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International Journal of Advanced Computer Science, Vol. 2, No. 4, Pp. 131-138, Apr. 2012.

Manuscript
Received:
6, Feb., 2012
Revised:
1, Mar., 2012
Accepted:
17,Mar.,2012
Published:
15, May,2012

Keywords
Buckling
analysis,
Thin-plate
theory,
Refined plate
theory,
Shear,
Uniaxial
stresses












Abstract The buckling strength check of
rectangular plates under combined shear and
uniaxial compressive forces is generally
carried out applying the classical thin-plate
theory, so neglecting the shear deformation,
even if the plating thickness may not be
considered totally negligible, as regards the
panels mean dimensions. Besides, Euler
shear stresses are evaluated separately, so
that no influence, due to the in-plane
compressive forces, is accounted for in the
strength check procedure. In the present
paper this matter is fully discussed and new
formulas are derived by curve fitting, to
account for both the shear deformation and
the interaction between shear and
compressive forces. Two different theories are
applied: the classical thin plate one and the
two variable refined theories proposed by
Shimpi, based on two coupled bending-shear
governing equations, derived by the
Hamiltons principle. Finally, to show the
feasibility of the proposed formulas, different
verification examples of plates loaded by
combined shear and compressive forces are
presented, varying the plating thickness, as
well as the panel aspect ratio. Besides, the
theoretical results are compared with those
ones obtained by ANSYS, where different FE
eigenvalue buckling analyses have been
carried out.


1. Introduction
In the past a lot of authors, such as S. Bergmann and
Reissner [1], Stein and Neff [2], Timoshenko [3-5] and
many others applied the classical thin plate theory to the
buckling analysis of plates under shear. They generally
neglected both the presence of uniaxial stresses, if applied,
and transverse shear effects, growing up when the plating
thickness may not be considered totally negligible as
regards the panels length and breadth. Obviously in the
years several shear deformable theories were also developed
by Mindlin [6], Levinson [7], Reddy [8] and Shimpi
[9]-[10], even if they were never applied to the buckling
analysis of plates under the combined action of shear and
uniaxial compressive forces. In the following two different


Dr. Vincenzo Piscopo is a contract professor at the University of
Naples Parthenope, Department of Applied Sciences
Email: Vincenzo-piscopo@unina.it
theoretical models are applied to the buckling analysis of
platings under shear and uniaxial compression: the first one
is the well known thin-plate theory (TPT), the second one is
the refined theory proposed by Shimpi (RPT), where the
vertical displacement field is defined by two coupled
governing equations for the bending and shear components,
respectively. The main advantage of this last theory, as
regards the other shear deformable ones, is that the
governing equations are derived by the Hamiltons principle
and so they are consistent with the assumed displacement
field.
In both cases, to evaluate the Euler shear stress at which
buckling occurs, the energy method is applied, developing
the vertical displacement field into appropriate double sine
trigonometric series, already satisfying the assumed
boundary conditions. The convergence of solution, in terms
of buckling coefficients, is fully investigated too, varying
the number of harmonics in both directions. In the analysis,
the plating is assumed simply supported at all edges, as
actual scantling checks generality prescribe on the safety
side, so neglecting the supporting members torsional
stiffness. Finally, a new buckling formula, obtained by
curve fitting of a large amount of data, is derived as
function of the plating thickness ratio, as well as the ratio
between uniaxial and shear forces. The new expression is
subsequently compared with the well-known classical
project formula for the Euler shear stress:
( )
s E
k
b
t E
2
2
2
1 12
|
.
|

\
|

=
v
t
t (Equ. 1)
where E is the Young modulus, v is the Poisson modulus, t
and b are the platings thickness and breadth and k
s
is the
shear buckling coefficient, function of the panels aspect
ratio o:

s +
> +
=
1
34 5
00 4
1
00 4
34 5
2
2
o
o
o
o
if
.
.
if
.
.
k
s
(Equ. 2)
Finally, various panels loaded by combined shear and
uniaxial forces are analyzed, varying the plating thickness
ratio, too. Both the thin-plate theory and the refined ones are
applied and the theoretical results are compared with the
relevant ones obtained by ANSYS, where some FE
eigenvalue buckling analyses have been carried out.
Classical and Refined Buckling Analysis of Plates
Under Shear and Uniaxial Stresses
Vincenzo Piscopo
International Journal of Advanced Computer Science, Vol. 2, No. 4, Pp. 131-138, Apr. 2012.
International Journal Publishers Group (IJPG)


132
2. Theoretical development
Let us refer to the coordinate system of Fig.1, with
z-axis having origin on the plate middle plane and let us
assume the plate buckles slightly under the action of in
plane forces. If the classical TPT is applied the vertical
displacement field reduces to the only bending component
w
b
(x,y), while, if the RPT is applied, the vertical
displacement field may be regarded as the sum of two
components due to bending w
b
(x,y) and shear w
s
(x,y).
y
x
a
b

Fig. 1 Plate reference system

In both cases it is assumed the displacements are small, if
compared with the plating thickness, and the stresses along
the z-axis are negligible as regards the in-plane ones.
A. Thin-plate theory (TPT)
Assuming there are no body forces nor lateral loads, the
differential equation for the buckled plate may be so
expressed:
y x
w
N
y
w
N
x
w
N w D
b
xy
b
y
b
x b
c c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
= V
2
2
2
2
2
4
2 (Equ. 3)
having denoted by N
x
, N
y
and N
xy
the in-plane forces per
unit of length due to axial compression along the x, y-axes
and shear, respectively. In Equ. (3) D is the plate flexural
rigidity, so defined:
( )
2
3
1 12 v
=
Et
D (Equ. 4)
Assuming from now on the plate is loaded by shear and
uniaxial forces, these last ones may be considered
proportional to the shear components, according to the
following relation:
| | 0 1, ; N N
xy x
e = (Equ. 5)
The Euler shear stress at which buckling occurs may be
evaluated applying the energy method, assuming the plate
undergoes some small lateral bending, consistent with the
assumed boundary conditions. Naturally, if the work done
by the in-plane forces per unit of length is smaller than the
strain energy, the equilibrium is stable, otherwise is unstable
and buckling occurs. The vertical displacement may be
developed into appropriate double sine trigonometric series,
each term of which already satisfies the assumed simple
support boundary conditions at the platings edges:
( )

= =
=
M
m
N
n
) b (
n , m b
b
y n
sin
a
x m
sin w y , x w
1 1
t t
(Equ. 6)
having denoted by M and N the number of harmonics in x
and y directions, respectively and by
) b (
n , m
w the unknown
amplitude of each harmonic. The strain energy, due to plate
bending, may be obtained by the following equation:
dxdy
y
w
x
w
y
w
x
w D
U
b b b b
b a
b
(
(

c
c
c
c
+
|
|
.
|

\
|
c
c
+
|
|
.
|

\
|
c
c
=
} }
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
0 0
2
2
A
(Equ. 7.1)
finally becoming:
2
2 2 2
1 1
2
3
4
8
|
|
.
|

\
|
+ =

= =
n m w
a
b D
U
M
m
N
n
) b (
n , m b
o
t
A (Equ. 7.2)
Besides, the work done by the in-plane forces is so defined:
dxdy
y
w
x
w
x
w
N T
b b b
b a
xy
(
(

c
c
c
c
+ |
.
|

\
|
c
c
=
} }
2
0 0
2

A (Equ. 8.1)
and may be expressed as follows:
(
(

+ =

= = = = = =
M
m
N
n
M
p
M
m
N
n
) (
q , p , n , m
N
q
) (
n , m xy
T T N T
1 1 1 1 1
2
2
1
1
32
4 A
o
t
A A
(Equ. 8.2)
with:
( )( )
2 2 2 2
1
n q p m
mnpq
w w T
mnpq ) b (
q , p
) b (
n , m
) (
q , p , n , m

=
_
A (Equ. 8.3)
2
2 2 ) b (
n , m
) (
n , m
w m T = A (Equ. 8.4)
and _
mnpq
=1 if mp and nq are odd, _
mnpq
=0 otherwise.
Equating the work produced by the external forces with the
strain energy due to plate bending, the coefficients
) b (
n , m
w of
series (6) may be chosen to make this equation minimum,
so that the following eigenvalue problem, defined by a
linear system of MxN equations may be solved:
N ... n ; M ... m
w
I
w
I
) b (
n , m
) b (
n , m
1 1 0
2 2 1
= = =
c
c

c
c
o (Equ. 9)

where:
xy
N b
D
2
4
32o
t
= (Equ. 10.1)
Vincenzo Piscopo: Classical and refined buckling analysis of plates under shear and uniaxial stresses
International Journal Publishers Group (IJPG)


133
2
2 2 2 1
2
|
|
.
|

\
|
+ =
c
c
n m w
w
I
) b (
n , m ) b (
n , m
o (Equ. 10.2)

= =
+ =
c
c
M
p
N
q
) b (
n , m
) (
q , p , n , m
) b (
n , m
) (
n , m
) b (
n , m
w
T
w
T
w
I
1 1
1 2 2
2
2
16
A A
o
t
(Equ. 10.3)
The problem of finding the minimum eigenvalue that makes
the determinant of (9) null has been solved by a dedicated
program developed in MATLAB MathWorks. The
convergence of solution has been fully investigated, too, as
it will be discussed in the following paragraph.
B. Refined plate theory (RPT)
In the refined plate theory proposed by Shimpi the
vertical displacement field is the sum of two components
due to bending w
b
(x,y) and shear w
s
(x,y), respectively:
) y , x ( w ) y , x ( w ) y , x ( w
s b
+ = (Equ. 11)
In absence of body forces and lateral loads, the
displacement field is governed by two coupled equations,
derived by the Hamiltons principle:

c c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
+ V = V
c c
c
+
c
c
+
c
c
= V
y x
w
N
y
w
N
x
w
N w Gt w
D
y x
w
N
y
w
N
x
w
N w D
xy y x s s
xy y x b
2
2
2
2
2
2 4
2
2
2
2
2
4
2
6
5
84
2

(Equ. 12)
Also in this case the two components of the vertical
displacement field may be developed into appropriate
double sine trigonometric series as follows:
( )
( )

=
=

= =
= =
M
m
N
n
) s (
n , m s
M
m
N
n
) b (
n , m b
b
y n
sin
a
x m
sin w y , x w
b
y n
sin
a
x m
sin w y , x w
1 1
1 1
t t
t t
(Equ. 13)
so that, substituting Equ. (13) into Equ. (12) it follows that,
for each harmonic, the amplitude of the shear displacement
field is related to the relevant bending one by the following
relation:
) b (
n , m n , m
) s (
n , m
w k w = (Equ. 14.1)
with:
( )
|
|
.
|

\
|
+ |
.
|

\
|

=
2 2 2
2
2
2
1 5
n m
b
t
k
n , m
o
o v
t
(Equ. 14.2)
It derives the total vertical displacement may be finally
rewritten as follows:
( )

= =
|
|
.
|

\
|
+ =
M
m
N
n
n , m
) b (
n , m
b
y n
sin
a
x m
sin k w y , x w
1 1
1
t t
(Equ. 15)
As well as in the previous case, the energy method may be
applied: the strain energy is the sum of two components due
to bending and shear, respectively. The bending one may be
expressed as in Equ. (7.1), while the shear component is:
( )
dxdy
y
w
x
w Et
U
s s
b a
s
(
(

|
|
.
|

\
|
c
c
+ |
.
|

\
|
c
c
+
=
} }
2 2
0 0
1 24
5
v
A (Equ. 16)
so that the total strain energy may be finally so rewritten:
2
2 2 2
1 1
2
3
4
1
8
|
|
.
|

\
|
+
|
|
.
|

\
|
+ =

= =
n m k w
a
b D
U
n , m
M
m
N
n
) b (
n , m
o
t
A (Equ. 17)
It derives that from Equ. (17) it is possible to obtain
Equ.(7.2) again imposing k
m,n
=0, i.e. t/b=0 as in the classical
thin-plate theory. Besides, the work done by the external
forces takes into account both the displacement components
due to bending and shear:
dxdy
y
w
x
w
x
w
N T
b a
xy
(
(

c
c
c
c
+ |
.
|

\
|
c
c
=
} }
2
0 0
2

A (Equ. 18)
and may be finally expressed as in Equ. (8.2) with:
( )( )
2 2 2 2
1
1 1
n q p m
mnpq
k k w w T
mnpq
q , p n , m
) b (
q , p
) b (
n , m
) (
q , p , n , m

|
|
.
|

\
|
+
|
|
.
|

\
|
+ =
_
A
(Equ. 19.1)
2
2
2 2
1
|
|
.
|

\
|
+ =
n , m
) b (
n , m
) (
n , m
k w m T A (Equ. 19.2)
The eigenvalue problem, defined by Equ. (9), may be
obtained again, with the following substitutions:
2
2 2 2 1
1 2
|
|
.
|

\
|
+
|
|
.
|

\
|
+ =
c
c
n m k w
w
I
n , m
) b (
n , m
) b (
n , m
o (Equ. 20.1)

= =
+ =
c
c
M
p
N
q
) b (
n , m
) (
q , p , n , m
) b (
n , m
) (
n , m
) b (
n , m
w
T
w
T
w
I
1 1
1 2 2
2
2
16
A A
o
t

(Equ. 20.2)
As well as in the previous case, a dedicated program has
been developed in MATLAB MathWorks and the
convergence of solution has been fully investigated.
3. Numerical analysis
As said, the main aim of the study is to derive a new
buckling formula for plates under combined shear and
uniaxial forces, which could also account for the shear
effects, growing up with the plating thickness. The
convergence of solution is studied and, subsequently, the
new formula is derived by curve fitting of a large data
amount.

A. Convergence of solution
The convergence of solution, in terms of buckling
coefficients, has been studied varying the number of
harmonics in both x and y directions: it has been found that
M=N=35 harmonics are sufficient to obtain very accurate
results. In Tables 1 and 2 the convergence of solution is
studied for plates under pure shear with t/b=0.00 and
t/b=0.05, respectively.
International Journal of Advanced Computer Science, Vol. 2, No. 4, Pp. 131-138, Apr. 2012.
International Journal Publishers Group (IJPG)


134
TABLE 1
CONVERGENCE OF SOLUTION FOR PLATES UNDER PURE SHEAR -T/B=0.00
o M=N=5 M=N=10 M=N=20 M=N=30 M=N=35
0.1 764.500 540.019 538.830 538.788 538.783
0.2 142.797 138.339 138.260 138.254 138.254
0.4 37.935 37.717 37.706 37.706 37.706
0.6 18.985 18.952 18.949 18.949 18.949
0.8 12.159 12.137 12.135 12.135 12.135
1.0 9.343 9.326 9.325 9.325 9.325
1.2 7.999 7.985 7.984 7.984 7.984
1.4 7.301 7.289 7.288 7.287 7.287
1.6 6.921 6.909 6.907 6.907 6.907
1.8 6.701 6.689 6.688 6.688 6.688
2.0 6.561 6.547 6.546 6.546 6.546
2.5 6.070 6.035 6.033 6.033 6.033
3.0 5.863 5.842 5.840 5.840 5.840
3.5 5.765 5.738 5.734 5.734 5.734
4.0 5.665 5.628 5.625 5.625 5.625
5.0 5.712 5.534 5.530 5.530 5.530
6.0 5.954 5.485 5.479 5.479 5.479
7.0 6.306 5.443 5.440 5.440 5.440
8.0 6.703 5.421 5.415 5.415 5.415
13.364 6.759 5.351 5.350 5.350
TABLE 2
CONVERGENCE OF SOLUTION FOR PLATES UNDER PURE SHEAR - T/B=0.05
o M=N=5 M=N=10 M=N=20 M=N=30 M=N=35
0.1 265.539 157.643 138.411 138.252 138.250
0.2 90.197 83.090 82.979 82.967 82.965
0.4 32.092 31.887 31.867 31.864 31.864
0.6 17.437 17.391 17.385 17.384 17.384
0.8 11.472 11.444 11.440 11.440 11.440
1.0 8.926 8.905 8.902 8.902 8.902
1.2 7.694 7.677 7.675 7.675 7.675
1.4 7.052 7.037 7.035 7.035 7.035
1.6 6.702 6.688 6.686 6.686 6.686
1.8 6.501 6.487 6.485 6.485 6.485
2.0 6.371 6.355 6.354 6.354 6.354
2.5 5.898 5.863 5.861 5.861 5.861
3.0 5.707 5.686 5.685 5.685 5.685
3.5 5.612 5.583 5.580 5.579 5.579
4.0 5.521 5.482 5.479 5.479 5.479
5.0 5.579 5.392 5.389 5.389 5.389
6.0 5.823 5.346 5.341 5.340 5.340
7.0 6.171 5.308 5.306 5.306 5.306
8.0 6.564 5.287 5.281 5.281 5.281
13.111 6.621 5.221 5.219 5.219
B. Data fitting
After having analyzed a large amount of data to obtain
the best fit curve, as function of the panel aspect ratio o and
the ratio between the shear and uniaxial forces (this last
one only for o1), the following expression has been finally
derived for the shear buckling coefficient:

s |
.
|

\
|
+ |
.
|

\
|
>
|
|
.
|

\
|
|
.
|

\
|
+
|
|
.
|

\
|
|
.
|

\
|
=
1
34 5
00 4
1
00 4
34 5
1 2 1
2 1 2 2 1
o
o
o
o

if
b
t
g
.
b
t
f .
if f
b
t
f
.
g
b
t
g .
k
s
(Equ. 21)
with:
2
1
2
1
667 9 1 870 26 1
|
|
.
|

\
|
=
|
|
.
|

\
|
|
|
.
|

\
|
=
|
|
.
|

\
|
b
t
.
b
t
g ;
b
t
.
b
t
f
(Equ. 22.1)


6317 0
2
6380 1
2
. .
e g ; e f = |
.
|

\
|
= |
.
|

\
|
(Equ. 22.2)
In Figures from 2 to 6 the buckling coefficient
distribution versus o is plotted for different values of the
ratio t/b, namely 0.00, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05 and for five
different values of , namely 0.00 (pure shear), -0.25, -0.50,
-0.75 and -1.00 (shear plus uniaxial compressive forces).
4. Verification examples
Several panels, made of high-strength steel with
E=2.06e11Pa and v=0.30, under pure shear and shear plus
uniaxial compressive forces are analyzed, varying both the
plating aspect ratio o and the ratio t/b, to examine also the
influence of shear effects, growing up with the plating
thickness. In the following tables the theoretical values of
the buckling coefficient, evaluated applying the new
proposed formula, are compared with the relevant results
obtained by some FE eigenvalue buckling analyses, carried
out by ANSYS. In the FE analysis the 4-node shell element
SHELL 181, suitable for thin to moderately thick structures,
has been adopted, with a mean shell element size of 0.010
m, sufficient to obtain very accurate results. The analyzed
panels have the following dimensions:
- Case 1: a=1.00 m; b=1.00 m; t=10, 20, 30 mm;
- Case 2: a=3.00 m; b=1.00 m; t=10, 20, 30 mm;
- Case 3: a=8.00 m; b=1.00 m; t=10, 20, 30 mm.
-
Tables 3.A, 4.A and 5.A show the buckling coefficients for
plates under pure shear (=0.00), while tables 3.B/C, 4.B/C,
5.B/C the same values for plates under shear plus uniaxial
compressive forces with =-0.50 and =-1.00, respectively.
The numerical results are compared with those ones
obtained applying both the thin-plate theory and the refined
one. From the analysis it follows that, in almost all cases,
the classical TPT slightly overestimates the buckling
coefficients, as regards the relevant ones obtained by FE
analysis.

Vincenzo Piscopo: Classical and refined buckling analysis of plates under shear and uniaxial stresses
International Journal Publishers Group (IJPG)


135

5.0
5.2
5.4
5.6
5.8
6.0
6.2
6.4
6.6
6.8
7.0
7.2
7.4
7.6
7.8
8.0
1.0 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.0 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.3 3.5 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.5 4.8 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.8 6.0 6.3 6.5 6.8 7.0 7.3 7.5 7.8 8.0
o
k
s
t/b=0.00
t/b=0.03
t/b=0.04
t/b=0.05

Fig. 2 Shear buckling coefficient distribution versus a for different values of t/b and =0.00

4.4
4.6
4.8
5.0
5.2
5.4
5.6
5.8
6.0
6.2
6.4
6.6
6.8
7.0
1.0 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.0 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.3 3.5 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.5 4.8 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.8 6.0 6.3 6.5 6.8 7.0 7.3 7.5 7.8 8.0
o
k
s
t/b=0.00
t/b=0.03
t/b=0.04
t/b=0.05

Fig. 3 Shear buckling coefficient distribution versus a for different values of t/b and =-0.25
International Journal of Advanced Computer Science, Vol. 2, No. 4, Pp. 131-138, Apr. 2012.
International Journal Publishers Group (IJPG)


136

3.4
3.6
3.8
4.0
4.2
4.4
4.6
4.8
5.0
5.2
5.4
5.6
5.8
6.0
1.0 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.0 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.3 3.5 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.5 4.8 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.8 6.0 6.3 6.5 6.8 7.0 7.3 7.5 7.8 8.0
o
k
s
t/b=0.00
t/b=0.03
t/b=0.04
t/b=0.05

Fig. 4 Shear buckling coefficient distribution versus a for different values of t/b and =-0.50

2.8
3.0
3.2
3.4
3.6
3.8
4.0
4.2
4.4
4.6
4.8
5.0
1.0 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.0 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.3 3.5 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.5 4.8 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.8 6.0 6.3 6.5 6.8 7.0 7.3 7.5 7.8 8.0
o
k
s
t/b=0.00
t/b=0.03
t/b=0.04
t/b=0.05

Fig. 5 Shear buckling coefficient distribution versus a for different values of t/b and =-0.75


Vincenzo Piscopo: Classical and refined buckling analysis of plates under shear and uniaxial stresses
International Journal Publishers Group (IJPG)


137

TABLE 3.A
CASE 1 o=1.00 =0.00
t/b
ANSYS TPT RPT
100

A
A B
100

A
A C

(A) (B) (C)
0.01 9.276 9.340 9.324 0.690 0.518
0.02 9.157 9.340 9.276 1.998 1.303
0.03 9.010 9.340 9.197 3.663 2.073
TABLE 3.B
CASE 1 o=1.00 =-0.50
t/b
ANSYS TPT RPT
100

A
A B
100

A
A C

(A) (B) (C)
0.01 5.516 5.657 5.649 2.561 2.407
0.02 5.517 5.657 5.623 2.542 1.926
0.03 5.518 5.657 5.581 2.524 1.137
TABLE 3.C
CASE 1 o=1.00 =-1.00
t/b
ANSYS TPT RPT
100

A
A B
100

A
A C

(A) (B) (C)
0.01 3.448 3.617 3.612 4.892 4.752
0.02 3.407 3.617 3.597 6.154 5.587
0.03 3.372 3.617 3.573 7.256 5.966




TABLE 4.A
CASE 2 o=3.00 =0.00
t/b
ANSYS TPT RPT
100

A
A B
100

A
A C

(A) (B) (C)
0.01 5.817 5.784 5.778 -0.560 -0.669
0.02 5.780 5.784 5.759 0.077 -0.363
0.03 5.739 5.784 5.727 0.792 -0.205
TABLE 4.B
CASE 2 o=3.00 =-0.50
t/b
ANSYS TPT RPT
100

A
A B
100

A
A C

(A) (B) (C)
0.01 4.109 4.090 4.085 -0.470 -0.574
0.02 4.069 4.090 4.073 0.509 0.087
0.03 4.027 4.090 4.051 1.557 0.598
TABLE 4.C
CASE 2 o=3.00 =-1.00
t/b
ANSYS TPT RPT
100

A
A B
100

A
A C

(A) (B) (C)
0.01 2.895 2.926 2.923 1.057 0.954
0.02 2.774 2.926 2.914 5.465 5.036
0.03 2.912 2.926 2.899 0.467 -0.453


2.4
2.6
2.8
3.0
3.2
3.4
3.6
3.8
4.0
1.0 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.0 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.3 3.5 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.5 4.8 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.8 6.0 6.3 6.5 6.8 7.0 7.3 7.5 7.8 8.0
o
k
s
t/b=0.00
t/b=0.03
t/b=0.04
t/b=0.05

Fig. 6 Shear buckling coefficient distribution versus a for different values of t/b and =-1.00

International Journal of Advanced Computer Science, Vol. 2, No. 4, Pp. 131-138, Apr. 2012.
International Journal Publishers Group (IJPG)


138
TABLE 5.A
CASE 3 o=8.00 =0.00
t/b
ANSYS TPT RPT
100

A
A B
100

A
A C

(A) (B) (C)
0.01 5.398 5.403 5.397 0.083 -0.015
0.02 5.344 5.403 5.381 1.095 0.696
0.03 5.297 5.403 5.355 1.992 1.086
TABLE 5.B
CASE 3 o=8.00 =-0.50
t/b
ANSYS TPT RPT
100

A
A B
100

A
A C

(A) (B) (C)
0.01 3.867 3.921 3.917 1.405 1.305
0.02 3.831 3.921 3.906 2.358 1.957
0.03 3.792 3.921 3.887 3.410 2.499
TABLE 5.C
CASE 3 o=8.00 =-1.00
t/b
ANSYS TPT RPT
100

A
A B
100

A
A C

(A) (B) (C)
0.01 2.863 2.851 2.849 -0.407 -0.504
0.02 2.842 2.851 2.840 0.329 -0.062
0.03 2.813 2.851 2.826 1.364 0.475

Also the RPT slightly overestimates the above mentioned
results, even if, in this case, the percentage errors are
meanly one-half of those ones obtained applying the
classical thin-plate theory. Furthermore, as it could be
predictable, these percentage errors increase with the ratio
t/b, as the shear effects become not more negligible.
5. Conclusions
In this paper the classical thin-plate theory and the
refined one proposed by Shimpi have been applied to the
buckling analysis of rectangular plates, under the combined
action of shear and uniaxial compressive forces. The energy
method has been applied to obtain, by curve fitting of a
large amount of data, a new formula for the buckling
strength check of rectangular panels, with all edges simply
supported, that could also take into account the shear
effects, growing up with the plating thickness. Different
numerical applications have been carried out to validate the
new proposed formula. Particularly, several panels have
been analyzed and the theoretical results have been
compared with those ones obtained by ANSYS, where
different eigenvalue FE buckling analyses have been carried
out. From the numerical examples it appears clear the new
formula always furnishes results closer to the FE ones,
respect to the classical one. Furthermore the influence of the
plating thickness becomes noticeable for high values of the
ratio t/b and so it seems that the shear effects may not be
neglected in a refined buckling strength check analysis.
References
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bending of elastic plates," (1945) Journal of Applied
Mechanics, vol. 12, pp. 69-77.
[2] M. Stein, J. Neff, 1947, NACA Tech. Note.
[3] S.P. Timoshenko, & J.M. Gere, Theory of elastic stability,
1963, 17
th
edition Mc-Graw-Hill International Book Company.
[4] S.P. Timoshenko, & S. Woinowsky-Krieger, Theory of Plates
and Shells, 1959, Mc-Graw-Hill International Book Company.
[5] S.P. Timoshenko, & J.N. Goodier, Theory of Elasticity,
Mc-Graw-Hill International Book Company, 1951.
[6] R.R. Mindlin, "Influence of rotary inertia and shear on flexural
motions of isotropic, elastic plates," (1951) Journal of Applied
Mechanics, vol. 18, pp. 31-38.
[7] M. Levinson, "An accurate simple theory of the statics and
dynamics of elastic plates," (1980) Mechanics Research
Communications, vol. 7, pp. 343-350.
[8] J. N. Reddy, "A refined non linear theory of plates with
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Solid and Structures, vol. 20, pp.881-896.
[9] R.P. Shimpi, & H.G. Patel, "Free vibrations of plates using two
variable refined plate theory," (2006) Journal of Sound and
Vibration, vol. 296, pp. 979-999.
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V. Piscopo is a Ph.D. at the University of Naples Federico
II, Department of Naval Architecture and Marine
Engineering. Actually he is a Contract Professor at the
University of Naples Parthenope, Department of Applied
Sciences.