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The following information was generated from the Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), a database of the National

Library of Medicine's TOXNET system (http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov) on January 3, 2014. Query: Records containing the term 8008 89 7 1 NAME: VEGETABLE OIL HSN: 5154 RN: 8008-89-7 HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS: HUMAN TOXICITY EXCERPTS: HUMAN TOXICITY REPORTED.[TEITELBAUM DT; VEGETABLE OIL AEROSOL SPRAY INTOXICATION; ROCKY MT MED J 66(10) 62 (1969)] **PEER REVIEWED** CONTROLLED TRIAL OF THE EFFECT OF LINOLENIC ACID ON INCIDENCE OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE. THE NORWEGIAN VEGETABLE OIL EXPERIMENT OF 1965-1966.[NATVIG H ET AL; CONTROLLED TRIAL OF THE EFFECT OF LINOLENIC ACID ON INCIDENCE OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE. THE NORWEGIAN VEGETABLE OIL EXPERIMENT OF 1965-1966; SCAND J CLIN LAB INVEST 22 (PSUPPL 15:1+), 1968] **PEER REVIEWED** EMERGENCY MEDICAL TREATMENT: EMERGENCY MEDICAL TREATMENT: EMT COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER: The information contained in the Truven Health Analytics Inc. products is intended as an educational aid only. All treatments or procedures are intended to serve as an information resource for physicians or other competent healthcare professionals performing the consultation or evaluation of patients and must be interpreted in view of all attendant circumstances, indications and contraindications. The use of the Truven Health Analytics Inc. products is at your sole risk. These products are provided "as is" and "as available" for use, without warranties of any kind, either express or implied. Truven Health Analytics Inc. makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, timeliness, usefulness or completeness of any of the information contained in the productsAdditionally, Truven Health ANALYTICS INC. makes no representation or warranties as to the opinions or other service or data you may access, download or use as a result of use of the Truven Health ANALYTICS INC. products. All implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose or use are hereby excluded. Truven Health Analytics Inc. does not assume any responsibility or risk for your use of the Truven Health Analytics Inc. products.<p>The following Overview, *** NON-TOXIC INGESTION ***, is relevant for this HSDB record chemical. LIFE SUPPORT: o This overview assumes that basic life support measures have been instituted. CLINICAL EFFECTS: 0.2.1 SUMMARY OF EXPOSURE

0.2.1.1 ACUTE EXPOSURE A) USES: This document describes the management of substances generally considered nontoxic. Careful identification of the exact substance is critical for the appropriate application of the recommendations included in this document. These substances may still cause significant health effects due to idiosyncratic or allergic reactions, acting as a foreign body, or when the exposure is massive. B) TOXICOLOGY: The most common effects are mucosal irritation or injury or gastrointestinal tract irritation. C) EPIDEMIOLOGY: Ingestions of nontoxic substances are very common. More than mild effects suggest misidentification of the product or massive exposure. D) WITH POISONING/EXPOSURE 1) The most common effects are mucosal irritation or injury or gastrointestinal tract irritation. Aspiration or upper airway obstruction from a foreign body are also possible. 0.2.23 OTHER 0.2.23.1 ACUTE EXPOSURE A) A nontoxic ingestion occurs when the victim consumes an inedible product that usually does not produce symptoms. The importance of knowing that a product is nontoxic is that overtreatment is avoided and, more importantly, the victim and parents are not placed in the jeopardy of a panicky automobile ride to the physician or nearest hospital (Comstock, 1978). B) Although some products may be labeled as nontoxic in this management, a patient can potentially have a non-dose-related life-threatening effect such as a hypersensitivity reaction to any substance, and be at risk of foreign body obstruction and aspiration (Kearney et al, 2006). C) Materials referenced to this management have been considered very unlikely to produce any toxicity except in enormous doses. For example, ballpoint pen cartridges, even if sucked completely dry by a child, do not contain enough toxic materials to cause illness (Mofenson et al, 1984). D) While almost anything, including water and table salt, may cause illness if taken in excessive amounts or by other than the normal route, normal exposures from these products would not be expected to produce toxicity (Horev &amp; Cohen, 1994). E) Some agents are harmful in manners different from that expected. A broken thermometer is dangerous not from the inert metallic mercury, but from the broken glass (Mofenson et al, 1984). Most patients calling are more worried about mercury, which they think of as poison, than the glass. F) General guidelines for determining whether an exposure can be categorized as nontoxic (reviewed in Weisman, 1998; (Mofenson et al, 1984): 1) Absolute identification of the product, its ingredients, and its concentration. 2) Absolute assurance that only the identified product was involved in the exposure. 3) The exposure must be unintentional.

4) "Signal words" identified by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (eg, Caution, Warning, Danger) must not be found on the label. 5) A reliable approximation of the quantity of the substance involved in the exposure. 6) The route of exposure can be assessed accurately from the patient's available history. 7) Following the exposure, the patient is symptom-free. 8) A follow-up consultation with the patient must be possible. In the case of a pediatric exposure, the parent must appear to be reliable. LABORATORY: A) In general, laboratory testing is not needed. If the patient has more than mild symptoms, testing should be directed at evaluation of the symptoms. B) Radiographs may be required to evaluate for retained objects, but many objects are not radio-opaque. Contrast studies may be used in some cases. C) Patients with symptoms suggesting gastrointestinal obstruction or perforation should have CT scan imaging. TREATMENT OVERVIEW: 0.4.2 ORAL EXPOSURE A) MANAGEMENT OF MILD TO MODERATE TOXICITY 1) Primarily supportive care. If the patient has oral irritation, they should rinse their mouth. Patients with persistent vomiting may require IV fluids. B) MANAGEMENT OF SEVERE TOXICITY 1) Severe toxicity suggests that the exposure was misidentified, idiosyncratic reactions (eg, allergic), or massive exposure. In these situations, management should be supportive and directed at the specific symptoms. Administer oxygen and obtain a chest radiograph if aspiration is suspected. C) DECONTAMINATION 1) Patients who have oral irritation should rinse their mouths with water. D) AIRWAY MANAGEMENT 1) If a non-toxic substance has been aspirated or causes upper airway obstruction, airway management may be necessary. E) ANTIDOTE 1) None F) PATIENT DISPOSITION 1) HOME CRITERIA: Patients with exposure to a known non-toxic product and who have no more than mild symptoms may be managed at home. 2) OBSERVATION CRITERIA: Patients with self-harm ingestions or children in whom abuse or neglect are concerns should be referred to a healthcare facility for evaluation. 3) ADMISSION CRITERIA: Admission is almost never necessary unless aspiration or airway obstruction have occurred. 4) CONSULT CRITERIA: Toxicologist should be consulted if there is a question of possible systemic toxicity. G) PITFALLS 1) Severe toxicity following exposure may suggest possible misidentification of the product. 0.4.3 INHALATION EXPOSURE A) Although inhalation of common dust may not be considered toxic, it is certainly a hazard if there is inhalation

of too many particles. Individuals should be removed from exposure to too high a concentration of even relatively nontoxic substances. 0.4.4 EYE EXPOSURE A) Foreign materials in the eye may not cause a toxic reaction, but injury from a foreign body may occur. In such cases, the patient should be observed for eye irritation and should seek medical assistance if the irritation becomes significant. 0.4.5 DERMAL EXPOSURE A) OVERVIEW 1) Foreign materials spilled on the skin may not represent a toxic or irritation hazard in small quantities but may produce adverse effects if applied in large quantities or if used over a significant period of time. Whenever possible, foreign materials should be removed from the skin with simple washing. Should skin irritation or erythema occur, a patient may wish to seek medical assistance. RANGE OF TOXICITY: A) These agents are considered not to be a toxic hazard in the quantities available through normal exposure or package size. ANIMAL TOXICITY STUDIES: NON-HUMAN TOXICITY EXCERPTS: SUNFLOWER OIL HAD LETHAL EFFECTS ON RATS WHEN ADDED TO DIET IN AMT CORRESPONDING TO 45% OF TOTAL DIET CALORIES FOR 4.5 MONTHS.[BEDULEVICH TS ET AL; EXPTL DATA ON EFFECT OF VEGETABLE OIL ON GROWING ORGANISM; GIG SANIT (10) 27 (1973)] **PEER REVIEWED** WEANLING MALE &amp; FEMALE RATS FED SEMIPURIFIED DIETS CONTAINING BROMINATED OIL (0.1 OR 0.5% OF DIET) FOR 105 DAYS, ALL RATS HAD FATTY CHANGES IN LIVER, EFFECT MORE PRONOUNCED @ HIGHER DIETARY LEVEL.[MUNRO IC ET AL; TOXIC EFFECTS OF BROMINATED VEGETABLE OILS IN RATS; TOXICOL APPL PHARMACOL 22(3) 432 (1972)] **PEER REVIEWED** VARIOUS DOSES SHOWED PROLONGED ADMIN PRODUCED NO INFLUENCE ON ORGAN CULTURE. PARENTERAL ADMIN (IP) OF OIL CAUSED HYPERPLASTIC CHANGES IN EPITHELIUM TO DEVELOP.[KOLESNICHENKO TS; THE POSSIBILITY OF VEGETABLE OIL TRANSPLACENTAL ACTION ON ORGAN CULTURES OF MOUSE EMBRYONIC LUNG TISSUE; BYULL EKSP BIOL MED 77(6) 93 (1974)] **PEER REVIEWED** METABOLISM/PHARMACOKINETICS:

PHARMACOLOGY:

ENVIRONMENTAL FATE & EXPOSURE: NATURAL POLLUTION SOURCES: OIL EXTRACTED FROM SEEDS, FRUIT OR NUTS OF PLANTS &amp; GENERALLY

CONSIDERED TO BE MIXTURES OF MIXED GLYCERIDES (EG, COTTONSEED, LINSEED, CORN, COCONUT, BABASSU, OLIVE, TUNG, PEANUT, PERILLA, OITICICA, ETC). MANY TYPES ARE EDIBLE.[Hawley, G.G. The Condensed Chemical Dictionary. 9th ed. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., 1977., p. 913] **PEER REVIEWED** ENVIRONMENTAL FATE: IN AUG 1975 CARGO SHIP WENT AGROUND ON FANNING ATOLL, HAWAII, USA, &amp; DUMPED 17,797 METRIC TONS OF CARGO; 10,000 TONS WERE VEGETABLE OILS &amp; EDIBLE-OIL RAW MATERIALS. FISHES, CRUSTACEANS &amp; MOLLUSKS KILLED.[RUSSELL DJ ET AL; EDIBLE-OIL POLLUTION ON FANNING ISLAND; PAC SCI 32(1) 1 (1978)] **PEER REVIEWED** ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS & REGULATIONS:

CHEMICAL/PHYSICAL PROPERTIES: MOLECULAR FORMULA: UVCB **QC REVIEWED** CHEMICAL SAFETY & HANDLING: STABILITY/SHELF LIFE: BECAUSE OF HIGH DEG OF UNSATURATION, VEGETABLE OILS ARE QUITE DIFFICULT TO STABILIZE WITH NORMAL QUANT OF ANTIOXIDANTS[Furia, T.E. (ed.). CRC Handbook of Food Additives. 2nd ed. Cleveland: The Chemical Rubber Co., 1972., p. 206] **PEER REVIEWED** WHERE MAX SHELF LIFE OF SHORTENING IS REQUIRED, COMBINATIONS OF BHA, BHT, &amp; PROPYL GALLATE WITH CITRIC ACID USEFUL ADDITIVES[Furia, T.E. (ed.). CRC Handbook of Food Additives. 2nd ed. Cleveland: The Chemical Rubber Co., 1972., p. 206] **PEER REVIEWED** CLEANUP METHODS: WASTEWATER CONTAINING EMULSION OR DISPERSION WAS TREATED BY PASSING IT THROUGH A MAGNESIA CLINKER COLUMN.[SATO H, ITANI F, SUGIMORI S; TREATMENT OF WASTEWATER CONTAINING EMULSION OR DISPERSION; JAPAN, KOKAI PATENT NUMBER 76132657 11/17/76 (MITSUBISHI RAYON CO, LTD)] **PEER REVIEWED** EFFLUENT WATER FROM VEGETABLE OIL REFINING WAS TREATED BY ADDITION OF CALCIUM CHLORIDE FOLLOWED BY A CLARIFICATION STEP.[GILL DF JR, IELASE JC; TREATMENT OF EFFLUENT WATERS FROM VEGETABLE OIL REFINING; US ENVIRON PROT AGENCY OFF RES DEV, (REP) EPA ISS EPA-600/2-76-294, 79 (1976)] **PEER REVIEWED** OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE STANDARDS:

MANUFACTURING/USE INFORMATION: MAJOR USES: PAINTS (AS DRYING OILS); SHORTENINGS; SALAD DRESSINGS; MARGARINE; SOAPS;

RUBBER SOFTENERS; DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS; PESTICIDE CARRIERS[Hawley, G.G. The Condensed Chemical Dictionary. 9th ed. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., 1977., p. 913] **PEER REVIEWED** IN DRUGS &amp; COSMETICS[THIERS H ET AL; ACTES CONGR MOND, SOC INT ETUDE CORPS GRAS, 13TH; VOL(SYMP 5) 11 (1976)] **PEER REVIEWED** EDIBLE OIL IN SALAD &amp; COOKING OILS, SHORTENING &amp; MARGARINE, ANIMAL FEEDS; CHEM INT FOR FATTY ACIDS, SOAPS, LUBRICANTS &amp; MISC CHEMS; CHEM INT FOR PLASTICS &amp; PLASTICS CHEMS, ESP PLASTICIZERS; CHEM INT FOR RUBBER-LIKE COMPOUNDS &amp; PESTICIDES; DRYING OIL (EG, IN COATINGS, INKS, CAULKS, &amp; CORE OILS); COSMETIC INGREDIENT (EG, MOISTURIZERS &amp; LIPSTICKS); VEHICLE FOR INTRAMUSCULAR PHARMACEUTICAL INJECTIONS; CHEM INT FOR PHARMACEUTICALS (EG, FAT-SOLUBLE VITAMINS); PHARMACEUTICAL INGREDIENT-ESP FOR SKIN CARE-OILS &amp; DERIVS; AGENT IN PLATING OF TIN &amp; TIN-LEAD (TERNE)[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** MANUFACTURERS: ANDERSON, CLAYTON &amp; CO, OILSEED PROCESSING DIVISION, ABILENE, TX, CHOWCHILLA, CA 93610, PHOENIX, AZ, THORNDALE, TX 76577[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** ARCHER DANIELS MIDLAND CO, ADM PROCESSING DIVISION, DECATUR, IL 62500, LINCOLN, NE 68500[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** CARGILL, INC, DES MOINES, IA, FAYETTEVILLE, NC, GAINESVILLE, GA 30501, MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55440, SAN FRANCISCO, CA[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** CENTRAL SOYA CO, INC, REFINED OIL DIV, CHATTANOOGA, TN 37406, DECATUR, IN 46733[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** CPC INTERNATIONAL INC, BEST FOODS DIV, BAYONNE, NJ 07002, CHICAGO, IL 60638, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, SANTE FE SPRINGS, CA 90670, CORN PRODUCTS UNIT, ARGO, IL 60501[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** C &amp; T REFINERY, INC, CHARLOTTE, NC[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** ESMARK, INC, SWIFT &amp; CO, BRADLEY (KANKAKEE), IL 60915, CHATTANOOGA, TN, FORT WORTH, TX[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** GOLD KIST INC, MARKS, MS 38646[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** HONEYMEAD PRODUCTS COMPANY, MANKATO, MN 56001[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** GEO A HORMEL &amp; CO, AUSTIN, MN 55912[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** KRAFT, INC, HUMKO PRODUCTS DIVISION, BUENA PARK, CA, CHAMPAIGN, IL 61820, MEMPHIS, TN[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** LEVER BROTHERS CO, HAMMOND, IN 46320, LOS ANGELES, CA 90022[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** NORTON SIMON, INC, HUNT-WESSON FOODS, INC, SUBSID, BAYONNE, NJ 07002, CHICAGO, IL 60623, FULLERTON, CA 92634, GRETNA, LA 70053, MEMPHIS, TN 38101, SAVANNAH, GA 31402[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** PALMCO, INC (JOINT VENTURE OF MITSUBISHI INTERNATIONAL CORP AND KOPPEL, INC), PORTLAND, OR 97203[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** PLANTERS PEANUTS (DIVISION OF STANDARD BRANDS INC), SUFFOLK, VA[SRI]

**PEER REVIEWED** THE PROCTER &amp; GAMBLE COMPANY, CHICAGO, IL 60603, DALLAS, TX 75222, IVORYDALE, OHIO 45217, LONG BEACH, CA 90801, MACON, GA 31200, PORT IVORY, NY 10301[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** PVO INTERNATIONAL, INC, FOOD PRODUCTS DIV, BOONTON, NJ 07005, LOS ANGELES, CA 90022, RICHMOND, CA 94804, ST LOUIS, MO 64147[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** RICELAND FOODS, INC, SOYBEAN DIV, HELENA, AR 72342, STUTTGART, AR 72160[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** RUSTCO SALES CO (SUBSID OF THE FEDERAL CO), DENVER, CO[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** SAFEWAY STORES, INC, BROOKSIDE DIV, DENISON, TX 75020[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** SCM CORP, DURKEE FOODS DIV, INDUSTRIAL FOODS GROUP, JOLIET, IL 60434, LOUISVILLE, KY 40201[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** C F SIMONIN'S SONS, INC, PHILADELPHIA, PA[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** A E STALEY MANUFACTURING CO, DECATUR, IL 62525[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** STOKELY-VAN CAMP, INC, CAPITAL CITY PRODUCTS CO, DIV, COLUMBUS, OH 43216, WEST NEW YORK, NJ 07093[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** THE THEOBALD INDUST, KEARNY, NJ 07032, MIAMI SPRINGS, FL[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** WILSON FOODS CORP (SUBSID OF LTV CORP), OKLAHOMA CITY, OK[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** METHODS OF MANUFACTURING: OILSEEDS AND FRUIT PULP ARE PRESSED MECHANICALLY AND THE OIL RECOVERED BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION WITH HEXANE AND REFINED BY TREATMENT WITH CAUSTIC SODA (TYPICAL SOURCES INCLUDE COTTONSEEDS, PEANUTS, SOYBEANS, CORN, LINSEEDS, SUNFLOWER SEEDS, AND COCONUTS)[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** GENERAL MANUFACTURING INFORMATION: THE BEST ANTIOXIDANTS FOR THESE /VEGETABLE OILS/ HIGHLY UNSATURATED TYPES OF FATS ARE THOSE CONTAINING MULTIPLE HYDROXYL GROUPS, SUCH AS PROPYL GALLATE &amp; NDGA (NORDIHYDROGUAIARETIC ACID). ...EVEN THESE SHOULD BE USED @ MAX ALLOWABLE CONCENTRATION (MAC) IN ORDER TO PROVIDE MAXIMUM STABILITY.[Furia, T.E. (ed.). CRC Handbook of Food Additives. 2nd ed. Cleveland: The Chemical Rubber Co., 1972., p. 206] **PEER REVIEWED** ...CASES WHERE VEGETABLE OILS MUST BE HELD PRIOR TO DEODORIZATION, ANTIOXIDANTS ARE ADDED TO PREVENT BREAKDOWN DURING STORAGE. SINCE THEY ARE REMOVED BY DEODORIZATION PROCESS, ADDITIONAL ANTIOXIDANTS MUST BE ADDED AFTER THIS PROCESS TO INSURE MAXIMUM STABILITY.[Furia, T.E. (ed.). CRC Handbook of Food Additives. 2nd ed. Cleveland: The Chemical Rubber Co., 1972., p. 206] **PEER REVIEWED** CITRIC ACID OR OTHER METAL CHELATORS ARE USUALLY ADDED AS INSURANCE AGAINST TRACE QUANTITIES OF METALS OFTEN PRESENT IN MOST VEGETABLE FATS.[Furia, T.E. (ed.). CRC Handbook of Food Additives. 2nd ed. Cleveland: The Chemical Rubber Co., 1972., p. 206] **PEER REVIEWED**

ANTIOXIDANT SOLN CONTAINING 20% PROPYL GALLATE &amp; 10% CITRIC ACID...FOR STABILIZING VEGETABLE FATS USED FOR FRYING OPERATIONS OR WHERE SHELF LIFE REQUIREMENTS OF FAT ARE ONLY CRITERIA FOR STABILITY.[Furia, T.E. (ed.). CRC Handbook of Food Additives. 2nd ed. Cleveland: The Chemical Rubber Co., 1972., p. 206] **PEER REVIEWED** FORMULATIONS/PREPARATIONS: An oil extracted from the seeds, fruit, or nuts of plants &amp; generallyconsidered to be a mixt of mixed glycerides (eg, cottonseed, linseed, corn, coconut, babassu, olive, tung, peanut, perilla, diticica, etc)[SAX. HAWLEY'S CONDENSED CHEM DICTNRY 11TH ED 1987 p.1219] **QC REVIEWED** CONSUMPTION PATTERNS: SALAD &amp; COOKING OIL, 39%; SHORTENING, 25%; MARGARINE, 17%; OTHER FOOD USES, 3%; DRYING OIL INDUSTRIES, 4%; FATTY ACIDS, 2%; SOAP, 2%; ANIMAL FEEDS, 1%; PLASTICS, 1%; MISC NONFOOD USES, 6% (1977)[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** U. S. PRODUCTION: (1977) 7.08X10+12 G-CROP YR APPROX 10/76-9/77[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** (1979) 1.03X10+13 G-CROP YR APPROX 10/78-9/79[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** (1987) No Data **QC REVIEWED** U. S. IMPORTS: (1977) 8.02X10+11 GRAMS[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** (1979) 6.96X10+11 GRAMS[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** (1985) 1.28X10+8 g /vegetable fats, oils, &amp; greases sulfonated, etc/[BUREAU OF THE CENSUS. U.S. IMPORTS FOR CONSUMPTION AND GENERAL IMPORTS 1985 p.1-602] **QC REVIEWED** (1985) 3.15X10+8 g /vegetable oils, except nut oil/[BUREAU OF THE CENSUS. U.S. IMPORTS FOR CONSUMPTION AND GENERAL IMPORTS 1985 p.1-61] **QC REVIEWED** U. S. EXPORTS: (1977) 1.25X10+12 GRAMS (EST)[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** (1979) 1.44X10+12 GRAMS (EST)[SRI] **PEER REVIEWED** (1985) 1.22X10+10 g[BUREAU OF THE CENSUS. U.S. EXPORTS, SCHEDULE E, 1986 p.2-68] **QC REVIEWED** LABORATORY METHODS: ANALYTIC LABORATORY METHODS: GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS WERE USED TO SHOW THAT THE RATIO OF BETA-SITOSTEROL TO CAMPESTEROL MAY BE USED TO IDENTIFY AN INDIVIDUAL OIL.[THORPE CW; CAMPESTROL &amp; BETA-SITOSTEROL CONTENT OF SOME VEGETABLE OILS; J ASS OFFIC ANAL CHEM 55(SEPT) 1085 (1972)] **PEER REVIEWED** GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF BROMINATED SESAME OIL IN ORANGE DRINKS.[CONACHER H BS; GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF BROMINATED SESAME OIL IN ORANGE DRINKS: COLLABORATIVE STUDY; J ASSOC OFF ANAL CHEM

56(3) 602 (1973)] **PEER REVIEWED** DETERMINATION OF BROMINATED VEGETABLE OIL CONCN IN SOFT DRINKS USING SPECIFIC ION ELECTRODE.[TURNER DL; DETERMINATION OF BROMINATED VEGETABLE OIL CONCN IN SOFT DRINKS USING SPECIFIC ION ELECTRODE; J FOOD SCI 37(5) 791 (1972)] **PEER REVIEWED** DETERMINATION VEGETABLE OILS IN EFFLUENTS &amp; SEWAGE SLUDGES BY GAS-LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY &amp; IR SPECTROPHOTOMETRY.[BENNETT M ET AL; DETERMINATION OF VEGETABLE &amp; MINERAL OILS IN EFFLUENTS &amp; SEWAGE SLUDGES OF THE UPPER TAME BASIN; WATER RES 7(12) 1849 (1973)] **PEER REVIEWED** DETERMINATION OF MICROAMOUNTS OF OIL IN WATER BY IR ANALYSIS.[TSAI M; INFRARED ANALYSIS OF MICROAMOUNTS OF OIL IN WATER; T'AI-WAN HUAN CHING WEI SHENG; 8(1) 22 (1976)] **PEER REVIEWED** TITRIMETRIC DETERMINATION OF SOAP IN REFINED VEGETABLE OILS.[NELSON RM; TITRIMETRIC DETERMINATION OF SOAP IN REFINED VEGETABLE OILS; J AM OIL CHEM SOC 50(6) 207 (1973)] **PEER REVIEWED** SPECIAL REFERENCES:

SYNONYMS AND IDENTIFIERS: SYNONYMS: EDIBLE VEGETABLE OIL **PEER REVIEWED** FORMULATIONS/PREPARATIONS: An oil extracted from the seeds, fruit, or nuts of plants &amp; generallyconsidered to be a mixt of mixed glycerides (eg, cottonseed, linseed, corn, coconut, babassu, olive, tung, peanut, perilla, diticica, etc)[SAX. HAWLEY'S CONDENSED CHEM DICTNRY 11TH ED 1987 p.1219] **QC REVIEWED** ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION: HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES DATABANK NUMBER: 5154 LAST REVISION DATE: 20050623 UPDATE HISTORY: Field Update on 2009-04-16, 2 fields added/edited/deleted Complete Update on 2005-06-23, 1 fields added/edited/deleted Field Update on 2005-01-29, 2 fields added/edited/deleted Complete Update on 07/22/2002, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 05/13/2002, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 05/15/2001, 1 field added/edited/deleted.

Complete Update on 09/21/1999, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 08/27/1999, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 11/17/1998, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 11/01/1997, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 04/23/1997, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 10/18/1996, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 01/28/1996, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 04/20/1995, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 04/20/1995, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 01/24/1995, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 01/05/1995, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 04/04/1994, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 08/07/1993, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Field update on 01/04/1993, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Field update on 12/29/1989, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 12/19/1989, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 01/27/1989, 1 field added/edited/deleted. Complete Update on 04/22/1988, 6 fields added/edited/deleted. Created 19830315 by GCF