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Systematic biology (hereafter called simply systematics) is the field that (a) p rovides scientific names for organisms, (b) describes

them, (c) preserves collec tions of them, (d) provides classifications for the organisms, keys for their id entification, and data on their distributions, (e) investigates their evolutiona ry histories, and (f) considers their environmental adaptations. This is a field with a long history that in recent years has experienced a notable renaissance, principally with respect to theoretical content. Part of the theoretical materi al has to do with evolutionary areas (topics e and f above), the rest relates es pecially to the problem of classification. Taxonomy is that part of Systematics concerned with topics (a) to (d) above.Systematic biology (hereafter called simp ly systematics) is the field that (a) provides scientific names for organisms, ( b) describes them, (c) preserves collections of them, (d) provides classificatio ns for the organisms, keys for their identification, and data on their distribut ions, (e) investigates their evolutionary histories, and (f) considers their env ironmental adaptations. This is a field with a long history that in recent years has experienced a notable renaissance, principally with respect to theoretical content. Part of the theoretical material has to do with evolutionary areas (top ics e and f above), the rest relates especially to the problem of classification . Taxonomy is that part of Systematics concerned with topics (a) to (d) above.Sy stematic biology (hereafter called simply systematics) is the field that (a) pro vides scientific names for organisms, (b) describes them, (c) preserves collecti ons of them, (d) provides classifications for the organisms, keys for their iden tification, and data on their distributions, (e) investigates their evolutionary histories, and (f) considers their environmental adaptations. This is a field w ith a long history that in recent years has experienced a notable renaissance, p rincipally with respect to theoretical content. Part of the theoretical material has to do with evolutionary areas (topics e and f above), the rest relates espe cially to the problem of classification. Taxonomy is that part of Systematics co ncerned with topics (a) to (d) above.Systematic biology (hereafter called simply systematics) is the field that (a) provides scientific names for organisms, (b) describes them, (c) preserves collections of them, (d) provides classifications for the organisms, keys for their identification, and data on their distributio ns, (e) investigates their evolutionary histories, and (f) considers their envir onmental adaptations. This is a field with a long history that in recent years h as experienced a notable renaissance, principally with respect to theoretical co ntent. Part of the theoretical material has to do with evolutionary areas (topic s e and f above), the rest relates especially to the problem of classification. Taxonomy is that part of Systematics concerned with topics (a) to (d) above.Syst ematic biology (hereafter called simply systematics) is the field that (a) provi des scientific names for organisms, (b) describes them, (c) preserves collection s of them, (d) provides classifications for the organisms, keys for their identi fication, and data on their distributions, (e) investigates their evolutionary h istories, and (f) considers their environmental adaptations. This is a field wit h a long history that in recent years has experienced a notable renaissance, pri ncipally with respect to theoretical content. Part of the theoretical material h as to do with evolutionary areas (topics e and f above), the rest relates especi ally to the problem of classification. Taxonomy is that part of Systematics conc erned with topics (a) to (d) above.