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We All Can Read: The Supplemental Reader James E.

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Pages 100 - 105

The Sailor Wins the Silver


The following story uses two syllable words which divide into syllables following the pattern of v/cv or vc/cv (syllable rules 1 and 2).

Last summer I met a fellow I will not forget. He was a master sailor, and during the hot season he went to the mountains to rest. In the winter he went to catch lobster. He did not complain, but his finger was often in need of a doctor and his mouth in need of a dentist. He said that he had made a mistake, and in a moment he had lost his sneakers into the sea. Hoping to catch fish, the seagulls near the ship would chatter all the time. Under his pillow he kept a key and a hundred dollars in bills. He forgot where the contest was held, but he was the winner in a tennis match, and they gave him a cash prize. He did not spend that cash but kept it for a day when he might need it. He said the key was not a plaything but part of a puzzle. If he could this

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moment locate the pilot who gave it to him, he would. "For this key," he said, "will unlock a greenhouse, and inside the greenhouse silver coins are hidden under a picnic table." The pilots husband was a cowboy who kept a horse, a hamster, a blanket, and not much else. He wore a dark collar and was an artist. The sailor saved this cowboys life long ago, and to thank him for this favor, the cowboys wife gave him this yellow key. But she also did whisper a riddle as she gave the sailor the key. She said, "Inside our greenhouse under the picnic table you will locate much silver, but in order to spend it, you must first go to the willow tree out in the garden. If you do this task, you will be able to spend the silver. If you do not go to the willow tree first, the silver will not belong to you." The sailor went to see if he could spot the willow tree in the garden next to the greenhouse. He went down to the bottom of his street, and he saw a

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monster vampire. But the vampire was a cartoon. Thunder struck all around him. With disgust he felt his mistake; he had left his rubber coat at home, and now he would get wet. Then a rainbow came, and the tadpoles made such a din. Uphill he went, but he did not complain. He got some turnip greens to eat for supper. After his meal he went on his way. Among the streets he did go, he saw a market. In the market he saw a man selling a number of ribbons and a cactus. He did ask the man about a willow tree outside a greenhouse. "Oh yes," the man said, "that tree is about sixteen blocks from here. You just go down this street, and when you see the peddler selling skateboards, turn into that alley." The sailor went down the street, thirteen, then fourteen, then fifteen blocks. There was the peddler selling skateboards. Yes, this corner must be the spot. And then he had a problem. Now what do I do? If I get the silver, I do not have a basket to put it in. I am not an umpire, and I cannot pretend

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that I have a better way. I will just walk into the alley and see if I may spot a willow tree in a garden next to a greenhouse. Then the sailor heard a loud bellow. He must collect himself. He cannot allow himself to be a robot. At that moment he saw a mailbox with his name on it. A letter inside the mailbox was for him. It said on the outside of the paper, "For the sailor to open at his own risk!!! Beware!!!" The sailor shook. He was shaking with the scare. But then he said, "Well I dont care. I have sailed all over. I have seen a twister hit the ground. I will not back away from this moment." So the sailor did read the letter. It said, "Sailor, you are out of your depth. Run away while there is still time." "No," said the sailor to himself. "I will not be made to run." He kept reading the letter. "If you will not leave now, then follow down the street to the next corner. Turn left, and go inside the gate. There you will see a willow tree. Look next to the tree, and you will see a burro with a harness and

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a saddle. The burros name is Bruno. Inside the saddle you will get a note that will explain what you are to do next. Go now!!!" The sailor was a mess, but he did not quit. He went into the gate and saw the burro with a harness and saddle next to the willow tree. He found the note inside the saddle. The note said that he must take out his key and match it to the key inside the saddle. If they both were the same size, then he could enter into the greenhouse, but if he did not have his key, then he must not come back. The sailor took out his key, and it did match the size of the key in the saddle. Then he went to the greenhouse and put the key inside the lock. The door swung open with creaking sounds. Inside the greenhouse all was bare except for a lone picnic table. The sailor took the table away. On the spot where the table had been, there was a patch of clover, and next to that a hole was in the ground with a ladder inside of the hole. The sailor went down the ladder, and at

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the bottom was a pot of silver. "I found it," said the sailor. "I have found the silver in the greenhouse." There was so much silver that he could not bring all to the top without first making a number of trips. At last he got it all up to the top. "Now I can get my own ship," said the sailor. At that moment out from behind the table came the pilot and the cowboy. "You have found the prize, and now we have been able to thank you for your help in saving my husbands life," said the pilot. With that they left, and the sailor began to sing a seamans song.

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Page 106

Susan and Her Stubborn Boss


The following story uses two-syllable words which divide into syllables following the pattern of v/cv or vc/cv (syllable rules 1 and 2).

I met her at the diner. She seldom was late, but that day she came in more than one hour behind the time we were to meet. She did not seem upset, but I had a hollow feeling that she had a problem. "Susan, how are you?" "Not so good, Barney; today I lost my bonus at work. My boss will not pay me for the sale of the auto from last Monday. I made an attempt to appeal, but his manner was stubborn." "Maybe it is time for you to get a better job, Susan. You said last week that you were looking for a new start. This time sounds like a good one to make a shift." "But, Barney, I like what I do, and I do it well; I am now an expert." "I support you either way, Susan, but perhaps if you permit this pattern to go on, you will be bitter. Please think on these things. It will be foolish for you to endure hardship on account of your boss."

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Page 107

The Band Rocks


The following story uses two-syllable words which divide into syllables following the pattern of v/cv or vc/cv (syllable rules 1 and 2).

The music event was held outside. It was not common for the township to sponsor such an affair. But the town of Mayport did not get the tax refund as they at first did expect. So they did invest in this event. Many students came. They came with picnic baskets with food and drink. They brought blankets and pillows and Frisbees and cartons of popcorn and pretzels. They brought games like checkers and cards to play poker. The music began, and the students did not falter or waver or stampede to the platform. They stood to see the band perform. What a show it was. The drummer did happen to be from England, and she was a stunner. The organ was too loud, but the man on the bongo drum did not seem to care. The band was driving a hard beat, but there did not seem to be a pattern to the songs. One would be a ballad, the next a tango.

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Page 108

Stephen Learns a Lesson


The following story uses two-syllable words which divide into syllables following the pattern of v/cv or vc/cv (syllable rules 1 and 2).

Stephen Lashner had three major goals in his life: to complete school, to see distant lands, and to open his own motel chain. But before he did those things, Stephen first did desire a date to the April prom. Judith Swain made him flutter, but he seldom gave an attempt to direct himself to her. She will not even care that I am alive; she is too much on the inside with the in crowd, he said. But the next week he stood next to her in line at the show. "Wow," she said. "I am new in this town. I am glad to meet you." Things went on, and then Stephen did ask her to the prom. She went with him. Stephen later sat down to think. This lesson is one I will not forget. She is a caring person, not stuck-up. Next time I will not be so fast to say a person is this way or that way. Next time I will be open and fair.

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Page 109

The Athlete Demands a New Contract


The following story uses two-syllable words which divide into syllables following the pattern of v/cv or vc/cv (syllable rules 1 and 2).

I did wonder what would happen in regard to the contract for the star athlete for the Falcons. He did return for the new season. He is the teams leader. He can hit a target from fifteen yards while running. He can outrun the entire team. His numbers get even better each year. But his request for an increase in pay was met with disdain by the owner. The owner said he would not make the payment. The athlete said, Pay me, or I go. Then the intown paper did publish a report on the affair. The paper said that the owner and the athlete should confer. The paper said the owner was selfish, and careless, and foolish, and unwise. The report in the paper said that this athlete had his reasons for his request for a payment increase and that he is better this year than last year. Pay more for the skill increase. We will win all thirteen games this year, and we need our hero to do so.

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