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Health, Safety and Environmental Management

Page 1 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.0

DIVING SAFETY

1. ADNOC GROUP POLICY AND STRATEGY ......................................................................................................... 6 1.1 POLICY REQUIREMENTS.................................................................................................................................... 6 1.2 SCOPE ..................................................................................................................................................................... 6 1.3 LEGISLATION AND INDUSTRY STANDARDS ................................................................................................ 7 1.3.1 Local Legislation ............................................................................................................................................. 7 1.3.2 International Standards ................................................................................................................................... 7 1.4 DIVING CONTRACTOR MANUALS AND PROCEDURES............................................................................... 7 1.5 CLIENTS (OPCOS) UNDERWATER SMS............................................................................................................ 7 2. GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND DEFINITIONS ....................................................................................................... 8 3. DUTIES, RESPONSIBILITIES AND RELATIONSHIPS .................................................................................... 11 3.1 DIVING CONTRACTOR ..................................................................................................................................... 11 3.2 OTHERS................................................................................................................................................................ 12 3.3 DIVING SUPERVISOR ........................................................................................................................................ 14 4. EQUIPMENT ............................................................................................................................................................. 16 4.1 EQUIPMENT LOCATION AND INTEGRITY.................................................................................................... 16 4.2 GASES................................................................................................................................................................... 16 4.2.1 Storage Cylinders........................................................................................................................................... 17 4.2.2 Marking and Colour Coding of Gas Storage................................................................................................. 17 4.2.3 Diver’s Breathing Gas Supply ....................................................................................................................... 17 4.2.4 Emergency Air Cylinders ............................................................................................................................... 18 4.2.5 Oxygen ........................................................................................................................................................... 18 4.3 DIVER COMMUNICATIONS.............................................................................................................................. 18 4.4 DIVING BELLS .................................................................................................................................................... 19 4.4.1 Breathing Mixture Supply .............................................................................................................................. 19 4.4.2 Emergency Recovery...................................................................................................................................... 19 4.4.3 Equipment Level............................................................................................................................................. 19 4.5 EMERGENCY MARKINGS ON HYPERBARIC RESCUE SYSTEMS ............................................................. 20 4.6 ELECTRICITY...................................................................................................................................................... 20 4.7 SUITABILITY....................................................................................................................................................... 20 4.8 CERTIFICATION ................................................................................................................................................. 21 4.9 MAN-RIDING HANDLING SYSTEMS .............................................................................................................. 21 4.9.1 Winches .......................................................................................................................................................... 21 4.9.2 Diving Baskets and Open-Bottom Bells ......................................................................................................... 21 4.9.3 Lift Wires........................................................................................................................................................ 21

Health, Safety and Environmental Management

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DIVING SAFETY

4.9.4 Surface Diver Deployment and Recovery ...................................................................................................... 22 4.10 MEDICAL / EQUIPMENT LOCKS AND DIVING BELL TRUNKS ................................................................ 22 4.11 THERAPEUTIC RECOMPRESSION ................................................................................................................ 22 4.11.1 Recompression chambers............................................................................................................................. 22 4.12 MAINTENANCE OF DIVING EQUIPMENT.................................................................................................... 23 4.12.1 Periodic Examination, Testing and Certification ........................................................................................ 23 4.12.2 Planned Maintenance System ...................................................................................................................... 23 4.12.3 Equipment Register ...................................................................................................................................... 23 4.12.4 Cylinders Used Under Water....................................................................................................................... 23 4.12.5 Diving Bell and Basket Lift Wires................................................................................................................ 24 4.12.6 Lift Bags ....................................................................................................................................................... 24 4.13 LIFTING EQUIPMENT DESIGN, PERIODIC TEST AND EXAMINATION REQUIREMENTS ................. 24 5. PERSONNEL.............................................................................................................................................................. 25 5.1 TRAINING AND COMPETENCE ....................................................................................................................... 25 5.1.1 Tenders........................................................................................................................................................... 25 5.1.2 Divers............................................................................................................................................................. 26 5.1.3 Deck Crew / Riggers ...................................................................................................................................... 30 5.1.4 Life Support Personnel .................................................................................................................................. 31 5.1.5 Supervisors..................................................................................................................................................... 31 5.2 NUMBERS OF PERSONNEL / TEAM SIZE ....................................................................................................... 33 5.3 WORKING PERIODS........................................................................................................................................... 36 5.4 TRAINING ............................................................................................................................................................ 37 5.4.1 Safety Training............................................................................................................................................... 37 5.5 COMMUNICATIONS .......................................................................................................................................... 37 6. MEDICAL................................................................................................................................................................... 38 6.1 MEDICAL EQUIPMENT ..................................................................................................................................... 38 6.2 SUITABLE DOCTORS......................................................................................................................................... 38 6.3 FIRST-AID TRAINING AND COMPETENCIES................................................................................................ 38 6.4 MEDICAL CHECKS............................................................................................................................................. 39 6.4.1 Responsibility of the Diver............................................................................................................................. 39 6.4.2 Responsibility of the Supervisor..................................................................................................................... 40 6.5 LIAISON WITH A SUITABLE DOCTOR ........................................................................................................... 40 6.6 MEDICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS................................................................................ 41 6.6.1 Diver Monitoring ........................................................................................................................................... 41 6.6.2 Seismic Operations and Sonar Transmissions............................................................................................... 41

Health, Safety and Environmental Management

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DIVING SAFETY

6.6.3 Decompression Illness after Diving ............................................................................................................... 41 6.6.4 Flying after Diving......................................................................................................................................... 41 6.6.5 Thermal Stress ............................................................................................................................................... 41 6.6.6 Duration of Saturation Exposure................................................................................................................... 42 6.6.7 Divers out of Closed Bells.............................................................................................................................. 42 6.7 REPORTING OF THERAPEUTIC RE-COMPRESSION EVENTS .................................................................... 42 7. WORK PLANNING................................................................................................................................................... 42 7.1 GENERAL............................................................................................................................................................. 42 7.1.1 SCUBA ........................................................................................................................................................... 43 7.1.2 Use of compressed air or oxy-nitrogen mixtures ........................................................................................... 43 7.1.3 Exposure limits for air and oxy-nitrogen diving ............................................................................................ 43 7.1.4 Surface supplied mixed gas diving................................................................................................................. 45 7.1.5 Water intakes and discharges ........................................................................................................................ 45 7.1.6 Restricted surface visibility ............................................................................................................................ 45 7.1.7 Underwater Currents ..................................................................................................................................... 45 7.1.8 Diving near ROV Operations......................................................................................................................... 45 7.1.9 Safe use of electricity ..................................................................................................................................... 46 7.1.10 High-pressure water jetting ......................................................................................................................... 46 7.1.11 Lift bags ....................................................................................................................................................... 46 7.1.12 Abrasive cutting discs .................................................................................................................................. 46 7.1.13 Oxy-arc cutting and burning operations...................................................................................................... 47 7.1.14 Diving from DP vessels................................................................................................................................ 47 7.1.15 Quantity of Gas ............................................................................................................................................ 47 7.1.16 Levels of Oxygen in Helium ......................................................................................................................... 48 7.1.17 Contents of Gas Mixes ................................................................................................................................. 48 7.1.18 Length of Diver’s Umbilicals....................................................................................................................... 48 7.1.19 Duration of Bell Runs and Lockouts ............................................................................................................ 48 7.1.20 Transfer Under Pressure ............................................................................................................................. 49 7.1.21 Underwater Obstructions............................................................................................................................. 49 7.1.22 Diving from vessel underway....................................................................................................................... 49 7.1.23 Live Boating ................................................................................................................................................. 49 7.1.24 Diving at night from small craft................................................................................................................... 49 7.2 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS.......................................................................................................... 49 7.2.1 Water Depth and Characteristics .................................................................................................................. 50 7.2.2 Currents ......................................................................................................................................................... 50 7.2.3 Sea State......................................................................................................................................................... 51

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7.2.4 Weather .......................................................................................................................................................... 51 7.2.5 Other Considerations..................................................................................................................................... 52 7.3 COMMUNICATIONS .......................................................................................................................................... 52 7.3.1 Onboard Communications. ............................................................................................................................ 52 7.3.2 Communications between a vessel/barge and offshore installations............................................................. 53 7.4 SUPPORT LOCATIONS....................................................................................................................................... 53 7.4.1 Small Work boat, Supply Boat or Standby Vessel.......................................................................................... 53 7.4.2 Small Air Range Diving Support Vessels and Larger Supply Boats .............................................................. 54 7.4.3 Monohull Diving Support Vessels (DSVS)..................................................................................................... 55 7.4.4 Fixed Platforms.............................................................................................................................................. 55 7.4.5 Temporarily Fixed Platforms......................................................................................................................... 56 7.4.6 Specialist Locations ....................................................................................................................................... 56 7.4.7 Dynamic Positioning...................................................................................................................................... 56 7.5 LAUNCH AND RECOVERY ............................................................................................................................... 57 8. EMERGENCY AND CONTINGENCY PLANS..................................................................................................... 58 8.1 DIVING EMERGENCIES..................................................................................................................................... 58 8.2 LOST BELL CONTINGENCY PLAN .................................................................................................................. 58 8.3 HYPERBARIC EVACUATION ........................................................................................................................... 58 9. DOCUMENTATION ................................................................................................................................................. 59 9.1 EQUIPMENT CERTIFICATION AND MAINTENANCE .................................................................................. 59 9.1.1 Pre-and Post-dive Checks.............................................................................................................................. 59 9.2 PLANNED/PERIODIC MAINTENANCE ........................................................................................................... 60 9.2.1 Spare Parts .................................................................................................................................................... 60 9.3 EQUIPMENT REGISTER..................................................................................................................................... 60 9.4 OPERATING PROCEDURES .............................................................................................................................. 60 9.5 MANUALS AND DOCUMENTATION............................................................................................................... 61 9.5.1 Reference Documentation .............................................................................................................................. 62 9.6 DIVING OPERATIONS LOG............................................................................................................................... 62 9.7 DIVERS PERSONAL LOG BOOKS .................................................................................................................... 63 9.8 USE OF CHECKLISTS ......................................................................................................................................... 64 10. SCIENTIFIC, ARCHAEOLOGICAL, ENVIRONMENTAL & MEDIA DIVING CARRIED OUT ON BEHALF OF ADNOC GROUP COMPANIES........................................................................................................... 64 10.1 GENERAL........................................................................................................................................................... 65 10.2 SCUBA RESTRICTIONS ................................................................................................................................... 65 10.3 COMMUNICATIONS ........................................................................................................................................ 66

.................. Safety and Environmental Management Page 5 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1............................................................................ 71 ..........................................................4 OPERATIONAL STANDARDS......................................5 PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS.......... BIBLIOGRAPHY / REFERENCES. 66 11..................................... 66 10................... 67 APPENDIX A CHECKLIST FOR THE INITIAL SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF DIVING CONTRACTORS ........0 DIVING SAFETY 10........................................Health...............................................................

Safety and Environmental Protection implemented by the Group Companies and Contractors working in its sphere of operations in order to ensure that all reasonable protection is provided to preserve personnel. pipelines. Some aspects covered in this guideline are unlikely to be encountered in Abu Dhabi because of the shallow water depths. inlets.0 DIVING SAFETY 1. they have been included to cover all possible present and future potential eventualities. ponds. equipment and the environment in accordance with ADNOC Policies. Vessels owners and marine crews involved with diving operations. jetties. Statutory Legislation and the rules and regulations enforced by each Operating Company. ADNOC Group Companies will ensure that the contractor provides evidence of an annual audit by a recognized independent third party auditor duly approved by ADNOC. Safety and Environmental Protection Management Systems and that of their Diving Contracting Companies’ management systems. ADNOC Group Companies will ensure that all contractors have established membership of IMCA. however. harbours. among others: • • • • Personnel directly or indirectly involved in diving operations.2 SCOPE The Guidelines will apply in respect of all Oil and Gas industry related diving operations conducted in connection with and in support of ADNOC Directorates. The guidelines are established to ensure that a standard and uniform approach is adopted by Group Companies in the evaluation of their own Health. docks.1 POLICY REQUIREMENTS ADNOC Group Companies with diving operations shall have IMCA membership. culverts. all water depths relevant to Abu Dhabi.Health. Safety and Environmental Management Page 6 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. The documents is intended to assist the following. Staff involved in the preparation of bid documents and contracts. 1. Group Companies and Affiliated Companies. ADNOC GROUP POLICY AND STRATEGY ADNOC places a continuing emphasis on the Management of Health. plant. 1. including Petroleum Ports. from inshore to within the limits of the territorial waters of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. .. lakes. Clients and Contractor Representatives. tanks etc.

5 CLIENTS (OPCOs) UNDERWATER SMS All Clients must include in their HSEMS information or a manual specific to their own management structure. 1. Guidelines and Protocols.3 LEGISLATION AND INDUSTRY STANDARDS 1. The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS). Safety and Environmental Management Page 7 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. 1. 1.1 Local Legislation ◊ ◊ Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs ‘Federal Law No. 8 of the year 1980’. Codes.0 DIVING SAFETY • • Installation and rig managers using divers. including the ISM code -‘The International Management Code for the Safe Operation of Ships And for Pollution Prevention’. Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs ‘Ministerial Order No. 1.2 International Standards All relevant International Maritime Organization Resolutions. International Organization for Standardization ISO 9000 and 14000 series. (32) for the year 1982’.3.3. The SMS must identify the position (or make arrangement for consultancy services) of Competent Person for diving operations and such persons should . All personnel involved in Safety and Quality Assurance. International Marine Contractors Association (IMCA) International Code of Practice for Offshore Diving. relating to the safe management of underwater operations.4 DIVING CONTRACTOR MANUALS AND PROCEDURES All companies carrying out diving operations should prepare standard diving manuals and procedures covering their operations and any foreseeable emergencies.Health. If the specific task they are undertaking is not standard then they should prepare procedures specific for that work. This must at least reflect the standards of IMCAs International Code of Practice for offshore diving and this guideline.

A dive takes place when a person enters the water. COMPRESSION CHAMBER (DDC) DIVE . A pressure vessel for human occupancy which does not go under water. These terms are defined below. ABLJ ADC AODC BSAC CMAS COMPANY MEDICAL ADVISER COMPETENT Adjustable Buoyancy Life Jacket American Diving Contractors Association of Offshore Diving Contractors (Now IMCA) British Sub Aqua Club Confederation Mondiale de activities Subaquatique (World Underwater Federation) A nominated diving medical specialist appointed by a diving contractor to provide specialist advice. Safety and Environmental Management Page 8 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. a chamber. GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND DEFINITIONS A number of specialized terms are used in this document.0 DIVING SAFETY preferably be qualified to a minimum of diving supervisor level as laid down in this document and have wide experience preferably with previous working experience in diving consultancy for a major oil company. It is assumed that readers are familiar with most of them. however a number of them. decompression chamber or deck chamber. This guideline is not meant to be a substitute for company manuals and procedures. could be misunderstood. although they have been in use for many years. Having adequate and sufficient training or experience (or a combination of both) to be capable of carrying out a task safely and efficiently. 2. Also called recompression chamber.Health. or any other environment in which he is subject to pressure greater than 100 millibars above atmospheric pressure and who in order to survive in such an environment breathes in air or other gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure.

Diving Safety Memorandum A ship or other vessel (with sufficient space) whose primary role is the support of diving operations. A system whereby external reference systems are used to maintain a vessel in a predetermined position. The time at which a diving bell under pressure is reconnected to the compression chamber (s) on LOCK OFF TIME LOCK ON TIME . Normally relies on computer control and built in redundancy levels. The time at which a diving bell under pressure is disconnected from the compression chamber(s) on deck. A pressure vessel for human occupancy which is used to transport divers under pressure either to or from the underwater work site. Often used by divers for lifting purposes.C.M. including where appropriate mixed gas and saturation diving accidents.Health. System Safety. Dynamic Position Vessel Owners Association (Part of IMCA) Health.A. Safety and Environmental Management Page 9 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.0 DIVING SAFETY DIVER DIVING BELL A person at work who dives (as defined above). Such a doctor will have undergone specialized training and have demonstrated experience in this field. DIVING MEDICAL SPECIALIST DSM DSV DYNAMIC POSITIONING (DP) DPVOA HSEMS IMCA LIFT BAG International Marine Contractors Association A bag which is filled with air or gas to provide up-lift to an underwater object. Diving Medical Advisory Committee (part of IMCA) A doctor who is competent to manage the treatment of diving accidents. Environmental Management D.

Remotely operated vehicle/Remotely Control Vehicle Diving carried out for the pursuance of scientific or archaeological activities. which are identified as involving significant risk. A doctor who is trained and competent to perform the annual assessment of fitness to dive for divers. The process by which every perceived risk is evaluated and assessed before an operation commences. Diving carried out by a person(s) for recreational purposes while not at work.0 DIVING SAFETY deck. The findings will be documented.Health. Training Services Agency (UK) MSC NAUI NDT NPD PADI PERMIT TO WORK SYSTEM RECREATIONAL RISK ASSESSMENT ROV/RCV SCIENTIFIC AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL SMS STANDBY DIVER TSA . Safety Management System A diver other than the working diver(s) who is dressed and with equipment immediately available to provide assistance to the working diver(s) in an emergency. They may not possess knowledge of the treatment of diving accidents. A permit to work system is a formal written system used to control certain types of work. Safety and Environmental Management Page 10 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. MEDIA MEDICAL EXAMINER OF DIVERS Diving in support of underwater media work. Manpower Services Commission (UK) National Association of Underwater Instructors Non-destructive Testing Norwegian Petroleum Department Professional Association of Diving Instructors.

This will normally be the company who employs the divers. which terminate at the wet bell. RESPONSIBILITIES AND RELATIONSHIPS 3. DUTIES. The company in control is called the Diving Contractor. again recorded in writing. A main supply umbilical will come from the surface to the wet bell with the divers having their own separate umbilical.0 DIVING SAFETY UK-HSE UNESCO USCG USN WET BELL United Kingdom Health and Safety Executive. If there is more than one company employing divers then there will need to be a written agreement as to which of these companies is in overall control.Health. Scientific and 3. The diving contractor will need to provide a defined management structure in writing. This should include arrangements for a clear hand over of supervisory responsibilities at appropriate stages in the operation. A supply of spare gas will be carried on the wet bell.1 DIVING CONTRACTOR On any diving project there needs to be one company in overall control of the diving operations. . The name of the diving contractor should be clearly displayed and all personnel. clients and others involved in the diving operation should be aware who the diving contractor is. Safety and Environmental Management Page 11 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. There are sufficient personnel of the required grades in the diving team. The place from which operations are to be carried out is suitable and safe. United Nations Educational Cultural Organisation United States Coastguard United States Navy A basket with a closed top section which is capable of containing a dry gaseous atmosphere to provide a refuge for the divers. The diving contractor’s responsibilities should include provisions to ensure that: • • • Risk assessments have been carried out both onshore and at site. Also called an open bottom bell. It is not a pressure vessel.

All relevant regulations are complied with. or a contractor acting on behalf of the operator or owner.Health. If the main contractor appoints an on-site representative then such a person should have the necessary experience and knowledge to be competent for this (ii) . Project records are kept of all relevant details of the project. 3. Suitable plant and equipment is supplied. including all dives. The operator or owner will appoint an on-site diving representative. when required. The level of detail or involvement required of the diving contractor. A suitable plan is prepared which includes emergency and contingency plans. The client will usually be the operator or owner of a proposed or existing installation or pipeline where diving work is going to take place. Adequate arrangements exist for first aid and medical treatment of personnel. There is a clear reporting and responsibility structure laid out in writing (see also 6. The main Contractor carrying out work for the client and overseeing the work of the diving contractor according to the contract.0 DIVING SAFETY • • • • • • • • • • The personnel are qualified and competent.2 OTHERS The actions of others can have a bearing on the safety of the diving operation even though they are not members of the team. in charge of the project to be competent.7). are given in the relevant sections of this Guideline. such a person should have the necessary experience and knowledge to be competent for this task. and information on how to meet the responsibilities. This should be signed and dated by the person preparing it. The plant and equipment is correctly certified and properly maintained. Suitable site specific safety and familiarization training is provided to all members of the dive team. These others include: (i) The client who has placed a contract with a Diving contractor for a project. The clients HSEMS should require an employee or consultant. Safety and Environmental Management Page 12 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. Supervisors are appointed in writing and the extent of their control documented.

Safety and Environmental Management Page 13 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. Providing the diving contractor with details of any possible substance likely to be encountered by the diving team that would be a hazard to their health. The diving contractor will need to be informed of the location and exact operational details of such items in writing and in sufficient time to account for them in the risk assessments. This information will need to be provided in writing and in sufficient time to allow the diving contractor to carry out the relevant risk assessments. the Installation Manager and / or the master. overhead scaffolding work. Ensuring that a formal control system. The Master of a vessel (or floating structure) from which diving work is to take place who controls the vessel and has overall responsibility for the safety of the vessel and all personnel on it.Health. gas flare mechanisms that may activate without warning. They may. (Only the diving supervisor can order a dive to commence). need to arrange for the suspension of supply boat unloading. (Ref. for example.g. drill cuttings on the seabed.0 DIVING SAFETY task. Their duties include: • Agreeing to provide facilities and extend all reasonable support to the diving supervisor or contractor in the event of an emergency. or equipment liable to start operating automatically. e. Ensuring that sufficient time and facilities are made available to the diving contractor at the commencement of the project in order to carry out all necessary site specific safety and familiarization training. exists between the diving team. These organizations or personnel will need to consider carefully the actions required of them. Considering whether any underwater or above-water items of plant or equipment under their control may cause a hazard to the diving team. for example. etc. 1). • • • • • . Ensuring that other activities in the vicinity do not affect the safety of the diving operation. (iii) (iv) The Installation or Offshore Manager who is responsible for the area inside which diving work is to take place. Details of the matters agreed should form part of the planning for the project. a permit-to-work system. The master may also prevent a dive commencing and order the termination of a dive on the grounds of safety. Such items include water intakes or discharge points causing suction or turbulence. They will also need to provide relevant risk assessments for these substances.

It is a requirement that sets of DP alarms are repeated in the diving control center. personnel and operating procedures to meet any relevant regulations before work begins. e. To ensure that the diving operation is carried out safely. can. These orders could include instructing unnecessary personnel to leave a control area. as far as it is reasonable. such as the vessel master or the DP operator. however. The supervisor with overall responsibility for the operation is the only person who can order the start of a dive. and they should only hand over control to another supervisor appointed in writing by the diving contractor. tell the supervisor to terminate a dive for safety or operational reasons. supervisors will need to ensure that they consider a number of points including: . such as a ship’s master or the installation manager. When diving from a dynamically positioned (DP) vessel. The following have additional responsibilities: • The client will need to ensure. The supervisor is entitled to give direct orders in relation to health and safety to any person taking part in. that the supervisor will need to liaise closely with other personnel. Supervisors can only supervise as much of a diving operation as they can personally control both during routine operations and if an emergency should occur. vessel movements.g. There will be times. the diving operation. deteriorating weather. that the diving contractor has the appropriate plant and equipment. the responsible person on the DP control panel will need to inform the diving supervisor of any possible change in position-keeping ability as soon as it is known. Such a handover will need to be entered in the relevant operations logbook. In such circumstances.0 DIVING SAFETY • Keeping the diving supervisor informed of any changes that may affect the diving operation. instructing personnel to operate equipment. subject to appropriate work permits etc. These orders take precedence over any company hierarchy. • 3. etc.Health. or who has any influence over. for example.3 DIVING SUPERVISOR Supervisors are responsible for the operation that they have been appointed to supervise. etc. Safety and Environmental Management Page 14 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. the supervisor must recognize that the vessel master has responsibility for the overall safety of the vessel and its occupants. Other relevant parties. during operations from a vessel using dynamic positioning techniques.

During saturation or bell operations. manufacturer’s instructions. on a pre-prepared checklist. They will need to check that the equipment they propose to use for any particular operation is adequate. however. as far as they are reasonably able. they will need to ensure that the possible hazards have been evaluated and are fully understood by all relevant parties and that. a supervisor will be able to control the raising and lowering of a diving bell adequately if there is a direct audio link with the winch operator. properly certified and maintained. This will normally by achieved on the • • • • • • . further risk assessment will need to be considered. if required. They can do this by confirming that the equipment meets the requirements set down in this Guideline. safe. for example. They will need to ensure that the operation they are being asked to supervise complies with the requirements of this Guideline. For example. They will also need to obtain any necessary permission before starting or continuing the operation. where practicable. They will need to satisfy themselves that the personnel they are to supervise are competent to carry out the work required of them. that these personnel are fit and in possession of a valid medical certificate of fitness. visual communications with any personnel under their supervision. Such checks will need to be documented. or plans to use. Detailed advice on how they can ensure this is given in various sections of this Guideline.Health. When the operation uses. and recorded in the diving operations log for the project. even though the winch may be physically located where the supervisor cannot see it or have ready access to it.0 DIVING SAFETY • • They should satisfy themselves that they are competent to carry out such work. complex or potentially hazardous equipment. Such responsibilities will need to be contained in the relevant documentation. If the situation changes. Supervisors will meet their responsibilities by ensuring the documentation exists and following any guidance contained in the documentation. and that they understand their own areas and levels of responsibility and who is responsible for any other relevant areas. training is given. normally via a “permit-to-work” system. They should also ensure that they are in possession of a letter from the diving contractor appointing them as a diving supervisor. Safety and Environmental Management Page 15 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. for example. This will be carried out as part of the risk assessment during the planning of the operation and will need to be documented. They will need to establish that all involved parties are aware that a diving operation is going to start or continue. The supervisor will need to have clear audible and. They should also check. They should ensure that the equipment is adequately checked by themselves or another competent person prior to its use. supervisors will need to be able to see the divers inside the bell or compression chamber.

If this is by a separate generator. possible shutdown phases. Equipment location is often dependent on available deck space. vibration. In this respect it should be ensured that in-date test certificates for all equipment are available where required.1 EQUIPMENT LOCATION AND INTEGRITY The choice of equipment location will be determined by the type of installation (a fixed structure may differ from a vessel). and structures etc. Normal practice will be to prepare a deck layout or plan prior to mobilization in order that a suitable equipment location and the service connections required are clear to all parties. vapour or volatile liquid). The power source for the diving system may be independent of the surface platform or vessel’s power supply. 4. length of cable required. the detail of the type of diving equipment involved. In some applications the diving system may be required to operate in a hazardous area (i. weather. Before welding any part of the diving system to a ship’s or installation’s deck. an area in which there is the possibility of danger of fire or explosion from the ignition of gas. the position of fuel tanks and any other possible problem should be ascertained. (Ref.e. All diving equipment used in such an area must comply with the safety regulations for that area. or listen to. fire protection and ventilation. the integrity of any handling system with respect to lifting points or load bearing welds.Health. EQUIPMENT 4. however if it is possible. noise.2 GASES .0 DIVING SAFETY surface by means of direct viewing through the view ports but when the bell is under water this will need to be by means of an internal camera. 2). the positioning of this should be governed by the following factors. Diving supervisors should also comply with any specific site requirements and where required obtain an appropriate permit-to-work before conducting diving operations. then placing the diving deployment system close to a ship’s center of gravity will minimize motion. even if another person needs to talk to. 4. the diver. exhaust. • The supervisor will need to have direct communications with any diver in the water at all times. Safety and Environmental Management Page 16 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.

a carbon dioxide analyser will need to be fitted in all saturation operations using gas reclaim equipment. temperature and flow for all foreseeable situations. All gases used offshore will need to be handled with appropriate care. .2. In particular the supply will need to be arranged so that no other diver (including the standby) is deprived of breathing gas if another diver’s umbilical is cut or ruptured.Health. the provision of fire deluge systems. 3.1 Storage Cylinders Gas cylinders will need to be suitable in design. Where appropriate. 4. 5). Each cylinder needs to be tested and have appropriate certification issued by a competent person. Cylinders used for diving within the scope of this Guideline may be subjected to special conditions. The dive plan needs to specify that the gas storage areas need to be adequately protected by. where gas means any other breathing medium other than natural compressed air.2. This will prevent the diver being supplied with the wrong percentage of oxygen even if the breathing medium is compressed air. quads and banks. 7). 4.3 Diver’s Breathing Gas Supply The correct use of breathing gases for divers and the continuity of their supply is vital to diver’s safety and health. 4.0 DIVING SAFETY Gases stored in cylinders at high pressure are potentially hazardous. The diving contractor will need to ensure that all gas storage units comply with a recognized and agreed standard of colour coding and marking of gas storage cylinders. such as use in salt water. (Ref. Total or partial loss or interruption of diver’s breathing gas supply can be fatal. This should have sufficient capacity to allow the diver to reach a place of safety. (Ref. (All gases should be analysed before use in any case). including emergencies. with breathing gas of the correct composition. An in-line oxygen analyser with an audible Hi-Lo alarm will need to be fitted to the diver’s gas supply line in the dive control area.2. Each diver in the water will need to carry a reserve supply of breathing gas that he can quickly switch into the breathing circuit in an emergency. Safety and Environmental Management Page 17 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. In addition. including the standby diver. fit for purpose and safe for use.2 Marking and Colour Coding of Gas Storage Fatal accidents have occurred because of wrong gases or gas mixtures being used in a diving project. suitable volume. pipework will also need to be colour coded. for example. 4. and will therefore need special care. Equipment will therefore be needed to supply every diver.

2. If an incident occurs during the dive. but can be used safely if stored and handled correctly. agreed layout. the communication record will need to be retained for any subsequent investigation. and the recording kept until the dive is successfully completed. Formal cleaning procedures for such equipment will need to be provided by the diving contractor. All such communications will need to be recorded. Speech processing equipment will be needed for divers who are breathing gas mixtures containing helium. preferably via a head mounted camera so as to keep the divers hands free. Any gas mixture containing more than 25% oxygen by volume will need to be handled like pure oxygen. voice contact with the supervisor on the surface. Safety and Environmental Management Page 18 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. two ways. which distorts speech. Wherever practicable dives should also be video taped. (Ref. emergency breathing gas cylinders will need to be supplied in the basket in a standard. 4. 8). Experience has shown that medical incidents may not become apparent for some hours after the actual dive is completed.2. (Ref. although protected as detailed in Sec.Health.3).0 DIVING SAFETY 4.2. Any materials used in plant which is intended to carry oxygen will need to be cleaned of hydrocarbons to avoid explosions. as a minimum should be provided (also refer section 7. together with documentary evidence that such procedures have been followed. It should not be stored in a confined space or below decks but out in the open.5 Oxygen Pressurized oxygen can fuel a serious fire or cause an explosion. 4. It is therefore recommended that recordings be kept for 24 hours before being erased. A monitor for the diving supervisor. This enables the divers to access the cylinders rapidly in an emergency. .3 DIVER COMMUNICATIONS All divers in the water will need a communication system that enables direct. 9).4 Emergency Air Cylinders When a diving basket is used by surface-supplied divers. 4.

11. (Ref.2 Emergency Recovery The dive plan needs to specify that adequate equipment and procedures are needed to enable the diving bell to be rescued if the bell is accidentally severed from its lifting wires and supply umbilical. 4. (Ref. (Ref. Lifting equipment will need to be fitted to enable a person in the bell to lift an unconscious or injured diver into the bell in an emergency. 14).4. Divers will need to be able to enter and leave the bell without difficulty. It should also be fitted with the internationally agreed common manifold block for attachment of an emergency umbilical.0 DIVING SAFETY 4.4. 11).4 DIVING BELLS 4. The bell will need an alternative way to return to the surface if the main lifting gear fails. This design will need to ensure that the weights cannot be shed accidentally. the weights will need to be designed so that the divers inside the bell can shed them. This is normally by means of the guide wires and their lifting equipment or could be by means of an ROV attaching a new lift wire. (Ref. However. The bell will need to be capable of sustaining the lives of trapped divers for at least 24 hours. 10).3 Equipment Level Closed diving bells used for saturation or bounce diving will need a minimum level of equipment and facilities.1 Breathing Mixture Supply The main umbilical system of a diving bell will need to be fitted with suitable protective devices that will prevent uncontrolled loss of the atmosphere inside the diving bell if any or all of the components in the umbilical are ruptured. 12). Divers will also need to be able to transfer under pressure from the bell to a surface compression chamber and vice versa. (Ref. 4. 11.4. The bell will need to be equipped with a relocation device using the internationally recognized frequency to enable rapid location if the bell is lost. if weight shedding is employed. .Health. 13). Safety and Environmental Management Page 19 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.

without the occurrence of excessive lateral. Procedures have been developed for the safe use of electricity under water.5 EMERGENCY MARKINGS ON HYPERBARIC RESCUE SYSTEMS In an emergency. vertical or rotational movement. clear instructions or statements from the manufacturer or supplier. are required to work with equipment carrying electric currents. 17) Care will need to be taken to provide adequate ventilation. Such markings will need to be clearly visible when the system is afloat and repeated in Arabic. 15). 4. will be needed to supply an appropriate breathing mixture to divers in. 16).0 DIVING SAFETY The bell will need doors that open from either side and that act as pressure seals.7 SUITABILITY The diving contractor will need to be satisfied that the equipment provided for the diving project is suitable for the use to which its will be put. 4.6 ELECTRICITY Divers. Adequate first-aid equipment will be needed. gauges and other fittings (made of suitable materials) will be needed to indicate and control the pressure within the bell. To ensure that rescuers provide suitable assistance and do not accidentally compromise the safety of the occupants. the bell. . and others in the dive team. Valves. Safety and Environmental Management Page 20 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. The external pressure will also need to be indicated to both the divers in the bell and the diving supervisor. an IMO standard set of markings and instructions has been agreed. which can provide an explosion hazard in confined spaces. Lifting gear will be needed to lower the bell to the depth of the diving project. Suitability can be assessed by the evaluation of a competent person. and working from. it is possible that personnel with no specialized diving knowledge will be the first to reach a hyperbaric rescue system. (Ref. (Ref. and raise it to the surface. which presents the risk of electric shock and burning. physical testing or previous use in similar circumstances. 4. maintain it at depth. in all foreseeable circumstances on that project. Equipment will be needed to light and heat the bell. Adequate equipment. including reserve facilities. Recharging lead-acid batteries generates hydrogen.Health. (Ref. and any equipment used in a diving operation will need to comply with this guidance.

have been established.9. Such handling systems should be designed with a suitable minimum safety factor on the load.9. including wires intended for secondary or back-up lifting.9 MAN-RIDING HANDLING SYSTEMS Particular safety standards will need to be applied when using lifting equipment to carry personnel because serious injury may result from falling. and with suitable hand holds for the divers.3 Lift Wires Particular selection criteria will need to be used for man-carrying lift wires. providing primary and secondary protection. . Suitable certificates (or copies) will need to be provided at the worksite for checking. used in support of surface-supplied diving. tests and certification. These wires will need to have an effective safety factor of 8:1. and the requirements of those who are competent to carry out such examinations. They are not to be fitted with a pawl and ratchet gear in which the pawl has to be disengaged before lowering. but should not be discounted because it has not been used before. 4. will need to be able to carry at least two divers in an uncramped position.(Reference 8). 4.0 DIVING SAFETY New. equipment will need to be considered carefully. protect the divers from falling objects and carry sufficient breathing media for emergency purposes. 4. 18). Alternative design factors may be considered if based on detailed analysis. ( Ref. or innovative. 4.9.1 Winches Both hydraulic and pneumatic winches will need suitable braking systems. be non-rotating.8 CERTIFICATION The standards and codes used to examine. It will need to be designed with a chain or gate at the entry and exit point to prevent the divers falling out. and be as compact as possible to minimize the space requirements of their operating winches. The design will also need to prevent spinning or tipping. such as computer modeling of support ship motions. test and certify plant and equipment. 4.2 Diving Baskets and Open-Bottom Bells A basket or open-bottom bell. etc. Safety and Environmental Management Page 21 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.Health. All equipment and plant supplied for use in a diving operation will need to comply with at least these standards.

10 MEDICAL / EQUIPMENT LOCKS AND DIVING BELL TRUNKS The inadvertent release of any clamping mechanism holding together two pressurized units under internal pressure may cause fatal injury to personnel both inside and outside the units. Overboard O2 dumps will terminate outside the container.4 Surface Diver Deployment and Recovery Surface divers must not be expected to climb more than 3 meters up a ladder. which will include the operator’s station. Saturation diving DDC’s shall have a minimum diameter of 2 meters.11 THERAPEUTIC RECOMPRESSION No diving operation within the scope of this Guideline is to be carried out unless at least a two-compartment chamber is at the worksite.11. All chambers shall have originally been constructed by a fabricator approved by an internationally recognized certifying authority and be fitted out to the standard specified in that authorities “Rules for Certification and Construction of Diving Systems”. to provide suitable therapeutic recompression treatment. The chamber will be located in a air-conditioned environment.Health. 4. 30). a second mechanical recovery system will be required. . and where a distance of 5 meters or more (from water level to landing area). Internal main pressurization and depressurization valves will be fitted with isolating valves (regardless of NRV’s).1 Recompression chambers Surface diving DDC’s shall be twin compartment type designed to BS5500 Category 1 or equivalent. 4.9. Safety and Environmental Management Page 22 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. The Contractor must provide proof of compliance with this requirement or alternatively have the chamber recertified by a recognized certifying authority. (Ref. The minimum internal diameter will be 1372 mm (54 inches) and the main chamber will contain two off floor bunks. The medical lock will be fitted with a mechanical interlocking mechanism (not just a passive alarm). 4.0 DIVING SAFETY 4. which will be long enough to accommodate the divers in the fully reclined position. All such clamps will need pressure indicators and interlocks to ensure that they cannot be released while under pressure.

Testing and Certification Detailed guidance exists on the frequency and extent of inspection and testing required of all items of equipment used in a diving project. (Ref. 18). 4.12.4 Cylinders Used Under Water Diver’s emergency gas supply cylinders (bail-out bottles) and cylinders used under water for back-up supplies on diving bells and baskets can suffer from accelerated corrosion. For each major unit. (Ref. Such a system may be based on either passage of time or amount of use. 4. such as details of the materials used to construct diving bells and surface compression chambers.Health. either on paper or computer.2 Planned Maintenance System The diving contractor will need to establish a system of planned maintenance for plant and equipment to demonstrate compliance with these regulations. Safety and Environmental Management Page 23 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. if applicable.12.g.5 and 18.12. It will need to contain any relevant additional information. that it is not damaged or suffering from deterioration. with copies of all relevant certificates of examination and test. The individual involved will then need to complete a record of the work.0 DIVING SAFETY 4. It will also need to contain details of any applicable design limitations. including frequent immersion in salt water.3 Equipment Register An equipment register will need to be maintained at the worksite. 3. 4. the system will need to identify the frequency with which each task is to be undertaken and who should do the work. e. maximum weather condition for use. It therefore requires regular inspection. maintenance and testing to ensure it is fit for use.12. 4. together with the levels of competence required of those carrying out the work.1 Periodic Examination.) .12 MAINTENANCE OF DIVING EQUIPMENT Diving plant and equipment is used under extreme conditions.4. Particular care will need to be taken to ensure that they are regularly examined and maintained. for example. but ideally will be based on a combination of both.

rings. 19). Any lifting cable or wire should be provided with a test certificate confirming its Safe Working Load (SWL). Regular examination every six months is also recommended. NDT on relevant welds have been completed.Health.5 Diving Bell and Basket Lift Wires Frequent immersion in salt water. Manufacturer’s maintenance instructions and testing requirements will need to be followed. the number of divers to be deployed (with all their equipment) and any components that hang from the lifting cable (including cable weight in air).. shackles and pins should have test certificates when supplied and be examined at six monthly intervals thereafter. and will need to be followed to ensure that wires remain fit for purpose. All lifting gear.6 Lift Bags Special requirements for the periodic examination. shock loading from waves.13 LIFTING EQUIPMENT DESIGN. The SWL should never be exceeded during operations and should include the deployment device. The certificates should show the SWL and the result of load tests undertaken on the components to 2 x SWL. The lifting and lowering winch should be rated by the manufacturer for a safe working load at least equal to the weight of the deployment device plus divers in air plus any additional components. such as sheaves. after installation at another site and after major alternation or repair. passing over multiple sheaves. Specialised advice on maintenance exists. The condition and integrity of the cable should be checked at six monthly intervals. etc. or more frequently as circumstances dictate. An overload test of the winch’s lifting and braking capacity should be undertaken after: • • All permanent deck fixing are in place. Safety and Environmental Management Page 24 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.12.0 DIVING SAFETY 4. 4. can cause wear and deterioration to the lift wires of diving bells and baskets if they are not properly maintained. . (Ref. test and certification of lift bags have been established.12. Any additional testing specified should be at the discretion of the ‘competent person’. PERIODIC TEST AND EXAMINATION REQUIREMENTS All lifting equipment should be examined by a ‘competent person’ before the equipment is used for the first time. 4.

They should therefore be competent to provide the level of assistance that the diver expects and needs. 5. should have a certain level of competence in that area but the diving contractor and the diving supervisor will need to satisfy themselves that the person has the detailed competence necessary to do the specific task required during the particular diving operation. and their ability to run the planned dive safely.Health. Competence may not be the same as qualification. such as a diver training certificate. . 5. They should understand the method of deployment being used and all of the actions expected of them in an emergency. efficiently and as a member of a team. including carrying out contingency and emergency plans. Safety and Environmental Management Page 25 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. their grades.1 Tenders Tenders are there to help the divers. In some case experience alone will indicate competence even if no formal training has been undertaken. competence and qualifications. This will normally mean establishing that the person has had sufficient training coupled with experience. Competence is required of tenders in that: ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ They should understand the diving techniques being used.0 DIVING SAFETY 5. They will need to be fully familiar with all of the diver’s personal equipment. personnel need to have a basic level of competence of the task they are being asked to carry out. This includes a detailed knowledge of the emergency and contingency plans to be used. A person who has a particular qualification. PERSONNEL This section refers to the number of divers and support personnel. They should understand the ways in which their actions can affect the diver.1 TRAINING AND COMPETENCE To work safely. The different members of the diving team will require different levels and types of competence.1.

Only two grades of diver are allowed to work within the scope of this Guideline: surface-supplied divers and closed bell divers. without a valid medical certificate.1. such medical staff requested to enter a chamber may do so. In cases where the tender is not a diver however.1. Transitional Part I (issued between 1/7/81 . In an emergency however. All divers at work should hold a diving qualification suitable for the work they intend to do. however. then his competence will need to be established on the basis of previous experience supplemented. In such cases their competence will be able to be verified easily. A suitable diving qualification is not required by people such as medical staff who may be exposed to pressure in chambers but who are not divers: they will.copies should not be accepted. HSE Part I. and may in fact be a member of the deck crew. A number of certificates and qualifications are recognised for the two grades: 5. need to pass the diver’s medical restricted for exposure to pressure in a chamber.2. . with any additional training which the diving contractor or supervisor feel is necessary.2 Divers Divers will possess a formal training certificate showing that they have attended a recognised school or have been trained in some other way. Safety and Environmental Management Page 26 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. Some tenders will be fully qualified. They will need to have the original certificate in their possession at the site of the diving project .31/12/81). but less experienced divers. 5.0 DIVING SAFETY ◊ They should understand line signals.Surface Dependent Diver. where appropriate. Norwegian NPD surface diver.1 Surface-supplied diver certificates HSE Surface Supplied (with offshore top up).Health. Dutch Part 1. TSA or MSC Basic Air Diving .

Australian Diver Accreditation Scheme Part 4.2 Closed bell diver certificates HSE Part II.0 DIVING SAFETY French Class 2. Canadian Category 2 Diver. Transitional Part II (issued between 1/7/81 . Canadian Category 3 Diver.2. Canadian Unrestricted Surface Supplied Diver to 50m. New Zealand Part 2. New Zealand Part I.Health. Australian Diver Accreditation Scheme Part 3. French Class 3.Bell Diver.31/12/81). Norwegian NPD Bell Diver. South African Class 1. South African Class 2. 5. HSE Closed Bell. . Canadian Bell Diver. Dutch Part 2 . IMCA Surface Supplied Diver.1. Canadian Category 1 Diver Canadian Surface Supplied Mixed Gas Diver to 70m. TSA or MSC bell diving. Safety and Environmental Management Page 27 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.

some of which are said to be “equivalent” to HSE / NPD or similar. Those with one of the Closed Bell certificates listed above are also qualified to undertake surface-supplied activities. Divers Academy Of the Eastern Seaboard Inc. These schools are independently audited and certificates from them can be accepted as showing suitable basic training. College of Oceaneering. Within this framework. The US training system is based on a diver receiving basic training at a diving school followed by experience gained in the field under a form of “apprenticeship”. Divers Institute of Technology Inc. Cýamden. .Health.1.. New Jersey. Seattle. once finalized.3 Other certificates ADC Inc. These schools are: The Ocean Corporation. may also provide evidence of basic training. a system is in existence whereby five US based schools are recognized by the Association of Commercial Diving Educators (ACDE) as giving a minimum standard of training to US Standard ANSI/ACDE -01-1993 (note this standard is currently being updated and will become ANSI/ACDE -01-1998). Military diving qualifications will not be suitable qualifications for diving within the scope of this code. 5.. Houston. is in the process of establishing a certification scheme for US trained divers and this scheme. Santa Barbara. Safety and Environmental Management Page 28 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. Other schools and training organizations award certificates to divers. Washington. Los Angeles. Subsequent diving experience needs to be demonstrated by log book entries. Texas. Divers trained in the USA will not normally possess one of the certificates listed above.0 DIVING SAFETY IMCA Bell Diver.2. ADNOC is unable to say that these certificates are suitable and they should be deemed to be unacceptable. California. Santa Barbara City College. California.

None of these certificates in themselves prove competence. both to ensure that the pile of sandbags created is correct from an engineering viewpoint and also to ensure that the diver lifts and handles the bags in such a way that we does not injure himself. This will include wave action. . This includes breathing gas. They will need to be competent to work in the environmental conditions. This will normally require them to understand why they are doing certain things and how their actions may affect others. They will need to be competent to carry out the tasks required of them. are not acceptable qualifications for offshore commercial diving. Where a diver has not carried out a task before. such as moving sandbags under water. If there is any doubt about the validity of experience then the individual should be questioned in detail to establish their exact level of knowledge. but evidence of training. Safety and Environmental Management Page 29 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. Even tasks which are apparently very simple. coupled with subsequent experience. the area to be worked in and any other relevant factors. competence can be gained by detailed review of drawings and specifications. Competence is simultaneously: required of diver in several different areas The Diver will need to be competent to use the diving techniques being employed. Previous experience of a similar task is one demonstration of competence but care should be taken to ensure that a diver is not claiming or exaggerating experience in order to obtain work or appear knowledgeable to his superior. personal equipment and deployment equipment. or where a task may be new to every member of the diving team. visibility and current effects. They will need to be competent to use any tools or equipment they need during the course of the dive. require a degree of competence.0 DIVING SAFETY Sport diving certificates. such as BSAC or PADI. the equipment to be operated under water.Health. will allow a reasonable decision to be made about a person’s competence. since the standards of training may vary considerably.

The deck crew will need to have competence in a number of areas: ◊ They will need to understand and be familiar with good rigging practice and seamanship. would pay particular attention to supporting the person gaining competence. ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ . the depth of detail reviewed and the checks necessary to confirm competence. They will need to be familiar with safe working loads and safety factors. will depend on the complexity of the task involved and the hazards associated with the operation. This will include relevant knots. slinging.Health. It should be recognized that inexperienced divers require to gain competence in a work situation and it is correct to allow this provided it is recognized by the other members of the team that the individual is in the process of gaining experience and competence. 5. The actions of the people on deck can have a major impact on the safety and efficiency of the work being carried out under water. an experienced inspection diver who is asked to use a new measuring tool may well be competent to carry out this operation after a few minutes handling the tool on deck and reading an instruction manual whereas a team of divers who are required to install a complex new type of unit on the seabed may need not only instruction. correct use of shackles etc. In such a case it would be expected that the other team members. but actual trials under water in using the unit. For example they will need to understand that a diver cannot normally lift an item under water which it took two men to carry on deck.0 DIVING SAFETY The time required for this review. For instance. and particularly the supervisor.1. Safety and Environmental Management Page 30 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. They should understand the limitations of a diver in relation to the work they can carry out. They should understand the various ways in which equipment can be prepared on deck to ease the task of the diver under water. The diving contractor will need to establish the level of competence required for a particular application.3 Deck Crew / Riggers Divers rely heavily on the support given to them from the surface by the deck crew. They should understand the task that the diver is being asked to carry out under water.

Health. A certification scheme for LSTs has been running for some years. specialized personnel will be used to look after stored high pressure gases and to carry out the operations on and around the deck compression chambers in which the divers are living. it is relatively simple to establish if a person is suitably qualified to act as a Supervisor. This scheme issues formal certification to individuals who meet the necessary requirements. It is thus simple to establish if a person holds a qualification as a life Support Technician. Once finalized this scheme should provide suitable certification for such personnel. 20). 5.5 Supervisors There is only one person who can appoint a supervisor for a diving operation and that is the diving Contractor. . (Ref. provided they are closely overseen by a competent and experienced person. (Ref. In most cases it will be necessary for the diving supervisor. A recognised certification scheme for the main grades of supervisor has been running for some years. With a larger deck crew it will not be necessary for all members of the crew to have the same level of competence. administered by the AODC (now IMCA). In such a case competence can be established quickly. Regarding qualifications. Such personnel are often called Life Support Technicians. to give at least a short explanation to the deck crew prior to each job. 5.1. such that competence is assured. Safety and Environmental Management Page 31 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.0 DIVING SAFETY Often the deck crew will be made up in large part of experienced divers who are not actually diving.1. is currently setting up a similar system for the examination and certification of US trained life support personnel. The diving Contractor should consider a number of factors when appointing a Supervisor. 20). or someone acting on his behalf. ADC Inc. This Scheme issues formal certification to individuals who meet the necessary requirements. administered by the AODC (now IMCA).4 Life Support Personnel On many larger projects involving saturation or closed bell diving techniques.

Care will need to be taken that such an individual has the necessary competence if they are asked to supervise surface mixed gas diving operations. which does not fall clearly in to the areas normally undertaken by that diving Contractor. including those in deck chambers. For offshore diving there are currently three possible levels of certificate available and any person being considered for appointment as a Supervisor will need to be in possession of the relevant certificate. Supervisors do not normally need to be qualified in first aid. or being compressed or decompressed in a DDC. If a diving operation is being planned. Once finalised this scheme should provide suitable certification for such personnel. Clearly the issue of competence is more subjective and the diving Contractor needs to consider the operations being planned and the competence of any individual being considered for appointment as a Supervisor. and are considered competent by the Diving contractor to supervise the life support of divers living in. Safety and Environmental Management Page 32 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. . Similar to diving supervisors. however the diving Contractor should consider the role and requirements of the supervisor during a medical emergency. life support supervisors are to be appointed in writing by the diving contractor.Health. A Life Support Supervisor (LSS) is a diving contractors Life Support Technician who has passed the LST module of the certification scheme and after completing a minimum further 200 days working offshore at this grade. Life support supervisors are subject to the authority of the diving supervisor. then detailed consideration will need to be given to the most suitable qualification for the Supervisors to be selected. The possession of the necessary qualification does not in itself demonstrate competence for any specific operation. since the examination and training for air diving supervisor does not include surface mixed gas diving techniques..0 DIVING SAFETY ADC Inc. is currently setting up a similar system for the examination and certification of US trained diving Supervisors. They are not qualified however to supervise the actual dive. An Air Diving Supervisor will have passed the relevant modules of the certification scheme and be qualified to supervise all surface diving operations including decompression in a deck chamber. A Bell Diving Supervisor will have passed both air diving and bell diving modules of the certification scheme and be qualified to supervise all diving operations.

clients. such as the complexity of the part of the operation the person is going to supervise. the equipment and facilities which will be available to the Supervisor. a diving Contractor may wish to appoint individuals as supervisors for parts of the operation.0 DIVING SAFETY The diving Contractor will need to consider the details of the planned operation. 5. or to the limited previous experience of the individual being considered. rather than relying on personnel provided by others for assistance ( e. In such a case.g. particularly on very large operations. Safety and Environmental Management Page 33 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. If personnel who are not employed by the diving Contractor are to be used in the diving team for any reason they will need to be carefully considered for competence and . the diving contractor will need to consider the most suitable qualifications available and in particular establish the competence of the individual for that position.). If relevant previous supervisory experience of similar operations cannot be demonstrated due to unique features of the planned operation. Five personnel are considered as a minimum for the team size. It is possible that in the future. The diving Contractor will normally need to provide a sufficient number of competent and qualified personnel to operate all the equipment and to provide support functions to the diving team. then the diving Contractor should asses the relevant information available. the details checked with previous diving Contractors. For safe operation.2 NUMBERS OF PERSONNEL / TEAM SIZE The diving Contractor will need to specify the size of team based on the details of the project. Relevant previous experience supervising similar operations will demonstrate a suitable level of competence. this may need to include additional deck support personnel and other management or technical support personnel. ship crews. etc. however if this has been gained with a different diving Contractor then checks should be made to establish the veracity of the claimed experience. a decision will need to be made whether one Supervisor can be responsible for all that is intended or whether more supervision is required. the risks which the Supervisor and divers may be exposed to and the support which would be available to the Supervisor in an emergency.Health. such as project engineers or maintenance technicians. After such consideration. consider the possible risks involved and make a decision as to the competence of the individual concerned. For this purpose the log book maintained by the supervisor can be consulted and if necessary. which do not fall neatly in to the categories identified above.

Type of equipment (air. . Deployment method. This allows one supervisor to take rest. This equipment will.).g. more than one supervisor may be needed on duty. comfort and meal breaks away from the stressful job of operating the control panel. whose principal duties may be associated with the diving or ships equipment. Operational period (e. Each supervisor will only be able to provide adequate supervision of a defined area of operations. A standby diver will need to be in immediate readiness to provide any necessary assistance to the diver. Location. Safety and Environmental Management Page 34 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. for example. whenever a diver is in the water. either a diving supervisor or a life support supervisor will need to be in control of the operation at all times. Even on a 12-hour operation a second diving supervisor will be required if continuous/back to back diving is considered. The team size and composition must always be sufficient to enable the diving operation to be conducted safely and effectively. Their will be exceptions to this requirement.Health. rules and equipment. need to be immediately to hand. may form part of the diving team. when a diving system is installed long term on a DSV and there are suitable technicians employed by the vessel owner. This means that a number of eventualities should be considered when deciding team size and make up including the following: • • • • • • • Type of task. however. In such circumstances. including dealing with foreseeable contingencies or emergencies. For umbilicals tended from a bell or basket. It is the absolute responsibility of the diving contractor to provide a wellbalanced. competent team of sufficient numbers to ensure safety at all times. Such personnel can create a hazard to themselves and others if they lack familiarity with the contractor’s procedures. For large projects. Water depth. 12 or 24 hours per day). The standby diver will need to be dressed to enter the water. The overriding factor must always be the safety of personnel during operation and maintenance. Handling of any foreseeable emergency situations. For umbilicals that are tended from the surface. saturation etc. one tender is required for every two divers in the water.0 DIVING SAFETY suitability before being included. When a dive is taking place. Such an arrangement will need to be confirmed in writing. together with the responsibilities of these individuals. these personnel. at least one tender is required for each diver in the water. but need not wear a mask or helmet.

Health. It is not the aim of this document to remove the responsibility for safe operations from the contractor.0 DIVING SAFETY There will need to be one standby diver for every two divers in the water. a single person should not work alone when dealing with:• • • • • High Voltage. the standby diver will remain on the surface. All divers are trained to operate an SCC and are thus competent. Potential fire hazards . When divers are in saturation. . standby diver. High pressure machinery. and to assist in an emergency. The controls of a surface compression chamber (SCC) can be operated by any competent person under supervision. the standby diver will remain inside the bell. tender for working diver. When using a closed bell. For surface supplied diving. Competent and qualified personnel providing life support will be needed to look after divers living in saturation. A separate life support supervisor may need to be appointed in writing by the diving contractor if the life support control is remote from the diving control. burning. tender for standby diver.welding. Additional personnel may be needed to operate or maintain specialized equipment. and may undertake other duties within the dive team while the bell is under water. Safety and Environmental Management Page 35 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. This diver need not be dressed for diving provided the equipment is available. normally two life support personnel will need to be on duty at all times. Heavy Lifts. such as winches. With regard to safe working practices. Actual team sizes will need to be decided after completion of a risk assessment. Another diver will need to be on the surface with equipment suitable for intervention within the surface diving range. working diver. as are qualified life support technicians (LSTs).supervisor. Saturation diving Supervisors are qualified to act as life support supervisors. Epoxy fumes etc. The absolute minimum required to conduct a safe surface-supplied dive within the scope of this Guideline is five .

but not diving. and a tender for the surface diver. life support supervisor. but such circumstances should be exceptional and never planned. the longest period a diver will be asked to work. The absolute minimum team will be seven-diving supervisor. One when the divers are in the bell or in the water under the control of a diving supervisor. In such cases. Individuals in a diving team will often carry out more than one duty. Safety and Environmental Management Page 36 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. life support technician. two divers inside the bell. It should be remembered that accidents are more likely when personnel work long hours because their concentration and efficiency deteriorate and their safety awareness is reduced. the divers will not be asked to undertake a bell run exceeding 8 hours from seal to seal. provided they are qualified and competent to do so and that their different duties do not interfere with each other. They will then need to be allowed at least 12 hours of unbroken rest. 5. Trainees will often form part of the team but will not normally be allowed to take over the functions of the person training them unless that person remains in control. one diver on the surface. will be 16 hours before being given 8 hours unbroken rest. extreme care will need to be taken and allowance will need to be made for the effects of fatigue. On Large projects. with breaks for meals. Members of the diving team will not be asked to work. Extended work periods offshore without a break reduces safety awareness. Similarly. and the handover does not affect the safety of the operation. Work will therefore need to be planned so that personnel do not work offshore for long periods . where a diving team has been on standby. and only in exceptional circumstances. Work should be planned so that each person is normally asked to work for a maximum of 12 continuous hours. and may or may not perform “hands-on” duties as part of the dive team.Health. dedicated personnel may be required to provide safe management control. and a second under a life support supervisor when the divers are in the saturation chambers. This may be for example. for a number of hours before diving is needed. is present to oversee their actions.3 WORKING PERIODS It is recognized that long hours are sometimes required. for more than 12 hours without having at least 8 hours of unbroken rest during the previous16 hours. or be on standby. In saturation diving. Overlapping functions will need to be clearly identified in procedures.0 DIVING SAFETY An absolute minimum closed bell project requires two operations. and is then given a 12-hour unbroken rest period between shifts. These personnel are often called senior supervisors or superintendents.

personnel tend to revert to their own language. The dive plan should state the language to be used during the project. Personnel also need toilet and refreshment breaks during their shifts.5 COMMUNICATIONS In an emergency.Health.1 Safety Training Safety Training should include the following: Courses on survival. on diving safety where it interfaces with diving operations. These times may need to vary to suit operational needs or exceptional circumstances. or to meet specific contractual conditions or requirements.0 DIVING SAFETY without being allowed time onshore. No person will be expected to work a 12-hour shift without a meal break taken away from their place of work. but personnel should be given a reasonable onshore break related to the period spent offshore.4 TRAINING It is necessary that diving contractors ensure that their personnel receive safety and technical training in order to allow them to work safely and in line with all relevant legislation. Safety and Environmental Management Page 37 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. 5. Refresher training at regular intervals. the diving contractor will need to ensure that the planned work either has natural breaks (for example. ◊ 5. first aid and fire fighting. masters and deck foremen. To allow for these breaks. Any such handovers of responsibility should be recorded in writing in the diving operations log.4. during periods of strong tide) or that qualified and experienced personnel are available to act as relief’s during breaks. and all team members will need to be . If team members do not speak the same language this can cause an obvious hazard. Further task-specific safety training outlining any special hazards associated with the tasks being worked on including. This is particularly important in relation to supervisors whose responsibilities are often onerous and stressful. ◊ ◊ An installation or vessel-specific safety induction course on the hazards to be found at work and while responding to emergencies. 5.

as a result of training and/or experience have the necessary knowledge to advise on suitable treatment of diving related injury. The medical examiner of divers who certifies their fitness to dive needs to have an understanding of the working environment of the diver.1 MEDICAL EQUIPMENT A minimum amount of medical equipment will need to be at a diving site to provide first aid and medical treatment for the dive team. MEDICAL 6. Medical care in such circumstances may be difficult and the diving contractor. (Ref.2 SUITABLE DOCTORS The physiology of diving and the problems encountered by an ill or injured diver are not subjects.Health.0 DIVING SAFETY able to speak to each other fluently and clearly at all times. The location of first-aid equipment will need to be identified by the international sign of a white cross on a green background. but a standard list has been agreed. particularly during emergencies. For this reason it is necessary that any doctor who is involved in any way with examining divers or giving medical advice in relation to divers has sufficient knowledge and experience to do so. 6.3 FIRST-AID TRAINING AND COMPETENCIES . 6. (Ref. 21). This minimum will depend on the type of diving. Recommendations are available concerning the specialised equipment needed. (Ref. 23) and he should have UK-HSE certification. 22). Such a doctor however may be unable to give the necessary advice in relation to treatment of decompression sickness or other diving related injury Some doctors. which most doctors understand in detail. Particular problems exist if a diver becomes seriously ill or is injured while under pressure. in conjunction with their medical adviser. They are usually described as Diving Medical Specialists and should be approved by ADNOC and fit to be compressed (see Ref. 22). will need to prepare contingency plans for such situations. 6. Safety and Environmental Management Page 38 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. which is normally gained by undertaking an appropriate training course. Diving medical specialists will then know what equipment and supplies are available when giving advice to a worksite.

respiratory system. and is valid for as long as the doctor certifies. and should be reported to the supervisor before the start of a dive. .. one member of the dive team who is not diving (other than the supervisor) will need to be trained to a higher standard of first aid known as “ diver medic”. Supervisors should seek guidance from their company or its medical adviser if there is doubt about a diver’s fitness. Even a minor illness. In addition. The medical examination looks at the diver’s overall fitness for purpose. If the examination is carried out during the last 30 days of the validity of the preceding medical then the start date of the new certificate will be the expiry date of the old certificate. recent medical treatment. Divers with recognised diving first-aid certificates may choose to complete a general first-aid course rather than a diving specific course. For saturation diving. who do not dive together.4 MEDICAL CHECKS All divers at work must have a valid certificate of medical fitness to dive issued by a UK-HSE approved doctor. but must be qualified to go under pressure in an emergency. this means that at least two team members. divers will need to refresh their qualification at appropriate intervals. will need to inform their supervisor.1 Responsibility of the Diver Divers who consider themselves unfit for any reason.g. In practice. are trained as diver medics. For diving within the scope of this Guideline. It includes the main systems of the body . capacity for exercise. the curriculum of which must be equivalent of UK-HSE First-Aid course. fatigue. 6. This level of training will also require refresher training at regular intervals (normally every three years) (Ref. Safety and Environmental Management Page 39 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. such as the common cold or a dental problem. The certificate of medical fitness to dive must be renewed prior to expiring if a diver wishes to continue diving at work. 24) that will comply with DMAC Training.0 DIVING SAFETY Diving physiology and medicine forms and integral part of all diver training courses. the diver medic may be a team member on the surface. can have serious effects on a diver under pressure. central nervous system -and ears. e.Health.4. up to maximum of 12 months. This qualification expires after a period of time. The certificate of medical fitness to dive is a statement of the diver’s fitness to perform work under water.cardio-vascular system. minor injury. vision and dentition. 6. etc. nose and throat.

2 Responsibility of the Supervisor Before saturation exposure. (Ref. with a suitably qualified and experienced doctor such that medical advice and treatment is available at any time to the diving personnel offshore. their fitness to enter saturation. 25). Safety and Environmental Management Page 40 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.Health. 6. If the required treatment cannot be administered by the personnel at the worksite. Part of the planning will need to be the pre-agreement of a suitable method of transferring medical information from worksite to doctor. It is the responsibility of the diving contractor to make such arrangements. and will be specified in the contractor’s diving manuals.5 LIAISON WITH A SUITABLE DOCTOR The dive plan and risk assessment will need to consider the situation where a diver is injured but a doctor is not available at the worksite.0 DIVING SAFETY Divers who have suffered an incident of decompression illness will need to record details of the treatment they received in their log books. All risk assessments and dive plans will need to account for the fact that a seriously ill or injured diver in a DDC cannot be treated as if he was at atmospheric pressure. (Ref. Before any dive not involving saturation. (Ref. 22). 6. the Diving Medical Advisory Committee’s aide memoire. the supervisor will need to ask the divers to confirm that they are fit to dive. The content of the examination and the format of the written record will be decided by the diving contractor. the supervisor will need to ensure that the divers have had a medical examination within the previous 24 hours. the specialist doctor should possess a valid offshore security pass. This arrangement should be documented with the necessary details readily available offshore. before any diving operation commences. They will need to show this to the supervisor responsible for the first dive after the treatment in order that a check can be made of their fitness to return to diving. Such an arrangement is normally the subject of a “standby” agreement with a doctor experienced in diving medicine and means that an emergency contact is available at all times for medical advice. arrangements will be needed to allow personnel at the site to communicate over radio or telephone links with a diving medical specialist. 26).4. In such a circumstance. then trained medical staff and specialised equipment will need to be transported to the . for example. The medical examination will be carried out by a nurse or a diver medic. and if they have taking any medication. as far as reasonably practicable. To avoid problems in an emergency situation. This will be recorded in the diving operations log. This will confirm.

Treatment will be given to the injured diver inside the DDC.0 DIVING SAFETY casualty. safety and efficiency. It is difficult to treat decompression illness if recompression facilities are not immediately available. divers may be provided with suitable passive or active heating. 30).4 Flying after Diving The dive plan will need to state that flying is avoided for a specified time (Ref.6 MEDICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS 6.11. the dive plan will need to specify that supervisors need to be able to monitor divers’ breathing patterns and receive verbal reports from the divers of their condition.5 Thermal Stress The dive plan will need to specify ways in which divers can be maintained in thermal balance because excessive heat or cold can affect their health. 27). 28.6. For example. 31) following a dive because of the decrease in pressure on the diver’s body caused by increased altitude. the dive plan will need to include parameters for the safety of the diver. such as thermal undergarments and a well-fitting “dry” diving suit. (Ref. If there is any possibility of sonar activity or seismic activity in the vicinity of a diving project.1 Diver Monitoring For safety reasons. 6. 6. Safety and Environmental Management Page 41 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.6.6.29).6. The chamber must be available onsite at all times See 4.Health. The diver will not be decompressed or transferred to any other location until in a stable condition.2 Seismic Operations and Sonar Transmissions There are inherent problems for divers who are close to seismic operations or sonar transmissions. (Ref. or a . 6. The dive plan will therefore need to specify that divers remain close to suitable recompression facilities for a set time following a dive. 6. (Ref.6.3 Decompression Illness after Diving Divers are at risk of decompression illness (DCI) after diving. 6.

6. Because of the effects of long periods under pressure on the diver’s health.Health.6 Duration of Saturation Exposure When planning a dive. While lack of food will not normally be a problem. Safety and Environmental Management Page 42 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.0 DIVING SAFETY hot-water suit. including decompression. (Ref. safety and efficiency the dive plan will need to state that divers are not to be in saturation for more than a specified number of days (often 28) under normal circumstances. 51). a light snack when back at the bell can be helpful. 6. consideration will need to be given to the previous saturation exposures of each diver and the time they have spent at atmospheric pressure since completing their last saturation dive. To allow for statistical analysis ADNOC HSE division should receive an annual report from each OPCO stating the total number of dives carried out.6. and that they will need to be at atmospheric pressure for a specified period before starting another saturation.6. and that their inspired breathing gas will need active heating for dives deeper than 150 m. A diver spending over two hours out of a closed bell should be offered the opportunity to return to the bell and remove their breathing apparatus for a drink or other refreshments.1 GENERAL .7 REPORTING OF THERAPEUTIC RE-COMPRESSION EVENTS All such events have to be reported to ADNOC Environment & Safety Division within 7 days. (See Ref. The dive plan will need to state that divers who breathe oxygen and helium mixtures will require active heating because of the high thermal conductivity of this breathing mixture. Such periods should be specified in conjunction with the Company Medical Adviser.7 Divers out of Closed Bells Divers operating out of a closed bell over extended periods can suffer from dehydration. WORK PLANNING 7. 32). 6. Conversely in very warm waters nothing more than cotton overalls may be required. 7.

It should not be used unless it can be proved that surface supplied equipment is a higher risk and thus there are unlikely to be any circumstances where the use of SCUBA will provide a suitable technique for diving under the scope of this Guideline. The dive plan will therefore need to specify the maximum depth for the mixture being used. to reduce the chances of DCI. Archaeological. Safety and Environmental Management Page 43 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. In surface supplied diving the incidence of DCI drops if the length of time a diver spends at any particular depth is limited. All supervisors will need to have copies of the dive plan. 7.1. 33). whether compressed natural air or an artificial mixture. typically the US Navy “O” repetitive group. see Section 10. Based on this information. The risk assessment will need to identify site-specific hazards and their risks.1.3 Exposure limits for air and oxy-nitrogen diving Diving carries an inherent risk of decompression illness (DCI).Health. More detailed information will be found in the Bibliography later in this document. The plan will need to cover the general principles of the diving techniques as well as the needs of the particular operation. Breathing mixtures other than oxygen and nitrogen (or air) will normally be used when diving takes place deeper than 50 m of water.0 DIVING SAFETY Before any diving is carried out there should be a dive plan in existence. 7. such as limited breathing gas supplies.1. 7.2 Use of compressed air or oxy-nitrogen mixtures Divers breathing a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen under pressure. Many diving contractors use an artificial limit on time at any depth. It will also need to provide contingency procedures for any foreseeable emergency.1 SCUBA Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) has inherent limitations and difficulties. (Ref. The dive plan will consist of a diving contractor’s standard operating rules and any site-specific risk assessments and procedures. are at risk of both oxygen toxicity and nitrogen narcosis as the depth increases. Dive plans should be based on maximum bottom time limitation . An exhaustive list of hazards and risks is not possible but some are highlighted below. the plan will then need to state how these hazards and risks can be controlled. Environmental & Media Diving. For Scientific. Many factors need to be considered when preparing a dive plan for a diving project.

MAXIMUM BOTTOM TIME FOR SURFACE DECOMPRESSION AND IN-WATER DECOMPRESSION Maximum Depth of Dive Feet 0-40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 Meters 0-12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 Bottom Time in Minutes SD & in water 270 200 140 130 110 90 80 70 70 50 50 50 40 40 7. Regular repetitive diving of this nature generally results in higher residual nitrogen levels in the body and a subsequent increase in decompression sickness incidence.3. Safety and Environmental Management Page 44 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.Health.1. using tables which utilize the principle of diminishing residual body nitrogen in relation to increasing surface intervals is prohibited for routine diving operations. using the combined bottom times and the deepest depth to select the appropriate decompression schedule. The use of combined diving . In any event repetitive diving using USN repetitive dive tables shall never follow surface oxygen decompression. Repetitive diving of this kind shall only be allowed in the case of an emergency or extreme urgency where there would be a serious possibility of injury or property damage if the dive was not conducted. is .1 Repetitive and Combined Diving The practice of repetitive diving.0 DIVING SAFETY for surface decompression (SD) and in water decompression diving limits as set out in the table below: . The diving supervisor must record in the diving operations log book any USN type repetitive diving operation. If regular repetitive diving is required it may indicate that the diving team size is insufficient. stating his reason for allowing its use.

1.8 Diving near ROV Operations . Such measures will need to be part of a work control system. 35). such as a permit-to-work system.5 Water intakes and discharges Divers are vulnerable to suction or turbulence caused by water intakes and discharges.6 Restricted surface visibility Restricted surface visibility caused by driving rain for example may affect the safety of the operation. (Ref.13.0 DIVING SAFETY permitted. and could include mechanical isolation.7 Underwater Currents The dive plan will need to consider the presence of currents and the limitations they impose on the diver’s operational ability. The diving contractor will need to establish with the client whether there are any underwater obstructions or hazards in the vicinity of the proposed diving project. suitable measures will need to be taken to ensure that these cannot operate while divers are in the water unless the divers are protected with a suitable physical guard.1. 7. This is on the condition that in no event shall the combined time exceed the limitations of Section 7.1. 7. 7. 34). If there are any intakes or discharges. The dive plan will need to identify when operations will need to be suspended because of restricted visibility. (Ref. The dive plan for such work will need to consider all the relevant safety implications of using this technique instead of the use of a closed bell. The normal solution is to use a mixture of helium and oxygen as the breathing gas. Safety and Environmental Management Page 45 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.4 Surface supplied mixed gas diving The diving contractor may wish to carry out work using surface supplied techniques but where the use of compressed air or oxy-nitrogen mixtures would not be appropriate. tide meters provide accurate information on the current at different depths and can be used to assess the diving conditions. (Ref. 7. While other parameters also need to be taken into account. 1) 7.1.1. For such diving a properly equipped wet bell should be used and the maximum depth should be limited to 75 m of water for 30 minutes.Health.

Safety and Environmental Management Page 46 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. The plan will need to ensure that only dry discs not previously exposed to water are used. The dive plan will need to include ways to prevent the uncontrolled ascent of a load. and electrical trip mechanisms or guards could be employed.1. (Ref.11 Lift bags The use of lift bags under water can be hazardous. The dive plan will need to include solutions for these hazards. and guidance is available. umbilicals could be restricted in length. A dive plan that includes the use of such units will therefore also need to include safe operating procedures that will need to be followed. or in the vicinity of. 19). and that only enough discs for each dive are taken under water at any one time. 16). to ensure that the divers and other members of the dive team.1. etc.40).1.Health. physical contact. Care will need to be taken. the adhesive used in these discs tends to degrade in water. 36. ROVs.12 Abrasive cutting discs The dive plan will need to address the risk of abrasive cutting discs breaking during use under water. In particular.0 DIVING SAFETY There are a number of safety considerations that need to be taken into account when divers are working with. Such procedures can be found in industry guidance. (Ref. 7. 7. 39. For example. 16.9 Safe use of electricity Divers often come into contact with equipment operated by. electrical hazards.1. are protected from any hazards resulting from the use of electricity and particularly from any shock hazards (Ref. These include entanglement of umbilical. . 37). or carrying electricity. therefore. Good practice established by the industry will need to be followed. 7. Battery-operated equipment used inside compression chambers can also be a hazard and the dive plan will need to include safe parameters for using such equipment.10 High-pressure water jetting Even an apparently minor accident with this equipment has the potential to cause a serious internal injury to the diver. 7. (Ref.

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7.1.13 Oxy-arc cutting and burning operations There are inherent dangers in the use of oxy-arc cutting and burning techniques under water, including explosions from trapped gases, trapping of divers by items after cutting, etc. Guidance on this subject exists. The dive plan will need to include precise instructions regarding the operating procedures. Procedures, which eliminate blowback, etc., will need to be employed (Ref. 16,41). 7.1.14 Diving from DP vessels Diving from dynamically positioned vessels can be hazardous to divers because of the presence of rotating propellers and thrusters. Practical steps have been established to reduce the risks arising from this hazard, and these will need to be included in the dive plan (Ref. 42). The use of an ROV or some other way of carrying out the task will need to be considered if the possibility of an umbilical or diver coming into contact with a thruster or propeller cannot be discounted. The dive plan will need to ensure that any diving support vessel operating on dynamic positioning meets industry technical and operational standards. (Ref. 43,44,45). 7.1.15 Quantity of Gas The likely quantities of gases needed for diving operations, including therapeutic treatment and emergencies, will need to be calculated when planning a diving project. Allowances will also need to be made for leakage, wastage, and contingencies. AODC 14 shall be complied with (Ref. 46) for surface diving within 50 meters depth, the requirement for oxygen for emergency use shall not fall below 90 cm3 before a dive commences. Diving will need to be stopped if the minimum quantity of gas acceptable for safety purposes falls below the agreed minimum specified in the dive plan.

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7.1.16 Levels of Oxygen in Helium For safety reasons, pure helium should not be sent offshore except as a calibration gas or for a specific operational requirement. A small percentage of oxygen will need to be present in helium to be used within the scope of this Guideline. The minimum industry norm is 2%. (Ref. 47,48). When an oxygen-helium mixture is used as the reserve supply in the divers’ bailout bottle, it should contain a percentage of oxygen that allows it to be breathable over the largest possible depth range. Guidance on a suitable percentage exists. (Ref. 49). 7.1.17 Contents of Gas Mixes Gas cylinders containing breathing gases coming from suppliers will be colour coded in accordance with industry guidance (Ref. 6) and will be accompanied by an analysis certificate. The dive plan will need to make it clear that neither of these should be accepted as correct until a competent member of the dive team has analysed at least the oxygen content. This analysis will need to be repeated immediately before use of the gas. 7.1.18 Length of Diver’s Umbilicals The required length of the diver’s umbilical in relation to the worksite will need to be included in the dive plan, particularly where an emergency situation might require rapid location and recovery of the diver. (Ref. 50). When a diving bell is being used from a dynamically positioned vessel, the dive plan will additionally need to consider the fouling and snagging hazards in relation to umbilical length. (Ref. 42). 7.1.19 Duration of Bell Runs and Lockouts The dive plan will need to limit bell runs to less than 8 hours from “lock-off” to “lock-on” because of decreased safety and efficiency. The dive plan will also need to ensure that in a two-man bell, neither diver spends no more than 6 hours out of the bell. The dive plan will need to state that divers in saturation need to be given at least 12 continuous hours of rest in each 24-hours period.

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7.1.20 Transfer Under Pressure The transfer of divers or equipment into or out of the saturation chamber, or between chambers under pressure, introduces a particular hazard. The dive plan will need to state that internal doors, i.e. those between the transfer chamber and the trunking to the diving bell and those separating living chambers within the chamber complex, are to be kept closed and sealed at all times except when divers are actually passing through them. Industry safety notices have been issued on this subject. 7.1.21 Underwater Obstructions Diving operations can be complicated by the number of lines deployed during operations: DP tautwire, equipment guide lines, clump weights and wires and diver’s and bell umbilicals, swim lines etc. This situation is however often simplified by the level of detailed planning involved in the operation, resulting in all involved parties having a clear understanding of responsibilities and expectations. 7.1.22 Diving from vessel underway Diving from vessel underway is not permitted (except D.P. vessels in D.P. mode). 7.1.23 Live Boating Live Boating is permitted from inflatable or small (less than 6.5 m) craft where propellers are properly guarded and man tended and the umbilicals are distance marked 7.1.24 Diving at night from small craft Diving at night from small craft shall not normally be permitted

7.2 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS The safe and efficient deployment and operation of divers is dependent upon suitable environmental conditions. For any given situation the combination of these conditions can be dramatically different and it is the responsibility of the diving supervisor to

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assess all available information before deciding to conduct, to continue or to finish diving operations. Each Diving Contractor normally defines clear environmental limits. Diving supervisors should also ensure that they understand the implications of any other limitations, which apply to vessels and deployment systems. At no time should a diving supervisor allow contractual pressure to compromise the safety of personnel during ongoing or planned diving operations. The following sub-sections are designed to highlight environmental aspects that effect diving operations. There is not, however, any substitute for practical experience. 7.2.1 Water Depth and Characteristics Water characteristics may have a significant effect and the following factors should be taken into account when assessing the use of a diver on a given task: ◊ Visibility - Poor visibility can alter the effectiveness of the operation. Diving operations near or on the bottom can stir up fine grained sediment, which may reduce visibility, particularly in low or zero current situations. Temperature - Extreme temperature ( both high and low) may affect the reliability of equipment and impose particular hazards on personnel. Pollutants - The presence of man - made and natural petroleum products around oil fields can cloud optical lenses and may damage plastic materials. Equally gas can affect visibility, block sound transmission and cause sudden loss of buoyancy. Special precautions should be taken to protect the divers if pollutants are present, as well as protecting personnel who may handle the divers or their equipment during launch / recovery and during maintenance. Divers are very sensitive to water movement and great care has to be taken in shallow water where surge of the water or the proximity of vessel thrusters can have a major effect on the ability of a diver to remain in a particular position. (Ref. 35).

◊ ◊

7.2.2 Currents Currents can cause considerable problems in diving operations (Ref. 35) but unfortunately it is often the case that very little quantitative data on particular current profiles is available.

Health. Rough seas also require a heightened awareness of the possibility of accidents during recovery. e. these can have an effect on diving operations in a number of different ways: ◊ ◊ Wind speed and direction can make station-keeping difficult for the support vessel. While divers under water may not be directly affected by the various effects of weather. Good communication is a vital factor in reducing the possibility of accidents. 34). Rain and fog will cause a reduction in surface visibility. In certain situations.3 Sea State The sea state can affect every stage of a diving operation. 7.2.0 DIVING SAFETY Simulations and analysis can provide good indications of the effect of currents but often currents are not constant even close to the seabed. both to the surface crew and to the divers. 7. . Safety and Environmental Management Page 51 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. that all personnel involved with launch and recovery wear all necessary personnel protective equipment and fully understand their own role as well as the role of others involved in the operation.g. particularly in adverse sea states.4 Weather The cost and efficiency of operations can be adversely altered by the effects of weather. It is important. The use of a tide / current meter may provide information on the current strength and direction at any particular depth. purpose-built deployment systems.2. motion compensation systems. Working from a support vessel in rough seas requires careful consideration of safety before and during launch and recovery. such as the captain of the support vessel. Currents vary with location and surface currents can be quickly affected by wind direction. possibly creating a hazard for the support vessel (Ref. can either reduce or better accommodate the effect of wave action thereby enabling diving operations to be conducted in higher than normal sea state conditions while maintaining normal safety standards.

rain.1 Onboard Communications. which need not be hard-wired. A dedicated hard-wired intercom should link the Dive Control Position (Diving Supervisor) with the bridge. particularly with adverse combinations of wind. etc. This will normally form part of the Risk Assessment carried out for that operation.3 COMMUNICATIONS Good communications are an essential ingredient of safe operations. and communications equipment should be operable with one hand.Health. should also be provided. Safety and Environmental Management Page 52 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. crew readiness and the nature and urgency of the tasks. therefore. be carefully monitored with regard to the safety of both personnel and equipment. A suitable back-up system. 7. The operating position should be located to ensure ease of use. Extreme heat (including direct sunlight) can cause the temperature inside deck chambers to rise to dangerous levels. the system’s readiness. It should include arrangements such as loudspeakers or head phones for passing instructions to people on deck. In particular umbilicals stored on deck are more susceptible to overheating by warm air or direct sunlight. In the particular case of the crane operator (if there is one) he should always be able to communicate with the dive control position and the bridge by hard-wire if a static crane is installed. 7. Hot weather can cause overheating. 7. their interaction with each other. the DDC Control position and ROV control.3. for communication between the diving supervisor and Winch Operator and for ensuring that the standby Diver and Tender can monitor communications with the Diver.5 Other Considerations A diving supervisor should only allow a diving operation to begin after he has carefully considered all possible environmental criteria.0 DIVING SAFETY ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ Bad weather can make working on deck extremely hazardous for the diving crew. and other factors including the deployment of equipment.2. . Operations should. The following principles should be observed. Electric storms or lightning may be a hazard to exposed personnel or equipment.

by use of its crane. The design of all communication arrangements should take into account the likelihood of high ambient noise levels. extra supports needed. for example. Due account should be taken of voltage and/or pressure drops due to length. Due consideration should be given. Such items as suitable deck strength. The level of services should also be assessed. therefore. external supplies available and the ease of launch and recovery will need to be considered. should only be used if the installation is directly involved with the conduct of the dive. Supply Boat or Standby Vessel . Hose and cable runs should be protected from physical damage and should not cause a hazard to personnel. When such communications are used they should be monitored throughout on the vessel bridge.Health. care should be taken when considering hose or cable runs. such as the dive control station position and the installation. 7. When diving on or in the close vicinity of an offshore installation or other unit. Safety and Environmental Management Page 53 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. There are six basic types of support location:7.4. Prior to mobilisation it is recommended that a suitable person (this may be the diving supervisor) should inspect the site and decide on the optimum location for the system.3. While it is not necessary for the various components of the diving system to be placed in a single location. Diving Supervisors must inform the bridge of times of divers entering/leaving the sea.0 DIVING SAFETY Suitable communications should be provided between Dive Control and Operators of ancillary equipment. throughout the period when divers are in the water. 7. primary and back-up voice communications should always be established and manned between the Bridge of the vessel and an appropriate control position on the installation. Voice communications between other positions in the vessel.1 Small Work boat.4 SUPPORT LOCATIONS Divers are required to operate from different locations with varying levels of support to the diving system and crew. which exceed standard system lengths.2 Communications between a vessel/barge and offshore installations. to the effect each location will have on the safety and efficiency of an operation.

Poor weather susceptibility for overside operations. but they still need to be carefully assessed prior to the project to ensure that the limitations of the vessel are nevertheless acceptable in relation to the proposed work scope and envisaged environmental considerations. Lack of marine crew familiarity with diving operations. No. Safety and Environmental Management Page 54 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. or very low capability. While such vessels can be used successfully in many situations.2 Small Air Range Diving Support Vessels and Larger Supply Boats These vessel can be convenient for diving operations and while they will normally not have all the limitations listed in 7. Often. Low grade navigation systems. Again such vessels can be used in a number of situations.4. or very low capacity. or in an emergency. No. Minimal deck space. Unsuitable propeller guards. the vessel’s crew will be familiar with diving operations. which can be very advantageous in difficult operating condition. above. crane facilities. They offer relatively low day rates compared to other support vessels but may also present operational limitations such as: ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ Lack of manoeuverability. . Limited personnel accommodation.4.Health.0 DIVING SAFETY These are vessels of convenience from which diving may be carried out. they need to be carefully assessed prior to the project and a clear decision made that the limitations of the vessel are nevertheless acceptable in relation to the proposed work scope and envisaged environmental consideration. they will have some of these limitations. Low electrical power reserves. 7.1. offshore mooring or position keeping system.

(Ref. ROVs may operate from DSVs in a complementary role to a diving operation in which case the requirements relating to the diver’s safety take precedence at all times. there are a number of specific problems associated with operating from a fixed platform such as: ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ The need to comply with specific.Health.3 Monohull Diving Support Vessels (DSVS) Such vessels make good diving support ships but they are relatively expensive in comparison to other vessels due to the range of capabilities they can provide.4 Fixed Platforms While the fixed nature of an installation results in the absence of a number of the limitations imposed by floating structures.4. Space limitations leading to difficulty in installation of surface support equipment. 36). The possibility of a power shut-down due to a preferential trip operation. 7. zoning requirements in relation to hydrocarbon safety.0 DIVING SAFETY The range of vessel falling in to this category is substantial but some of the smaller or earlier generation vessels may still have some limitations which may well require careful consideration.4. Additional safety requirements imposed on personnel such as training in H2S emergencies. which governs the operation of diving systems. . and may result in operational delays. Safety and Environmental Management Page 55 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. Additional hazards resulting from operations undertaken inside the jacket area. Problems can arise if tidal effects on the diver make relocation difficult. often onerous. 7. In addition all platforms operate a ‘permit-to-work’ system. Deployment and recovery may be complicated by the height between the platform and sea level. Intakes and Outfalls.

Health. crane barges.0 DIVING SAFETY 7. All allow the vessel to move in a predetermined “footprint”. They may be maintained in that location by moorings.4. On many specialised vessels one of the main limitations on diving operations is that the primary task. which may in themselves be mobile but are intended to remain in one location during work. These platforms may however have other hazards to diving operations such as anchor wires and submerged pontoons. Examples would be drilling rigs. other types of platform may have no such limitations. .7 Dynamic Positioning Many of the above types of support location can be held in a fixed position by the use of dynamic positioning. for example pipelaying.4. accommodation barges etc. which can be quite large. 7. laybarges.4. Every specialist location will present different problems. 7. which will need to be carefully considered at the planning stage. Dynamic positioning has its own inherent limitations and hazards in relation to diving operations: No system keeps the vessel static. cannot be interrupted without serious consequences. This type of system can comprise anything from a supply boat captain using a joystick to manually maintain the vessel in one approximate location through to very sophisticated systems whereby several computers use external reference measurements to keep the vessel in an almost static position. It is important that all diving operations being conducted from a specialist location are planned to conform to a set of procedures agreed specifically for that location with the client. trenching barges or specialised marine vessels.5 Temporarily Fixed Platforms Included in this category are various large structures. DP systems or other means. Safety and Environmental Management Page 56 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.6 Specialist Locations These can include multi-support vessels (MSVs). These may present to diving operations similar hazards to those of a fixed platform and while zoning and hydrocarbon safety requirements will normally apply to drilling rigs.

which may or may not have been checked by a certifying authority. 45). crew competence etc. 43. This can then be compared with the required scope of work and a decision made about suitability and any restrictions which may need to be put on the operation.5 LAUNCH AND RECOVERY Because of the variety of diving systems. For the above reasons it is important that a thorough assessment is carried out prior to the offshore operation to establish what the capabilities and limitations are of the DP system on the proposed vessel.0 DIVING SAFETY Although many such systems are very reliable. which will assist in any such consideration.Health. it is not possible to define every launch/recovery procedure in this document. all have the possibility of failure. The diving contractor would be expected to have prepared appropriate calculations to a recognised standard. 7. levels of redundancy. The procedure should progress in smooth. It is the responsibility of the diving supervisor to ensure that a safe launch/recovery procedure exists that is understood by all members of both the diving and the support installation crews. 44. logical steps and be designed so that all personnel involved in the operation are fully aware of the situation at all times. Only vessels complying fully with all aspects (such as number of reference systems.) of the International Standard for diving using DP should be used. which can leave a vessel effectively out of control close to a number of other vessels or fixed objects. (Ref. DP vessels may be classified in accordance with an International classification system. These calculations may specify limits for launch and recovery based on weather/sea state/vessel motions or other parameters. DP uses the thrusters and propellers at all times which means that the diver and his umbilical can be at risk from these items or the wash that they generate. support locations and deployment systems. . Safety and Environmental Management Page 57 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.

need to be made to evacuate them safely while keeping them under pressure. which should be considered.3 HYPERBARIC EVACUATION In an emergency. in a chamber capable of being removed from the worksite to a safe location while maintaining the divers at the correct pressure and with life support for a minimum of 24 hours. such as locators. etc. These factors will need to be considered during the risk assessment. • • • • • Dealing with an injured or unconscious diver. The use of purpose built hyperbaric lifeboats is one option. which is not exhaustive. the number of divers to be evacuated. Loss of pressure in chambers or bell. Approach of severe weather. divers in saturation cannot be evacuated by the same methods as other crew members. 8. This should identify the actions of the diving contractor and other personnel.2 LOST BELL CONTINGENCY PLAN A contingency plan will need to exist for the relocation and recovery of a lost closed bell. the location of the worksite. therefore. Special arrangements and procedures will. and the provision of specific equipment. EMERGENCY AND CONTINGENCY PLANS 8. Safety and Environmental Management Page 58 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. (Ref. The exact design of such equipment and its method of deployment will depend on the facilities available. identifies the type of possible emergencies to be considered. . Fire in a chamber or around the dive system. Faulty or broken equipment. for example.1 DIVING EMERGENCIES The diving contractor’s operations manual should contain a section laying out the actions required of each member of the diving team in the event of a foreseeable emergency occurring during operations.0 DIVING SAFETY 8. The following list.Health. 8. 11).

Loose bolts or couplings should be tightened or.1 Pre-and Post-dive Checks Prior to diving commencing and after diving has been completed. It therefore requires regular inspection. if necessary. Each function should be briefly operated to ensure proper response. Diving contractors will need to prepare and authorize the use of such checklists as part of the planning for projects. Safety and Environmental Management Page 59 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. All of the equipment used in a diving operation will need to comply with at least these standards and suitable certificates (or copies) will need to be provided at the worksite for checking. discolouration. Many complex action sequences are required during a diving project and there is a risk that steps may be omitted or actioned out of sequence. a series of simple tests and examinations should be carried out to confirm that equipment is in good condition. Diving contractors should give due consideration to recommendations given in manufacturers’ maintenance manuals.1. Regular maintenance is an important factor in ensuring the safe operation of a diving system. that it is not damaged or suffering from deterioration. replaced. A typical system check is described below in outline format. DOCUMENTATION 9.0 DIVING SAFETY 9. 18). oil spots. These checks should include: ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ A brief visual and ‘touch’ inspection prior to any power being turned on.1 EQUIPMENT CERTIFICATION AND MAINTENANCE Guidance exists on the frequency and extent of inspection and testing required of all items of equipment used in a diving project. The system should be examined for cracks and dents. including frequent immersion in salt water. Diving equipment is used under extreme conditions. dirty camera lens etc. e. maintenance and testing to ensure it is fit for use. .Health. together with the levels of competence required of those carrying out the work (Ref. All mechanical parts should be kept clean and lubricated. 9. unsecured wires or hoses. A suitable way to ensure the thoroughness of such sequences on each occasion is the use of pre-prepared checklists that require the relevant personnel to tick a box to demonstrate correct completion. loose parts.g.

particularly for those items. 9. Safety and Environmental Management Page 60 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.4 OPERATING PROCEDURES . with copies of all relevant certificates of examination and test.0 DIVING SAFETY ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ Areas of potential corrosion should be examined and any necessary preventative or corrective measures undertaken. amount of use. Such a system may be based on passage of time. 9. The planned maintenance system will need to identify the frequency with which each task is to be undertaken and who should do the work. maximum weather conditions for use.2. which are essential to continued operation and safety. but ideally will be based on a combination of all of these. Major mechanical components should be regularly checked for alignment and abrasion.2 PLANNED/PERIODIC MAINTENANCE The Diving contractor will need to establish a system of planned maintenance for plant and equipment. The individual involved will then need to complete a record of the work.3 EQUIPMENT REGISTER An equipment register will need to be maintained at the worksite. Electrical lines and connections should be examined and any hydraulic system inspected for leaks. Fluid levels should be regularly checked. A function test should be performed on all brakes and latches. ◊ 9.Health. for example. abrasions and oil leaks.1 Spare Parts Diving operations are often undertaken in remote offshore areas. 9. either on paper or computer. manufacturer recommendations or previous operational experience. Diving contractors should therefore ensure that an adequate serviceable supply of spare items is available. The handling system should be checked for structural damage. It will need to contain any relevant additional information such as details of any applicable design limitations.

0 DIVING SAFETY The operating procedures will consist of a diving contractor’s standard operating rules and any site-specific risk assessments and procedures. personnel and any tooling necessary to execute the programme. Safety and Environmental Management Page 61 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. An exhaustive list of hazards and risks is not possible but some are highlighted in the previous sections. System equipment technical manuals. In certain circumstances (such as a contractual or legislative requirement) specific documentation and procedures covering the intended scope of work should be prepared and submitted to the client for approval. The management of a project should be clearly specified together with a defined chain of command.Health. A QA Summary. Based on this information. check lists and log books appropriate to the operation. A risk assessment will need to identify site-specific hazards and their risks. A mobilisation plan. Many factors need to be considered when preparing the procedures for a specific project. the procedures will then need to state how these hazards and risks can be controlled. They will also need to provide contingency procedures for any foreseeable emergency. It is the responsibility of every contractor to ensure that each diving system is supplied with the necessary documentation including at least the following:• • • • Contractor’s operations manual.5 MANUALS AND DOCUMENTATION A major factor in a safe and efficient diving operation is the supply of a comprehensive set of manuals. Documentation should include: • • • • A clearly defined scope of work and a list of resources. The procedures will require to cover the general principles of the diving techniques as well as the needs of the particular operation. A logistics plan. 9. Daily diary/report book. Safety management system. .

Name of the supervisor making the entry and date on which the entry was made. Safety and Environmental Management Page 62 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.6 DIVING OPERATIONS LOG Diving Contractors should ensure that a written record is kept on a daily basis of all the activities carried out and of any other relevant factors. There is no specific format that this document should take however the following matters should be a minimum level of information to be recorded: • • • • • • • • Name and address of the diving contractor. Systems spares inventory. Location of the diving operation.0 DIVING SAFETY • • • • Planned maintenance system. Any codes of practice which apply to the diving operation. Date to which entry relates (an entry must be completed daily by each supervisor for each diving operation). including the name of any vessel or installation from which diving is taking place.1 Reference Documentation Diving contractors should be familiar with all relevant legislation for the areas in which they are operating and the various advisory publications relevant to diving operations. 9. Some examples of these are listed in the bibliography at the end of this document.Health. Repair and maintenance record. 9. Pre/post dive check list.5. Names of all those taking part in the diving operation as divers or other members of the dive team. . Breathing apparatus and breathing mixture used by each diver in the diving operation. Purpose of the diving operation.

Any defect recorded in the functioning of any plant used in the diving operation. Any other factors likely to affect the safety or health of any persons engaged in the operation. . Emergency support arrangements. 9. The date to which the entry relates (an entry must be completed daily for each dive carried out by the diver). Any emergency or incident of special note which occurred during the diving operation. There are a number of hard bound log books available for this purpose. however any suitable log book can be used. Safety and Environmental Management Page 63 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. worksite.7 DIVERS PERSONAL LOG BOOKS Divers need to keep a detailed daily record of any dives they have carried out.0 DIVING SAFETY • • • • • • • • Decompression schedule containing details of the pressures (or depths) and the duration of time spent by divers at those pressures (or depths) during decompression. The maximum depth reached on each occasion. craft or other place from which the diving operation was carried out.Health. The time the diver left the surface. Time at which each diver leaves atmospheric pressure and returns to atmospheric pressure plus his bottom time. • • • • • • The name and address of the diving contractor. The name of the supervisor who was in control of a diving operation in which the diver took part. Particulars of any relevant environmental factors during the operation. The following is the minimum information. including details of any decompression illness and the treatment given. The name or other designation and the location of the installation. Maximum depth which each diver reached. The IMCA publication is a suitable example. and the time the diver reached the surface on each occasion. which needs to be entered in the diver’s log book. the bottom time.

The type of breathing apparatus and mixture used by the diver. a dive plan will require to be submitted to the OPCO Competent Person for diving. 9.0 DIVING SAFETY • • • • • • • Where the dive includes time spent in a compression chamber. details of any time spent outside the chamber at a different pressure. for example. discomfort or injury suffered by the diver. 10. Any emergency or incident of special note which occurred during the dive. Safety and Environmental Management Page 64 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. Any other factor relevant to the diver’s safety or health. A suitable way to ensure the thoroughness of such sequences on each occasion is the use of pre-prepared checklists that require the relevant personnel to tick a box to demonstrate correct completion. . ENVIRONMENTAL & MEDIA DIVING CARRIED OUT ON BEHALF OF ADNOC GROUP COMPANIES Should any of the Group Companies require this operation to be carried out. There is a risk that steps may be omitted or actioned out of sequence. Any work done by the diver on each occasion.Health. The entry must be dated and signed by the diver and countersigned by the supervisor. Any decompression illness.8 USE OF CHECKLISTS Many complex action sequences are required during a diving project. ARCHAEOLOGICAL. Any decompression schedules followed by the diver on each occasion. checking a diving bell before deployment. and the equipment (including any tools) used in that work. SCIENTIFIC. Diving contractors will need to prepare and authorize the use of such checklists as part of the planning for diving projects.

2 SCUBA RESTRICTIONS If a Scuba dispensation is applied for/granted the following restrictions will also be applied.Health. For dives requiring operational decompression.1 GENERAL When planning and implementing such programmes Job officers should be aware that these operations are subject to different standards than normal commercial/oil field diving operations. Before the operation commences the contractor must apply for approval from the OPCO relevant department to use Scuba. . In currents exceeding 1 knot. In water visibility less than 2 meters. With a total team size less than 5 including boat crew. standby diver and tender. quoting the particular code or standard to be utilized and submit a risk assessment. diving supervisor. Additionally the other limitations on the use of Scuba. During hours of darkness. Safety and Environmental Management Page 65 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. Scuba diving is not permitted: • • • • • • • In condition Beaufort 3 and above. environmental conditions and decompression facilities may also apply. Different skill and operational standards are therefore considered applicable. Diving procedures in such codes allow the use of Scuba with certain controls. Emergency Procedures and work procedures must also be submitted to the OPCO relevant department for review and approval. Without using an ABLJ. Internationally accepted codes have been established keeping in mind that such operations are not normally as hazardous as commercial/oil field diving operations and that the divers are normally scientific professionals rather than professional commercial divers.0 DIVING SAFETY 10. 10. Diving rules (Diving Manual). small boats. diver.

0 DIVING SAFETY • Without the use of a lifeline to surface unless the diver is connected by a buddy line. to a second diver who is equipped with a line and surface buoy.4 OPERATIONAL STANDARDS The following codes are accepted by ADNOC in regards to the scope of works to which they apply: • • • • The American Academy of Underwater Sciences Standards for Scientific Diving Certification and Operation of Scientific Diving Programs.5 PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS All diving related personnel will be subject to interview and must demonstrate that they posses the required experience and qualifications for the particular task(s) to be performed. UK HSE Diving at Work Regulations Scientific and Archaeological Diving Code. Diving Supervisors particularly must demonstrate an excellent understanding of safety requirements including accident procedures and Emergency and Contingency Plans. CMAS 3 star diver equivalent. Safety and Environmental Management Page 66 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. b. UNESCO/CMAS Scientific Diving Code of Practice. PADI Rescue Diver. The diving supervisor should also locate the nearest chamber and have an agreement that in an emergency recompression facilities will be available. 10. The following diving qualifications are acceptable for this scope of diving operations: a. Diving log books and original qualifications certificates. medical examination certificates and appropriate first aid training certificates must be produced.Health. 10. Any other similar code of practice which can be shown to be of an equal or higher standard to the previously named codes (to be approved by the OPCO Competent Person / Relevant Department ). 10. not exceeding 2 meters.3 COMMUNICATIONS The dive boat must have the ability to communicate with shore or main diving vessel (if diving from a small craft) in case of an emergency. or Plus any additional requirements of the particular code of practice for scientific diving .

11. Communications with Divers. Diver’s Gas Supply. Marking and colour coding of gas cylinders. In some cases these documents may be based on the Regulations of a particular country. REF. Their content should be considered as sound advice rather than a fixed requirement. Ingress of Water into Underwater Cylinders charged by means of a Manifold System.Health. Periodic Examination of bail-out bottles. Diving Supervisors must be appointed in writing by the employer of divers.0 DIVING SAFETY c. First Aid training for Diving Supervisors is mandatory and such training must include instruction in the use of emergency oxygen administration. Any of the higher qualifications specified in this document for commercial divers plus compliance with any other required standards of the proposed Code of Practice for Scientific Diving Programmes. Gas cylinders used in conjunction with diving operations in areas governed by UK Regulations. quads and banks for diving applications. • Any person who will be required to conduct work underwater must be in possession of a valid certificate of medical examination as prescribed by the proposed Code of Practice for Scientific Diving Programmes. Diving Supervisors will be experienced in the type of equipment to be used and type of diving operation to be supervised. NAUI Master Diver. Safety and Environmental Management Page 67 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. BIBLIOGRAPHY / REFERENCES The following is a list of documents which give more detailed information on subjects covered in the Guideline. They will already be established supervisors and comply with the requirements and standards specified in the proposed Code of Practice for Scientific Diving Programmes. • • Any other qualifications required and accepted by the above codes for scientific diving programmes. . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 SOURCE AODC 055 AODC 031 AODC 010 (Rev 1) AODC 037 AODC 064 AODC 016 (Rev 1) AODC 028 DESCRIPTION Protection of Water Intake Points for Diver Safety.

Bell Ballast Release Systems and Buoyant Ascent in Offshore Diving Operations. Underwater Air Lift Bags. Oxygen Cleaning. The training and refresher training of doctors involved in the examination and treatment of professional divers.0 DIVING SAFETY 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 AODC 039 AODC 029 AODC 009 AODC 019 (Rev 1) AODC 012 AODC 026 AODC 061 AODC 017 AODC 035 AODC 054 IMCA DO18 Emergency air bottles in diving baskets. Testing and Certification of Diving Plant and Equipment-in accordance with UK Regulations. Diver emergency heating. Safety and Environmental Management Page 68 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. Code of Practice in the Initial and Periodic Examination. USCG. The main ones are DNV. Germanischer Lloyd. 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 IMCA DO16 (Rev 1) AODC 053 (Rev 1) DMAC 15 (Rev 1) DMAC 28 DMAC 17 DMAC 11 DMAC 13 (Rev 1) . Lloyds. Bell emergency location equipment trials. Note Certification Societies also publish standards for this. First aid training for divers and diving supervisors. ABS. Medical equipment to be held at the site of an offshore diving operation. Code of Practice for the safe Use of Electricity Under Water. Guidance Note on emergency diving bell recovery. The provision of emergency medical care for divers in saturation. Guidance Note on the marking of hyperbaric rescue systems designed to float in water. Emergency isolation of gas circuits in the event of a ruptured bell umbilical.Health. Bureau Veritas. Guidance on assessing fitness to return to diving after decompression illness. Prevention of Explosions during Battery Charging in relation to Diving Systems. AODC Offshore diving supervisor and life support technician schemes.

Health. Oxy-arc cutting operations under water. Power system protection for DP vessels.0 DIVING SAFETY REF. 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 SOURCE DMAC 01 DMAC 02 DMAC 06 DMAC 12 DMAC 22 DMAC 07 DMAC 21 (Rev 1) AODC 065 AODC 034 AODC 047 AODC 032 (Rev 1) AODC 051 AODC 062 AODC 049 DMAC 03 IMCA D 003 IMCA D 010 (Rev 1) 103 DPVOA 108 DPVOA IMCA M 117 AODC 014 DMAC 05 AODC 038 DESCRIPTION Aid memoire for recording and transmission of medical data to shore. The effect of sonar transmissions on commercial diving activities. Guidance note on the use of inert gases. Proximity to a recompression chamber after surfacing. Safe diving distance from seismic surveying operations. Recommendations for flying after diving. Guidance on the duration of saturation exposures and surface intervals between saturations. Minimum quantities of gas required offshore. Recommendations on minimum level of O2 in helium supplied offshore. The training and experience of key DP personnel. The effects of underwater currents on diver’s performance and safety. . Safety and Environmental Management Page 69 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. Guidelines for the design and operation of dynamically positioned vessels. In water diver monitoring. Accidents with high pressure water jets. Code of practice for the use of high pressure water jetting equipment by divers. SCUBA Diving when there is poor surface visibility. Diving operations from vessels operating in DP mode. Use of battery operated equipment in hyperbaric conditions. Guidance note on the safe and efficient operation of remotely operated vehicles. Remotely operated vehicle intervention during diving operations.

Safety and Environmental Management Page 70 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.0 DIVING SAFETY REF. Copies of these documents can be obtained from IMCA in London. . 49 50 SOURCE DMAC 04 AODC 020 DESCRIPTION Recommendations on partial pressure of O2 in bail out bottles.Health. Length of diver’s umbilicals from diving bells.

Health.0 DIVING SAFETY Appendix A CHECKLIST FOR THE INITIAL SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF DIVING CONTRACTORS . Safety and Environmental Management Page 71 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.

It will also enable the safety assessor (who will normally be the OPCO Competent Person for Diving Operations) to expeditiously advise his senior of his assessment and whether the Contractor meets the basic requirements. Such reports must be attached and cross referenced in the main recommendation section. • • • • • . Safety and Environmental Management Page 72 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. It is emphasized that Contractor is required to demonstrate the adequacy of his system and not to demonstrate in detail how compliance with specific requirements is to be ensured. General Notes • The majority of the questions are intended to seek whether the Contractor provides for the diving operation to be conducted as part of the overall Safety Management System and not in isolation to it. from a safety point of view to be included on an approved bid list. other than in specific diving manuals. etc. It should be stressed that this initial exercise will only provide information for the first stage of the audit. plant inspections and other checks and audits would need to be conducted. To give a “NO” answer to questions does not necessarily imply that the provisions are unacceptable since. or not acceptable..Health. documents. The assessment must be signed by the persons conducting the audit and must state the contractor is acceptable. procedures. Any conditions may be included in the “Main recommendations” section or on separate supporting report. 2. conditionally acceptable. Purpose The purpose of this exercise is to ensure that the initial safety assessment of a Contractor is conducted in a consistent and auditable manner. It should be recognized that many of the answers to the questions may be found in Contractors manuals.0 DIVING SAFETY INITIAL SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF DIVING CONTRACTORS 1. in some cases. Before new Contractors can be fully and finally approved it is envisaged that site visits. it may be that the question is inappropriate in the particular circumstances.

Safety and Environmental Management Page 73 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.0 DIVING SAFETY • • The assessment must be endorsed by the Head of Safety (or his designate in his absence). The job officer must be officially notified of the audit findings and in turn inform the contractor. .Health.

... sites and workshops.C.......... 4........... 3..... SECTION A ....... Has the Contractor designated one individual to be responsible for diving safety....................... responsibilities in regard to safety.....S... issues by making frequent offshore visits and can such visits be effectively verified.... 8.. based chief or senior executive......&E............S........ Is Contractor a member of I... Is the policy statement consistent throughout the Contractors documentation and signed by the U.. .........&E....A............ If so what is his official title......Health. Does the organization have an H...E.... Does he have a formal Job Description stating his duties... Does Senior Management demonstrate their commitment to H...... Is the same policy statement displayed at offices......POLICY AND ORGANISATION ITEM SUBJECT REMARKS 1.. Safety and Environmental Management Page 74 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1................. AUDIT DATE: .. 5............................................. Safety & Environmental issues and does it specifically mention diving related activities.A. 7... 6... Is there a clear and definitive chain of command chart showing the various responsibilities/duties/reporting path between various positions..........0 DIVING SAFETY CHECKLIST FOR THE INITIAL SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF DIVING CONTRACTORS NAME OF CONTRACTOR:..M..... 2.... policy statement that commits both senior and operational personnel to Health............ Is he adequately qualified and experienced to fulfill his role – State how/details/ qualifications....

documentation state specific: • • • Governing standards. A consultancy agreement with a local qualified diving physician for emergency hyperbaric situations.S.&E.&E. Marine Operations Manual (if diving Co. Management Manual. Diving Safety Manual. Safety and Environmental Management Page 75 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. documentation including: • • • H. 11.S. Name the Doctor and his base. emergency response and contingency plans for diving operations specific to installations. Plant requirements + inspection/test/certificate requirements. An adequately equipped Emergency Response Room to handle Marine/Diving emergencies. Does the Contractor’s H. also owns vessels). 10. 12. 15. Does the Contractor have: • • • .0 DIVING SAFETY ITEM SUBJECT REMARKS 9. Does the Contractor carry current adequate third party liability/employee insurance. 16. Does the Contractor distribute the Diving Safety documentation to sites and appropriate client and sub-contractor positions. site hazards and their environments.S. A nominated liaison man to coordinate with clients and clients Emergency Response Room. Does the Contractor have adequate H. what is the controllers official position. Who is responsible for updating the above documentation and what are the dates of the current editions. Are they controlled and is there a nominated document controller. Does the diving operations/safety manual contain adequate instruction to ensure the health and safety. 13.&E. Personnel training and qualification requirements.Health. 14.

20.S.&E. subcontractors and clients are these minuted/verifiable. Does the Contractor’s H.S. 21. Is the Contractor’s Management formally advised of the findings of such audits and is there evidence that such audits are being conducted?. Safety and Environmental Management Page 76 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. Management System provide a procedure for auditing its own and sub-contractors Health & Safety Management Systems / Policies. Management System provide for external audit of its H.&E. Does the Contractor’s H.S. Are minutes distributed to relevant offshore personnel. clients and sub-contractors.&E. Are onshore safety meetings held with Management. . 19.0 DIVING SAFETY ITEM SUBJECT REMARKS 17.Health. Management System. 18.

Who is responsible for analyzing workscopes and procedures for H. 6. Who is responsible for compilation of the Project Safety Plan. 9. matters. Does the Contractor hold pre-mobilization meetings with the client and sub-contractors to discuss H. 11. 8. Do Contractor’s personnel. In the case of a rapid mobilization requirement does the Contractor have in place a procedure to ensure safety inspection and formal safety requirements are being followed. accidents and incident reporting.&E. Safety and Environmental Management Page 77 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. who are involved in the planning and implementing of diving operations. Does the Contractor make provision for documents to bridge his own emergency procedures and those of clients and subcontractors. . Do the Contractors personnel qualification + experience standards comply with ADNOC requirements.S. updating and distributing the bridging documents. 5. 4. work permit requirement. safety policy on site hazards. matters. restrictions.Health.0 DIVING SAFETY SECTION B . Are such meetings recorded/minuted and is there a formal procedure to ensure relevant onshore and offshore personnel are provided with instructions arising from such meetings. 7. Who is responsible for producing. have formal job descriptions stating their duties. 3. responsibilities and qualification requirements. Are workscopes/procedures critically analyzed in regards to the Health & Safety of the personnel involved in the operations. 10. emergency and contingency plans.S. both offshore and onshore.&E.PLANNING & IMPLEMENTATION ITEM SUBJECT REMARKS 1. 2. Is the Management structure sufficient in numbers and competence to support the proposed operation and is there adequate staff support including arrangements to cover leave periods.

13. first aid boxes. Is there any evidence of an adequate Planned Maintenance Schedule being implemented and does this include prevention of breakdown by prudent replacement of components. first aiders. Contractors office / workshop – Adequate communications equipment present.’s. fire escapes. Is there any record of contractors personnel attending site / vessel safety inductions prior to commencing operations.Health. . Does the Contractor have adequate premises. 21. Is there any evidence that effective initial and ongoing competence assessments are being conducted on personnel. 15. Fire drills regularly conducted / logged. Are references required and checked. 18. fire extinguishers. 16. 14. Are Masters of Marine Vessels and other appropriate associated personnel being vetted for their experience of working on diving operations and knowledge of basic diving safety or is the Contractor conducting basic diving safety induction. 20. Does the Contractor’s Safety Management System establish preventive controls for all identified potential health and safety hazards at (and adjacent to) the dive site. 17.v. Does the Contractor carry substantial/adequate spare parts in his stores/ on site. 19. workshop and skilled technicians for maintaining and repairing diving equipment/dive support vessels (if also vessel owners).0 DIVING SAFETY ITEM SUBJECT REMARKS 12. Safety and Environmental Management Page 78 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. and on his own premises. Is there any evidence that Contractors are vetting personnel to ensure they meet the required standards and possess the experience claimed in c. alternative escape route present escape procedures posted. Does the Contractor’s procedure provide for a proven / adequate method of evacuation of divers from vessels or installations taking into account divers may be under pressure.

Has the Contractor developed and uses predive checklists and are they adequate. Are Diving Supervisors IMCA certified (or equivalent) and do their log books verify the required familiarization of the Contractors diving rules. Are there procedures provided by the Contractor to ensure diver emergency and specific diving safety drills and evacuation drills are conducted at regular intervals. 24. 25.0 DIVING SAFETY ITEM SUBJECT REMARKS 22. 23. emergency and contingency plans has been conducted. 26. . Does the Contractor’s procedure take into account the need for adequate and protected escape routes from dive control and the placing of diving plant and stations in safe areas. Safety and Environmental Management Page 79 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.Health. Does the Contractor have a policy or a formal procedure requiring them to inform other diving operators in the area of their working location in order to give / receive assistance on diving related matters in case of an emergency.

0 DIVING SAFETY SECTION C . in addition to “in-house” H. Does the Contractor.&E. 5. 3. as minimum: • • • • • • • IMCA / AODC Guidelines. Safety and Environmental Management Page 80 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. safety reports and inspection results distributed to management and offshore personnel. Are unbiased “on site” safety inspections conducted to determine the percentage of compliance with statutory.S.S. HSE DSM’s. 6. Are appropriate AODC/IMCA guidelines. Does the Contractor require regular on site safety meetings to be conducted. have an adequate technical reference library to enable him to implement and measure safe working operations e. . Guidances to regulations / risk assessment / Successful Health & Safety Management Systems. how often?. 2. Certifying Authority Rules. Are audit. Does the Contractor conduct on “on site” safety assessment surveys which encourage personnel involvement in conducting the surveys.&E. client’s representatives and sub-contractors when appropriate. IMCA monthly publications. documentation.g. DMAC notices. H.Health.MEASURING PERFORMANCE ITEM SUBJECT REMARKS 1. DSMs and DMAC notices provided to diving sites in addition to in-house. ADNOC and Contractor’s regulations. UK Diving Regulations. documentation. If so. 4.

Are Contractors management reviewing these minutes and responding back to offshore sites to keep them informed of reaction to items and progress regarding safety suggestions. client’s representative and displayed on site notice board. 11. 10. or any other accidents and incidents.0 DIVING SAFETY ITEM SUBJECT REMARKS 7. Are investigation reports and recommendations distributed to management. Are accidents / incidents investigated thoroughly. sites and clients as appropriate. . Has the onshore safety officer a duty to ensure action and reply. 9. 8. Reward of his own personnel who achieve exemplary safety standards or innovations / suggestions. Are the minutes of such meetings copied to the onshore management. competently and do such investigations include specialists and senior management when appropriate. reported in an acceptable format and records kept. Safety and Environmental Management Page 81 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1.Health. Are diving related. 12. person in-charge of site. Does the Contractor have established procedures for dealing with: • • Any personnel who blatantly contravene safety practices and regulations.

REVIEWING PERFORMANCE ITEM SUBJECT REMARKS 1. Does the Contractor possess adequate historical accident / incident data for risk assessment purposes. 7. 4. 2.S. Are accidents and incidents analyzed to not only identify immediate causes but also underlying causes. matters and recommendations from previous contracts and accident investigations are considered. Is there a Safety Improvement Plan in operation and a procedure for ensuring that H. 3. implemented and included as appropriate in H. Are formal personnel performance assessments conducted and are assessment forms completed by the employee’s immediate supervisor. 10. manuals. Are post contract meetings held. 9. 6. 8.0 DIVING SAFETY SECTION D . Are these statistics circulated to Management. When was the last external audit? Is there any evidence to indicate steps have been taken to implement external audit recommendations and to what percentage have they been implemented.S. 5.M. Are annual accidents statistics produced which identify accidents / incidents by type + frequency and identify any trends in order to formulate future responses / possible changes to the Contractors S. .Health. How often is the Contractor’s SMS audited / assessed for improvement by external auditors. Is there a requirement for controlled documentation (including that in clients possession) to be returned to the document controller.&E. Safety and Environmental Management Page 82 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. sites and clients.S.&E.

How often are internal SMS conducted / date of last internal audit. Is there any evidence to indicate implementation of internal audit recommendations and to what percentage level have they been implemented.Health. . Safety and Environmental Management Page 83 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1. 12.0 DIVING SAFETY ITEM SUBJECT REMARKS 11.

.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Safety and Environmental Management Page 84 of 84 Effective Date: July 1999 Approved by: Chief Executive Officer Version: 1...................................... SIGNED:........................................................................................................................................................................................................... .......................................................................... .................................................................................................................................................. NAME: ........................................ NAME: ..... ............................................................................0 DIVING SAFETY CHECKLIST FOR THE INITIAL SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF DIVING CONTRACTORS MAIN RECOMMENDATIONS .......................................................................................... POSITION:........................................... .................................................................................................................................................................................. SIGNED:........................ POSITION:......................................................................................... ENDORSED: ................ ..................... .................................................................... AUDITOR: ........................................................................................................... ................................................ ........................................................................................................................................................................................ ....... ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. ...........................................................Health.................................................. .................................