further proven by a torn male fin-
ger ringed by a safety pin removed
from a hand grenade, which was
found on the site of the explosion.
The bomber detonated explo-
sives in front of a metal detector
just beyond the station’s main
entrance when a police sergeant
became suspicious and rushed for-
ward to check ID, officials said.
The officer was killed by the blast,
and several other policemen were
wounded.
“When the suicide bomber saw a
policeman near a metal detector,
she became nervous and set off her
explosive device,” Vladimir
Markin, the spokesman for the
nation’s top investigative
agency, said in a statement earlier
in the day. He added that the bomb
contained about 10 kilograms (22
pounds) of TNT and was rigged
with shrapnel.
Markin later told Interfax that
the attacker could have been a
man, but added that the investiga-
tion was still ongoing. He said
that another hand grenade, which
didn’t explode, was also found on
the explosion site.
Markin argued that security con-
trols prevented a far greater num-
ber of casualties at the station,
which was packed with people at a
time when several trains were
delayed. About 40 were hospital-
ized, many in grave condition.
Earlier, Lifenews.ru, a Russian
news portal that reportedly has
close links to security agencies,
even posted what it claimed was an
image of the severed head of the
female’s attacker. It even said the
attacker appeared to have been a
woman whose two successive
rebel husbands had been killed by
Russian security forces in the
Caucasus.
Female suicide bombers, many
of whom were widows or sisters of
rebels, have mounted numerous
attacks in Russia. They often have
been referred to as “black wid-
ows.”
In October, a female suicide
bomber blew herself up on a city
bus in Volgograd, killing six peo-
ple and injuring about 30.
Officials said that attacker came
from the province of Dagestan,
which has become the center of
the Islamist insurgency that has
spread across the region after two
separatist wars in Chechnya.
As in Sunday’s blast, her bomb
was rigged with shrapnel that
caused severe injuries.
Chechnya has become more sta-
ble under the grip of its Moscow-
backed strongman, who incorpo-
rated many of the former rebels
into his feared security force. But
in Dagestan, the province
between Chechnya and the
Caspian Sea, Islamic insurgents
who declared an intention to carve
out an Islamic state in the region
mount near daily attacks on police
and other officials.
16 killed in suicide bombing in Russia’s south
REUTERS
Investigators work near the body of a victim after an explosion outside a
train station in Volgograd.
By Ryan Lucas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT— Saudi Arabia has
pledged $3 billion to
Lebanon to help strengthen
the country’s armed forces and
purchase weapons from
France, Lebanon’s president
said Sunday, calling it the
biggest grant ever for the
nation’s military.
Michel Sleiman, who made
the surprise announcement in
a televised national address,
did not provide any further
details. The Lebanese army
has struggled to contain a ris-
ing tide of violence linked to
the civil war in neighboring
Syria, a conflict that has
inflamed sectarian tensions in
Lebanon and threatened the
country’s stability.
“The Saudi king decided to
give a generous, well-appreci-
ated grant to Lebanon
amounting to $3 billion for
the Lebanese army, which will
allow it to buy new and mod-
ern weapons,” Sleiman said.
“The king pointed out that the
weapons will be bought from
France quickly, considering
the historical relations that
tie it to Lebanon and the mili-
tary cooperation between the
two countries.”
Sleiman said he hoped Paris
would quickly meet the initia-
tive, and help the Lebanese
army with arms, training and
maintenance.
French President Francois
Hollande, who was in Riyadh
Sunday for talks with Saudi
King Abdullah, said that
France would help if requested
to do so.
“If there are demands that
are addressed to us, we will
satisfy them,” Hollande told
reporters.
Fragile in the best of times,
Lebanon is struggling to cope
with the fallout from Syria’s
civil war. That conflict has
deeply divided Lebanon along
confessional lines, and para-
lyzed the country’s ram-
shackle political system to
the point that it has been
stuck with a weak and ineffec-
tual caretaker government
since April.
Saudi to give Lebanon
$3B to strengthen army
OPINION 9
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Lompoc Record
The Santa Barbara County Board
of Supervisors is moving toward
letting voters determine whether
the local onshore oil industry
should pay an extra dollar a barrel
in taxes. The vote could come as
early as next June, or possibly
November.
We have a more practical sugges-
tion — why not just put a measure
on the ballot to ban all oil develop-
ment in the county. That’s essen-
tially what the board majority is
attempting to do, but going
through a back door to get the deed
done.
In fact, there are many county res-
idents who would like to see no oil
development in this region. And
you can bet most of them live on
the South Coast, holding a different
perspective on commerce than
those of us here in North County,
for whom oil development and agri-
culture are major economic genera-
t ors.
The widening north/south split
was made even more apparent at
last week’s Board of Supervisors
meeting, during which North
County supervisors Steve
Lavagnino and Peter Adam were vir-
tually ignored, while the South
Coast-centric trio of Salud
Carbajal, Janet Wolf and Doreen
Farr discussed the pros and cons of
tacking an extra $1 tax on every
barrel of oil produced onshore.
The board majority made its feel-
ings known about oil development
at a previous meeting, at which the
majority assessed extra-ordinary
emissions restrictions on the pro-
posed Santa Maria Energy project
in the Orcutt Hills.
This proposed added tax simply
increases the burden a singled-out
industry must endure, if it wants to
continue doing business in Santa
Barbara County.
The extra tax notion sprang from
a civil grand jury report published
last June suggesting the county
could enhance its revenue stream by
tapping the oil industry. Based on
previous years’ numbers, such a tax
could produce $3 million-plus in
revenue.
The fact the board majority seems
to be conveniently overlooking is
that in those same years, the coun-
ty collected more than $8 million
in property taxes, and even more in
other fees.
The question then becomes —
how much more punishment will
the oil industry take before it
decides the cost of doing business
here is just too steep.
We get the distinct feeling that’s
the board majority’s general idea,
taxing an industry it doesn’t want
out of existence.
Don’t get us wrong, the oil indus-
try has a long and fairly dirty histo-
ry in Santa Barbara County. But at
the same time, the county has
extracted more than a pound of
flesh from the oil producers.
And today’s oil operations are not
what they were in your grandfa-
ther’s day, or even your father’s .
Modern technology has cleaned up
oil projects considerably, and when
accidents do happen, the county and
state have regulatory relief mecha-
nisms in place.
Opponents of the tax proposal
were out in full force at last week’s
board meeting, including one who
opined that a ballot measure to
impose the new tax would be defeat-
ed by voters, guaranteed.
We’re not quite as certain about
the outcome of such a vote, but we
are sure the oil industry — if it is to
continue operating in Santa Barbara
County at all — does not need more
taxes and fees.
There is no sense in singling out
an industry to carry an extra tax
burden, unless county officials plan
to tack extra taxes and fees onto
other industries.
Miami Herald
A
tough and thorough report
by an independent panel of
experts last week should
be all the justification that
President Obama needs to make
critical changes in the National
Security Agency’s spy programs to
protect Americans’ privacy without
undermining national security.
Until now, President Obama has
tried to deflect criticism of the
NSA secret surveillance projects
that a federal judge last week
labeled “nearly Orwellian.” The
president has offered soothing
assurances that he understands why
the public is worried, but he has
never committed to undertake the
changes necessary to ensure a min-
imum level of privacy. It’s time to
stop talking and start acting.
The report by a five-member
panel of intelligence and legal
experts appointed by the president
himself stopped short of recom-
mending the dismantling of NSA
programs designed to prevent acts
of terrorism. Nor should they have.
The threat of terrorism on
American soil remains very real.
But does that mean that the pub-
lic has to surrender a reasonable
expectation of privacy in commu-
nications, either by phone or in
cyberspace? The NSA’s excesses,
responding to orders from two
administrations and from
Congress, went far beyond what is
necessary to maintain a proper bal-
ance between security and the right
to be free of a smothering level of
surveillance.
Among the most important is the
recommendation that the data
gleaned from systematically col-
lecting the logs of every
American’s phone calls — so-
called metadata — should be held
in private hands (phone companies
or some sort of private consor-
tium) and not by the government
itself. The NSA would have to get a
judge’s order to perform “link
analysis” on any stored record.
The president is expected to
announce next month what he
intends do about the secrecy pro-
grams. He should embrace those
changes that provide greater
accountability and enhance the
civil liberties of Americans. If
there are recommendations he can-
not accept, he must make a persua-
sive case to the public as to why.
Balancing security and privacy
Wise words
A
s we say good-bye to one year and welcome
another, it’s a time for reflection. Several
holiday greeting cards included memorable
words of wisdom for New Year resolutions. If you are
lucky enough to be on Bill Kenney’s holiday mailing
list (he’s a longtime San Mateo resident) you received
a large envelope in December with numerous wise and
inspirational thoughts. Here are a few to consider:
“To get profit without risk, experience without dan-
ger, and reward without work, is as impossible as it is
to live without being born.” — Harry Truman.
“If you are patient in one moment of anger, you will
escape a hundred days of sorrow.” — Chinese proverb.
“If you desire many things, many things will seem
few.” — Benjamin Franklin.
“The chains of habit are too weak to be felt until they
are too strong to be broken.” — Samuel Johnson.
“The distance is nothing. It is only the first step
that is difficult.” — Marie de Vichy-Chamrond.
***
One of my favorites was
from a friend with eight
children and twice as
many grandchildren. To
distinguish among the
siblings and their off-
spring each family is
dressed in a specific
color. Here’s the quota-
tion which accompanied
the multi-colored family
phot o:
“Your children are not
your children
They are sons and daughters of Life’s longing for
itself.
They come through you but not from you.
And though they are with you yet they belong not to
you.
You may give them your love but not your thoughts,
For they have their own thoughts.
You may house their bodies but not their souls.
For their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow,
which you
Cannot visit, not even in your dreams.
“You may strive to be like them, but seek not to
make them like you.
For life goes not backward nor tarries with yester-
day.
You are the bows from which your children as living
arrows are sent forth ...
Let your bending in the archer's hand be for glad-
ness.
For even as He loves the arrow that flies, so He
loves also the bow that is stable.”
— Kahlil Gibran, The Prophet.
***
Very sad news about the passing of Ernestine
Mazzola, one of San Mateo’s outstanding teachers.
She taught fifth grade at Fiesta Gardens in the San
Mateo school district for many years. She was an
active member of the teacher’s union at both the local
and state level and was respected by administrators,
parents, and students, as well as her colleagues. She
was named teacher of the year in San Mateo county
and nominated for California teacher of the year. We
talked across the aisle, so to speak, when I served on
the elementary board and I often turned to her for
advice. She always told it like it was and her primary
interest was always the students. When many teachers
and principals in the district did not like the changes
a new and forceful superintendent, Dave Thomas, was
making to improve educational standards, Ernestine
Mazzola knew he was on the right track and wasn’t
afraid to say so. She will be missed but remembered
by the many students who were lucky enough to be in
her classroom.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column
runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
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County must help businesses
Other voices
BUSINESS 10
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Wiseman, David McHugh
and Elaine Kurtenback
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aglobal retirement crisis is bear-
ing down on workers of all ages.
Spawned years before the Great
Recession and the 2008 financial
meltdown, the crisis was significant-
ly worsened by those twin traumas. It
will play out for decades, and its con-
sequences will be far-reaching.
Many people will be forced to work
well past the traditional retirement
age of 65. Living standards will fall
and poverty rates will rise for the eld-
erly in wealthy countries that built
safety nets for seniors after World War
II. In developing countries, people’s
rising expectations will be frustrated
if governments can’t afford retirement
systems to replace the tradition of
children caring for aging parents.
The problems are emerging as the
generation born after World War II
moves into retirement.
“The first wave of under-prepared
workers is going to try to go into
retirement and will find they can’t
afford to do so,” says Norman Dreger,
a retirement specialist with the con-
sulting firm Mercer in Frankfurt,
Germany.
The crisis is a convergence of three
factors:
— Countries are slashing retire-
ment benefits and raising the age to
start collecting them. These countries
are awash in debt since the recession
hit. And they face a demographics dis-
aster as retirees live longer and falling
birth rates mean there will be fewer
workers to support them.
— Companies have eliminated tra-
ditional pension plans that guaran-
teed employees a monthly check in
retirement.
— Individuals spent freely and
failed to save before the recession and
saw much of their wealth disappear
once it hit.
Those factors have been document-
ed individually. What is less appreci-
ated is their combined ferocity and
global scope.
“Most countries are not ready to
meet what is sure to be one of the
defining challenges of the 21st centu-
ry,” the Center for Strategic and
International Studies in Washington
concludes.
Mikio Fukushima, who is 52 and
lives in Tokyo, worries that he might
need to move somewhere cheaper,
maybe Malaysia, after age 70 to get
by comfortably on income from his
investments and a public pension of
just $10,000 a year.
People like Fukushima who are fret-
ting over their retirement prospects
stand in contrast to many who are
already retired. Many workers were
recipients of generous corporate pen-
sions and government benefits that
had yet to be cut.
Jean-Pierre Bigand, 66, retired
Sept. 1, in time to enjoy all the perks
of a retirement system in France that’s
now in peril. Bigand lives in the
countryside outside the city of Rouen
in Normandy. He has a second home
in Provence. He’s just taken a vaca-
tion on Oleron Island off the Atlantic
coast and is planning a five-week trip
to Guadeloupe.
“Travel is our biggest expense,” he
says.
Under siege
The notion of extended, leisurely
retirements is relatively new.
Germany established the world’s first
widely available state pension sys-
tem in 1889. The United States intro-
duced Social Security in 1935. In the
prosperous years after World War II,
governments expanded pensions. In
addition, companies began to offer
pensions that paid employees a guar-
anteed amount each month in retire-
ment — so-called defined-benefit pen-
sions.
The average age at which men could
retire with full government pension
benefits fell from 64.3 years in 1949
to 62.4 years in 1999 in the relative-
ly wealthy countries that belong to
the Organization for Economic
Cooperation and Development.
“That was the Golden Age,” Mercer
consultant Dreger says.
It would not last. As the 2000s
dawned, governments — and com-
panies — looked at actuarial tables
and birth rates and realized they
couldn’t afford the pensions they’d
promised.
The average man in 30 countries
the OECD surveyed will live 19
years after retirement. That’s up from
13 years in 1958, when many coun-
tries were devising their generous
pension plans.
The OECD says the average retire-
ment age would have to reach 66 or
67, from 63 now, to “maintain con-
trol of the cost of pensions” from
longer lifespans.
Compounding the problem is that
birth rates are falling just as the
bulge of people born in developed
countries after World War II retires.
Populations are aging rapidly as a
result. The higher the percentage of
older people, the harder it is for a
country to finance its pension sys-
tem because relatively fewer
younger workers are paying taxes.
In response, governments are
raising retirement ages and slashing
benefits. In 30 high- and middle-
income OECD countries, the average
age at which men can collect full
retirement benefits will rise to 64.6
in 2050, from 62.9 in 2010; for
women, it will rise from 61.8 to
64.4
In the wealthy countries it studied,
the OECD found that the pension
reforms of the 2000s will cut retire-
ment benefits by an average 20 percent.
Even France, where government
pensions have long been generous,
has begun modest reforms to reduce
costs.
“France is a retirees’paradise now,”
says Richard Jackson, senior fellow
at the CSIS. “You’re not going to
want to retire there in 20 to 25 years.”
The fate of government pensions is
important because they are the corner-
stone of retirement income. Across
the 34-country OECD, governments
provide 59 percent of retiree income,
on average.
The financial crisis
makes things worse
The outlook worsened once the
global banking system went into a
panic in 2008 and tipped the world
into the worst recession since the
1930s.
Government budget deficits swelled
in Europe and the United States. Tax
revenue shrank, and governments
pumped money into rescuing their
banks and financing unemployment
benefits. All that escalated pressure on
governments to reduce spending on
pensions.
The Great Recession threw tens of
millions out of work worldwide. For
others, pay stagnated, making it hard-
er to save. Because government retire-
ment benefits are based on lifetime
earnings, they’ll now be lower. The
Urban Institute, a Washington think
tank, estimates that lost wages and
pay raises will shrink the typical
American worker’s income at age 70
by 4 percent — an average of $2,300
a year.
Leslie Lynch, 52, of Glastonbury,
Conn., had $30,000 in her 401(k)
retirement account when she lost her
$65,000-a-year job last year at an
insurance company. She’d worked there
28 years. She’s depleted her retirement
savings trying to stay afloat.
“I don’t believe that I will ever retire
now,” she says.
Many of those facing a financial
squeeze in retirement can look to
themselves for part of the blame.
They spent many years before the
Great Recession borrowing and
spending instead of saving.
The National Institute on
Retirement Security estimates that
Americans are at least $6.8 trillion
short of what they need to have saved
for a comfortable retirement. For
those 55 to 64, the shortfall comes to
$113,000 per household.
The Asia Challenge
In Asia, workers are facing a dif-
ferent retirement worry, a byprod-
uct of their astonishing economic
growth.
Traditionally, Chinese and Koreans
could expect their grown children to
care for them as they aged. But newly
prosperous young people increasing-
ly want to live on their own. They
also are more likely to move to dis-
tant cities to take jobs, leaving par-
ents behind. Countries like China and
South Korea are at an “awkward”
stage, Jackson says: The old ways are
vanishing, but new systems of caring
for the aged aren’t yet in place.
Yoo Tae-we, 47, a South Korean
manager at a trading company that
imports semiconductor components,
doesn’t expect his son to support him
as he and his siblings did their par-
ents.
“We have to prepare for our own
futures rather than depending on our
children,” he says.
China pays generous pensions to
civil servants and urban workers.
They can retire early with full benefits
— at 60 for men and 50 or 55 for
women. Their pensions will prove to
be a burden as China ages and each
retiree is supported by contributions
from fewer workers.
The world braces for retirement crisis
By Marc Levy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HARRISBURG, Pa. —
Republican governors running for
re-election next year are looking
to capitalize on distaste for
Washington gridlock and
President Barack Obama’s drop-
ping public approval amid the
bumpy rollout of his signature
health care law — and Democratic
challengers may need to respond
with a popular cause.
Aminimum wage increase could
be the answer.
Democrats vying to challenge a
slew of Republican governors,
particularly those seeking re-elec-
tion in states that Obama won last
year, are talking up an increase as
their campaigns get off the ground
11 months before the election.
Polls say it’s publicly popular,
it revives the message of econom-
ic inequality that Obama wielded
effectively last year, and it comes
wrapped in a broader jobs and eco-
nomic message that touches on
the top priority of many voting
Americans.
In Pennsylvania, championing
a minimum wage increase is
already popular among the big
field of Democrats vying to chal-
lenge the re-election bid of Gov.
Tom Corbett.
Now, Katie McGinty, a onetime
environmental policy adviser to
the Clinton White House and
Corbett’s Democratic predecessor,
is distinguishing herself by
telling audiences and potential
donors that she was the first
Democrat in the Pennsylvania
field to make it an issue.
“This is core for me,” McGinty
said. “I think it is fundamentally
true across the centuries that one
of the things that can really bring
a nation down is the increasing
chasm in terms of income.”
Thus far, the Republicans whom
Democrats view as most vulnera-
ble aren’t changing their minds
and supporting it.
In addition to Corbett, the
Democrats’ list of most vulnerable
includes Maine’s Paul LePage,
Michigan’s Rick Snyder and
Wisconsin’s Scott Walker.
Florida’s Rick Scott and Ohio’s
John Kasich might be insulated
because their states’ laws boost
minimum wage with inflation and
Iowa’s Terry Branstad, New
Mexico’s Susanna Martinez and
Nevada’s Brian Sandoval aren’t
viewed as sufficiently endangered.
All of those governors won a
first term in the national
Republican sweep of 2010, and
most have had strong Republican
representation in their legisla-
tures to support them.
But LePage was tasked with fac-
ing a Democrat-controlled legisla-
ture, and in July he vetoed a bill to
incrementally raise the state’s
minimum wage.
For his likely Democratic chal-
lenger, U.S. Rep. Mike Michaud,
increasing the minimum wage is
an issue the onetime paper mill
worker from northern Maine dis-
cusses often, said campaign advis-
er David Farmer.
“He is closely aligned with
working- and middle-class fami-
lies,” Farmer said. “He’s not a mil-
lionaire.”
Still, it would not be unheard of
for a Republican to advocate a
minimum wage increase. New
Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who
leads the Washington, D.C.-based
Republican Governors
Association, and New Mexico’s
Martinez each vetoed their legis-
lature’s minimum wage bill, but
not without making a counteroffer
of a more modest increase.
Republican governors are
focused on lightening tax and reg-
ulatory burdens for businesses to
improve wages, said Jon
Thompson, a spokesman for the
Republican Governors
Association. But he also seemed
to acknowledge the occasional
political necessity for
Republicans to embrace a mini-
mum wage increase.
“It’s complicated because there
are some states that a minimum
wage increase could be more help-
ful and useful than other states,”
Thompson said in an email.
For Democrats, campaign advis-
ers and strategists say there’s no
mandate from national party lead-
ers to wield the issue as a weapon
next year. But there’s no denying
it’s popular and salient to the
political battlefield, said Danny
Kanner, spokesman for the
Democratic Governors
Association.
“The defining issue in every sin-
gle one of these races is who is
fighting for the middle class,” he
said.
Democrats are pairing their
advocacy of a minimum wage
increase with criticism of cuts to
corporate tax rates, public pen-
sions or education aid that
Republican governors pushed
through. They also contend that
it’ll revive the economy by flush-
ing more money into the hands of
consumers who spend it and reduce
reliance on food stamps or other
government programs for the
poor.
If vulnerable Republicans aren’t
budging on the issue, neither are
the big-business groups that tend
to back them. The U.S. Chamber
of Commerce warns that small
employers will have the hardest
time absorbing higher labor
costs, while the National
Federation of Independent
Business warned of job losses.
“We’re not going to waver,” said
NFIB spokeswoman Jean Card.
“It’s the kind of thing that sounds
good, but rarely are polling ques-
tions backed up with the kind of
economic downside that’s
inevitable.”
For Democrats, Obama got the
ball rolling on the issue by call-
ing for an increase in his February
budget speech, and union-organ-
ized demonstrations in front of
profitable mega-chains such as
Wal-Mart and McDonald’s have
kept it in the public eye.
And it’s not only a popular issue
with the labor unions that often
provide money and volunteers to
help power Democrats’ campaigns
— the public warmly embraces it,
t oo.
An NBC News/Wall Street
Journal survey this month found
that more than six in 10 voting-
age adults said they would support
an increase of the federal minimum
wage from $7.25, where it was last
raised in 2009, to $10.10 an hour.
Support to raise it to $12.50 fell
to about four in 10 and fewer than
three in 10 supported an increase
to $15 an hour. ACBS News poll
in November found that just one in
four would like the federal mini-
mum wage to remain at $7.25.
Some Democrats may neverthe-
less approach the issue with cau-
tion.
Mary Burke, who is expected to
win the Democratic nomination to
challenge Wisconsin’s Walker,
said she supports legislation there
to increase the minimum wage by
a relatively modest 35 cents an
hour to $7.60.
Beyond that, the former state
commerce secretary and daughter
of Trek Bicycle’s founder said a
gradual and fair increase in the
minimum wage could avoid eco-
nomic harm. While she wasn’t
prepared to say what that is, the
subject will be prominent in her
campaign, Burke said.
“This race is going to be about
jobs and people being able to sup-
port themselves,” Burke said,
“and that is an important way we
can help more people move toward
economic independence.”
In governor races, Democrats eye wage increase
<< Seahawks clinch top seed, page 13
• Former F1 driver in critical condition, page 15
Monday, Dec. 30, 2013
NFL: PACKERS TAKE OVER BEARS >> PAGE 12
By Bob Baum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GLENDALE, Ariz. — San
Francisco booted a 17-point lead,
then Phil Dawson kicked the 49ers
to a victory that clinched the
NFC’s No. 5 playoff seed.
Dawson made a 40-yard field
goal as the game ended to lift the
49ers to a 23-20 victory over the
Arizona Cardinals on Sunday.
San Francisco will visit Green
Bay in the wild-card round next
weekend.
Dawson had matched his career
best with a 56-yarder to put the
49ers (12-4) up 20-17 with 1:45
to go. Jay Feely’s 43-yard field
goal then tied it for Arizona with
34 seconds left.
LaMichael James’ 45-yard kick-
off return and two quick comple-
tions by Collin Kaepernick set up
Dawson’s game winner.
Arizona (10-6) rallied from a 17-
0 first-quarter deficit to tie it on
Carson Palmer’s 34-yard touch-
down pass to Andre Roberts with
3:20 remaining.
Anquan Boldin caught nine
passes for 149 yards and a TD in
his first game back since Arizona
traded him to Baltimore after the
2009 season.
To make the playoffs, the
Cardinals needed to beat San
Francisco and have New Orleans
lose to Tampa Bay. Neither
occurred, leaving Arizona, in its
first year under coach Bruce
Arians, to settle for just its third
10-win season since the franchise
moved to the desert in 1988.
Palmer, after a slow start, was 28
for 49 for 407 yards and two
touchdowns with one intercep-
tion. In the process, he became
the first player in NFL history to
throw for more than 4,000 yards
in a season for three different
teams. Larry Fitzgerald had six
catches for 113 yards.
San Francisco’s NaVarro
Bowman had an interception, a
forced fumble, a fumble recovery
and a sack in the 49ers’ ninth vic-
tory in the last 10 meetings with
Arizona.
Boldin did most of his damage
in the first quarter, with six catch-
es for 106 yards, including a 4-
yarder for a touchdown and a 63-
yard play to set up another TD.
But that was it for the San
Francisco offense until Dawson’s
late two kicks. In between the
kicker’s franchise record string of
27 consecutive field goals ended
when he missed a 24-yard chip
shot in the waning seconds of the
first half.
Feely, who made a 49-yarder,
had missed from 37 and 43 yards
before making the one to tie the
game for the last time.
Bowman’s sack had put Arizona
in third and 13 when Palmer lofted
one to the end zone, where
Roberts gathered it in just as he
was sliding out of bounds on a
slippery turf recently re-sodded for
Tuesday’s Fiesta Bowl.
Kaepernick’s 18-yard pass to
Boldin helped set up Dawson’ 56-
yarder, matching his longest, set
in 2008.
Palmer, though, connected on
passes of 24 yards to Rob Housler
and 23 yards to Fitzgerald to give
Feely a chance for redemption, and
the kick that tied it at 20.
With the game seemingly head-
ed for overtime, James raced from
five yards deep in the end zone to
the 49ers 40, then Kaepernick
connected for 18 yards to Boldin
and, in a play that started with just
18 seconds to play, a sidelines
pass of 29 yards to Quinton
Patton. Then Dawson’s final field
goal ended it.
Bowman’s interception set up
Boldin’s first-quarter touchdown
catch. Kaepernick also had a 3-
yard TD pass to Vernon Davis.
Palmer and the Cardinals finally
got going in the second quarter
with a 12-play, 88-yard touch-
down drive. On fourth-and-goal at
the 1, Palmer threw to wide open
Jake Ballard for the score to cut
the lead to 17-7.
Dawsonkicks 49ersto 23-20 victory
MARK J. REBILAS-USA TODAY SPORTS
Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald (11) is tackled by San Francisco 49ers safety Donte Whitner (31)
and linebacker Patrick Willis (52) in the second quarter at University of Phoenix Stadium.
By Tom Withers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CLEVELAND — Stephen
Curry scored 29 points and made
a clutch jumper with 13.5 sec-
onds left as the Golden State
Warriors opened a long road trip
with their fifth straight victory,
108-104 in overtime against the
Cleveland Cavaliers on Sunday.
Curry overcame a poor shoot-
ing performance after halftime,
and nearly recorded a triple-dou-
ble by adding 11 assists and nine
rebounds in 48 minutes. Curry
was just 2 of 12 from the floor in
the second half and OT.
David Lee scored 19 before
fouling out for the Warriors, who
are on the road for seven games
over the next 13 days.
Kyrie Irving scored 27 for
Cleveland, which dropped its
fifth straight and lost its third
tight game in a row. The Cavs
lost by three in Boston on
Saturday and two in double-over-
time against Atlanta on
Thursday.
Irving drained a 3-pointer with
9.5 seconds left in regulation to
tie it 99-all. The Warriors, who
once trailed by 17, quickly
pushed the ball up the floor for
one final shot, but Curry’s 8-foot
runner in the lane bounced off the
rim in the last second, sending
the teams to overtime.
Curry threw
his head back
in disbelief at
the miss. But
t he si l ky
smoot h poi nt
guard more
than made up
for it in the
extra session.
After Irving
missed, Curry fed Andre Iguodala
on the wing and the Warriors for-
ward alertly hit a cutting
Draymond Green for a dunk to put
Golden State ahead 106-104 with
59 seconds to go.
Jarrett Jack misfired for the
Cavs, and with the 24-second
shot clock winding down on the
Warriors’ next possession, Curry
dropped a contested 23-foot
jumper from the left side to put
Golden State up by four.
The Warriors then stole
Cleveland’s last inbounds pass
to wrap up a grind-it-out win.
Green went just 2 of 10 from
the field but added 10 rebounds,
and Klay Thompson scored 16
for Golden State.
Curry’s shot wasn’t falling
after halftime, so he adjusted his
game and picked up seven assists
in the second half and overtime.
The loss wrapped up a strange
weekend for the Cavs, who
excused Andrew Bynum indefi-
nitely on Saturday for conduct
detrimental to the team. The
Cavs are trying to trade the 7-
foot center, who signed a two-
year, $24 million contract with
Cleveland in July and showed
flashes of being dominant again
but became a headache.
Bynum’s bizarre situation con-
tinues to hover over the Cavs.
His locker was empty except
for a half-loaf of whole grain
bread, a jar of peanut butter,
headphones, a pair of sneakers
and shower sandals. It’s unlikely
he’ll be back to fetch them as the
Cavs will either deal or release
him before Jan. 7, the deadline
for his contract to be guaranteed.
The Cavs beat the Warriors at
their own fast-paced game in the
first half, building a 64-47 lead
with 1:13 left before halftime on
Jack’s 3-pointer.
But Curry, who came in shoot-
ing just 32 percent (20 of 63)
from the field in his past four
games, knocked down a pair of 3-
pointers and Golden State closed
the half with an 8-0 tear to pull
within 64-55 at the break.
Curry went 5 for 5 from long
range in the first half.
The Cavaliers reeled off 18
straight points in the first quar-
ter, turning a five-point deficit
into a 12-point lead. Irving and
C.J. Miles made 3-pointers dur-
ing the stunning run, which
helped Cleveland open a 35-26
lead after one.
Warriors score big in OT
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — With one ster-
l i ng hal f, Peyt on Manni ng
accomplished all he needed to in
the regular-season finale by
seizing another prestigious
record and home-field advantage
in the playoffs.
He knows his next time out
probably won’t be so easy.
Manning set the NFL single-
season record for yards passing
and threw four first-half touch-
down passes to clinch the top
seed in the AFC playoffs for the
Broncos with a 34-14 victory
over Oakland on Sunday.
“This was a good game today, ”
Manning said. “We needed this
win. We needed to improve on
some things. The coaches chal-
lenged us in a couple of areas
and I think we responded to
those challenges.”
The Broncos (13-3) were near-
ly perfect in building a 31-0
halftime lead before coach John
Fox gave Manning and some
other regulars the second half
off to rest for the first playoff
game two weeks from now in
Denver.
Manning threw touchdown
passes to Eric Decker and
Knowshon Moreno in the first
quarter and added two to
Demaryius Thomas in the sec-
ond quarter. He broke Drew
Brees’ record of 5,476 yards set
in 2011 with a 5-yard pass to
Thomas with 13 seconds left in
the half to make it 31-0.
That ended Manning’s day
having completed 25 of 28
passes for 266 yards. He fin-
ished the season with 5, 477
yards and 55 touchdown passes.
“The first half was about as
good in all three phases as
we’ve been all year,” coach
John Fox said. “It allowed us to
get some guys out of the game
and rest them and still take care
of business on the field.”
The Raiders (4-12) ended their
11th straight non-winning sea-
son with six consecutive losses
and big questions about the
future of second-year coach
Dennis Allen. Oakland has won
eight games in Allen’s two sea-
sons but after showing signs of
progress early this season,
regressed down the stretch to put
his job in jeopardy.
Broncos beat
Raiders 34-14
See RAIDERS Page 16
Stephen Curry
SPORTS 12
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CHICAGO — Aaron Rodgers and Randall
Cobb came back just in time to lift the Green
Bay Packers to the NFC North champi-
onship.
Rodgers fired a 48-yard touchdown pass to
Cobb in the final minute, and the Packers
beat the Chicago Bears 33-28 to capture the
division title.
Back after missing seven games with a
broken left collarbone, Rodgers found a
wide-open Cobb on fourth-and-8 to wipe out
a one-point deficit with 38 seconds left.
Green Bay will host San Francisco next
weekend in the wild-card round.
The Bears had one final drive, but Jay
Cutler’s deep pass to Alshon Jeffery was
intercepted by Sam Shields on the final play.
That gave the Packers (8-7-1) their third
straight division title and fifth postseason
appearance in a row. It also kept the Bears (8-
8) out of the playoffs for the sixth time in
seven years.
Things weren’t looking great for the
Packers after Chicago’s Brandon Marshall
spun away from Tramon Williams in the end
zone on the first play of the fourth quarter to
make it 28-20. But the Packers answered
with a touchdown drive.
Eddie Lacy ran in from the 6 after a 22-yard
pass from Rodgers to Andrew Quarless went
through safety Chris Conte’s hands, making
it a one-point game.
Then, on the winning drive, Green Bay
converted twice on fourth-and-1 before
Rodgers eluded pressure unleashed that win-
ning pass to Cobb.
It was a strong finish after a shaky start for
the superstar quarterback, and it gave him
some payback against the team that nearly
ended his season.
Rodgers was intercepted on the Packers’
first two possessions, with Conte picking
him off in the end zone on the first one. He
also threw for 318 yards and two touchdowns
in his first appearance since Nov. 4. He got
knocked out of that game on an early sack by
Shea McClellin at Lambeau Field, sending
the Packers into a 2-5-1 slide.
Jordy Nelson had 161 yards receiving, and
Cobb, in his first appearance since Oct. 13,
won it with his catch. James Starks ran for
88 yards. Eddie Lacy, hobbled by a knee
injury, finished with just 66.
For the Bears, their first season under Marc
Trestman ended the same way five of the pre-
vious six did under Lovie Smith — on the
outside looking in at the playoffs.
They had a chance to wrap up the division last
week, only to get pounded 54-11 at Philadelphia.
And with another opportunity, they came up
short against their longtime rivals.
This one is sure to spark memories of Green
Bay’s victory in the 2010 NFC title game at
Soldier Field on the way to the Super Bowl
championship — and fuel more questions
about Cutler’s ability to win big games.
With a playoff spot on the line and his
contract set to expire, Cutler threw for 226
yards with two touchdowns and an intercep-
tion. He is now 1-9 against Green Bay,
including that conference final and a loss
with Denver in 2007.
Matt Forte ran for 110 yards and two
scores. He also had 47 yards receiving with a
touchdown catch.
Alshon Jeffery had 80 yards receiving, and
Brandon Marshall had 74.
Two unusual plays late in the first half
turned a 7-3 deficit into a 13-7 advantage for
the Packers.
Green Bay had a first down at the Chicago
17 when a sack and strip against Rodgers by
Julius Peppers turned into one unusual touch-
down. Jarrett Boykin ran across the field,
picked up the loose ball as play stopped. One
thing, though: The whistle never blew.
With Rodgers standing nearby,
Boykin turned and headed 15 yards to the
end zone. Rodgers then threw his hands
up to signal a touchdown, and after a
replay review, it stood.
Rodgers, Cobb lead Packers over Bears, 33-28
DENNIS WIERZBICKI-USA TODAY SPORTS
Green Bay Packers wide receiver Randall Cobb
(18) scores the winning touchdown against
Chicago Bears cornerback Zack Bowman (38)
during the second half at Soldier Field.
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SEATTLE — After failing on two
previous occasions, the Seattle
Seahawks finally ensured the road to
the Super Bowl in the NFC goes
through the Pacific Northwest.
Seattle (13-3) matched the fran-
chise record for wins in a season and
finally wrapped up the No. 1 seed
after losses to San Francisco and last
week to Arizona, which snapped a
14-game home winning streak.
Russell Wilson finished 15 of 23
for 172 yards. Seattle capped the vic-
tory with a 47-yard touchdown pass
from Wilson to Golden Tate early in
the fourth quarter that lacked the
unsportsmanlike wave that got Tate
flagged on a similar TD reception in
St. Louis earlier this season.
Tate finished with eight catches for
129 yards, both career highs in his
final regular-season game before he
becomes a free agent.
With home-field advantage
wrapped up, there might be a few
postseason games still to come for
Tate and the Seahawks.
The only other time Seattle had
home-field advantage came in 2005,
the only time the Seahawks have
reached the Super Bowl. They’ll get a
week of rest before hosting in the
divisional round, and they might
need the time off after a pair of key
injuries Sunday.
Defensive tackle Brandon Mebane
left in the second half with a hip
injury, but more costly could be a
lower left leg injury sustained by
backup tight end Luke Willson early
in the fourth quarter. Willson was
taken off the field on a cart with an air
cast on his leg.
But the injuries didn’t mute the cel-
ebration after the favorite in the NFC
most of the season finally clinched
everything it had sought. Smith got
Seattle started with his interception
return for a touchdown early in the
first quarter a week after he was tack-
led at the 3-yard line trying to score
on an interception return.
Lynch finished with 97 yards on
23 carries, his best game since run-
ning for a season-best 145 yards
against Atlanta in Week 10. Seattle
continued to struggle on third down,
going 4 of 13, but a lack of disci-
pline from the Rams helped out the
Seahawks.
The Rams (7-9) were penalized 12
times for 87 yards and lost their com-
posure on defense late in the third
quarter. St. Louis was flagged for four
personal foul penalties in the span of
two plays — two on Alec Ogletree
and two on Kendall Langford. The
penalty against Langford was for
making contact with an official,
which on replay appeared inadver-
tent. Langford was ejected and
became incensed, slamming his hel-
met to the turf as he left the field.
Two plays later, Lynch walked in
from the 2 and Seattle led 20-3.
St. Louis was called for two more
personal fouls on the ensuing kick-
off. The 12 penalties were a season
high for the Rams.
Kellen Clemens finished 21 of 30
for 157 yards and two interceptions.
Zac Stacy, who needed 42 yards rush-
ing to reach 1,000 on the season,
was held to 15 yards on 15 carries.
Robert Quinn needed two sacks to
become the 10th player with 20 in a
season. He got No. 19 in the first
half, but was kept off Wilson’s back
in the second half.
Clemens threw a 2-yard touchdown
pass to Jared Cook with 4:13 left as
the Rams finally got their offense
moving when the result was
already decided. They finished with
13 yards rushing and 158 total yards
for the game.
Seahawks clinch top seed with 27-9 win over Rams
JOE NICHOLSON-USA TODAY SPORTS
Seattle Seahawks outside linebacker Malcolm Smith (53) celebrates with
middle linebacker Bobby Wagner (54) after scoring a touchdown against
the St. Louis Rams during the first quarter at CenturyLink Field.
SPORTS 14
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CINCINNATI — Andy Dalton
threw for two touchdowns, ran for
another and set a pair of Bengals
passing records on Sunday, lead-
ing Cincinnati to a 34-17 victory
that eliminated the defending
Super Bowl champion Baltimore
Ravens.
It was an erratic performance by
the third-year quarterback, who
also threw four interceptions for
AFC North winner Cincinnati (11-
5).
The Ravens (8-8) lost their last
two games, denying them a chance
to make the playoffs for a sixth
straight season. They couldn’t
avoid the Super Bowl slump that’s
so common.
The Ravens became the 15th
Super Bowl champ that failed to
reach the playoffs the following
season, and the sixth in the last 12
years.
In Cincinnati, there’s only one
thing in mind: finally win a play-
off game. The Bengals haven’t
done that since the 1990 season.
They lost opening-round games in
Houston each of the last two sea-
sons as wild cards.
JETS 20, DOLPHINS 7
MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. — The
Dolphins were eliminated from the
scramble for the AFC’s final wild-
card berth by the Jets, who thrived
in the role of spoilers against their
archrivals.
Then Jets owner Woody Johnson
said coach Rex Ryan would return.
The Jets (8-8) will sit out the
postseason themselves for the
third year in a row.
Geno Smith led three long scor-
ing drives, ran for a touchdown and
threw for 190 yards, while two
interceptions by rookie Dee
Milliner and one by 35-year-old Ed
Reed prevented a Miami come-
back.
The Dolphins (8-8) squandered a
shot at their first playoff berth
since 2008 by losing their final
two games. It was a dismal end to a
roller-coaster season that included
a four-game losing streak and a
bullying scandal that drew nation-
al scrutiny.
STEELERS 20, BROWNS 7
PITTSBURGH — Le’Veon Bell
ran for 90 yards and a touchdown
and Pittsburgh maintained its
unlikely pursuit of a playoff berth.
Ben Roethlisberger passed for
179 yards and a touchdown against
two interceptions as the Steelers
(8-8) won their third straight to
avoid the franchise’s first losing
season since 2003. The victory
also continued a furious second-
half rally by the Steelers, who
went 6-2 over the season’s final
eight weeks to fuel an improbable
run at the AFC’s final postseason
spot.
Jason Campbell completed 23 of
40 passes for 240 yards with a
touchdown, but the Browns (4-12)
lost their seventh straight, fueling
speculation first-year coach Rob
Chudzinski’s job could be in jeop-
ardy.
PANTHERS 21, FALCONS 20
ATLANTA— Cam Newton threw
two touchdown passes, Greg Hardy
had a team- record four sacks and
the Panthers clinched the NFC
South.
The Panthers (12-4) earned a
first-round bye and home-field
advantage for at least one game as
the No. 2 seed in the NFC.
Carolina, which won 11 of its
final 12 games, set a team record
by sacking Matt Ryan nine times.
The defense also produced a touch-
down on Melvin White’s 7-yard
interception return in the second
quarter.
Falcons tight end Tony Gonzalez
had four catches for 56 yards and
was honored at halftime in his
final regular-season game. He has
announced plans for retirement.
COLTS 30, JAGUARS 10
INDIANAPOLIS — Andrew Luck
threw for 282 yards and one touch-
down, Robert Mathis reclaimed the
NFL sacks lead and Adam Vinatieri
joined the 2,000-point club.
The AFC South champs have
won three straight, matching their
longest streak of the season. Indy
(11-5) finished with a 6-0 mark
against division foes and has
outscored its last three opponents
78-20.
Jacksonville (4-12) lost its third
straight.
Luck was 26 of 37 and became
the first player in league history to
top 8,000 yards in his first two
NFL seasons. Mathis retook the
sacks lead in the first half and added
another in the second half, giving
him 19 1/2. Vinatieri moved into
fifth on the career scoring list with
2,006 points, passing George
Blanda and Matt Stover.
TITANS 16, TEXANS 10
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Chris
Johnson ran for 127 yards and a
touchdown in what might be his
last game with the Titans, a win
that may help coach Mike
Munchak’s argument to stay on the
job in 2014.
With their 14th straight loss,
the Texans (2-14) clinched the No.
1 selection in next May’s draft for
the next head coach owner Bob
McNair hires.
The Titans (7-9) scored 16
straight points in snapping a five-
game home skid that was their
longest since leaving Houston for
Tennessee in 1997. They also won
a second straight game for the first
time since September, when they
started 3-1.
Rob Bironas kicked three field
goals, including a season-long 55-
yarder. Linebacker Akeem Ayers
intercepted a pass and forced a fum-
ble as the Titans got four turnovers
they turned into 10 points.
GIANTS 20, REDSKINS 6
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J —
New York’s Jerrel Jernigan caught
a 24-yard touchdown pass and ran
49 yards for another score in what
might be Mike Shanahan’s final
game as Redskins coach.
Shanahan has not only seen the
Redskins (3-13) finish the season
with an eight-game losing streak
just a year after winning the NFC
East, but his future is uncertain
because of his shaky relationship
with oft-injured franchise quarter-
back Robert Griffin III.
The Giants (7-9) also aren’t
going to the playoffs, but they
closed the season with a 7-3 record
after losing their first six games.
It’s a finish that probably will
have two-time Super Bowl win-
ning coach Tom Coughlin back
next season, unless the 67-year-
old decides he has had enough.
The game was the final one at
MetLife Stadium until the Super
Bowl on Feb. 2.
Cincinnati Ravens beat Baltimore Bengals 34-17
SPORTS 15
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
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NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 9 6 0 .600 418 360
Dallas 8 7 0 .533 417 408
N.Y. Giants 7 9 0 .438 294 383
Washington 3 13 0 .188 334 478
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Carolina 12 4 0 .750 366 241
x-New Orleans 11 5 0 .688 414 304
Atlanta 4 12 0 .250 353 443
Tampa Bay 4 12 0 .250 288 389
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Green Bay 8 7 1 .531 417 428
Chicago 8 8 0 .500 445 478
Detroit 7 9 0 .438 395 376
Minnesota 5 10 1 .344 391 480
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Seattle 13 3 0 .813 417 231
x-San Francisco 12 4 0 .750 406 272
Arizona 10 6 0 .625 379 324
St. Louis 7 9 0 .438 348 364
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
y-New England 12 4 0 .750 444 338
N.Y. Jets 8 8 0 .500 290 387
Miami 8 8 0 .500 317 335
Buffalo 6 10 0 .375 339 388
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Indianapolis 11 5 0 .688 391 336
Tennessee 7 9 0 .438 362 381
Jacksonville 4 12 0 .250 247 449
Houston 2 14 0 .125 276 428
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Cincinnati 11 5 0 .688 430 305
Pittsburgh 8 8 0 .500 379 370
Baltimore 8 8 0 .500 320 352
Cleveland 4 12 0 .250 308 406
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Denver 13 3 0 .813 606 399
x-Kansas City 11 5 0 .688 430 305
x-San Diego 9 7 0 .563 396 348
Oakland 4 12 0 .250 322 453
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 13 15 .464 —
Boston 13 17 .433 1
Brooklyn 10 20 .333 4
New York 9 21 .300 5
Philadelphia 8 21 .276 5 1/2
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 23 7 .767 —
Atlanta 17 14 .548 6 1/2
Washington 13 14 .481 8 1/2
Charlotte 14 17 .452 9 1/2
Orlando 10 20 .333 13
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 24 5 .828 —
Detroit 14 18 .438 11 1/2
Chicago 11 17 .393 12 1/2
Cleveland 10 20 .333 14 1/2
Milwaukee 6 24 .200 18 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 24 7 .774 —
Houston 21 12 .636 4
Dallas 17 13 .567 6 1/2
New Orleans 13 15 .464 9 1/2
Memphis 13 16 .448 10
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 25 5 .833 —
Portland 24 6 .800 1
Minnesota 15 15 .500 10
Denver 14 15 .483 10 1/2
Utah 9 24 .273 17 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 21 11 .656 —
Phoenix 18 11 .621 1 1/2
Golden State 19 13 .594 2
L.A. Lakers 13 17 .433 7
Sacramento 9 20 .310 10 1/2
Sunday’sGames
Orlando 109, Atlanta 102
Golden State 108, Cleveland 104, OT
Oklahoma City 117, Houston 86
San Antonio 112, Sacramento 104
Philadelphia at L.A. Lakers, Late
NBA GLANCE
By Sarah DiLorenzo
and Geir Moulson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PARIS — Seven-time Formula
One champion Michael
Schumacher was in critical con-
dition after undergoi ng brai n
surgery following a skiing acci-
dent in the French Alps on
Sunday, doctors said.
The Grenoble University
Hospital Center said the retired
driver arrived at the clinic in a
coma and underwent immediate
surgery for a serious head trau-
ma.
It was not clear whether the
44-year-old German was still in
a coma but the hospital state-
ment, which was signed by a
neurosurgeon, an anesthesiolo-
gist and Marc Penaud, the hospi-
tal’s deputy director, said “he
remains in a critical condition.”
The retired driver fell while
skiing off-piste in Meribel ear-
lier Sunday and hit his head on a
rock, according to a statement
from the resort. Resort man-
agers said he had been wearing a
helmet and was conscious when
rescuers first responded to the
scene.
Earlier in the day, the Meribel
resort said Schumacher had been
taken to Grenoble for tests and
authorities said his life was not
in danger.
But the situation began to
look more serious when the
resort said that orthopedic and
trauma surgeon Gerard Saillant
had traveled from Paris to the
hospi t al t o exami ne
Schumacher. German news
agency dpa said it was Saillant
who operated on Schumacher
when he broke his leg during a
crash at the Silverstone race
course in 1999.
In an email to The Associated
Press, Schumacher’s manager
Sabine Kehm said the retired
driver was on a private skiing
trip and “fell on his head.”
“We ask for understanding that
we cannot give running updates
on his condition. He wore a hel-
met and was not alone,” Kehm
said. Schumacher’s 14-year-old
son was skiing with his father
when the accident happened, the
resort said.
In addition to the crash at
Silverstone, Schumacher was
hurt seriously in a motorcycling
accident in February 2009 in
Spain when he suffered neck and
spine injuries. He recovered suf-
ficiently from those injuries to
make a comeback in F1.
Schumacher retired in 2006
after winning five straight titles
with Ferrari following two earli-
er ones with Benetton. He came
back to the sport in 2010 and
drove for three seasons for
Mercedes without much success
before retiring again last year.
Former F1 driver Schumacher in critical condition
REUTERS
Michael Schumacher skis during a stay in the northern Italian resort of
Madonna Di Campiglio in this January 16, 2004 file photo.
16
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Allen said he expects to meet in the
next few days with general manager
Reggie McKenzie and owner Mark Davis
to discuss the future of the organization.
“That’s a decision that’s made over my
head,” Allen said. “I fully expect to be
back. I fully believe that I deserve the
opportunity to come back here and get a
chance to go through the reconstruction
phase. I want to be part of the rebuilding
phase.”
The Raiders, who allowed the second
most points in franchise history, were
completely exposed by Manning. He fre-
quently targeted fill-in cornerback
Chimdi Chekwa, who started for the
injured Mike Jenkins.
The Broncos forced a punt on the open-
ing possession and then easily drove
down the field. Manning completed eight
of nine passes for 70 yards on the 12-
play drive, capping it with a 3-yard pass
to Decker.
A bad snap by Stefen Wisniewski on
the first play of the next drive set up a 7-
yard TD pass to Moreno and the rout was
on.
Oakland held Manning to a field goal
early in the second quarter before he beat
them deep with a 63-yard pass to Thomas
to make it 24-0 and then methodically
led a late drive down field that was capped
with the short throw to Thomas that
broke Brees’ record and earned Manning
some rest in the second half.
“I feel like it’s a record every other
week,” Thomas said. “It’s great to be a
part of, to get it. We just have to sit back
and talk about it but our main goal is to
win the Super Bowl. It’s a good accom-
plishment for our offense. The main
thing now is being able to win.”
Brock Osweiler played the entire sec-
ond half in his most extensive action of
his two-year career. He completed 9 for
13 passes for 85 yards but only led
Denver to one field goal
The decision to go back to Terrelle
Pryor at starting quarterback after six
games with Matt McGloin failed to pro-
vide the spark Allen had been seeking.
Pryor looked rusty in his return to the
lineup, missing receivers and having lit-
tle room to run on read-option plays and
scrambles.
Pryor completed 21 of 38 passes for
207 yards and two touchdowns after the
game was out of reach. Pryor also ran for
49 yards to give him 576 yards rushing
for the season, breaking Rich Gannon’s
franchise mark of 529 for quarterbacks
set in 2000.
“I would say I’m inconsistent,” Pryor
said. “Period. I got to get better. ”
The Raiders couldn’t even capitalize on
their one good chance as Sebastian
Janikowski missed his ninth field goal
of the season after blocked punt by
Jamize Olawale gave Oakland the ball at
the Denver 24.
NOTES: Broncos S Duke Ihenacho left
the game with a concussion. ... The
Raiders had about 45 members of the
1983 team that won the Super Bowl on
hand for a halftime ceremony.
Continued from page 11
RAIDERS
KELLEY L COX-USA TODAY SPORTS
Denver Broncos wide receiver Demaryius Thomas (88) carries the ball against the Oakland
Raiders during the first quarter at O.co Coliseum.
DATEBOOK 17
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Enjoy great music, delicious
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A
quick online search of “top 10
New Year’s resolutions” is bound
to include variations on these
perennial faves: lose weight; get in shape;
get a better job; spend more time with
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financial situation; do something charita-
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2014 list. Think about this. If you adopt a
dog, you’ll cover about half of these reso-
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you’ll also want to come home from work
earlier to spend time with your new family
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one since dogs make us more social (dare I
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you’ll stretch your entertainment budget
since your dog will provide endless fun at
very little cost to you. And, by adopting,
you’re doing your charitable duty. Now, if
your home already includes a pet, you
might include a few resolutions for him or
her. Consider these: a training class, even
for the older dog in your life; a trip to the
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four-legged playmate for your pet (but
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your canine companion is a frequent trav-
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overdue vaccinations; more time with
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Behavior and Training, Education, Outreach,
Field Services, Cruelty Investigation,
Volunteer and Media/PR program areas and
staff from the new Tom and Annette Lantos
Center for Compassion.
By Monika Scislowska
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WARSAW, Poland — Wojciech Kilar, a
Polish pianist and composer of classical
music and scores for many films, including
Roman Polanski’s Oscar-winning “The
Pianist” and Francis Ford Coppola’s “Bram
Stoker’s Dracula,” died Sunday. He was 81.
The composer died in his hometown of
Katowice, southern Poland, following a
long illness, according to Jerzy Kornowicz,
head of the Association of Polish
Composers.
“The power and the message of his music,
as well as the noble character of Wojciech
Kilar as a person, will stay in my memory
forever,” said Kornowicz.
Polish film director Kazimierz Kutz said
working with the composer “was pure
pleasure. He would come, see my movie and
a month later he would bring extremely
good music that was always beyond my
expectations.”
Polish conductor Antoni Wit praised
Kilar’s generosity, saying he “liked to
share whatever he had with others.”
A modest man who often avoided public
attention, Kilar’s main love was compos-
ing symphonies and concertos, and he
always put that above movies, even though
he wrote the scores of dozens of films. He
drew inspiration from Polish folk music and
religious prayers and hymns, which he had
learned in Latin as an altar boy.
But it was film music, especially for
Coppola’s 1992 erotic horror movie, that
brought this prolific vanguard composer to
the world’s attention and commissions
from other celebrity directors, including
Jane Campion and her “Portrait of a Lady. ”
Kilar once said the three criteria that made
him write film music were, in this order: the
name of the director, the salary and the
script.
In a 2007 interview with PLUS, a journal
about Polish-American affairs, he recalled
asking Coppola in Los Angeles what kind
of music he was expecting and the director
replied: “I did my part. You are the compos-
er. Do what you want.”
Kilar’s dedication to composing primari-
ly for the concert halls even led him to lose
a commission to write the score for Peter
Jackson’s “Lord of the Rings” trilogy. “In
a movie, music is just one of the many ele-
ments,” Kilar once said. “Serious music,
which I compose, is signed with my name
only, and I get real pleasure from that.”
But in 2012, while receiving an honorary
doctorate in Poland, he admitted that he
never felt sure of the quality of the works he
created until musicians and audiences gave
their verdict.
Kilar wrote music for more than 130
movies in Poland and abroad, but “Dracula”
won him the Best Score Composer award
from the American Society of Composers,
Authors and Publishers in 1992.
His dense, broad and heart-swelling music is
very evocative and seems destined to illustrate
movies. Richly instrumented, it uses repeti-
tion of a simple melody, making it sound like
romantic classical music. His trademark
sounds involve basses and cellos.
Polish composer Wojciech Kilar dies, aged 81
Composer Wojciech Killar.
18
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
Restauranteur,author,and Food Network personality Gina Neely was the keynote speaker at Feeding Your Body
& Soul at Burlingame’s Marriott Hotel on Dec.7.The annual event,sponsored by the African-American Community
Health Advisory Committee and Sutter Health Mills-Peninsula Health Services,seeks to help women become better
informed about their health choices.
Speaking about health
St even Ki m and Al i c e
Chen Ki m, of San Mateo, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Dec.
18, 2013.
Jason and
Mel i nda Kersey,
of Redwood City,
gave birth to a baby
boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood
City Dec. 19, 2013.
Roshan and Krishna
Patel , of Redwood City, gave birth
to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital
in Redwood City Dec. 19, 2013.
Andrew Uccel l i and Al i
Barger, of San Carlos, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Dec.
19, 2013.
Ant hony and Eri n
Paruszewski, of Menlo Park,
gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City Dec. 20, 2013.
David and Karina Ange l , of
Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Dec. 20, 2013.
Sergi o Gi l do and Nancy
Pi neda, of San Mateo, gave birth
to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital
in Redwood City Dec. 21, 2013.
Al exander Li t t l e and
Pri s ci l l a De Ol i vei ra, of
Woodside, gave birth to a baby
boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Dec. 21, 2013.
Hanna and Maure e n
Hanhan, of Mountainview,
gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City Dec. 21, 2013.
Theodore and Nadi a
Gaumer, of San Mateo, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Dec.
23, 2013.
Ri cardo Perez and
Mi l agros Barahona de
Pere z, of Belmont, gave birth
to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Dec.
23, 2013.
LOCAL 19
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
with learning challenges and currently has
45 students in kindergarten through eighth
grade, helped her now 10-year-old son sub-
stantially. She said they were lucky Arbor
Bay was so nearby and had great teachers.
While some students stay for several years,
20 percent of students transition successful-
ly to a school in their community each year.
“What makes Arbor Bay unique in some
ways is it takes kids like Jack who aren’t
obviously impaired,” she said. “There are
things when it comes to academics that are
more of a challenge and there were kids just
like him. He wasn’t quite ready for elemen-
tary school and there aren’t that many
schools that go right in between there.”
Since he has difficulty processing audito-
ry information and it was hard for him to
focus, teachers at Arbor Bay offered him a
much more visual approach to learning.
“He needed a smaller class size,” Lawry
said. “They were really able to address his
listening, handwriting and impulsivity
problems.”
The school does offer smaller classes with
4 to 1 student teacher ratios. Additionally,
having a lot of onsite occupational and
speech therapists, along with teachers with
special education credentials.
“They understood Jack,” she said. “They
knew how to approach what his problems
were and I don’t know if public school would
have been able to deal with the things
going on. In preschool, he had a long list of
infractions ... that all changed when got to
Arbor Bay. Everything was all positive.”
She noted having her son in place where
the staff understood what’s going on with
him was a night and day difference. Now, he
is academically at or above grade level and
has gone far socially.
The switch to public school wasn’t as dif-
ficult as anticipated too. He did have to
adjust to a bigger classroom of 25 students
and Lawry worked with the teacher on giv-
ing him more visual learning aids. Teachers
have been understanding, especially since
Lawry talked to them prior to him starting
at the public school, she said.
“There weren’t too many growing
paints,” Lawry said. “Our fears were
unfounded and I was worried the classroom
would be really hard for him. We told them
‘this is what works with Jack’ and for that
reason there’s been very few problems.”
Now, Evans is happy in his new school
setting. Arbor Bay helped smooth the
switch by telling the family things to watch
out for when transitioning over, Lawry said.
For example, watching out for a teacher
used to typical things and might see his
behavior differently.
“He loves having access to more kids,”
she said. “There were times in the begin-
ning when he’d try to get out of class by
making up reasons to leave the room. We
told them to be careful; he is anxious about
his work and wants to remove himself. We
worked out strategies to reduce that.”
For more information on Arbor Bay
School, visit arborbayschool.org.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
ARBOR
give a lump sum of money to the returning
vets, but it was a stepping stone to the edu-
cation of many of the working class. It was
felt that many would never be able to pay for
an education that would better themselves
and the country so the government offered
the G.I. Bill — an opportunity to educate
the returning vets at the expense of the gov-
ernment. This was an unheard of concept at
this time and many in the society immedi-
ately voiced their opinion against throwing
our money away on people who probably
wouldn’t use it properly. College education
had traditionally been mainly for the elite,
the moneyed class, not for indigents. Many
thought these vets would turn our colleges
into chaos and degrade the halls of educa-
tion. The bill was put into effect over the
voices of this opposition and it proved to
be the best investment the government
every offered the citizens of our country. It
was a resounding success. By the time it
officially ended in July 1956, more than 8
millions citizens used the G.I Bill to further
their education and these 8 million fueled
the greatest growth in prosperity any coun-
try had ever experienced.
The Korean War in the 1950s spurred pas-
sage of the Veterans Adjustment Act of 1952
followed by passage of the Veterans Benefit
Act of 1966. The 1966 act included those
who had served during times of war or peace.
A new concept. In 1973, the U.S. military
became all voluntary and continued incen-
tives for education and training. The
Montgomery G.I. Bill was in force from
December 1976 through 1987 and, in 2008,
a post 9/11 G.I. Bill with expanded benefit s
made sure that those who served in the mili-
tary were rewarded for their service to our
country.
The success of the G.I. bills was very grat-
ifying for our country. More than 51 percent
of World War II vets took part of some form
of the provisions. The Korean War success
rate dropped down to 43 percent but the
Vietnam vets astounded the government
with a 72 percent use of the bill. Our coun-
try has prospered greatly from the foresight
of our legislators’ interest in encouraging
education.
The College of San Mateo was one of the
many colleges that benefited from the G. I.
Bill. The facilities of the college were over-
run with returning vets and it goaded the
trustees into expanding the facilities into
three campuses to handle the demand for
education. The universities and colleges
throughout the Bay Area were pushed into
expanding their campuses and leading the
way into the new era that this educated pop-
ulace produced.
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold
Fredricks appears in the Monday edition of
the Daily Journal.
Continued from page 3
HISTORY
Serial car burglar suspect arrested
SAN MATEO — An alert citizen's tip led
to the speedy arrest Friday of a San
Francisco man who allegedly burglarized
at least ten cars in San Mateo, according
to police.
Police said officers were called around 6
a.m. to the area of 36th Avenue and
Michael Drive after a community member
reported a suspicious person rummaging
through garbage cans.
Officers arriving on the scenes located
a man who matched the suspicious per-
son's description and questioned him.
During their investigation, officers
found the man to be in possession of sev-
eral items clearly belonging to nearby
residents, according to police.
Police said the property was later deter-
mined to have been stolen from 10
unlocked vehicles in a neighborhood near
the San Mateo County Medical Center.
The suspect, identified as 27-year-old
Clinton Skelley, was also in possession
of a "window punch" tool commonly used
in vehicle burglaries as well as drugs
packaged for sale and suspected proceeds
from drug sales. Skelley was arrested on
suspicion of theft and drug offenses and
taken to county jail.
Police say the incident serves not only
as a reminder to citizens to report suspi-
cious activity but also to secure their
vehicles to prevent thefts.
The public is reminded to always lock
their vehicles and keep valuables out of
si ght .
Man killed in Japantown shooting
SAN FRANCISCO — A36-year-old man
who was fatally shot Sunday morning
near San Francisco's Japantown has been
identified as David Gilford, of Modesto,
according to the San Francisco medical
examiner's office.
Gilford was in a crowd of people com-
ing out of a nightclub in the 1800 block
of Post Street at about 1:45 a.m. when the
shooting occurred, San Francisco police
Sgt. Danielle Newman said.
Gilford was shot as he stood on the
sidewalk, Newman said. He was pro-
nounced dead at the scene.
No information about a possible sus-
pect was immediately available, Newman
said.
Investigators were canvassing the
neighborhood on Sunday in a search for
witnesses.
Anyone with information about the
shooting is asked to call the Police
Department's anonymous tip line at (415)
575-4444 or to send a tip by text mes-
sage to TIP411 with "SFPD" in the mes-
sage.
S.F. firefighters injured in crash
SAN FRANCISCO — Two firefighters
were injured in a crash in San Francisco’s
South of Market neighborhood Sunday
morning, a police spokeswoman said.
The crash occurred just before 11 a.m.
and involved a San Francisco Fire
Department ladder truck and a sedan, San
Francisco police Sgt. Danielle Newman
said.
The intersection at Fifth and Howard
streets were closed while an investiga-
tion took place, Newman said.
The two firefighters were transported to
a hospital, she said. There was no imme-
diate information about their condition.
Local briefs
DATEBOOK 20
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
people decide how to plan for the
future.”
Although king tides are not
directly linked to sea level rise, the
effects are indicative of what can be
expected in 2050 when the sea level
is projected to have raised by one
foot, Papendick said.
“Essent i al l y, the tides are not
related to sea level rise. But over-
time, sea levels are rising and this
is a way to show what it could look
like in the future,” Papendick said.
California’s king tide photograph
initiative began in the Bay Area in
2010; however, by the end of winter
people were participating
statewide. By getting the public
involved, the commission is able
to gather critical information that
will assist in outlining future plan-
ning, Papendick said.
“It’s really useful for validating
flood models; having people go out
year after year and take photos in
the same places can be used for
data,” Papendick said.
On Oct. 14, the Coastal
Commission released a draft of its
new Sea-Level Rise Policy, a docu-
ment providing guidance for local
governments on incorporating the
science behind it when planning for
future development, Papendick said.
The draft is open for public com-
ment through Jan. 15 and the data
gathered through the king tide ini-
tiative will be added to the second
draft, Papendick said.
The photographs and statewide
participation encouraged by the king
tide initiative raises awareness about
the potential effects of sea level rise
and contributes to public policies
aimed at sustaining coastal
resources, Papendick said.
“With the power of citizens and
the public, we’re able to capture the
data from the entire state in just a
couple days,” Papendick said. “It’s
really data we wouldn’t be able to
get without public participation.”
For more information about the
California King Tides Initiative or
t o submi t phot os vi si t
CaliforniaKingTides.org
For more information about the
Cal i forni a Coast al Commi ssi on
visit www.coastal.ca.gov
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
TIDES
MONDAY, DEC. 30
CuriOdyssey Winter Camp. 1651
Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo.
Running on Dec. 26, 27 and 30. Each
day features an engaging science
theme. To register go to
www.CuriOdyssey.org/activities/win
ter-camps. first-, second- and third-
graders only. For more information
call 342-7755.
TUESDAY, DEC. 31
NewYear’s Party. 10:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road. Salmon or
prime rib lunch, Champagne toast at
noon, and dancing to ‘The Knights of
Nostalgia’ Band. $10. For more infor-
mation call 616-7150.
Countdown to Happy ‘Noon’ Year!
11:30 a.m. San Mateo Public Library,
55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Hear sto-
ries, make a craft and enjoy refresh-
ments as we count down to the
‘Noon’ year! Free. For more informa-
tion call 522 -7838.
Alternative New Year’s Eve. 6:30
p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Mercy Center in
Burlingame. There will be a quiet,
candle-lit chapel, Taizé chants, a walk
on the labyrinth and art activities.
Visitors can stay the night. Free. For
more information call 340-7474.
New Year’s Eve Vigil Mass. 7:30
p.m. Our Lady of Angels Catholic
Church, 1721 Hillsdale Drive,
Burlingame. Free. For more informa-
tion call 347-7768.
Rock in the New Year with
RockSkool — The Ultimate Party
Rock Tribute. 8 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $20 per
person. For more information call
(877) 435-9849 or go to www.club-
foxrwc.com.
New Year’s Eve Dance Party. 9:15
p.m. to 12:15 a.m. Cubberley
Pavilion, 4000 Middlefield Road, Palo
Alto. $15. For more information
email cheryl@boogiewoogieball-
room.com.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 1
NewYear’s Day Worship. 8 a.m., 11
a.m., 7:30 p.m. Our Lady of Angels
Catholic Church, 1721 Hillsdale
Drive, Burlingame. Free. For more
information call 347-7768.
Race to End World Hunger. 9:30
a.m. Mountain View Kite Flying Park,
3070 Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View.
5k run and walk/race proceeds go
locally to Second Harvest Food Bank
of Santa Clara and San Mateo coun-
ties, the Health Trust and interna-
tionally to fund women and micro
finance programs. $40 the day of the
race, $35 by Dec. 30. Fee includes
technical T-shirt and chip. For more
information call 574-2994.
New Year’s Day Worship. 9:30 a.m.
Robert’s Church, 1380 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Free. For
more information call 589-2800.
THURSDAY, JAN. 2
Winter Break Explorer Day. 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. 1651 Coyote Point Drive,
San Mateo. Explore the science of
the world. Free. For more informa-
tion go to www.CuriOdyssey.org.
FRIDAY, JAN. 3
Winter Break Explorer Day. 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. 1651 Coyote Point Drive,
San Mateo. Explore the science of
the world. Free. For more informa-
tion go to www.CuriOdyssey.org.
Free Friday at the San Mateo
County History Museum. 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. In addition to free admission,
there will be two programs through-
out the day. For more information
call 299-0104 or go to www.histo-
rysmc.org.
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Enjoy a variety
of Lego creations made by members
of the club, featuring train layouts,
Bay Area landmarks, castles, minia-
ture cities, sculptures and more.
Admission is $2. Exhibit runs
through Jan. 19 on Fridays, Saturdays
and Sundays.
Registration Deadline for New
Volunteer Recruitment at Fioli. The
deadline for the New Volunteer
Recruitment (Jan. 11) is 4 p.m. today.
Attendees can register by emailing
volunteer@fioli.org.
SATURDAY, JAN. 4
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Enjoy a variety
of Lego creations made by members
of the club, featuring train layouts,
Bay Area landmarks, castles, minia-
ture cities, sculptures and more.
Admission is $2. Exhibit runs
through Jan. 19 on Fridays, Saturdays
and Sundays.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation call 430-6500.
Historical, Cultural and Social
Links to Downton Abbey. 1 p.m. to
3:30 pm. San Mateo Main Library, 55
W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Dr. DiAnn
Ellis will cover the world of Downton
Abbey and Victorian and Edwardian
periods. Tea and biscuits will be
served at intermission. Free. For
more information or to RSVP, call
522-7818.
Feast of Epiphany. 4:30 p.m.
Robert’s Church, 1380 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Free. For
more information call 589-2800.
SUNDAY, JAN. 5
Feast of Epiphany. 7:30 a.m., 9:30
a.m., 11:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Robert’s
Church, 1380 Crystal Springs Road,
San Bruno. Free. For more informa-
tion call 589-2800.
First Sunday Line Dance with Tina
Beare and Jeanette Feinberg. 1
p.m. to 4 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road,
San Bruno. $5. For more information
call 616-7150.
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Enjoy a variety
of Lego creations made by members
of the club, featuring train layouts,
Bay Area landmarks, castles, minia-
ture cities, sculptures and more.
Admission is $2. Exhibit runs
through Jan. 19 on Fridays, Saturdays
and Sundays.
TUESDAY, JAN. 7
Hearing Loss Association of the
Peninsula Meeting. 1:30 p.m.
Veterans Memorial Senior Center,
1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City.
The program will be presented by
Sharif Frink with the California
Telephone Access Program. Learn
about this free phone program and
be able to try it out. Free. For more
information call 345-4551.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 8
Canadian Women’s Club January
luncheon and speaker series. 11
a.m. Basque Cultural Center, 599
Railroad Ave., South San Francisco.
Reservation required. $35. Guests
and gentlemen welcome. To reserve
a seat, call (415) 824-9745 or email
President@canadianwomensclub.or
g.
Listening Live: Celebrating Live at
Mission Blue 10th Season. 7 p.m.
Brisbane Public Library, 250
Visitacion Ave., Brisbane. Free. For
more information email jennifer-
bousquet@yahoo.com.
Lifetree Cafe Conversations:
Dangerous Foods. 7 p.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Lifetree Cafe will host an
hour-long conversation exploring
and discussing hints and strategies
for healthy eating. Complimentary
snacks and beverages will be served.
For more information go to life-
treecafe.com.
Willamette University Choirs to
Perform on Tour. 7 p.m. St.
Gregory’s Catholic Church, 2715
Hacienda St., San Mateo. Free. For
more information email
npate@willamette.edu.
Art Demonstration by Gary
Bukovnik. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Burlingame Recreation Center, 850
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame. Free.
For more information email artbe-
gay@gmail.com.
THURSDAY, JAN. 9
School-Age Thursday Afternoon
Storytelling Series. 4 p.m. Menlo
Park Library, 800 Alma Street, Menlo
Park. Free. For more information go
to www.menloparklibrary.org
Four Calm Steps to Conflict
Resolution: HR Business Leader
Series. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Sequoia, 1850 Gateway Drive, Suite
600, San Mateo. $35 for general
admission and free to NCHRA mem-
bers. For more information call 415-
291-1992.
FRIDAY, JAN. 10
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Enjoy a variety
of Lego creations made by members
of the club, featuring train layouts,
Bay Area landmarks, castles, minia-
ture cities, sculptures and more.
Admission is $2. Exhibit runs
through Jan. 19 on Fridays,
Saturdays, and Sundays.
Opening: Annual Members'
Exhibit and Contemporary
Pakistani Art. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Pacific Art League, 227 Forest Ave.,
Palo Alto. Free. For more information
e m a i l
frontdesk@pacificartleague.org.
Roger Glenn Latin Jazz Ensemble.
7 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Angelicas, 863
Main Street, Redwood City. Roger
Glenn, master musician, composer
and entertainer on the flute, sax and
vibraphone, and son of the late Tyree
Glenn who was one of the 57
notable jazz musicians pictured in
the historic photo “A Great Day in
Harlem.” Advance tickets begin at
$25 and tickets at the door are $31.
Valet parking available. For more
information call 679-8184 or go to
www.angelicasllc.com/entertain-
ment.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
f or pr ogr ams she hel ped st ar t
l i ke Heal t h Ci t i es Tut ori ng and
she i s al so wort hy of t hi s year ’s
honor.
For Hunkapi l l er ’s par t , s he
f eel s l i ke she’s i n good company
wi t h past r eci pi ent s.
“I feel t rul y honored. It ’s j ust
such a speci al t hi ng and I ’ ve
al ways been so happy for t hem
so t o have i t happen for me i s
t rul y speci al , ” she sai d.
Hunkapi l l er r esi gned i n
Oct ober f r om t he San Car l os
El ement ar y School Di s t r i ct
Board of Trust ees fi ve meet i ngs
s hy f r om hi t t i ng t he 20- year
mark. Her move came amid ques-
t i ons about a heft y home l oan
from t he di st ri ct for superi nt end-
ent Cr ai g Baker whi ch
Hunkapi l l er r ecent l y sai d was
si mi l ar t o a movi e — even t he
gr eat ones have a coupl e of
moment s t hat aren’t .
The r es i gnat i on as i de,
Hunkapi l l er ’s commi t ment t o t he
ci t y goes back even before her
1993 el ect i on t o t he s chool
board. The Shawnee, OK native
moved wi t h her husband t o
Cal i forni a for graduat e school ,
l ured by t he exci t ement of t he
st at e and an uncl e worki ng as a
Los Angel es Ti mes edi t or, and
ul t i mat el y set t l ed i n San Carl os
i n 1983.
Hunkapi l l er ’s mot her was a
t eacher, her great -grandfat her a
count y super i nt endent of
school s. Educat i on may not be
genet i c but i t cer t ai nl y shows
t he i nfl uence of fami l y nurt ur-
i ng, she sai d.
Hunkapi l l er, whose own chi l-
dren and now grandchi l d, j our-
neyed t hrough t he ci t y’s s chool
syst em began as a vol unt eer
t eacher at her son’s par ent co- op
nursery school and a s a Gi rl s
Scout dai sy t r oop coor di nat or.
She moved i nt o act i ve s chool
work as presi dent of t he Heat her
School PTA and chai r of i t s Fun
Day. She al so served on an ad hoc
commi t t ee t o sel ect a super i n-
t endent and chai red t he campai gn
for t he Commi t t ee t o Defeat t he
Voucher.
Not cont ent t o s t op t her e,
Hunkapi l l er and husband Mi ke
mat ched donat i on f unds f or a
decade t hrough t he San Carl os
Educat i on Foundat i on. Thei r
effort s, and money, hel ped pro-
cure science equipment, LCD pro-
j ect or s , s mar t boar ds , i Pads ,
physi cal educat i on needs, ar t
suppl i es and musi cal i nst rument s
among ot her s.
Hunkapi l l er sai d t he coupl e
st art ed smal l wi t h a fi rst mat ch
of maybe $5, 000 but over t he 10
year s have seen t hei r gener osi t y
grow wi t h t hat of t he communi t y.
“We j ust kept pace wi t h peo-
pl e’s wi l l i ngness t o gi ve, ” she
sai d.
Hunkapi l l er sai d many of t he
programs and t hi ngs t hat make
her most pr oud ar e a gr oup
achi evement i ncl udi ng t eachers,
par ent s and ot her s i nvol ved i n
gr owi ng af t er school car e, r ai s-
i ng money, t ut or i ng and cl osi ng
White Oak Way.
“I t s no my accompl i s hment .
Everyt hi ng i s shared, ” she sai d.
But whi l e t he 2013 Ci t i zen of
t he Year honor i s al l her s ,
Hunkapi l l er i s st i l l humbl e about
her rol e i n t he communi t y and
educat i on.
“I’m j ust grat eful for t he recog-
ni t i on and grat eful for t he chance
t o hel p our school s be vi br ant ,
heal t hy pl aces, ” she sai d.
The Recogni t i on Gal a i s
Fr i day, J an. 24 at t he Hot el
Sofi t el i n Redwood Shores. More
i nforamt i on and t i cket purchas-
i ng i s at www. s ancar l os cham-
ber. org
mi chel l e@smdai l yj ournal . com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
CITIZEN
COMICS/GAMES
12-30-13
WEEKEND’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Golf club
5 Want ad letters
8 Impressed
12 Thin coin
13 Two-bagger (abbr.)
14 — song (cheaply)
15 Stash
16 Confusion
18 Horror film menace
20 Chaps
21 Raw mineral
22 Romaine
23 Aluminum company
26 Server on skates
29 Neat as — —
30 Sky bear
31 Tire layer
33 Santa — winds
34 Persian monarch
35 Treasured
36 Element in salt
38 Faint traces
39 “Gross!”
40 Cabbie’s income
41 Get through to
44 Occur
47 Chat with colleagues (2
wds.)
49 “— — Old Cowhand”
51 Canal of song
52 Bullfight cheer
53 1492 ship
54 Luge, e.g.
55 LP successors
56 Hot rum drink
DOWN
1 SSNs, e.g.
2 Posh hotel
3 Melville title
4 Lunar phase (2 wds.)
5 Fisher or Murphy
6 Drama award
7 Chicago trains
8 Once more
9 Frazzled
10 QED part
11 Calendar squares
17 Socrates’ hangout
19 Halter, for one
22 Ready money
23 Battery size
24 Med. staffers
25 Hi or bye
26 Study late
27 Candid
28 Land map
30 Nah (hyph.)
32 Mo. multiples
34 Weary exhales
35 Candle-making
37 Avoided
38 Kind of boots
40 Seals a package
41 66 and 101
42 Viscount’s superior
43 “I cannot tell — —”
44 Grab onto
45 Mideast VIP
46 Billionth, in combos
48 Ad — committee
50 Kvetch
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
MONDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2013
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — It’s time to make
positive changes, but now is not the moment to share
your thoughts in advance. Reflect on the past year and
make decisions about how to proceed in the future.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Networking
and making new friends will keep your mind
active. Join a new group. Alone time will not be
sufficiently challenging or stimulating. Interaction
will lead to innovation.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Your partner will
express frustration if you avoid your chores. If you
take an honest approach, you may save yourself the
hassle of having a needlessly emotional day.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Chasing excitement
will turn out to be costly. Focus on being productive
and acquiring useful information. Your choices will
set the tone for the year to come.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — A financial venture may
reach a dead end. Do not take legal action, though you
may be tempted. Someone unexpected may cause
difficulties. Try to be helpful without being critical, and
meet your responsibilities without complaint.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You should make
time for social activities today. Be cautious if you
are juggling relationships. If you are asked for an
honest, clear answer, you may have to make a
difficult decision on the spot.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Think carefully before
promising something that you can’t deliver. If you’ve
been exaggerating your abilities, you may get stuck
with a job that leaves you feeling out of your depth.
Keep your opinions to yourself.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Get to know your
colleagues better through social activities. Distant
friends or people from your past may turn up
unexpectedly. Prepare to reminisce.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — If you use your
imagination, you can turn your home into a
palace. Assess the costs involved carefully before
proceeding. Someone will oppose you fiercely if
they think you are overspending.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Make sure to complete
your domestic duties before relaxing or socializing.
Don’t rush through things, or you may injure yourself.
Try not to get into a bickering match.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Focus on what you
want to see change in the new year. You can advance
professionally if you network with well-connected
people. Make a point of revealing your abilities.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Your emotional
vitality will be strong, leading to greater self-
confidence. Try new things and chase your
dreams. Your ability to challenge others will catch
someone’s eye.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
º work well with others
º Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
º A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
TAXI & Limo Driver, Wanted, full time,
paid weekly, between $500 and $700
cash, (650)921-2071
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CUSTOMER CONTACT -
OUTSIDE POSITION
FULL TIME/PART TIME
$15.62 per hour start
to $35 per hour
with bonuses
Full training and expenses
Mr. Connors (650)372-2810
INSPECTOR / HOME -
DO YOU HAVE
A LADDER?
DRAW A DIAGRAM?
USE A TAPE MEASURE?
CAMERA?
Full training, to do inspections
for our 28 year old company.
Good pay. And expenses.
Mr. Inez, (650)372-2813
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
180 Businesses For Sale
ESTABLISHED BUSINESS FOR SALE
in Downtown San Mateo (510)962-1569
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258926
The following person is doing business
as: Focaccia Market Bakery, 1 Tower Pl.,
Ste. 100, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Focaccia Cafe, Inc, CA and
Focaccia Market Bakery, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN 01/01/1993.
/s/ David Davari /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/30/13, 01/06/14, 01/13/14, 01/20/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258954
The following person is doing business
as: All Industrial Supply, 895 Mitten Rd.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: All Indus-
trial Electric Supply, Inc, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN 09/11/2013.
/s/ Alex Vaysberg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/30/13, 01/06/14, 01/13/14, 01/20/14).
23 Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Howard W. Harrington
Case Number: 123997
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Howard W. Harrington.
A Petition for Probate has been filed by
Ellen B. Harrington in the Superior Court
of California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Ellen
B. Harrington be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: January 15, 2014 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
R. Hollis Elliott 33805
841 Menlo Ave.
MENLO PARK, CA 94025
(650)321-8460
Dated: December 13, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on December 16, 23, 30, 2013.
203 Public Notices
SAN MATEO County's Human
Services Agency will be issuing
a request for proposal (RFP) on
January 6, 2014, seeking quali-
fied respondents to act as one of
eight Core Service Agencies
specifically serving the cities of
South San Francisco, San Bruno
and Brisbane. The agency/or-
ganization would provide links to
benefits and services such as
food, shelter, clothing, transpor-
tation, housing assistance, utilit-
ies assistance, and assistance
with benefits forms, as well
as other safety net services for
low income families and individ-
uals. The RFP will be posted at
the San Mateo County, Human
Services Agency web page for
download.
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
295 Art
ART: 5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”,
signed Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all.
650-345-3277
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! (650)430-6556
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
(650)430-6556
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL REFRIGERATOR great for of-
fice or studio apartment . Good condition
$40.00 (650)504-6058
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 (650)591-3313
SCHWINN 20” Boy’s Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, (650)787-8600
120 Foreign (70), U.S. (50) USED Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$5.00 all, 650-787-8600
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
298 Collectibles
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
MAHJONG SET 166 tiles in case good
condition $35.00 call 650-570-602
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TONKA EXCAVATOR, two arms move,
articulated,only $22 (650)595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BOX FULL TOYS Original Pkg., 40’s -
50’s, $90 for all (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
32 “ FLAT SCREEN TV - Slightly Used.
HDMI 1080, $100 (650)283-0396
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SAMSUNG, FLAT screenTV, 32” like
new! With Memorex DVD player, $185
(650)274-4337
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(SOLD
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO (650)515-2605
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO (650)515-2605
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
AMOIRE ENTERTAINMENT cabinet $50
(650)622-6695
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
304 Furniture
DINNING ROOM table with chairs excel-
lent condition like new. $99.00 (650)504-
6058
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50 SOLD
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $200 OBO
SOLD!
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $85
RETAIL $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, SOLD
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable
coast $600.00 sacrifice $80.00
(650)504-6058
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 SOLD
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
24
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
304 Furniture
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72” tall x 13”
wide, $20 (650)591-3313
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
TWINE BED including frame good con-
dition $45.00 (650)504-6058
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. (650)322-2814
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GAS STOVE - Roper, Oven w 4 Burners,
good condition $95 (650)515-2605
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO SOLD!01976533
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
MONOPOLY GAME - rules, plastic real
estate, metal counters, all cards and pa-
per money $10 (650)574-3229
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
306 Housewares
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 (650)368-0748
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW 18VOLT Drill/Driver w/ light,
warranty, only $29.99 (650)595-3933
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
16 BOOKS on Histoy if WWII Excllent
condition $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BALANCING SANTA, Mint condition,
Santa rocks back/forth, 20 in high, sturdy
metal, snowman, chimney, $12.00
(650)578-9208
BLACK LEATHER Organizer, Unop-
ened, Any Year, Cell Holder, Wallet, Cal-
ender., In Box $12 (650)578-9208
BLACK LEATHER Organizer, Unop-
ened, Any Year, Cell Holder, Wallet, Cal-
ender., In Box $12 (650)578-9208
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRIC IMPACT wrench sockets
case warranty $39.95 (650)595-3933
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FRONT LOADER, bucket & arm move,
articulated $12.50 (650)595-3933
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX BATH TOWELS(3) 26"x49",
watermelon color $15 (650)574-3229
310 Misc. For Sale
MARTEX HAND TOWEL(5) 15"x28", wa-
termelon color $10 (650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$40. (650)873-8167
VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN
black/gold/white floral on aqua $10
(650)574-3229
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR no brand $65
(650)348-6428
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
K MANDOLIN - A Style, 1940’2 with
Case, $50 firm SOLD!
311 Musical Instruments
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
NEAPOLITAN MANDOLIN With case
sounds good $75 SOLD!
OLD USED Tube Amplifer, working con-
dition $25 SOLD!
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $10
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
316 Clothes
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB LOUNGE exercise machine cost
$100. sell for $25. Call 650-570-6023
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
SMALL TRAMPOLINE $5.00 call 650-
570-6023
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
SOLD!
TAYLOR MADE 200, driver & Fairway
metals. 9 PC iron set $99 OBO.
650-349-6969
25 Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Key with no flats
or sharps: Abbr.
5 Terra __: pottery
clay
10 Dog’s greeting
14 Big deli sandwich
15 Extreme fear
16 Away from the
wind
17 1965 Righteous
Brothers hit
repopularized by
its use in the
1990 film “Ghost”
20 “__ sera”: Italian
“Good evening”
21 Clip-__: earrings
for non-pierced
ears
22 Choir section
23 Letter-shaped
hardware items
25 Pilot’s approx.
26 Fixes firmly (in)
29 Mini-burgers
33 Scarily
unpredictable
type
36 However, briefly
37 1/12 of a foot
38 See 67-Across
39 Leg bone
40 Sleuth, slangily
41 Monopoly board
corner
45 Lash holders
47 Tenor and bass
48 Where cows
graze
49 Coffee maker
brand
51 TV financial
adviser Suze
54 Sturgeon delicacy
55 Macaroni shape
59 Pep that won’t
quit
62 “That __ say ...”
63 Indy 500 family
name
64 Wall Street order
65 Skin pics
66 Bearded farm
critters
67 With 38-Across,
Popeye’s kid
DOWN
1 Common
freshwater bait
fish
2 List of dishes
3 With the bow, in
music
4 ’80s-’90s
“Entertainment
Tonight” co-host
5 401, in old Rome
6 “To be, __ to be ...”
7 Adolescents
8 Little boys
9 Naval bigwig:
Abbr.
10 Song from a
troubadour
11 Very much
12 Decorate again
13 Lock inserts
18 “Duck Dynasty”
network
19 Part of EIK
24 Trojans’ sch.
25 “Xanadu” rock gp.
26 Privileged few
27 Cold hard cash
28 Lawn bowling
game
29 Ginger cookie
30 Code of conduct
31 River valley known
for Riesling wine
32 Karaoke
selections
34 Tarzan’s foster
family
35 Once known as,
in society pages
39 Like less-caloric
chicken pieces
41 Devilish one
42 Nutritional stat.
43 Gardner of the
silver screen
44 Cathedral city on
the Seine
46 Gauchos’ plains
49 __ nova: Brazilian
dance
50 Stopwatch
button
51 “In memoriam”
column, briefly
52 Civil rights activist
Parks
53 Mixed-breed
pooch
54 Nevada casino
city
56 Make, as coffee
57 Look at
lecherously
58 Noah of “Falling
Skies”
60 Carry with effort
61 Triage ctrs.
By Joel D. Lafargue
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
12/30/13
12/30/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
318 Sports Equipment
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $45., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
SOLD
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
INVERSION TABLE relieves pressure
on back. Cost $100.00 sell for $25.
(650)570-6023
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
REDWOOD CITY 1 bedroom apartment
$1350. month, $1000 deposit, close to
Downtown RWC, Absolutely no animals.
Call (650)361-1200
SAN MATEO Complete remodeled 2
bdrm 1 bath. Includes parking spot.. Wa-
ter and garbage paid. . $2500/month +
dep. RENTED!
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2,400 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
26
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services • General
Errands • Event Help
$65 Holiday Special,
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Concrete
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTERS AND ROOF
REPAIR
• New Installation seamless,
• Cleaning and Screening,
• Commercial and Residential
Power Washing
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1976
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
Hauling
Landscaping
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
GUTTER
CLEANING
27 Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
Health & Medical
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Massage Therapy
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
28
Monday • Dec. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
There Is
New Hope!
A Health Center
Dedicated to
Severe Disc
Conditions
If you suffer with lower back,
neck, or leg pain, we invite you to try
our non surgical solution. The pain
from degenerating and bulging discs
affects everything that you do, from
work, to play, and ultimately your
quality of life. At Crossroads Heath
Center, we have created an entire
facility dedicated to patients with
severe disc conditions that have not
responded to traditional care. Our
revolutionary, Crossroads Method,
provides a very high success rate to
patients with serious back, neck,
leg and arm pain – even when all
else has failed. This FDA cleared;
non-surgical treatment allows us
to rehabilitate your herniated or
degenerative disc(s) by reversing
internal pressure and enabling your
disc(s) to heal from the inside out.
We succeed where other treatments
have failed – by removing the
pressure that is causing pain to
your disc(s) and nerves – without
drugs, injections, invasive surgery or
harmful side effects.
The only office to have
“The Crossroads Method”
This method which includes
computerized true disc
decompression is considered by
many doctors to be the most
advanced and successful non-
invasive treatment of serious back,
neck, leg or arm pain.
This procedure allows for a much
higher success rate by increasing
hydration of your discs, fexibility,
relaxation of muscles and ligaments
along with improving muscle and
core strength, balance and posture.
This results in a more effective and
lasting solution to your pain. There
are no side effects and no recovery
time is required.
This gentle and relaxing treatment
has proven to be effective… even
when drugs, epidurals, traditional
chiropractic, physical therapy
and surgery have failed… The
Crossroads Method has shown
dramatic results.
Patient Testimonials
During the 1 1/2 years of having
constant daily lower back pain and
spasms, I took anti-infammatory
and pain medication, but nothing
helped lessen the pain. When an MRI
showed that I had two degenerative
discs, I went through a series of
lumbar epidural injections without
success. The only thing that made
the pain and spasms go away was
Spinal Decompression treatments at
Crossroads Health Center. Four years
later and I am still pain-free!
Lisa K. San Jose, 2013
I came in to Dr. Ferrigno for
lower back pain. It’s a problem
that I have had for about 10 to
15 years. I tried everything from
physiatrists, medical doctors,
doctor of osteopathy, chiropractic,
acupuncture, pain medications,
epidural injections and everything
was a temporary fx. I decided to try
the DRX therapy and I’ve gone from
an average pain level between 5/7
out of 10 all the way down to a pain
level of 1 to 2 pretty consistently.
The DRX was defnitely the only
thing that has made me feel better.
Brian G. Los Gatos CA. 2013
How Will I Know If I Qualify
for Treatment?
When you come in for a
complimentary consultation we will
ask a series of questions and perform
a comprehensive examination to
determine exactly where the pain is
coming from. If x-rays are necessary,
we can take them in our offce. Once
we determine the cause of your
pain we will let you know if we can
help you and if you qualify for our
treatment protocol.
If we don’t feel like we can help we
will refer you to someone who can.
Serious Back or Neck Trouble?
Leg/Arm Pain or Numbness?
Have You Been Diagnosed With a
Bulging, Herniated or Degenerative Disc?
Paid Advertisement
Disclaimer: Due to Federal Law, some exclusions may apply.
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
Campbell San Mateo
855-240-3472 650-231-4754
www.BayAreaBackPain.com

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