FREEDOM HIGH SCHOOL

Principal: Eric L. Volta Assistant Principal: Erik Faulkner Assistant Principal: Chris Holland Assistant Principal: Pam Seto Assistant Principal: Tara Biancamano 1050 Neroly Road, Oakley, CA 94561 (925) 625-5900 Fax: (925) 625-0396 http://www.libertyuhsd.k12.ca.us/freedom/

School Accountability Report Card 2008-2009
District Office
Superintendent……………………………..Daniel M. Smith Human Resources……………...………..….Jerry T. Glenn Administrative Services…………...………….Roy Ghiggeri Business Manager…………………...…………..Rick Miller Educational Services ………………...…Mary Vinciguerra Project Developer…………………………..Wayne Reeves Maintenance and Operations……………….Robert Brown Special Services……………………………......John Saylor Technology……………………………..……….Gina Kroner Transportation……………………………Steve McElhaney

Reported for school year 2007-2008 Published during 2008-2009 Board of Trustees
A five Member Board of Trustees elected at large governs the District that serves the City of Brentwood, City of Oakley and the communities of Bethel Island, Byron, Discovery Bay, and Knightsen: Term Steve Barr 2010 Joanne Byer 2010 Holly Hartman 2012 Yolanda Peña-Mendrek 2010 Ray Valverde 2012

I. Data and Access DataQuest

DataQuest is an online data tool located at http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/ that contains additional information about this school and comparisons of the school to the district, the county, and the state. Specifically, DataQuest is a dynamic system that provides reports for accountability (e.g. Academic Performance Index [API], Adequate Yearly Progress [AYP], test data, enrollment, graduates, dropouts, course enrollments, staffing, and data regarding English learners.

Internet Access
Internet access is available at public libraries and other locations that are publicly accessible (e.g., the California State Library). Access to the Internet at libraries and public locations is generally provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Other use restrictions include the hours of operation, the length of time that a workstation may be used (depending on availability), the types of software programs available on a workstation, and the ability to print documents.

Freedom High School has proven itself to be a unique learning experience for students in Far East County. The school, built in 1997, was planned around the tenets of Second to None, a California Department of Education document that stressed smaller learning communities, school-to-career opportunities and integration of curricular areas. Freedom High School along with its progressive founding, also believes in providing a safe, sane and positive learning environment. Our faculty works hard at making students feel good about themselves and their school. As a school, we take pride in what we provide for our students and the community. I am proud to be serving Freedom High School and the Oakley communities. This is my twelfth year in education administration and my twentieth in education. School Description In its thirteenth year of operation, Freedom High School is located in a rural-suburban portion of East Contra Costa County. Situated amongst new housing developments, and rich pastures to the east, Freedom serves students from a large and diverse attendance area. The local setting also underscores the challenge of serving both rural and suburban communities. Freedom High School is a comprehensive four-year high school that is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. This is the third year of a full six-year accreditation with a midterm review coming up in the spring of ‘09. October enrollments for Freedom totaled 2289 students. The school’s attendance area serves the communities of Oakley, Bethel Island and Northern Brentwood. Ten maintenance and custodial staff members are assigned to Freedom High School on a permanent basis and are responsible for maintaining a safe and clean campus.

II. About the School Principal’s Message

School Mission
The mission of Freedom High School is to educate students to prepare them for a successful future. Freedom will be the center for knowledge and pride in the community.

Parents have the ability to support Freedom High School formally through organizations such as Athletic Boosters, Music Boosters, Choral Boosters, and the School Advisory Council. In the Winter of 2004, Freedom High School created the Parent Advisory Group. This Group’s main function is to provide feedback from the parents to the Principal regarding pertinent school issues. This group has met quarterly in the past.

Opportunities for Parental Involvement

Student Enrollment by Grade Level
This table displays the number of students enrolled in each grade level at the school. Grade Level Enrollment Grade 9 640 Grade 10 586 Grade 11 552 Grade 12 468 Total Enrollment 2246

Student Enrollment by Group
This table displays the percent of students enrolled at the school who are identified as being in a particular group. Percent Racial and Ethnic Subgroup of Total Racial and Ethnic Subgroup Enrollment African American 8.68 % White (Not Hispanic) American Indian or Alaska Native 1.16 % Multiple or No Response Asian 2.4 % Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Filipino 4.23 % English Learners Hispanic or Latino 32.9 % Students with Disabilities Pacific Islander 0.8 % Percent of Total Enrollment 49.82 % % 16 % 8 % 13 %

Average Class Size and Class Size Distribution (Secondary)
This table displays by subject area the average class size and the number of classrooms that fall into each size category (a range of total students per classroom). 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 Avg. Number of Classrooms Avg. Number of Classrooms Avg. Number of Classrooms Subject Class Class Class 1-20 21-32 33+ 1-20 21-32 33+ 1-20 21-32 33+ Size Size Size English 28.2 32 50 5 25.3 45 44 11 25.2 44 45 15 Mathematics 36.4 4 32 27 29.4 14 33 21 28.0 20 30 25 Science 29.7 1 57 1 29.4 4 46 11 30.3 4 35 27 Social Science 29.8 4 67 3 29.9 9 46 20 30.1 7 46 25

III. SCHOOL CLIMATE School Safety Plan
Information about the currency and contents of the school's comprehensive safety plan. Date of Last Review/Update November 13, 2008 Date Last Discussed with Staff October 23, 2008 Each site updates their Emergency and School Safety Plans on a yearly basis. Standard Operating Procedures (S.O.P.) were developed for all staff members dealing with safety issues. Quarterly, the District meets with students to address safety issues on campus.

Suspensions and Expulsions
This table displays the rate of suspensions and expulsions (the total number of incidents divided by the total enrollment) at the school and district levels for the most recent three-year period. School District Rate 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 Suspensions 16.7 15.9 15.4 13.0 16.2 16.4 Expulsions 0.5 0.2 0.1 0.5 0.5 0.1

IV. SCHOOL FACILITIES School Facility Conditions and Planned Improvements (School Year 2008-09)
A walk-thru is completed two times a year addressing school facility conditions. The site is evaluated and any facilities that need repair are listed on the Facility Inspection Tool. The results of this survey are available at the district office. Planned remedial action and a timeline are set by the site and district. The site and the district are committed to provide safe, clean, adequate and functional facilities to staff and students. District maintenance staff ensures that the repairs necessary to keep the school in good repair and working order are completed in a timely manner. An online work order process is used to ensure efficient service and the emergency repairs are given the highest priority. The Director of Maintenance and Operations works daily with the custodial staff to develop cleaning schedules to ensure a clean and safe school. The Williams Uniform Complaint form, regarding facilities, can be picked up at the Principal’s Office. Data reported are the determination of good repair as documented in a completed Facility Inspection Tool on July 15, 2008. Additional information about the condition of the school's facilities may be obtained by speaking with the school principal or the Director of Maintenance & Operations. Repair Status Item Inspected Repair Needed and Action Taken or Planned Good Fair Poor Gas Leaks x Mechanical Systems x Windows/Doors/Gates (interior and exterior) x Interior Surfaces (walls, floors, and ceilings) x Hazardous Materials (interior and exterior) x Structural Damage x Fire Safety x Electrical (interior and exterior) x Pest/Vermin Infestation x Drinking Fountains (inside and outside) x Restrooms x Sewer x Playground/School Grounds x Roofs x Overall Cleanliness x

School Facility Conditions Good Repair Status (School Year 2008-09)

Overall Summary of School Facility Good Repair Status (School Year 2008-09)
This table displays the overall summary of the results of the most recently completed school site inspection. Facility Condition Item Inspected Exemplary Good Fair Overall Summary x Poor

V. TEACHERS Teacher Credentials
This table displays the number of teachers assigned to the school with a full credential, without a full credential, and those teaching outside of their subject area of competence. Detailed information about teacher qualifications can be found at the DataQuest Web page http://dg.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/. Teachers With Full Credential Without Full Credential Teaching Outside Subject Area of Competence School 2006-07 89 7 3 District 2007-08 273 23 N/A

2005-06 88 8 5

2007-08 94 8 3

Teacher Misassignments and Vacant Teacher Positions
This table displays the number of teacher misassignments (teachers assigned without proper legal authorization) and the number of vacant teacher positions (not filled by a single designated teacher assigned to teach the entire course at the beginning of the school year or semester). Note: Total Teacher Misassignments includes the number of Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners. 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 Teacher Misassignments Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners Total Teacher Misassignments Vacant Teacher Positions 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Core Academic Courses Taught by NCLB Compliant Teachers (School Year 2006-07)

This table displays the percent of classes in core academic subjects taught by No Child Left Behind (NCLB) complaint and non-NCLB complaint teachers at the school, at all schools in the district, at high-poverty schools in the district, and at low-poverty schools in the district. More information on teacher qualifications required under NCLB can be found at the NCLB Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/nclb/sr/tq/. Percent of Classes In Core Academic Subjects Location of Classes Taught by NCLB Compliant Teachers Taught by NCLB Non-NCLB Complaint Teachers This School 95.7 4.3 All Schools in District 93.6 6.4 High-Poverty Schools in District Low-Poverty Schools in District 93.6 6.4

VI. SUPPORT STAFF Academic Counselors and Other Support Staff (School Year 2007-08)
This table displays, in units of full-time equivalents (FTE), the number of academic counselors and other support staff who are assigned to the school and the average number of students per academic counselor. One FTE equals one staff member working full time; one FTE could also represent two staff members who each work 50 percent of full time. Number of FTE Assigned to Average Number of Students per Title School Academic Counselor Academic Counselor 4.0 561 Library Media Teacher (Librarian) 1 N/A Library Media Services Staff (paraprofessional) 1 N/A Psychologist 1 N/A Social Worker N/A Nurse N/A Speech/Language/Hearing Specialist N/A Resource Specialist (non-teaching) N/A Other 7.0 N/A

VII. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION Quality, Currency, Availability of Textbooks and Instructional Materials (School Year 2008-09)

This table displays information about the quality, currency, and availability of the standards-aligned textbooks and other instructional materials used at the school, and information about the school’s use of any supplemental curriculum or non-adopted textbooks or instructional materials. Core Curriculum Areas Quality, Currency, and Availability of Textbooks and Instructional Materials
Literature and Language Arts 9th Grade; Holt, 2003 Literature and Language Arts 10th Grade; Holt, 2003 Literature and Language, English and World Literature Purple Level; McDougal, Littell, 1994 and Literature and Language Arts, Holt 2003 11th and 12th grades

Percent of Pupils Who Lack Their Own Assigned Textbooks and Instructional Materials

Reading/Language Arts

0%

Mathematics

Algebra I: Prentice Hall 2005 Geometry: Prentice Hall 2008; Concepts and Skills; McDougal Littell, 2005 Algebra II: Algebra/Trig structured and Math book 2 2000 McDougal Advanced Math: Integrated Mathematics, Rubenstein, Craine, Butts; McDougal Littell: 2002 Pre-Calculus: Functions and Graphs; Cengage (Thompson Learning) Brooks/Cole 2008 Statistics: Modeling the World; Prentice Hall, Bock, Velleman De Veax 2008 Calculus: Calculus, Graphical, Numerical , Algegraic: Finney, Demana, Waits, Kennedy. Addison Wesley Longman 2001 Earth Science: Holt 2007 Biology: McDougal Littell 2007 Chemistry Calif. Edition: Prentice Hall 2007 Physics: Holt 2007 Modern World History McDougall, Littell, 2006 U.S. History: The Americans McDougall, Littell, 2005 American Government Prentice Hall, 2006 Economics-Principals in Action Prentice Hall, 2006 Paso A Paso I, II, III Glencoe Health; Glencoe, Mary H. Bronson 2008

0%

Science

0%

History-Social Science

0%

Foreign Language Health Visual and Performing Arts

0% 0%

Science Laboratory Equipment

The school stocks an adequate supply of equipment for its students. Inventory includes, but is not limited to: microscopes, slides, ring stands, clamps, support rings, utility clamps, test tubes, test tube holders and brushes, tongs, flasks, beakers, and Bunsen burners.

VIII. SCHOOL FINANCES Expenditures Per Pupil and School Site Teacher Salaries (Fiscal Year 2006-07)
This table displays a comparison of the school’s per pupil expenditures from unrestricted (basic) sources with other schools in the district and throughout the state, and a comparison of the average teacher salary at the school site with average teacher salaries at the district and state levels. Detailed information regarding school expenditures can be found at the Current Expense of Education Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/ec/ and teacher salaries can be found on the Certificated Salaries and Benefits Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/cs/. Total Expenditures Expenditures per Pupil Expenditures Level Average Teacher Salary per Pupil (Supplemental) per Pupil (Basic) School Site $7898 * * $62802 District N/A N/A $61845 Percent Difference – School Site and District N/A N/A + 1.55% State N/A N/A $5300 $65574 Percent Difference – School Site and State N/A N/A - 4.22% *Supplemental and Basic Expenditures per Pupil are not separated therefore only the total is shown.

Types of Services Funded (Fiscal Year 2007-08)

The Liberty Union High School District spends approximately $7,898 annually per student. This includes all education costs ranging from direct salaries of teachers, transportation, custodial and maintenance, facilities, utilities, and administration. It also includes costs of support services such as counseling, library and media services, and special State and Federal categorical funds.

This table displays district-level salary information for teachers, principals, and superintendents, and compares these figures to the state averages for districts of the same type and size. The table also displays teacher and administrative salaries as a percent of a district’s budget, and compares these figures to the state averages for districts of the same type and size. Detailed information regarding salaries may be found on the Certificated Salaries and Benefits Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/cs/. Category Beginning Teacher Salary Mid-Range Teacher Salary Highest Teacher Salary Average Principal Salary (High School) Superintendent Salary Percent of Budget for Teacher Salaries Percent of Budget for Administrative Salaries District Amount $42333 $64633 $85645 $113048 $193743 39.4 % 6.4 % State Average For Districts In Same Category $41367 $66967 $85877 $123438 $185780 37.1 % 5.1 %

Teacher and Administrative Salaries (Fiscal Year 2006-2007)

The California Standards Tests (CST) show how well students are doing in relation to the state content standards. The CST’s include Englishlanguage arts and mathematics in grades 2 through 11; science in grades 5,8,9,10 and 11; and history-social science in grades 8,10, and 11. Student scores are reported as performance levels. Detailed information regarding CST results for each grade and performance level, including the percent of students not tested, can be found on the Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Results Web page at http://star.cde.ca.gov. Note: Scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or to protect student privacy. In no case shall any group score be reported that would deliberately or inadvertently make public the score or performance of any individual student.

IX. STUDENT PERFORMANCE California Standards Tests

CST Results for All Students --- Three-Year Comparison
School 2006-07 38 9 42 26

This table displays the percent of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standards). Subject English-Language Arts Mathematics Science History-Social Science District 2006-07 40 11 38 25 State 2006-07 43 40 38 33

2005-06 42 12 46 32

2007-08 43 11 47 37

2005-06 44 14 41 31

2007-08 47 14 46 34

2005-06 42 40 35 33

2007-08 46 43 46 36

CST Results by Student Group – Most Recent Year
This table displays the percent of students, by group, achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standards) for the most recent testing period. Group African American American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Filipino Hispanic or Latino Pacific Islander White (not Hispanic) Male Female Economically Disadvantaged English Learners Percent of Students Scoring at Proficient or Advanced English-Language Arts 29 17 57 61 34 44 51 39 48 27 5 Mathematics 3 0 20 13 8 7 15 12 11 8 2 Science 25 * 54 64 33 * 58 47 46 24 6 History-Social Science 20 0 39 50 31 27 44 40 35 4

Students with Disabilities Students Receiving Migrant Education Services

7 *

5 *

11 * *

California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) Results
The California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) is primarily used as a graduation requirement. However, the grade 10 results of this exam are also used to establish the percentages of students at three proficiency levels (not proficient, proficient, or advanced) in ELA and mathematics in order to compute Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) designations as required by the federal NCLB Act of 2001. Detailed information regarding CAHSEE results can be found at the CAHSEE Web site at http://cahsee.cde.ca.gov/. Note: Scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy, or to protect student privacy. In no case shall any group score be reported that would deliberately or inadvertently make public the score or performance of any individual student.

CAHSEE Results for All Students – Three-Year Comparison

This table displays the percent of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level. School District Subject 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2005-06 2006-07 English 56.0 57.2 59.3 59.7 59.1 Mathematics 43.0 45.5 46.0 49.0 49.2

2007-08 61.2 52.8

2005-06 51.1 46.8

State 2006-07 48.6 49.9

2007-08 52.9 51.3

This table displays the percent of students, by group, achieving at each performance level in English language-arts and mathematics separately for the most recent testing period. English Mathematics Group Not Not Proficient Advanced Proficient Advanced Proficient Proficient All Students 40.7 51.2 8.0 54.0 36.2 9.9 Male 48.1 45.3 6.7 54.1 37.4 8.5 Female 31.9 58.4 9.7 53.8 34.7 11.4 African American 47.7 47.7 4.5 69.8 25.6 4.7 American Indian or Alaska Native * * * * * * Asian 15.4 76.9 7.7 30.8 46.2 23.1 Filipino 26.1 60.9 13.0 39.1 47.8 13.0 Hispanic or Latino 55.6 42.1 2.2 64.9 28.7 6.3 Pacific Islander * * * * * * White (not Hispanic) 32.5 54.8 12.7 47.0 41.4 11.6 English Learners 70.6 29.4 0.0 81.5 16.9 1.5 Socioeconomically Disadvantaged 66.1 32.1 1.8 71.3 23.1 5.6 Students Receiving Migrant Education * * * * * * Services Students with Disabilities 83.8 16.2 0.0 95.9 2.7 1.4

CAHSEE Results by Student Group – Most Recent Year

California Physical Fitness Test

The California Physical Fitness Test is administered to students in grades 5,7, and 9 only. This table displays by grade level the percent of students meeting fitness standards (scoring in the healthy fitness zone on all six fitness standards) for the most recent testing period. Detailed information regarding this test, and comparisons of a school’s test results to the district and state levels, may be found at the Physical Fitness Testing Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/pf/. Grade Level Percent of Students Meeting Fitness Standards 9 31 Note: Scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy, or to protect student privacy. In no case shall any group score be reported that would deliberately or inadvertently make public the score or performance of any individual student.

X. ACCOUNTABILITY Academic Performance Index (API)

The Academic Performance Index (API) is an annual measure of the academic performance and progress of schools in California. API scores range from 200 to 1,000, with a statewide target of 800. Detailed information about the API can be found at the API Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/ap/.

This table displays the school’s statewide and similar schools API ranks. The statewide API rank ranges from 1 to 10. A statewide rank of 1 means that the school has an API score in the lowest 10 percent of all schools in the state, while a statewide rank of 10 means that the school has an API score in the highest 10 percent of all schools in the state. The similar school API rank reflects how a school compares to 100 statistically matched “similar schools.” A similar schools rank of 1 means that the schools academic performance is comparable to the lowest performing 10 schools of the 100 similar schools, while a similar schools rank of 10 means that the school’s academic performance is better than at least 90 of the 100 similar schools. API Rank 2005 2006 2007 Statewide 6 6 5 Similar Schools 6 5 2  "N/A" means a number is not applicable or not available due to missing data.  "*" means this API is calculated for a small school, defined as having between 11 and 99 valid Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program test scores included in the API. The API is asterisked if the school was small eitherin 2007 or 2008. APIs based on small numbers of students are less reliable and therefore should be carefully interpreted.  "A" means the school or subgroups scored at or above the statewide performance target of 800 in 2008.  "B" means the school did not have a valid 2007 Base API and will not have any growth or target information.  "C" means the school had significant demographic changes and will not have any growth or target information.  "D" means this is either an LEA, an Alternative Schools Accountability Model (ASAM) school, or a special education school. Target information is not applicable to LEAs, ASAM schools, or special education schools.  "E" indicates this school was an ASAM school in the 2007 Base API Report and has no target information even though the school is no longer an ASAM school.

API Ranks -– Three Year Comparison

API Changes by Student Group – Three Year Comparison

This table displays, by student group, the actual API changes in points added or lost for the past three years, and the most recent API score. Note: “N/A” means that the student group is not numerically significant. Actual API Change Growth API Score Group 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008 All Students at the School 17 -27 24 713 African American 35 -33 43 654 American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Filipino Hispanic or Latino 17 -27 35 663 Pacific Islander White (not Hispanic) 22 -25 19 748 Socioeconomically Disadvantaged 35 -26 36 628 English Learners 57 585 Students with Disabilities 60 -25 17 498  "N/A" means a number is not applicable or not available due to missing data.  "*" means this API is calculated for a small school, defined as having between 11 and 99 valid Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program test scores included in the API. The API is asterisked if the school was small either in 2007 or 2008. APIs based on small numbers of students are less reliable and therefore should be carefully interpreted.  "A" means the school or subgroups scored at or above the statewide performance target of 800 in 2008.  "B" means the school did not have a valid 2007 Base API and will not have any growth or target information. "C" means the school had significant demographic changes and will not have any growth or target information.   "D" means this is either an LEA, an Alternative Schools Accountability Model (ASAM) school, or a special education school. Target information is not applicable to LEAs, ASAM schools, or special education schools.

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)

"E" indicates this school was an ASAM school in the 2007 Base API Report and has no target information even though the school is no longer an ASAM school.

The federal NCLB Act requires that all schools and districts meet the following Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) criteria:  Participation rate on the state’s standards-based assessments in English-language arts (ELA) and mathematics  Percent proficient on the state’s standards-based assessments in ELA and mathematics  API as an additional indicator  Graduation rate (for secondary schools) Detailed information about AYP, including participation rates and percent proficient results by student group, can be found at the AYP Web page http://www/cde/ca/gov/ta/ac/ay/.

AYP Overall and by Criteria (School Year 2007-08)
This table displays an indication of whether the school and the district made AYP overall and whether the school and the district met each of the AYP criteria. AYP Criteria Overall Participation Rate – English-Language Arts Participation Rate – Mathematics Percent Proficient – English-Language Arts Percent Proficient – Mathematics API Graduation Rate School No Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes District No Yes Yes No No Yes Yes

Schools and districts receiving federal Title I funding enter Program Improvement (PI) if they do not make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for two consecutive years in the same content area (English-language arts or mathematics) or on the same indicator (API or graduation rate). After entering PI, schools and districts advance to the next level of intervention with each additional year that they do not make AYP. Detailed information about PI identification can be found at the AYP Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/ay/. Indicator School District Program Improvement Status Not in PI In PI First Year of Program Improvement Implementation 2008-2009 Year in Program Improvement Year 1 Number of Schools Currently in Program Improvement N/A Percent of Schools Currently in Program Improvement N/A

Federal Intervention Program (School Year 2008-09)

XI. SCHOOL COMPLETION AND POSTSECONDARY PREPARATION Admission Requirements for California Public Universities University of California
Admission requirements for the University of California (UC) follow guidelines set forth in the Master Plan, which requires that the top one-eighth of the state’s high school graduates, as well as those transfer students who have successfully completed specified college work, be eligible for admission to the UC. These requirements are designed to ensure that all eligible students are adequately prepared for University-level work. For general admissions requirements please visit the University of California Web site at http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/admissions/general.html.

Admission requirements for the California State University (CSU) use three factors to determine eligibility. They are specific high school courses; grades in specified courses and test scores; and graduation from high school. Some campuses have higher standards for particular majors or students who live outside the local campus area. Because of the number of students who apply, a few campuses have higher standards (supplementary admission criteria) for all applicants. Most CSU campuses utilize local admission guarantee policies for students who graduate or

California State University

transfer from high schools and colleges that are historically served by a CSU campus in that region. For general admissions requirements please visit the California State University Web site at http://www.calstate.edu/admission/.

This table displays the school’s one-year dropout rates and graduation rates for the most recent three-year period. For comparison purposes, data are also provided at the district and state levels. Detailed information about dropout rates and graduation rates can be found on the DataQuest Web page at http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/. Indicator Dropout Rate (1-year) Graduation Rate School 2005-06 0.4 97.7 District 2005-06 2.0 91.0 State 2005-06 3.5 83.0

Dropout Rate and Graduation Rate

2004-05 0.5 96.7

2006-07 0.9 96.2

2004-05 0.5 96.2

2006-07 2.3 89.9

2004-05 3.1 85.0

2006-07 4.4 79.5

Completion of High School Graduation Requirements
Students in California public schools must pass both the English-language arts and mathematics portions of the California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) to receive a high school diploma. For students who began the 2007-08 school year in the 12th grade, as evidenced by that school year’s October CBEDS enrollment, this table displays by student group the percent who met all state and local graduation requirements for grade 12 completion, including having passed both portions of the CAHSEE or received a local waiver or state exemption. Detailed information about the CAHSEE can be found at the CAHSEE Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/hs/. Note: "N/A" means that the student group is not numerically significant. Graduating Class of 2008 Group School District State All students 88% 74% -African American 7% 5% -American Indian or Alaska Native 1.5% 0.8% -Asian 2% 2.4% -Filipino 3% 2% -Hispanic or Latino 23.5% 19% -Pacific Islander 0.4% 0.3% -White (not Hispanic) 48% 44% -Multiple Ethnicity/Race or no response 2% 1% Socioeconomically Disadvantaged 14% 11% -English Learners 6% 6% -Students with Disabilities 10% 6% --

Career Technical Education (CTE) Programs (School Year 2007-08)

In Freedom High School, career tech education courses are organized through career paths within three school-to-career academies. The academy curriculum integrates academic and career/technical education. Students who complete an academy program have completed all district graduation requirements and are prepared to attend college and/or enter the work world. Students who successfully complete an academy program may receive certificates. A career path or major is a series of specialized courses concentrated in a particular career or academic area. Students are provided with the introductory skills and knowledge necessary to pursue post-secondary education or work immediately after graduation from high school. There are three academies, each with a particular focus and each with career paths that are defined by a variety of majors. A major consists of a series of related courses with a general career focus. Academies, majors and career paths in Freedom High School include courses in these specific career fields: Arts and Media, Business, Engineering, and Technology, and Professional Human Development. ARTS AND MEDIA SEQUENCE OF COURSES FOR MAJORS/ ACADEMY COMPLETION Visual/Commercial Art Performing Arts Beginning Courses Beginning Art Beginning Art Intro. to Art History Women’s Choir Beginning Fashion Men’s Choir Concert Band Beginning Fashion Beginning Acting

Mass Media Concert Band Men’s Choir Women’s Choir Beginning Art Beginning Acting Keyboarding I/II

Intermediate Courses

Intermediate Art Animation Intermediate Fashion Photography I

Beginning Guitar Intro. to Art History Jazz Band Intermediate Fashion A’Capella Choir Intermediate Acting Women’s Ensemble

Personal Computing Journalism Speech and Debate Animation ROP The Art of Video Production ROP Digital Arts/Design for the Web Desktop Publishing Photography I Animation Graphics Illustration Advanced Video Production Advanced News Production Publications/Graphic Arts Photography II Advanced Animation ROP Dynamic Web Development

Advanced Courses

Advanced Art Photography II Advanced Animation AP Art History Studio Art

Theater Production and Stage Craft Symphonic Band Music Appreciation Orchestra Select Singers

BUSINESS ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY (BETA) SEQUENCE OF ELECTIVE COURSES FOR ACADEMY MAJOR COMPLETION Beginning Business Technology Keyboarding Practical Computing Foreign Language Math / Computer Science Practical Computing Systems Management I-IV Foreign Language Practical Math Keyboarding Computer Programming Algebra II Desktop Publishing Web Design MS Office Cert. Program Physics, AP Computer Programming Web Development Pre-calculus or Calculus Science Environmental Science Earth Science Foreign Language Engineering / Architecture Design Drafting I, II Electronics Foreign Language Technology Explorations Architecture Design Algebra II Engineering CAD Physics Pre-calculus

Intermediate

MS Office Certification Web Design

Advanced

Virtual Enterprise Web Development

Anatomy/Physiology Chemistry Algebra II Forensic Science Zoology Biotechnology AP Biology Physics AP Chemistry Pre-calculus

PROFESSIONAL HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (PHD) Teaching Major Electives: Child Development, ROP Careers in Education, T.E.P. Program (Teaching Experience Program), Psychology or AP Psychology, Practical Computing or Keyboarding Sports Medicine/Medical Major Electives: Anatomy & Physiology, Sports Medicine I & II, Physics, AP Chemistry, Psychology & AP Psychology, Biology & AP Biology, Biotechnology, Zoology Psychology: Psychology and/or AP Psychology, Biology or AP Biology, Anatomy & Physiology, Chemistry or AP Chemistry Law Enforcement/ Fire: ROP Law Enforcement, ROP Fire Science, Psychology or AP Psychology, Keyboarding, Biology or AP Biology, Forensic Science

Career Technical Education Participation (School Year 2007-08)

This table displays information about participation in the school’s CTE programs. Measure Number of Pupils Percent of Pupils completing a CTE program and earning a high school diploma Percent of CTE courses sequenced or articulated between the school and institutions of postsecondary education

CTE Program Participation 1051 94.7% 0%

Courses for University of California (UC) and/or California State University (CSU) Admission (School Year 2007-08) This table displays, for the most recent year, two measures related to the school’s courses that are required for University of California (UC) and/or California State University (CSU) admission. Detailed information about student enrollment in, and completion of, courses required for UC/CSU admission can be found on the DataQuest Web page at http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/. Indicator Percent Students Enrolled in Courses Required for UC/CSU Admission 66.2 Graduates Who Completed All Courses Required for UC/CSU Admission 30.5 Advanced Placement Courses

This table displays for the most recent year the number of Advanced Placement (AP) courses that the school offered by subject and the percent of the school’s students enrolled in all AP courses. Detailed information about student enrollment in AP courses can be found on the DataQuest Web page at http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/. Subject Computer Science English Fine and Performing Arts Foreign Language Mathematics Science Social Science All Courses Number of AP Courses Offered 2 1 1 1 1 4 10 Percent of Students in AP Courses -------2.9

XII. INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING AND SCHEDULING Professional Development
The Liberty Union High School District and Freedom High School utilize three Staff Development Days and Professional Development Days (short day) in 2007-2008 for professional development needs. The focus of these days is on effective classroom instruction, data analysis, teaching strategies in a block schedule and implementation of our Local Educational Agency Plan (LEA Plan). These days were used for a variety of purposes tied to the goals of the site School Improvement Plan. The School Site Council (SSC) is composed of parents, students, teachers, administrators, and classified staff members. It oversees the SIP plan which directs the school improvement efforts, develops and monitors the Single Plan for Student Achievement, and authorizes expenditures for school wide professional development. The SSC monitors and identifies areas of instructional need before distributing School Improvement Program (SIP) funds.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful