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Claremont

CITY TO TAKE A LONG LOOK AT DEVELOPMENT PLANS /PAGE 4
Friday, January 3, 2014 u One dollar

claremont-courier.com

Slip sliding
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COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Michelle Lafianza and her brother, Peter, enjoy a ride down the slopes while tubing with their family on Tuesday at The Mount Baldy Ski Lifts. In spite of very dry conditions, the resort made enough snow in early December to open their popular tubing run as well as the beginnersʼ skiing slope.

Mrs. Nelsonʼs Toy and Bookshop to close/ PAGE 14

A show of support/PAGE 3

COURIER photo/ Peter Weinberger

Customers have left notes for Mrs. Nelsonʼs bookstore owner Judy Nelson on the east wall of her store paying tribute to the many years she has been selling books in La Verne. After 28 years, she has decided to close up shop, but will continue to serve Claremont through her traveling book fairs.

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POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4 OBITUARIES/ PAGE 9

LETTERS/ PAGE 2 & 7 CALENDAR/ PAGE 16

The COURIER’s got its groove back. Check online. Visit our website: claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

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1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 Office hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Owner Janis Weinberger Publisher and Owner Peter Weinberger
pweinberger@claremont-courier.com

Obscene nativity

READERS’ COMMENTS
I was surprised, however, that under the heading “Burger boom makes a big bang” there was no mention of another great new burger place, Beer Belly Deli, located in the southwest corner of the Packing House. In addition to burgers, they have an interesting gastropub-ish menu. They also serve brunch on Saturdays and Sundays. The food has been of consistently high quality, though the service can be a little slow at times. Hopefully that will continue to improve the longer they are open. Thank you for drawing attention to these great restaurants.
Johanna Sweaney Salt Claremont

ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU
The Vortox building— Big boulevard mystery. Knock knock, get sucked in.
—Donald J. Kraemer Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in Claremont. Please email entries to editor@claremont-courier.com.

Editor-in-Chief Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com

Newsroom
City Reporter Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

Education Reporter/Obituaries Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Education Reporter/Obituaries Christina Burton (Interim)
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Dear Editor: Artistic license has hit another low. John Zachary has heightened the “controversial” Christmas scenes he has produced for the last seven years with an obscene manger scene substituting a bleeding Trayvon Martin instead of the baby Jesus. Mr. Zachary contends that it ties into the death of Jesus, as well as the birth. What possible connection can there be between the birth of the savior of mankind with the death of Martin? How can one compare Martin’s death for any reason with the death of a man that all consider a prophet, if not the son of God? And why would any church condone this bastardization of a revered spiritual moment in history? Jesus taught us to forgive and came to heal our minds and give us an opportunity for eternal life. His birth should be celebrated, not compared to a divisive incident in our times.
Hayden and Rosemary Lening Claremont

GOVERNING OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Tuesday, January 7 Planning Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m. Thursday, January 9 Police Commission, Special Meeting Council Chamber, 7 p.m. Sixth Annual Five Second Film Festival, the 14th Annual Secret Santa Event and more! Thank you, Claremont!

A great year
Dear Editor: On behalf of the Claremont Community College, I wish to thank the community for their generosity and support of our activities in 2013. Two weeks ago we provided 150 deserving kids with gifts and a visit from St. Nick. More than 100 donors and volunteers made this possible. We thank the Cal Poly Society of Accountants, the Beta Alph Psi Honor Society, Cal Poly Circle K, the Claremont Brownie Troop, Ms. Emily, the Salvation Army and the Citizens Business Bank Arena. You can look forward to a 2014 filled with educational and cultural activities including our Oscar Award Show, the

Sports Reporter
Bryan Stauffer sports@claremont-courier.com

An omission
Dear Editor: I thoroughly enjoyed your article on the banner year for dining in Claremont. Indeed, one of the great benefits of being part of this vibrant community is the plethora of dining options available, especially within the Village area.

Photo Editor/Staff Photographer Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com

Vince Turner Claremont Community College

Reporter At Large Pat Yarborough Calendar Editor
Jenelle Rensch calendar@claremont-courier.com

Back Page Sammy

Production
Ad Design Jenelle Rensch Page Layout Kathryn Dunn, Jenelle Rensch Website Peter Weinberger

Advertising
Advertising Director Mary Rose
maryrose@claremont-courier.com

Classified Editor Jessica Gustin
classified@claremont-courier.com

Our 25th annual special section will be published January 31, 2014. Deadline is Wednesday, January 22.
The women of Claremont are truly exceptional. Donʼt miss this opportunity to reach nearly 5,000 homes and businesses in Claremont. Weʼll put it online, too.

Business Administration
Office Manager/ Legal Notices Vickie Rosenberg
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Claremont

Billing/Accounting Manager Dee Proffitt Distribution/Publications Tom Smith
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Call today and ask for Mary Rose or Jessica Gustin at 909-621-4761, or via email at maryrose@claremont-courier.com or classified@claremont-courier.com.

Circulation/Subscriptions
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The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2014 Claremont Courier

one hundred and sixth year, number 1

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

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Community mourns loss of local resident killed in cycling accident

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amily, friends and community members gathered on the corner of New Haven and Base Line Road Tuesday afternoon to honor the life of Ali Mirage, a 76-year-old La Verne resident who was struck by a car and killed last Friday while riding his bike in Claremont.
“He was so full of life and had so many dreams,” his wife Mitra Mirage recalled. “Unfortunately he left with lots of unfinished business.” A “ghost bike” remains chained to the light post surrounded by candles and flowers as a somber memorial to a man family members describe as a caring husband and father and constant adventure seeker. Mr. Mirage was traveling east on Base Line Road for his ritual morning bike ride when he was hit by a car authorities say was also traveling east.  Claremont police officers arrived shortly after the incident along with LA County Fire Department, but Mr. Mirage was pronounced dead on scene. The cause of the accident is still under investigation. The driver of the vehicle, a 54-year-old female, remained on scene Friday morning and has not been cited. Ramin Mirage, son of the late cyclist, said he and his family had grown concerned when his father had not returned home from his bike ride after an hour, the usual time it took him to bike up Base Line and back to their home near Fruit and the 210 freeway in La Verne. Ramin was getting ready to grab lunch for the family and search for his father, but his mother insisted she would go herself. Not soon after, Ramin received a call from his brother Quincy informing him of his father’s death. Ramin recalled passing his father in the hallway the night before the crash, on his way to get a glass of water from the kitchen. Instead of allowing his son to continue on his way, Mr. Mirage handed him an extra bottle of water and insisted he take it. It’s moments like these Ramin says he will cherish. “He was a good father, he said. In addition to his big heart, Mr. Mirage was known for his active spirit and health conscious ways, family shared. He loved to stay active and often tried to talk his wife into joining him on his bike rides, an invitation she politely refused. Though the bike was not for her, she enjoyed accompanying her husband in performing tasks around the house. Mr. Mirage, a noted handyman and carpenter, left his mark around the Mirage family home, taking pride in installing most things by hand. “He could do everything. He knew about the electricity, plumbing, could install sprinklers,” she said. “He was restless. He always had to be doing something.” A career as a rigging engineer for the Bechtel Corporation fed his active lifestyle, often sending Mr. Mirage on business across the country and around the world. His passport included stamps from Australia, Chile, Korea, Peru, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Though he was well traveled, he enjoyed returning home to his family. Friday’s incident was the only cycling fatality in Claremont in 2013, according to local police. However, officers say on average of one or two cyclists are killed each year within city limits. Ms. Mirage reminded those in attendance on Tuesday to take precautions when sharing the road with other cyclists and motorists. “It came out of nowhere,” she said of her husband’s accident. The Mirage family—Mitra and her five children, Soriya, James, Leesa, Quincy and Ramin—say they have been overwhelmed by the support received from the Claremont community, in particular Betty Crocker and the community group Keeping the Good in Our Neighborhood, who helped put together the memorial. “I have never seen anything like it in my entire life,” Ms. Mirage expressed. “It means so much to me.” A memorial service for Mr. Mirage was held yesterday.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

COURIER photos/Peter Weinberger Above, Mitra Mirage, left, receives a hug from Claremont resident Betty Crocker at the street-side memorial for Ms. Mirageʼs husband, Ali, who was killed in a cycling accident on Base Line Road last Friday. At left, Ms. Mirage writes a remembrance to her husband, whose memory was honored by the installation of a ʻghost bike,ʼ a common practice within the the cycling community where a roadside memorial is set up in a place where a cyclist has been killed or severely injured.

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

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City officials to update general plan housing element

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ith nearly 700 new housing units to hit the Claremont housing market in the next couple years, Claremont officials are making room for the possibility of a few more.
The Claremont Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing on Tuesday, January 7 to review proposed changes to the housing element of the city’s general plan. The meeting takes place at 7 p.m. in the City Council Chamber. The update, required by law, is needed to identify undeveloped land in the city of Claremont that might be viable to meet the area’s housing needs through 2021, according to Brian Desatnik, director of community development. Enacted in 1969, the housing element requires local governments to sufficiently plan for the current and anticipated housing needs of all economic segments of a community. Claremont’s housing element, required to undergo review every five to seven years, was last updated in 2006. Of the 694 housing units currently being added to the Claremont market, 80 are being developed as moderate-income housing, Brian Desatnik verified. If approved by the planning commission and ultimately the city council, the city will have identified several more potential spaces for affordable housing options. “We’ve looked at around 20 vacant or unutilized properties and ranked them in order of which ones would be most suitable to be developed in higher density for an affordable project,” Mr. Desatnik said. The top two potential spaces identified in the housing update are the lot at Mills Avenue, between

COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger With the recent housing development boom in Claremont, the planning commission will begin steps to update the housing element of the cityʼs general plan.

Scottsbluff Drive and Clarion Place—currently owned by the Golden State Water Company—and the vacant lot next to the Richard Hibbard dealership at Indian Hill Boulevard. Both sites will need to be rezoned as a residential overlay district, allowing developers the option to build higher density affordable housing, according to Mr. Desatnik. The lots are currently zoned as residential and commercial/professional, respectively. Developers have expressed interest in the vacancy next to the Hibbard dealership, not for affordable

housing at this point but market rate residential, according to Mr. Desatnik. The property at Mills Avenue remains open.   The full report on the city’s housing element update may be viewed on the city’s website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us. For more information, contact Associate Planner Joanne Hwang at (909) 399-5353 or by email at jhwang@ci.claremont.ca.us.

—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Package bandits continue to make presence felt
Claremont police may have placed two package thieves behind bars before the holidays, but the parcels continue to go missing from doorsteps throughout the city. A new victim was identified in the 700 block of West Eleventh Street. More than $200 in goods was taken between December 18 and December 27. Any information should be reported to the Claremont Police Department at (909) 399-5411. Friday, December 27 An employee of Foothill Laundry, located at 665 E. Foothill Blvd., was helping a customer mend a problem when she received some damage of her own. While busy altering the patron’s pants, two women entered the store and made off with the employee’s wallet and a bag of money, according to Claremont Detective Isaac Reyes. More than $300 was stolen. A report was taken, but the women made off undetected. **** Hipolito Lopez, a 56-year-old from Los Angeles, channeled his inner car on Friday evening just before rush hour when he wandered on foot in the middle of traffic on Foothill Boulevard between Claremont Boulevard and Monte Vista Avenue. Police caught Mr. Lopez near Corey’s Nursery, where he admitted to drinking Steel Reserve, a beer known for its unusually high alcohol content. He

POLICE BLOTTER

ported damage. Police arrived on scene and found 7 casings from a 40-caliber gun, but were unable to locate any suspects, though a potential suspect vehicle was identified. Police are currently conducting a follow-up investigation. Monday, December 30 The burglaries continue to mount up along Claremont’s wilderness trails. On Monday afternoon, a black male was allegedly spotted attempting to open the doors of cars parked in the 2000 block of North Indian Hill Boulevard at the Thompson Creek trailhead, though nothing was reported stolen. Police remind residents to keep their cars locked and valuables out of sight. **** A man believed to be lost in the Claremont Hills Wilderness Park was rescued by police on Tuesday evening after 6 hours wandering the local hillside, according to Det. Reyes. Police received reports around noon of a man who appeared dazed and confused. After several hours of searching, 25-year-old Gerardo Martinez of Pomona was found near Palmer Canyon. Mr. Martinez had cuts all over his arms and was treated at Pomona Valley Hospital for dehydration, according to Det. Reyes. In addition to minor injuries, police were able to identify what may have fueled Mr. Martinez’s flight: methamphetamine. He was arrested for being under the influence of a controlled substance.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Masking tape covers a bullet hole in the window of a Butte Avenue home in Claremont. The bullet traveled through a residentʼs fence continuing through a bedroom window and lodged into the bedroom wall. Claremont police are investigating the incident, but there is no evidence that the home was intentionally targeted.

was arrested for public intoxication. Saturday, December 28 A loud noise woke a 25-year resident of the 900 block of Butte Street on Saturday around 4:45 a.m. “I thought the water heater had blown up, that’s how loud it was,” she said. It wasn’t until around 9 a.m. that the resident noticed a

bullet hole in the window directly next to where she slept. The bullet traveled through the home’s side fence then the window and across her bed to lodge itself in her bedroom wall. Police received several reports of gunfire on Butte Street Saturday morning, according to Det. Reyes. However, no injuries were reported and only one homeowner re-

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

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Provocative nativity gets national attention

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he nativity in front of the Claremont United Methodist Church on Foothill Boulevard garnered national attention this week after David Allen of the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin had his story picked up by newspapers like the Los Angeles Times and the New York Daily News, as well as the Huffington Post and conservative-based Breitbart.com.
The artwork features a figure of Trayvon Martin—the black high school student fatally shot by George Zimmerman in Florida in February of 2012—in the foreground wearing his iconic “hoodie” sweatshirt and bleeding to death. The case has remained controversial, with many saying Trayvon’s death resulted from factors like racism and an overzealous gun culture, while others maintain that Trayvon essentially got what he deserved. Artist John Zachary has been on something of a media tour, including interviews with the BBC London, on his hometown Chatanooga radio station and local newsoutlets such as KCAL-9, Fox-11 and Los Angeles-based Spanish language channel 22. The COURIER Facebook page included comments both in support and critical of the artwork. Michelle Godt weighed in with, “Act like a thug, live like a thug and, sadly, die like a thug.” Claremonter Amy Burland Croushore shared in Ms. Godt’s criticism and related, “Ridiculous...shameful...and stupid.” Many of those who took offense to the artwork claimed to be disturbed by the use of the word nativity. “The second [that] baby Jesus was taken out of this scene, it ceased being a nativity and simply became a scene. Tragic way to celebrate Christmas,” wrote Illiana Barreras of Claremont.

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Claremont resident John Zachary speaks with a reporter from Los Angeles television station channel 22 on Monday in front of the Claremont United Methodist Church.

Alternately, Pamela Casey Nagler remarked that “The celebration of the birth of one child long ago in Bethlehem reminds us that all children are to be celebrated. Trayvon was 17 years old when he was murdered.” Martin Garcia shared, “I think people should listen to the artist's interpretation before they judge.” The case of Trayvon Martin has created a divide yet, at the same time, provided room for difficult conversa-

tions about race and the American gun culture. This dialgoue is precisely the result Mr. Zachary had intended. “I knew it was going to be controversial,” Mr. Zachary said. “That’s what we did it for—to start a conversation [about gun violence]. But people on the Internet were making racist posts. I didn’t know it was going to be quite like this.” —Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

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A fresh, new year with fewer language annoyances
By Mellissa Martinez

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t the end of the year, people tend to be pensive. We analyze past choices in an attempt to clear the way for an easier year ahead. Words, it seems, are not exempt from our scrutiny. Time magazine just came out with a list of the worst words from 2013 and requested that readers vote to banish the most irritating one altogether.

ing has led me to simply not like the word. In all honesty, I feel the same way about ‘hashtag,’ ‘gluten-free,’ and ‘kettlebell.’ Just because people don’t always embrace them, doesn’t mean that new, or ungrammatical words have any intention of retiring. In fact, my all-time favorite picked-on word has remained strong against the attack on its character for over a century. In a very recent article in The Huffington Post, language writer Jonathon Owen speaks from the heart in a superb defense of ‘irregardless.’ In the face of double-negative accusations and suggestions that the word is morphologically unThe poll includes lexical items like, ‘awesome sauce,’ the action that is causing people to protest? After all, hip sound, Mr. Owen is persistent. He writes, “When some‘bromance,’ ‘epic fail,’ ‘foodie,’ ‘selfie,’ ‘swagger,’ gyrating has been creating distress among adults since one uses irregardless, you know exactly what it means, ‘twerk’ and ‘lolz.’ Some of these expressions made the the time of Elvis Presley. In past years, would readers even if you want to pretend otherwise…the problem list because they are outdated or overused and others have voted to eradicate ‘bump,’ ‘grind,’ ‘shake,’ ‘gyrate’ with irregardless is entirely social: If you use it, you’ll be thought of as uneducated.” were simply labeled annoying. In 2011, the expression and other hip-movement related words? Like, ‘twerk,’ irregardless is also a blend. From a elected for banishment was OMG and in 2012 it was There are feelings associated with words that are often combination of irrespective and regardless, the word YOLO. This year, readers determined that the word they hard to describe. As sociolinguists point out, we judge a first appears in print in the late 1800s in the Portsmouth love to hate is ‘twerk,’ a new term for the age-old prac- person’s intelligence, kindness, dependability, ambition, Times . In Ohio, it was colloquially common to put emtice of booty shaking. leadership, sincerity, worldliness and sense of humor phasis on a word by using a double negative. Rather I must admit that when ‘twerk’ was elected for elim- (among other things) based on their language. Because than meaning the opposite of what it is used to express, ination, a slight smile crept over my face; I don’t like of our preconceived notions that come from culture, irregardless was probably used emphatically to express that word either. But soon, I began to wonder why. It is family, education and other factors, we all have a linexactly what the author intended. In any case, the word a simple blend with innocent origins. Most believe that guistic prejudice either for or against particular accents, was picked up and used in a variety of dialects throughit came from the combination of ‘twitch’ and ‘jerk,’ or dialects, languages and words. Pet peeves about lanout the United States and hangs on stubbornly to its was it ‘twist’ and ‘work’? In any case, it is in good com- guage often come from deep-rooted ideas about what semi-word status. pany with other blends like ‘twirl’ (from ‘twist’ and type of person uses what type of word. Although the future of ‘twerk’ remains uncertain, I ‘whirl’) and ‘meld’ (from ‘melt’ and ‘weld’). What is In my case, some soul searching led me to the consuspect it will be around for a while. Who knows? In it about ‘twerk’ that feels so distasteful? clusion that I don’t like ‘twerk,’ because I know so litthe face of banishment, the word may even gain strength Could it be the close resemblance to ‘twerp,’ a silly or tle about it. The only twerking I’ve actually seen is on and persevere for decades, irregardless of the way peoannoying person? Maybe it’s the fact that the dance is YouTube. My friends don’t do it and I would certainly ple feel about it now. impossible for anyone over the age of 25 (even that’s look ridiculous trying (I’m over 25, after all). It seems CLAREMONT HERITAGE/page 12 pushing it). This also begs the question, is it the word or that my complete ignorance (and perhaps fear) of twerk-

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IN THE

CITY

Students invited to contemplate ʻMaking Changeʼ
The city of Claremont’s Community and Human Services Department is kicking off its 24th annual “Making Change” contest. In honor of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, students are asked to submit an entry based on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s August 28, 1963, “I Have A Dream” speech. Students (K-12) who live in or attend school in Claremont are eligible to enter the contest. The deadline for all entries is February 5. An awards ceremony for the contest winners will be held on February 26 at 6:30 p.m. at the Hughes Community Center. For information, contact the Claremont Community and Human Services at (909) 399-5490.

OUR TOWN
Summer to end homelessness continues with winter meeting
Members of the wider Claremont community have been determining the extent of homelessness in the area through Claremont’s Summer to End Homelessness (CHAP) campaign, which launched May 5, 2013. Eight teams of two advocates began working with the first eight homeless participants to negotiate the service maze and attempt to secure permanent affordable housing.

By the end of September, the two CHAP outreach volunteers had observed 48 homeless individuals on the streets, in the parks and in tarp covered enclaves across the community. One of the group’s major findings is that there are no year-round shelters or affordable housing opportunities in this community for homeless males. A new emphasis will be to find or develop shelter and/or affordable housing opportunities. On Saturday, January 18, 2014 a “Second Half Kick Off” meeting will be held at the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., from 10 a.m. to noon. Residents are invited to attend to learn about ways to help. For more information, contact Karl Hilgert by email at karlhilgert@gmail.com.

Almost everyone is doing it.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

7

A year of numbers, indeed

Dear Editor: With the year at a close, I am reminded of a few things that took place in 2013. It seems that 2013 was a year of numbers. In January of 2013, Golden State Water raised my water rates 14 percent, while their parent company, American State Water, announced earnings of more than $54 million. In April, they announce first quarter earnings of $13.4 million. In July, they announced second quarter earnings of $16.6 million. And in October they announced third- quarter earnings of $20.8 million. But Golden State’s numbers weren’t just about earnings this year. This summer, 87 percent of Ojai voters told Golden State Water it was time for them to leave their town. While back in Claremont, 17 acres were destroyed at the Bernard Field Station from a fire cause by Golden State workers. But the best numbers of all in 2013 came on November 6 when hundreds of Claremont residents attended a town hall regarding the future of our city’s water system. And on that night, all five of our council members voted to move forward with what we are looking forward to in 2014, fairness and public ownership of the Claremont water system.
Anne K. Turner Claremont

READERS’ COMMENTS
Like millions of other Americans now, Obamacare has hit me personally. It has wiped out my own personal healthcare insurance. My family’s policy was canceled, and now I have no health insurance choices but what a big, bloated, arrogant, unconstitutional national government deigns to allow me. Unfortunately, the professional busybodies in Congress always think they can “help” us better than we can help ourselves. So, within that construct, if they are determined to “help” us by doing healthcare reform, then I want real healthcare reform that gets the federal government out of my personal choices. In short, I want my freedom back. I want my liberty back. Just to make it easy for Congress people to understand what to do, here are some simple, step-by-step instructions. Step 1: Repeal Obamacare in its entirety. Step 2: Effect the following changes: (1) Tort reform to restrict punitive damages to no more than 100 percent of economic damages, and to institute the so-called ‘loser pays’ system. (2) Establish that the exclusive regulator of insurance companies will be the state in which the company is incorporated. (3) Remove all federal government regulation of insurance companies, except as authorized by Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution. Or, alternatively, and even simpler: Enact HR 2900, the “Option Act of 2013.” Further, I would request Congresswoman Judy Chu and Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer to inform us exactly what each one is doing to get us back our freedom and to get us back our liberty. Douglas Lyon
Claremont

Affordable healthcare

Where’s my liberty?

Dear Editor: Speaking of Obamacare—yes, I know, who really wants to—but, we really do need to speak of it until it goes the way of the evil, dark lord Sauron at the end of The Lord of the Rings.

Dear Editor: In his recent letter attacking the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Scott Grannis concludes with “give the free market a chance.” Well, it had its chance, for the last 250 years, since the founding of our nation, and it failed miserably. It siphoned off too much money for non-medical expenses, bonuses and profits. As a result, it charged too much for what it offered. It denied applicants on flimsy grounds, it canceled coverage when people needed it most, and it denied payment for doctor-prescribed treatment to fatten its bottom line. Many of its policies were junk, with too many exclusions and limits. As a result, many Americans lacked insurance or couldn’t afford the care their doctors prescribed even with insurance. Some became disabled or died for lack of care. Many waited until they were seriously sick and then went to a hospital emergency room. This inflated costs, crowded the emergency room, and usually resulted in a financial loss to the hospital, which was unable to collect from many of the uninsured. Some hospitals simply added their emergency room losses to their other bills, thereby over-charging the rest of us. Others closed their emer-

gency rooms, which endangers all of us. Other developed nations have solved the problem by ensuring that everyone is covered and that coverage is affordable and adequate. The ACA is the closest our country could come to that. It would have been much better if the middlemen (the insurance companies) had been cut out of the loop, thereby saving additional money. That wasn’t politically possible, because big corporations are wealthy enough to reward or intimidate members of Congress. I hope that some day Congress will find the courage to pass single-payer health insurance, which will work like Medicare. Even seniors among the antigovernment Tea Partiers told the government not to mess with their Medicare; they like it. Meanwhile, we’ll have to settle for the ACA. Once the transition is past, the American people will find that the ACA is much better than the old mess. More of us will have insurance, our coverage will be better, we’ll be healthier, insurers will have to refund excess non-medical costs and profits, emergency rooms will be less crowded, and hospitals won’t have to charge the rest of us for so many unpaid bills.
Bob Gerecke Claremont READERS’ COMMENTS Please send readers’ comments via email to editor@claremont-courier.com or by mail or hand-delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The deadline for submission is Tuesday at 5 p.m. The COURIER cannot guarantee publication of every letter. Letters are the opinion of the writer, not a reflection of the COURIER. We reserve the right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed 250 words.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

8

City water plan long on promises and short on facts
by Denise L. Kruger, senior vice president, regulated utilities for Golden State Water Company

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olden State Water Company recently hosted a customer meeting in Claremont to share information about water service and the cost of the city’s plan to take the water system by eminent domain. We detailed our quality of service, the characteristics that make Claremont a unique system to manage and maintain, and shared that the cost of a potential acquisition by the city is likely to exceed $200 million.
One of America’s most respected water economists, Dr. Rodney T. Smith, presented his study published last year, which concluded water rates would increase by at least 30 percent under the city's estimate, and would more than double at a price that reflects a realistic value of the system. Claremont residents deserve all the facts as their city continues to pursue a costly takeover. Unlike the city, Golden State Water has provided facts and backed them up. The entirety of Dr. Smith’s research was made public, including the evidence that justifies his conclusions. The city has continuously attacked our company and our employees, while repeatedly refusing to disclose any evidence to support their claim that taking the water system will lead to lower water costs. Requests for their analysis have been made by our com-

VIEWPOINT
pany, non-profit organizations and local media, and have all been denied by the city. Following their November 6 community meeting, city lawyers rejected information requests to produce documents that would support the charts and graphs they showed at their public meeting and put on their website. The city simply refuses to provide the background used to produce those charts, yet claims they are being fully transparent. “Transparency is not the issue here,” Claremont City Manager Tony Ramos was quoted as saying in the November 20, 2013 Claremont COURIER. We disagree. The city's lack of transparency should concern everyone. Ask yourself, if the facts justified a takeover, wouldn't the city jump at the chance to share them? If the government wants residents to tax themselves and pay higher water costs for years, shouldn’t they provide the details and facts to show the benefit? The city has spent more than $1 million of taxpayer money on lawyers and consultants to promote a takeover plan without any vote of the people. This issue is about more than eminent domain. It’s also about the reliability of water service. At the November 6 meeting, Mr. Ramos promised that the city itself won’t run the water system or create a water department, but refused to say who will run the system

or what level of service will be provided. Residents are left in the dark about who their water provider might be, how this important decision will be made, and how any “contractor” that gets selected will make important decisions on infrastructure investment and maintenance in the future. Golden State Water is best positioned to meet Claremont’s needs, now and in the future. We are financially sound with significant expertise and a sole mission of providing reliable water service and maintaining infrastructure worth hundreds of millions of dollars. Company professionals place tremendous emphasis on research and development, infrastructure replacement, maintenance and customer service. Our access to capital provided more than $20 million for Claremont since 2000 to improve capacity, replace pipes and mains and to strengthen water quality and reliability. We encourage you to demand the city be forthcoming. Video from our public meeting and Dr. Smith’s research is available at www.gswater.com/claremont. We will be holding another customer meeting early this year and hope you will come learn more and work with us to address important issues about your water service. Residents deserve transparency, not secrecy, and we’re committed to providing complete information. We hope the city will change their non-disclosure policy instead of paying private lawyers to keep financial information away from taxpayers.

Irish music set to rock the Candlelight Pavilion
The Candlelight Pavilion Dinner Theatre in Claremont presents Michael Ryan and an ensemble of musicians, singers and Irish dancers. The three performances will feature Irish cultural, dance and music from the traditional Celtic music to the contemporary Irish Pub songs. Mr. Ryan is a guitarist and composer influenced by

OUR TOWN
classical guitar, Irish and Latin musical traditions. Mr. Ryan is a Departmental Associate for the University of La Verne music department and also teaches private guitar instruction and songwriting. Other performers include Hai Muradian, flute and vocals; Ken Soderlund, guitar; Julian Johnson, bass; Martie Echito on keyboards; Romy Stegen, vocals;

Danny Oberbeck, lead vocals and guitar; Dylan Oberbeck, guitar and backing vocals. Performances will take place this weekend, January 3, 4 and 5. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. with a 7:30 p.m. show time on Friday and Saturday. The Sunday show will begin at 2 p.m. with doors opening at 1:45 p.m. All of these shows are performance only with desserts and beverages available for purchase. Tickets are $20. For tickets or information call (909) 626-1254 or visit www.candlelightpavilion.com.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

9

Mary Adeline Cooke Miller
Mary Adeline Cooke Miller died on December 18, 2013 at the Claremont Manor Care Center after complications following surgery for a broken leg. She was 91. Known by her family and friends as ‘Macky,’ she will be remembered as a loving mother, devoted friend and champion for those on the margins of society. Mrs. Miller was born October 19, 1922 to W. Henry and Jennie Cooke of Claremont. She graduated from Pomona College in 1943 and went on to spend two years in the Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service (WAVES) program. Stationed in Atlanta, she trained pilots to use Link Trainer flight simulators. After working for the Bureau of Occupations at UCLA, she traveled to France on the GI Bill to study French at the University of Grenoble in 1949. There, she met Charles Sanford Miller, who coincidentally had been planning to come to the Claremont Graduate School to study history with Mrs. Miller’s father. The two married in 1950 and made their home in Claremont before moving to the Red Hill area of Rancho Cucamonga. A lifelong teacher, Mrs. Miller began her career at Claremont’s Oakmont Elementary School in 1952, moved to Sycamore School in 1953 and returned to teaching at the Valle Vista School in Rancho Cucamonga in 1966. She happily taught kindergarten and bilingual first

OBITUARIES
family game of “categories.” She had a particular passion for the Lakers and did not suffer their errors gladly, as all who watched games with her would attest. She also loved music, particularly classical music and that from the Big Band era. During her last years, classical radio station KUSC was her steady companion. Its strains constantly filled her apartment whenever she was not watching Jeopardy, Doc Martin, the Dodgers or the Lakers. Mrs. Miller is survived by sisters Ruth Cooke Henzie of Claremont and Frances Cooke Browne of Silver City, New Mexico; daughter Nancy Raabe (Bill), of Milton, Wisconsin; her son Brian of Claremont; a daughter by marriage, Myriam Charpentier (Jacques) of Poitiers, France; three grandchildren, Margaret and Martin Raabe and Johnathan Emerson; two grandchildren by marriage, Herve Charpentier and Sophie Payet (Thierry); four great-grandchildren by marriage; and several nieces and nephews. A service of committal will be held at Oak Park Cemetery, 410 S. Sycamore Ave., Claremont at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, January 25, 2014, the Reverend Jennifer Browne presiding. Memorials may be directed to the Claremont United Church of Christ, 233 W. Harrison Ave., Claremont, California, 91711, with “Mary Miller Memorial” in the memo line.

Loving mother, devoted friend, passionate humanitarian
school system and help their children excel. Many of those with whom she worked became members of her extended family. After retirement, Mrs. Miller and her husband, Charlie, became very involved in Volunteer Vital English, a local nonprofit that organized volunteers to teach English to Spanish-speaking people in their homes and workplaces. Eventually, the couple both held the position of president in the organization. While Mrs. Miller had many close friends, she also formed friendships over the years that transcended common socioeconomic barriers. Among her dear friends were housekeepers, janitors and others in various service industries. One friend recently remembered that Ms. Miller’s superiors sometimes cautioned against such liaisons. “It’s not a good idea to make friends with the help,” the supervisor had told her. Mrs. Miller was an ardent supporter of many humanitarian causes. She loved nature and had a heightened awareness to the things that filled it. She was encyclopedic in her knowledge of trees, birds, flowers and constellations. She enjoyed gardening, and the family dwellings were always elegantly appointed with living blooms and fresh-cut flowers. Fond of crossword puzzles, Mrs. Miller almost always triumphed in the beloved

grade at Valle Vista, in addition to the second, third and fourth grades, until her retirement in 1983. In 1975, she attended a Spanish immersion program in Cuernavaca, Mexico, and went on to receive her bilingual certification at Cal Poly Pomona a few years later. Like her parents, Mrs. Miller had a deep sensitivity to the plight of area immigrant communities. In her early years at the Valle Vista School, she began voluntarily teaching English in nearby migrant labor camps. She recognized the need for parents as well as children to learn English so parents could navigate the challenges of the

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

10

Joan Carolyn Coats
Mother, teacher, artist
Joan Carolyn Coats, a teacher at La Verne’s Calvary Baptist School and Claremont resident, died on Wednesday December 11 after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. She was 73. Ms. Coats was born on August 27, 1940 in Virginia and moved to Pomona as a child. She finally settled in Claremont with her husband Gene in 1969. Her family remembers her as a very giving woman that was always willing to help whoever needed it. She was a devote church-goer and loved the lord. Ms. Coats taught for 50 years at various schools with 25 of those years at Calvary Baptist serving as their art and bible teacher. She was also active with the church assisting with the children’s ministry in her spare time and helped out where she could. She was passionate about making a difference in the lives of her students. Ms. Coats was born with a tremendous talent in her hands and her heart, always making sure to use both for the benefit of others. With her love for creating she encouraged her children, grandchildren and students to make art. Her passion trickled into her time at Calvary Baptist in the form of helping to paint for productions and art shows that she organized. She would encourage students to present their talent for the world to see by entering her students work in the fair to be judged. In her private life she helped her grandchildren create and her personal

OBITUARIES

artwork still decorates the lives of her family members. “She was always such a giving person. She didn’t have a selfish bone in her body and she was fun to be with,” Ms. Coats’ children said. “She was one of the most awesome people and women you could know.” Ms. Coats is survived by her husband, Gene Coats; her three children and their spouses, Lonny (Mickie); Rhonda (Curtis) and Troy (Michele). She is also survived by her sister, Veronica; and six grandchildren, Phillip, Briannah, Nathan, Wyatt, Bryce and Myles. Services will be held today at 10 a.m. at the Calvary Baptist Church located at 2990 Damien Ave. La Verne CA, 91750.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY
accounting Christiansen Accounting
Corina L. Christiansen, CPA 140 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite E Claremont, CA 91711

For information on inclusion in the professional service directory, call Mary Rose at 621-4761.
architect attorney MIKE F. OʼBRIEN
Attorney at Law

architect/contractor
HARTMANBALDWIN
DESIGN/BUILD

WHEELER & WHEELER
A.I.A. Architects, Inc.
133 South Spring Street Claremont, CA 91711

100 West Foothill Blvd. Claremont, CA 91711

212 Yale Avenue Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 447-6802
www.christiansenaccounting.com
www.facebook.com/christiansenaccountingcpa

(909) 670-1344
www.hartmanbaldwin.com Since 1984
Residential remodeling, historic restorations, and custom home building

(909) 624-5095
www.wheelerarchitects.com

(909) 626-9999
www.mikefobrien.com
Specialist in personal injury and wrongful death cases. Se habla español

Specialize in small business accounting and tax planning since 1962.

Building a better Claremont since 1985

attorney PAUL L. BRISSON
Attorney at Law 112 Harvard Avenue Claremont, CA 91711

attorney
BUXBAUM & CHAKMAK
A Law Corporation

attorney Kendall & Gkikas LLP
Attorneys at Law 134 Harvard Avenue, 2nd Floor
Claremont, CA 91711

child & family therapy
ANN BINGHAM NEWMAN, PH.D., MFT
Child Specialist
Children have problems at home, at school and with friends... Is your child having difficulties? I can help. Individual, Child and Family Therapy

(909) 553-2182
Free consultation, 23 years experience. Low, flat fee Chapter 7 and 13 Bankruptcy, Civil Litigation, Evictions, Family Law, Small Claims, Wills & Living Trusts.

414 Yale Avenue, Suite K Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 482-1422
Specializing in Family Law in Claremont since 1994: Divorce, Custody, Visitation with Children, Property Division, Alimony, Child Support

(909) 621-4707
41 years experience in: Business Law, Probate, Family Law, Estate Planning, Real Estate Law, Civil Litigation, Bankruptcy.

(909)398-1984

NEW CAR GUIDE
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EMPIRE NISSAN ONTARIO AUTO CENTER (866) 234-2544
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Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

11

Martha Kohl Ervin
Martha Kohl Ervin died peacefully in her home in Bend, Oregon on Friday, December 27, 2013. She was 88. A long-time Claremont resident, Ms. Ervin died surrounded by her family who sang to her, prayed with her and comforted her. Ms. Ervin was born November 20, 1925 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa to Kenneth and Margaret Kohl. She grew up as the middle child between her older sister, Jane, and younger brother, Ken. Ms. Ervin graduated from University of Iowa School of Nursing. In June 1947, she married James Goodall Ervin and the two of them moved to Claremont, California where she spent her younger married years as a nurse. Mrs. Ervin left nursing for a short time to raise her five children at their Claremont home. She lived for her family and celebrated her children’s accomplishments. Ms. Ervin eventually returned to nursing and finished her career at Pomona Valley Hospital as an obstetrics nurse until her retirement. In the spring of 2006, Ms. Ervin left Claremont and moved to Bend, Oregon to be closer to two of her sons. She left

OBITUARIES

Loving mother, active grandmother
lived in Claremont her home was her grandchildren’s paradise filled with creative toys, sandbox, basketball hoop, barbecues around the pool and hours of baking in her tiny kitchen. She kept her home active and full of love. Ms. Ervin specifically requested that her children “go easy on any eulogies. God does not need to hear a persuasive presentation of my qualifications. He knows better and still has already covered me.” Ms. Ervin was predeceased by her husband, James, who died on October 24, 1977. She is survived by her sister, Jane Kemp, her three sons and daughter-in-laws, Mark and Betty (Rogers) Ervin, their children Rian and Bryce; Scott and Diane (Lang) Ervin, their daughter, Kelly; and Todd and Carolyn (Lang) Ervin and their children, Kohleen, Kent and Cori as well as her two daughters and sons-in-law, Claire and Stephen Williams, their daughters Kate, Lydia and Zoe; and Jayne and Dana Smith with their children, Lara, Jenna and Brent. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to First Presbyterian Church of Bend, “Kits for Kids” program. 230 NE 9th Street Bend, Oregon 97701. Private services will be held at a later date.

behind her beloved Claremont First Presbyterian Church, of which she was a charter member. In her free time, Ms. Ervin loved watching sports and cheering on her teams of the Iowa Hawkeyes, Chicago Cubs and Bend Lava Bears. While she

Wendy Losh
Claremont resident Wendy Christine Losh died on December 23, 2013, after a six-year fight with cancer. She was 63. Ms. Losh was an active member of the Claremont United Methodist Church and served as their organist. She also taught piano privately in the community with her 51 years playing experience. A full obituary and service information will appear in a future edition of the COURIER.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY
chiropractor
DR. MARTIN S. McLEOD
411 N. Indian Hill Blvd.

For information on inclusion in the professional service directory, call Mary Rose at 621-4761.
dentist
PETER T. IGLER, D.D.S. D. INGRID ROJAS, D.D.S.
Cosmetic & General Dentistry
615 W. Foothill Blvd. Claremont, CA 91711

c.p.a. LIGHTFOOT • RALLS & LIGHTFOOT LLP
Certified Public Accountants 675 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite 300 Claremont, CA 91711

design/build SRS GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
909-621-1559
www.srsgeneralcontractor.com
Practical design, tastefully executed.
• Residential Remodel • Restoration of Unique & Vintage homes • Room additions.

Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-1208
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(909) 624-6815
1 Hour In-Office Bleaching, Veneers, White Fillings, Dental Implants, Dentures.

energy efficiency

advertising

financial consultants
PAMELA J. ZEDICK
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® Securities and advisory services offered through National Planning Corporation. Member of FINRA/SIPC, a registered investment advisor

financial consultants
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HOME PERFORMANCE MATTERS
(909) 992-3214
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COURIER
Advertise your professional service here. Call Mary Rose for rates and great ideas on ways to boost your business.

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optometry
Ann M. Johannsen, O.D. Brad A. Baggarly, O.D.

optometry
ANNA M. TORRES, O.D.

real estate broker Geoff T. Hamill
Broker Associate, ABR. CRS. GRI, E-PRO, SRES, D.R.E. #00997900
Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty

tax preparation/EA D. PROFFITT, EA
Claremont, CA 91711

OPTOMETRY
695 W. Foothill Blvd. Established 1972

OPTOMETRY
1420 N. Claremont Blvd.,Ste. 209-B Claremont

Phone: (909) 445-1379
dee@dproffittea.com Visit my website at www.dproffittea.com
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Payroll Service • Accounting

Phone: (909) 621-0500
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(909) 625-7861
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Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time!

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

12

Four! There goes the golf course on historic Indian Hill
by John Neiuber

A

fter years of financial losses, The Claremont Golf Course, owned and managed by the Claremont University Consortium, closed in early December. The nine-hole golf course had been in operation for 54 years, having opened in March of 1959. Golf had been played on the site, almost continuously for nearly 100 years, except for a 14 year respite that began in 1945, when lack of maintenance equipment due to World War II forced the original Indian Hill Golf Club, established in 1913, to close.
Part of the Indian Hill Golf Club was purchased to become the Santa Ana Botanical Gardens. What remained of the original golf course was later established as The Claremont Golf Course. Around 1973, plans were developed to expand the golf course and build an 18-hole course on the land east of the Botanical Gardens and north of Foothill Boulevard, the site of what is now the Bernard Field Station. At the time, a number of scientists from The Colleges had been using the land as an informal ecological laboratory. The faculty members reacted negatively to the golf course proposal and were able to bring an end to the endeavor. A few years later in 1976, under the leadership of Professor Clyde Eriksen, the Robert J. Bernard Biological Field Station was established, and Mr. Eriksen became the first director. The golf course is located on Indian Hill. This is not meant to point out its obvious location on Indian Hill Boulevard. It is located on the Indian Hill, the name given by early settlers to the mesa that was home to the original inhabitants, commonly referred to now as the Gabrielino-Tongva tribes. The mesa was an ideal site to make a home. Historian Anthony Lehman, in Claremont’s Historic Indian Hill, points out that “water was plentiful because a branch of San Antonio Creek converged with Palmer Canyon Wash on the southeast side of the hill.” Tooch Martin, the first American settler in Claremont, noted that there was also a spring on the north side of the hill. The abundant oak trees provided acorns that were a staple of the local diet. Game was also abundant with the proximity to the San Gabriel Mountains. The history of the local indigenous people of Clare-

mont is much the same as that of others elsewhere in California. Mr. Lehman points out: “With the advent of the white man, they were crowded off their rancherias by the herds and fields of the new settlers; the old mode of existence was completely and irrevocably uprooted; and henceforth the rapidly declining Indian population could only support itself by laboring for the very people by whom it had been dispossessed.” Two smallpox epidemics devastated the tribe, first in 1862 and then again in 1873. The last epidemic killed the majority of those who had survived the first, and by 1883, Mr. Martin notes that the last of the tribe had left, having reported in the early days that as many as forty-five brush teepees and a population of 200 occupied the mesa. The history of the tribe in Claremont remains sketchy, at best. The location of the village was reported by Mr. Martin at one time to be the south end of the hill and, at another time, to be at the southwest corner of the mesa. Clyde Maynard, in The Development of San Antonio Canyon, reported that the village was on the east side of the hill and that the burial ground was located at the southeast corner of the hill. Over the years, a few artifacts have been collected in and around Indian Hill. The COURIER reported in the September 15, 1927 edition that fragments of mortars and pestles were still found throughout the Indian Hill area. Claremont resident, Jerry Laudermilk, wrote an article for Westways in 1958, wherein he describes making Indian bread from acorns he had collected around Indian Hill, using a mortar and pestle he had found in the same area. Mr. Laudermilk also discovered the remains of a one-room adobe in the area and ascertained, with assistance of the Los Angeles County Museum, that it was established by an Indian family that worked for the local rancho, given the artifacts

discovered that were typical of that period. A Pomona College student, Josephine Hervey, believed she had discovered the Indian burial ground in 1925, but after much digging to a depth of six feet, found nothing. Subsequently, other archaeological investigations and discoveries have been made, mostly by college staff and students, however, no professional excavations have been proposed or undertaken. Some artifacts have been cataloged and preserved by the Pomona College Museum. As the community discusses the loss of an institution that was part of the city for so long, long time residents recall their memories of golfing and the youth programs now look for other venues, there looms other considerations about the land, such as how it might be used and how those uses might impact a site that is important to the history of the city and valley. The Indian Hill site is important to the period of time before the recorded history of the city. The history of Claremont is well documented through The Colleges, the COURIER, the city and local citizens and historians, but the prehistoric era is relatively unknown. The Claremont University Consortium has been quiet about the future use of the site. It has been reported that the Botanic Garden has a master plan that includes incorporating the golf course land in the future. Regardless of what the plans may be for the site, a systematic exploration of Indian Hill is warranted to document the history of the Gabrielino-Tongva tribe that occupied the mesa, and lived in a village they called Torojoatnga, translated as “The Place Below Snowy Mountain.” This is a missing link in the history of the city, and given the academic and civic focus of the owners, should be explored and documented as part of any forthcoming plan.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

13

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Rouhi El-Rabaa swings Nayah Torres in a circle while playing in the snow on Tuesday at the Mount Baldy Ski Lifts. Dozens of area residents took advantage opportunity for some winter fun without the cold as temperatures at the resort were in the mid 50s.

No surprises with Claremont weather…it’s dry out there

T

o put a twist on Bob Dylan’s lyrics from “Subterranean Homesick Blues,” you don’t need a weatherman to know it has been dry in southern California.

How dry has it been? According to Bonnie Bartling, a weather specialist with the National Weather Service, it’s been the driest calendar year since 1877. Only a precious 3.05 inches of rain fell on downtown Los Angeles since January 1 of 2013. A normal year would deliver 14.93 inches, and 2012 saw 8.15. There is still hope for normal rainfall totals for the season, measured from July 1 to June 30, because the wettest months are typically in late winter and early spring. However, up to this six-month point we have seen less than an inch of rain. As dangerously cold air set in New Year’s Day in the northern plains and upper Midwest, one found it hard to complain about Claremont’s high-70s temperatures. But low rainfall not only threatens our water supply, it also exacerbates fire danger and could extend the fire season. The lack of precipitation also affects the skiing conditions in the local mountains and revenue for businesses like Mt. Baldy. General Manager Robby Ellingson noted that there have been just three storms this year that dropped only three or four inches of snow each, far less than what they need to open. Fortunately, the resort installed a nine million gallon reservoir five years ago, so they are able to make snow when the conditions allow. In a good season, Mr. Ellingson further remarked, the ski lifts will earn 90 percent of their annual income during the winter. The last couple of years’ winter revenues have been closer to 50 percent. “So far this year we are behind but with three solid months of winter to go we’re still optimistic the season could turn out okay,” he said. Because of a cold snap in early December, the resort was able to make enough snow to open the tubing area and the beginners’ slope. The more technical routes, how-

Hawaii resident Ami Herzer waits for her son Gabriel as the pair take in an afternoon of skiing on Tuesday at the Mount Baldy Ski Lifts. Ms. Herzer wanted her son to experience snow and winter sports, which she enjoyed growing up in Argentina.

ever, remain closed. Mr. Ellingson watches the weather closely but notes, “There has not been much to monitor lately.” The temperature at Mt. Baldy’s Top of the Notch restaurant, elevation 7800 feet, on Tuesday was 57 degrees, hardly what one thinks of as winter weather. “These temps are completely abnormal,” said Mr. Ellingson, adding that highs in the 40s and lows in the teens would be more typical. But the warm temperature did not dampen the fun for families enjoying an afternoon of tubing.

Fontana resident Richard Lafianaza and his children, Michelle and Peter, spent Tuesday afternoon playing in the snow. He didn’t mind the lack of winter weather and remarked, “It’s still fun if you have kids.” Plus, the warm temperature means the parents don’t shiver while watching from the sidelines. The forecast for the first few days of 2014 looks like much of the same: dry with mild temperatures, so go outside and enjoy the California sun.
—Steven Felschundneff

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

14

Mrs. Nelson’s to close after 28 years in community

T

he bright, orange doors of Mrs. Nelson’s Toy and Book Shop will be closing for good in January. The children’s bookstore, originally opened in Covina before moving to the La Verne location, has been providing the local children a place to foster a love of reading for the last 28 years.

Owners Judy and Byron Nelson cite a changing business climate and the desire for “big box” discount stores as contributing reasons why they are closing their beloved bookshop. “Over the last few years we have done everything we could think of to help bring sales up but in the end it just wasn’t enough,” Mrs. Nelson said. Increased craft projects for children, frequent author visits and carrying even the most popular titles were all done in attempts to bring in more customers. While the changes helped, in the end the demand for physical books was not high enough to keep the doors open. According to the Association of American Publishing, the demand for eBooks grew by 45 percent in 2012 and now constitutes 20 percent of the trade market. The demand for hardcover and paperback has been holding steady since 2011. This increase in online book purchases has closed many mom and pop type bookshops down in favor of convenience. “Personally, I believe having a bookstore where people can come in and browse and be surrounded by books is more important than just seeing a picture and a description,” Ms. Nelson said. During the 28 years the store has been open, it’s had a series of events and visitors that have caught the community’s attention. The most famous are the author visits that bring writers in to meet the children and discuss what it takes to become a writer. Guests include Chris Colfer of Glee, Ray Bradbury and Bob Keeshan, better known as Captain Kangaroo. Ms. Nelson recalls when Captain Kangaroo visited the shop in 1998 and how the line to meet him wove in and out of the aisles and way out the door. Since the announcement of the closure the store has been packed full of children and parents taking advantage of the 50 to 90 percent discounts. Toys that were once priced at $9.99 now sell for $0.82 as customers walk out in a steady stream laden with stacks of toys and books. Even though the shop may be closed as early as next week with sales increasing ten-fold, that does not stop the attentive staff from going through and organizing and reshelving books that have been taken out by customers. rs. Nelson has been kept busy alongside her staff to help keep up with the crowds. She often will stop and visit with regular customers that have grown

Above, Judy Nelson shows a book to her daughter-in-law Ann Nelson and grandson Jack on Monday at her bookstore, Mrs. Nelsonʼs Toy and Book Shop in La Verne. Ms. Nelson opened the bookstore 28 years ago and has been at its current location 23 years. The shop will be shutting its doors for good next week, due to competition from Internet sales.

up visiting the store. The owners’ son, Andy Nelson, walked down the aisles with his own son in his arms on Monday remembering when he used to come to author visits and work at the shop in his teens. Every summer he would assist with customers, sales and even gardening. He remembers how he painted the parking stripes in the small parking lot behind Mrs. Nelson’s as well. While he is sad to see the store close, he is not surprised by the closure. “Bookstores are being pushed out,” Mr. Nelson said. “It’s something where you can’t change the business enough to keep up with the trend.” His parents are sad that while their

own children were able to grow-up within the store’s walls, their grandchildren will have say goodbye before they are old enough to remember walking down the aisles of books, Mr. Nelson said. “The families are what I will miss the most,” Ms. Nelson said. “It’s so rewarding to see families come in, look at books and toys and just enjoy spending time together, while at the same time encouraging the love of books.” Two-year patron Malissa Hernandez will miss the brick and mortar store for the quality time it lets her spend with her two-year-old son, Jacob. Commuting from Rialto to the University of La Verne for work, Ms. Hernandez would

pass the store as she ran errands and think of what kind of fun her family could have inside. “I remember passing the shop and thinking, ‘as soon as we have kids, we’ll go there’” Ms. Hernandez said. “I am really going to miss the special attention that the staff gives to customers, there aren’t a lot of bookstores like this besides the chain stores.” Since Jacob was born, she has made it a point to bring him to Mrs. Nelson’s for author visits and the various craft activities that the location offered. Jacob often visits with his daycare group between visits with his mom. As time runs out for the mom and pop
MRS. NELSONʼS/next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

15

SPORTS
Strong defense has CHS boys basketball riding hot streak The Claremont boys basketball team is heading into the new year with a record of 10-4, having won their last seven games dating back to Decmber 19. Seniors Chris Edward and Omar Mahmoud have each played a significant role in the Wolfpack’s hot start. Edward leads the team with 17.1 PPG, with Mahmoud averaging 12.4 PPG. As a team, the Pack is shooting nearly 50 percent from the field and is averaging 63.3 PPG. Their defense, as it has been all season long, has been playing lights out, averaging 7.4 steals per game and 29.1 rebounds per contest. Claremont will travel to Alta Loma tomorrow to take on the Alta Loma Braves. Trio continue to star for girls basketball The Claremont girls basketball team sits at 9-4 near the midway point of the season. A big part of their early success has been the play of seniors Danna Robles, Jessica Abrolat and junior Katie Porter, who combine to average 27 points per contest, more than half of the team’s total average of 47.2. After a two-week hiatus, the Pack will take the court on January 15 against Ayala in their first league match of the season. Girls soccer game rises for league play The Wolfpack is preparing to kick-off the second half of their schedule on Jan. 15 after going 10-4-2 in their first 16 contests. The Pack has been on a roll as of late, winning 7 of their last 9 games, and could not have gotten hotter at a better time, with league action set to kick off in just a few weeks. Claremont is averaging 1.9 goals per game, with opponents only averaging only 1.1. Goalie play has been huge for Claremont thus far, with sophomore Sydney Fortson and senior Drew Williams combining for 55 saves and seven shutouts in 16 games. The Pack will travel to Ayala on January 15 for their first league match of the season. Boys soccer prepare for tough part of schedule The Claremont boy soccer team sits with a 7-3-2 record as they prepare to take on the second-half of their schedule, which is loaded with league matches. The Pack finished the first-half of their schedule with a record of 51-1 and hopes to carry that success over to their next stretch of stiff competition, which includes South Hills, Damien and Chino Hills. The Wolfpack is netting nearly two goals for every one goal the opponent scores, outscoring their opponents 31-15. Claremont will kickoff Sierra League play on January 17 against South Hills at home.
MRS. NELSONʼS/continued from the previous page COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Malissa Hernandez shows a book to her two-yearold son Jacob on Monday at Mrs. Nelsonʼs in La Verne. Ms. Hernandez works at the University of La Verne. —Bryan Stauffer sports@claremont-courier.coma

business, visitors have stopped to leave memories and thank you messages on the store’s memory wall. Many of the stories talk about the friends children made with staff members or other children while they waited in line to checkout. Others are from local teachers thanking Mrs. Nelson’s for their devotion to teaching their students the joy of reading. “This brick and mortar store will forever be a part of the fabric of my life,” one message reads. Thankfully, there is still light at the end of the tunnel for devote fans of the toy and book shop. While the La Verne location will be shutting its doors for good, the Pomona locations of Mrs. Nelson’s Book Fair Company and Mrs. Nelson’s Library Services will remain open. Currently, the owners are not sure if the author visits will continue at these locations as setting up the visits there will prove tricky. Mrs. Nelson’s Toy and Book Shop is located at 1030 Bonita Ave. in La Verne.
—Christina Burton

Every Friday in print. Every day online.
www.claremont-courier.com

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

16

Friday, January 3 through Saturday, January 11

CALENDAR

Nightlife
Ginger & the Hoosier Daddys perform at Hip Kitty Jazz & Fondue.

Galleries
See our Claremont Art Walk walking tour map and listing.

Page 18

Page 21

COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger Thousands of people line the streets of Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena during the 125th Tournament of Roses Parade on New Yearʼs Day last Wednesday.

YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

January Friday

3
4

CLAREMONT ART WALK Visit Claremont art galleries between 6 and 9 p.m. for this month’s opening receptions featuring refreshments and artist meet and greets. See page 21 for a walking tour map for this event.

binoculars and meet at the garden entrance. There is no charge to enter the garden with the Audubon group. Families are welcome. LIVE JAZZ performance on the Blue Fin patio at 2 p.m. 665 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. (909) 946-1398.

January Monday

6

January Saturday

AVIATION IN THE MOVIES Open to the public, Planes of Fame Air Museum (Chino, CA) presents its monthly Living History event. The topic for the January 4 event is “Aviation in the Movies,” featuring the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk. The featured speaker will be Mark Carlson, author of Flying On Film: A Century of Aviation in the Movies, 1912-2012, who will also be selling and signing his books. Joining him will be Robert J. Friend, Lt. Col. USAF Ret., former Tuskegee Airmen fighter pilot in WWII. These two speakers’ presentations will be followed by a question and answer period and flight demonstration. The P-40 will be on display and perform a flight demonstration. 10 a.m. to noon. Museum doors open at 9 a.m. The Planes of Fame Air Museum is located at 7000 Merrill Avenue #17, Chino.

SUSTAINABILITY DIALOG “Apple’s iPad: How it Can Benefit the Planet.” Michael Rosenthal will discuss what can be done with this remarkable one-pound device and how it can increase the efficiency, dynamism and sustainability of global society. Dialogue with the audience to follow. 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Pomona College’s Hahn 101, 420 N. Harvard, Claremont. (909) 624-5823. WALKING MEDITATION Qigong Energy from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. Four sessions per month. Visit www.rsabg.org for admission details. (909) 6258767, ext. 224.

January Tuesday

7

January Sunday

5

BIRD WATCHING The Pomona Valley Audubon will lead a two-hour walk at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, located at 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont at 8 a.m. Bring

HOOVER DAM REINVENTED Civil engineer Howard Lum will discuss the historic construction of the Hoover Dam and how it would differ if it were built today. Buffet lunch at 11:30 a.m. for $12 or dessert and coffee for $6. The University Club meets each Tuesday at the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. YOGA for all levels. Instructor Jasmin Iskandar has more than 400 hours of teacher training in Hatha
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Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

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9-DAY CALENDAR continued from the previous page

and Vinyasa Yoga. She was first trained in the Krishnamacharya lineage by Shiva Rea at Exhale Center for Sacred Movement in Venice Beach. Later, Ms. Iskandar traveled to India to study the Sri Sivananda Saraswati lineage of Hatha yoga. Her classes offer the dynamism of Vinyasa with the science of Hatha. Visit www.levitatela.com to learn more about Ms. Iskandar. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. The Colony at Loft 204, 532 W. First St. #204 upstairs in the Claremont Packing House.

January Wednesday

8

ZEN MEDITATION 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. at the McAlister Center for Religious Activities, Claremont University Consortium, located at 919 Columbia, Claremont. (909) 621-8685.

January Thursday

BIRD IDENTIFICATION The Pomona Valley Audubon Society will hold its monthly meeting at the Alexander Hughes Center in the Padua Room. 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. The Evening will begin with a bird identification session at 7 p.m. followed by refreshments, a short business meeting and the evening program featuring Judy Everett, who will present a program about the activities of her Wild Wings bird rehabilitation operation in San Dimas. The meeting is open and free to the public.

9

January

Friday

DEMOCRATIC CLUB OF CLAREMONT Professor of Physics Robert Wolf (Harvey Mudd College) will discuss the fourth generation nuclear reactors and their promise for a safe source of energy. The meeting will be at Casa de Salsa on Foothill Boulevard in Claremont. Food and conversation will be from noon until 1 p.m.; the speaker and discussion will run from 1 until 2 p.m. The buffet meal costs $16 and includes non-alcoholic drinks, tax and tip.

10

January

Saturday

11

ENERGY SEMINAR Learn ways to save energy in your home with SCE and CLEO. CLEO empowers customers with information about utility programs, rebates and energy knowledge for real power savings. These programs discuss simple energy efficiency strategies and provide information on SCE and SoCalGas’ residential rebates and income-qualified programs. Noon to 1 p.m. This free program will be held in the multipurpose room of the Upland Library, located at 450 N. Euclid Ave., Upland. For more information, call (909) 931-4205. FAMILY SCIENCE DISCOVERY DAY “The Mighty Dinosaurs” featuring crafts, a chance to learn about dinosaurs and special admission of $3 (free for children four and younger). 1 to 4 p.m. Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology, 1175 W. Baseline Rd., Claremont. (909) 624-2798. www.alfmuseum.org.

Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for admission (if applicable). Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com. Phone: 6214761. Fax: 621-4072. Address: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205-B, Claremont, 91711. There is NO guarantee that items submitted will be published.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

NIGHTLIFE
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is a restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment. 445-1200. —Thursdays: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m. —Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays: Romantic guitarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m. —Sundays: Mariachi San Pedro. Brunch. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Claremont. Open from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday; closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. “Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. 445-8875. —Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros. Brewery pints. —Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass. —Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the

week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month. —Thursday, January 9: All Tito’s Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka Thursday Night Music featuring Black Bear & The Cheyenne Autumn Band (folk). THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. —Open mic night, the last Sunday of every month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Info: 624-2928 or www.folkmusiccenter.com. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m., Saturday at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m and Sunday at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door. —Friday, January 3: Kareem Matthews from Comedy Central. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. —Saturday, January 4: Kareem Matthews from

Comedy Central. 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. —Sunday, January 5: Two Milk Minimum. 4:30 p.m. Silly Sundays Open Mic/Auditions. 9:00 p.m. —Wednesday, January 8: First timer Funnies. 8 p.m. —Thursday, January 9: First Timer Funnies. 8 p.m. —Friday, January 10: K-von from Showtime and MTV’s Disaster Date. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. —Saturday, January 11: K-von from Showtime and MTV’s Disaster Date. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. —Sunday, January 12: Two Milk Minimum. 4:30 p.m. Silly Sundays Open Mic/Auditions. 9:00 p.m. HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission: Two-drink minimum. Info: 447-6700 or www.hipkit tyjazz.com. —Friday, January 3: Ginger & the Hoosier Daddys (jazz/swing). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, January 4: Gina Saputo & the George Kahn Band (jazz) 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Sunday, January 5: GrooveSession (funk/jam). 7 p.m. —Tuesday, January 7: Beat Cinema 7 p.m. —Wednesday, January 8: Open Jam with Geno’s Standard Band (jazz/swing). 8 p.m. —Thursday, January 9: Suit & Skirt. 7 p.m. —Friday, January 10: Rumble King (swing/blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, January 11: Little A & The Allnighters (blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21 and over after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No cover. 625-4808. —Friday, January 3: Kansas City Bankroll (Guitar Rock). 10 p.m. —Saturday, January 4: The Duelords and Mick Rhodes and The Hard 8 (rock). 10 p.m. —Sunday, January 5: Piano Sunday (Patrick Vargas). 6 p.m. Super Awesome Open Mic. Night. 9:30 p.m. —Tuesday, January 7: King Trivia Night. 9:30 p.m. —Wednesday, January 8: Half-off wine Wednesday featuring music by Joe Atman. 9:30 p.m. —Thursday, January 9: Teryn Re (jazz). 8:30 p.m. followed by DJ Chris L. at 11 p.m. —Friday, January 10: New Manners (indie/rock). 10 p.m. —Saturday, January 11: Mothers of Fut (post punk) 10 p.m. PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21 and over. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID). 547-4266. —Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band. —Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke.” Rock the mic or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rockstars. 9 p.m. WALTER’S RESTAURANT: 310 Yale Ave., Claremont. VIP and fire pit lounge open from 7 to 10 p.m. Happy hour specials are only valid in the bar and lounge areas. 767-2255. —Margarita Mondays: $2 house margaritas, $3 house wine, $3 delirium tremens and $3 bolawnies. —Tequila Tuesdays: $2 house tequila, $3 house wine, $3 Coronas and $3 nachos. —Whiskey Wednesdays: $2 house scotch or bourbon, $3 house wine, $3 Stella and $3 bruschetta. —Thirsty Thursdays: Half-off all drinks and appetizers all evening. —Finest Fridays: $2 house vodka, $3 Pomona Queen, Green Flash and Hanger 24. Plus $3 house wine, $4 nachos and $6 classic burger and fries all evening. Kimera performs Gypsy Kings-style music. —Saturdays and Sundays: $3 Bloody Marys, mimosas and Afghan fries from opening to closing. Live jazz music is performed on weekends.

18

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

19

RESTAURANT ROW

CALL MARY TODAY: 621-4761

PERFORMING ARTS
BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way, Pomona College. Box-office hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (909) 607-1139. Tickets may be purchased online; you can easily choose seats at www.pomona.edu/bridges. —Sunday, January 19: New Shanghai Circus. Fearless performers with boundless energy bring you more than 2000 years of Chinese circus traditions. $25. Discounts available for children, seniors and military. 2 p.m. BRIDGES HALL OF MUSIC: Pomona College,

150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. (909) 607-2671. —Saturday, January 25: Claremont Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition winners Gaeun Moon (violin) and ShihZan Yao (cello) present a “Concert for Young People” at 10:30 a.m. CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. (909) 626-1254, ext.1 or www.candlelightpavilion.com. —Through January 5: Michael Ryan Irish Celebra-

tion of Music Song and Dance. —January 10 through February 2: The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas. —January 16 through 30: Lisa Layne. —February 7 through March 16: My Fair Lady. HAUGH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER: 1000 W. Foothill Blvd., Glendora at Citrus College. Discounts available for students, seniors and youth. 626963-9411 or www.haughpac.com. —Friday, January 17: Frankie Valli Tribute. 8 p.m. —Saturday, January 25: Big Drum, Small World for Kids. 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. —Sunday, January 26: Chita Rivera. 2 p.m.

COURIER CROSSWORD

Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #244

Across
1. Med. unit 4. Details 8. Struck hard, as in the Bible 13. Some deer 15. Impending 16. Uncanny 17. Short distance 18. 3600 secs 19. Smart one 20. Insulation material 21. Ace runner for the successful Claremont Wolfpack running team 23. Sacred beetle for the ancient Egyptians 25. Uncontrolled slide 26. Demons 29. Raises 33. "Wheel of Fortune" buy 35. Bibliographic abbr. 36. Column style

37. Dumped 39. Hustle tickets 42. Inadvisable action 43. Rice dish 45. Contort 47. Workout unit 48. Bratislava native 50. Dueling need 52. PA port 54. Excitement 57. Plain with major wildlife reserve 61. Hard to find 62. Conductor platforms 63. Latch onto 64. Simmer 65. Guinness et al. 66. Opposed 67. Teenage problem 68. Basic belief 69. Break 70. Conned

Down
1. Cuts back 2. Kind of boom 3. Indiscretion 4. Lives 5. Broadway brightener 6. Half man, half goat 7. Gold lace for upholstery 8. Albatross, e.g. 9. A kind of small reed organ 10. Certain cookie 11. Spasmodic contractions 12. Mock-frightened cry 14. Stock unit 22. Just manage, with "out" 24. Fifth, e.g. abbr. 27. French for lake 28. Shredded cabbage salads 30. Shade with inter-crossing lines 31. Food stabber 32. Glaswegian 33. Snakes 34. Short fiber 38. Former CHS basketball coach, now head coach of the University of Nevada in Las Vegas 40. ___ of averages 41. Ban 44. The Orient 46. Favoring 49. Relative 51. The 'back' 53. Actress Samantha 55. Circus site 56. Cut 57. Unwed 58. Garden in the Bible 59. Marine flier 60. Makes knots and loops 62. Mrs. Nixon

Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #243

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

20

GALLERIES
BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. www.buddhamouse.com. (909) 626-3322. —Through January 31: “Creatures of B.R. Guthrie,” is an exhibition, which focuses on a collection of original creatures and beasties inspired by the sci-fi and fantasy genre. The artworks shown are prints of digital work as well as traditional pencil work with digital coloring. Opening reception: Friday, January 3 from 6 to 9 p.m. Meet the artist and enjoy complimentary refreshments. BUNNY GUNNER GALLERY: 254 W. Bonita Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. 624-7238. —Through January 31: Mosaics by Cathy Garcia. Opening reception: Friday, January 3 from 6 to 9 p.m. Refreshments will be served. CLAREMONT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION ART GALLERY: 205 Yale Ave., Claremont Chamber of Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 398-1060. —Through January 31: “Marbled Paintings & More: The Art of Mary Hughes.” Opening reception: Friday, January 3 from 6 to 8 p.m. CLAREMONT FORUM GALLERY: 586 W. First St. in the Packing House. Tuesday through Thursday, noon to 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 7 p.m. (909) 626-3066. —Through January 31: “Fragile” includes works in paper and encaustic by Karen Karlsson. Drawing inspiration from nature’s kaleidoscopic palette, Ms. Karlsson’s monoprints, pastels and encaustic paintings often evoke a sense of serenity and contemplation. Her works dip into abstraction, structure and function, revealing a world built on mathematical shapes that, regardless of absolutes, never quite feels defined. This sense of the unknowable, and the emotion that drives us to understand, are always present in her work, from encaustic scars of heartbreak to solitary figures standing alone against the world. Ms. Karlsson is a Pomona-based artist who originally hails from Queens, New York. Her work, which debuted at the Main Street Gallery in Pomona’s Art Colony in 2009, has been seen throughout the inland and desert regions of southern California from where her inspiration is drawn; in 2011, she designed her first album cover art for award-winning Native American flutist Steve Rushingwind. Opening reception: Friday, January 3 from 6 to 9 p.m. Refreshments will be served. CLAREMONT MUSEUM OF ART: www.clare montmuseum.org. —Through March 30: “Betty Davenport Ford: Capturing the Animal Spirit,” an exhibit of sculpture presented by the Claremont Museum of Art, is on view in the gallery of Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden through March 2014. One of Claremont’s most prolific sculptors, Ms. Ford is well known for her unique style and honest craftsmanship. Working in clay and bronze for over 60 years, she simplifies form to abstract the natural essence of the wild creatures she depicts. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. The exhibit is open Friday-Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Garden admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and students, $4 for children and free for CMA and RSABG members. THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House. Open Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Extended hours on the first Friday of the month for Claremont Art Walk until 9 p.m., with live music at 8 p.m. Visit www.loft204.com. Email info@loft204.com for information about purchasing monthly wall space for artwork display or to inquire about event rental of gallery space. Call Vicki at (626) 224-7915 or (626)

Image courtesy of Bunny Gunner Gallery Mosiacs by Cathy Garcia will be on display at Bunny Gunner Gallery in the Claremont Village though the end of January. Visit the opening reception during Claremont Art Walk on Friday, January 3 from 6 to 9 p.m.

963-4238 for one-on-one art instruction for junior high and high school age students. —Tuesdays: Yoga class for all levels. Instructor Jasmin Iskandar has more than 400 hours of teacher training in Hatha and Vinyasa Yoga. She was first trained in the Krishnamacharya lineage by Shiva Rea at Exhale Center for Sacred Movement in Venice Beach. Later, Ms. Iskandar traveled to India to study the Sri Sivananda Saraswati lineage of Hatha yoga. Her classes offer the dynamism of Vinyasa with the science of Hatha. Visit www.levitatela.com to learn more about Ms. Iskandar. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —Through January 31: Photographer David Behar presents an exhibition of urban landscapes. In addition to framed pieces on display, unframed prints and Mr. Behar’s photography book will be available for purchase. Opening reception: Meet the artist Friday, January 3 from 6 to 9 p.m. Complimentary refreshments will be served. FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250 W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (909) 626-5455. —Through February 14: “Joe Zaldivar: Glimpse of a Street View” and holiday show. By using his tablet, Mr. Zaldivar uses Google Maps Street View to access street level vantage points around the world, which he uses as source material for his paintings/drawings. This show will include “Street View” renditions of the intersection of Hollywood and Vine in Los Angeles and the original Starbucks location in Seattle, a piece in which he incorporated coffee as a painting medium. Also on display is the annual holiday show. This First Street Gallery tradition will include at least one piece from every one of their 52 artists. Works purchased from the show will be available to take home immediately. GALERIA DE PÉROLAS: 532 W. First St. #211, Claremont Packing House. Open by appointment. —Friday, January 3: Closing reception of “Portraits” featuring various artists contribute to the exhibition. Live music and refreshments will be provided. 7 to 10 p.m. —Tuesdays: “Tribe Tuesday,” an open studio session for artists to share the space and work on their pieces. Open to artists of all levels from 7 to 9:30

p.m. Space is limited to 10 people per session. Call (909) 236-1562 or visit www.facebook.com/galer iadeperolas. GALLERIA BERETICH: The home and studio of Barbara Beretich, 1034 Harvard Ave., Claremont. (909) 624-0548. www.galleriaberetich.com. —Ongoing: Visitors welcome, appointments appreciated. Featuring California art, paintings and sculptures from local and national artists since 1976. MARTINEZ GALLERY: 504 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. www.martinezgallery.wee bly.com. (909) 527-9177. —January: Landscape and portrait art classes offered by Richard and Marciano Martinez focusing on watercolor, oil and acrylic. They will be painting at the gallery as well as ‘plein air’ painting trips to the mountains, beach and deserts. For info on classes and prices, call (909) 527-9177. —February: The featured artist will be Marciano Martinez focusing on an early retrospective along with some newer work. MALOOF FOUNDATION FOR ARTS & CRAFTS: 5131 Carnelian St., Alta Loma. 9800412, info@malooffoundation.org or www.maloof found ation.org. —Tours: Docent-led tours are offered on Thursdays and Saturdays at 1, 2 and 3 p.m. and feature Sam Maloof’s handmade home, furniture and the extensive Maloof collection of arts and crafts. Due to limited capacity, advance reservations are strongly recommended for all tours. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $5 for students. The Discovery Garden is open to visitors on Thursdays and Saturdays between noon and 4 p.m. at no charge. Check in at the Foundation Bookstore. The garden features drought-tolerant plants native to California and other parts of the world. PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCULTURAL ART: 730 Plymouth Rd., Pilgrim Place. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains collections of international fine art, folk art and material culture from 10,000 BCE to the present, contributed by Pilgrim Place residents and community friends, covering every continent. (909) 399-5544. —Through January 6: “Away in a Manger” featuring 127 nativity sets from the museum’s collections and lent by Pilgrim Place residents. Consisting of many different media such as prints, ceramics, wood, metal and various unusual organic materials from around the world, they will illustrate how the Christmas story is visualized in different countries and cultures. —Through January 31: “Cutting Edge Technology,” mini-exhibit featuring swords, knives, daggers, axes, spears and many different kinds of international cutting tools and weapons—both ancient and modern. POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART: 333 N. College Ave., Claremont. Open Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. Art After Hours on Thursday, 5 to 11 p.m. Open through December 5; closed Thanksgiving day. For more information, visit www.pomona.edu/museum. Contact Pomona College Museum of Art by email at museuminfo@pomona.edu or call (909) 621-8283. —January 21 through April 13: The exhibition “Mowry Baden: Dromedary Messanine” includes immersive, large-scale sculpture. Dromedary Mezzanine represents the first showing of this artwork in the western United States and the first time the work has been on view since becoming part of Pomona College’s permanent collection. One of Canada’s most accomplished artists and one of Pomona College’s most distinguished alumni, Mr. Baden has been creating kinesthetic sculptures and public artworks for four decades. Mr. Baden graduated from Pomona College in 1958 and returned
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GALLERIES continued from the previous page

10 years later to take on the roles of professor of art, department chair and gallery director. Mr. Baden’s works, which invite viewers to physically operate the sculpture, have always involved a more collaborative approach to viewers that prefigures much contemporary work today. —January 21 through April 13: The exhibition “Andrea Bowers: #sweetjane” includes new work by Los Angeles-based artist Andrea Bowers that examines the notorious Steubenville, Ohio high school rape case. In addition to a new series of drawings, “#sweetjane” includes a video based on Ms. Bowers’s three trips to Steubenville that documents the protest surrounding the trial and activities of “hactivist” group Anonymous. Her return to Ohio to document the Steubenville case is a form of personal mapping of 30 years of violence against women. The exhibition unfolds over two campuses and is the second collaborative project between the Pomona College Museum of Art and the Pitzer College Art Galleries. At the Pomona College Museum of Art, this exhibition is “Project Series 48” and is supported in part by the Pasadena Art Alliance. —January 21 through April 13: “Gathering the Work of Frederick Hammersley: Portraits, Abstractions,” and “In-Between: Gathering the Work of Frederick Hammersley” presents a selection of drawings, paintings and prints drawn from Pomona College’s collection. The late Frederick Hammersley taught painting for several years at Pomona College. He came to prominence in 1959 in the landmark exhibition “Four Abstract Classicists,” which brought together the work of Hammersley, Karl Benjamin, Lorser Feitelson and John McLaughlin. In over 60 years as an artist, Mr. Hammersley produced a wide range of drawings, from naturalistic portraits to computer-generated drawings. This exhibition showcases the range of Mr. Hammersley’s work and is made possible in part by the generous donation of art works from the Frederick Hammersley Foundation. It is curated by Hannah Pivo, Josephine Bump, Shayda Amanat, Graham “Bud” and Mary Ellen Kilsby. —January 21 through April 13: The exhibition “Witness: Käthe Kollwitz” features German artist Käthe Kollwitz, who lived and worked in the midst of tremendous political and social upheaval. “Witness: Käthe Kollwitz” features works in several graphic mediums—wood block, lithography, etching, and drypoint— drawn from Pomona College’s collection. The exhibition includes self-portraits from the 1920s and 1930s alongside images that unflinchingly depict death, poverty and violence against women. This exhibition is presented in conjunction with the West Coast premiere of the songcycle “Kollwitz-Konnex” (...im Frieden seiner Hände), composed by

Ralf Yusuf Gawlick and performed by Scripps faculty member Anne Harley and internationally-renowned guitarist Eliot Fisk. The performance, which will be held on March 27, is co-sponsored by the Pomona College Museum of Art, Scripps Department of Music, Intercollegiate German Studies and the Scripps O’Brian Fund. RAYMOND M. ALF MUSEUM: 1175 W. Base Line Road, Webb Schools campus. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturdays, 1 to 4 p.m. Admission: $6 per person, 4 and under free. The paleontology museum features fossils of dinosaurs and mammals. (909) 624-2798 or www.alfmuseum.org. —Saturday, January 11: “Family Science Discovery Day: The Mighty Dinosaurs” featuring crafts, a chance to learn about dinosaurs and special admission of $3 (children ages four and under may attend for free). 1 to 4 p.m. RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY: 1030 Columbia Ave., at 11th and Columbia Streets on the Scripps College campus. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. during exhibitions. Free admission. (909) 607-3397 or www.scrippscollege.edu/williamsongallery/. —January 25 through April 6: The longest-running exhibition of contemporary ceramics in the United States will celebrate its 70th year. Traditionally an “artist’s choice” event, this year’s exhibition will bring together a large number of past curators from the show’s long history to celebrate art in clay. Opening reception: Saturday, January 25 will feature a lecture at 4 p.m. in the Scripps College Humanities Auditorium given by Peter Held, curator of ceramics at the Ceramics Research Center at Arizona State University. Mr. Held’s talk will be followed by live music and refreshments at the gallery from 7 to 9 p.m. These events are free and open to the public. SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., or by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every six weeks. Call (909) 621-9091 or email info@squareigallery.com. —Through January 31: Annual Milford Zornes Birthday Celebration, “Small Works Spectacular.” Mr. Zornes is recognized as a leader in the California Style watercolor movement and taught painting workshops in China, Alaska, Mexico, Ireland, Italy and Spain. Opening reception: Friday, January 3 from 6 to 8 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

ART WALK: FRIDAY, JANUARY 3

Bonita Avenue

2
Second Street Indian Hill Blvd.

3
Yale Avenue

1

Harvard Avenue

7

First Street

4

6

5

Claremont Art Walk takes place the first Friday of each month between 6 and 9 p.m. and exhibits studio and fine art. Use this walking tour map as a guide to this monthʼs participating galleries.

1. Buddhamouse Emporium
6 to 8 p.m. 134 Yale Ave., Claremont
“Creatures of B.R. Guthrie” focuses on a collection inspired by the sci-fi and fantasy genre featuring prints, digital work and pencil with digital coloring. Meet the artist and enjoy complimentary refreshments.

2. Bunny Gunner Gallery
6 to 9 p.m. 254 W. Bonita Ave., Claremont
Mosaics by Cathy Garcia. Refreshments will be served.

3. Claremont Community Foundation
6 to 8 p.m. 205 Yale Ave., Claremont
“Marbled Paintings & More: The Art of Hary Hughes.” Refreshments will be served.

4. Claremont Forum/Prison Library Project
6 to 9 p.m. 586 W. First St., Claremont Packing House
The exhibition “Fragile” includes works in paper encaustic by Karen Karlson. Refreshments will be served.

5. The Colony at Loft 204
6 to 10 p.m. 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House
Photographer David Behar presents an exhibition of urban landscapes. Refreshments will be served.

6. Galeria de Pérolas
7 to 10 p.m. 532 W. First St., #211, Claremont Packing House
“Portraits” featuring various artists contribute to the exhibition. Live music and refreshments will be provided.

CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for admission (if applicable). Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com.

7. Square i Gallery
6 to 9 p.m. 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont
Annual Milford Zornes Birthday Celebration: “Small Works Spectacular.” Refreshments will be served.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, January 3, 2014

22

Grand opening event for the childrenʼs section at the Claremont Public Library
The Friends of the Claremont Library has announced that the formal opening ceremony of the children’s section will take place Saturday, January 18 at 10 a.m. After extensive renovations of the area, the event is scheduled to recognize donors and groups that were instrumental in making the remodel happen and to celebrate the new space for the children of our Claremont community. The public is encouraged to attend this celebration that will include prizes, raffles, facepainters and refreshments. Families are encouraged to bring children to the event to celebrate. Children are encouraged to get a library card, if they don’t already have one. The renovation included new carpet, refinished walls and new furniture. Children will find new computer desks lining the walls and some of the study desks feature power to charge electronic devices. A new “soft-seating” area provides a place for children to read comfortably. A new interactive literacy wall is a real highlight of this area. A new librarians desk has been added to complete the upgrade. This project was initiated and funded by the Friends of the Claremont Library through funds raised from booksales and memberships. The Communtiy-wide Spelling Bee previously sponsored by FOCL provided some inspiration for the designs. Additional funding was provided by Supervisor Gloria Molina and from the County of Los Angeles Public Library. Many honorary guests are expected to attend including County Supervisor Gloria Molina, LA County Librarian Margaret Todd and Claremont city representatives.

OUR TOWN
Local Dems ring in the new year with lecture on alternative energy
The Democratic Club of Claremont will hold its first luncheon of the new year on Friday, January 10 from noon to 2 p.m. at Casa de Salsa on Foothill Boulevard. Guest speaker Robert Wolf, professor (emeritus) of physics at Harvey Mudd College and an expert on energy issues, will discuss “Global Warming or Nuclear Power? You Choose.” Mr. Wolf will be defending new generation nuclear technology using thorium not uranium in small plants (think nuclear submarines.) Lunch costs $17 (includes buffet lunch, non-alcoholic beverage, taxes and tip) and will start at noon—the presentation will begin at 1 p.m. As always, the Democratic Club meetings are open to the public.

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Work crews clean up the street while repairing a broken water main Monday at the intersection of Base Line Road and Indian Hill Boulevard in Claremont. According to officials at the scene, Golden State Water Company first noticed the break on December 25 and determined that the pipe belonged to Three Valleys Municipal Water District. The repair necessitated the closure of both eastbound lanes on Base Line, just west of Indian Hill.

Claremont pilot honored with ride in the annual Rose Parade
Claremont residents may have found a familiar face among the floats of this year’s Rose Parade. Iris Critchell, Claremont resident and Harvey Mudd instructor of aeronautics emerita, joined fellow female pilots of WWII on a float honoring the wartime contributions of pioneering women pilots. Nearly $200,000 was raised by the Women Airforce Service Pilots program (WASP) to build the float. Ms. Critchell, who served as a designated pilot examiner for the FAA FSDO for more than 20 years, began flying in 1939 at Mines Field, now known as the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). From then on, her diverse flight experi-

ence helped define the role women were able to assume in the field of aeronautics. In 1941, Ms. Critchell became the first woman to complete the Civil Pilot Training Program at the University of Southern California (USC), where she also earned a degree in physical sciences and mathematics. As a member of the Women Air Force Service Pilots (WASP), Critchell went on to ferry military planes across the county during World War II for the US Army. Following the WASP disbandment, she continued her flight training and designed the curriculum for USC’s aeronautical courses for veterans at its College of Aeronautics in Santa Maria in 1946. She also helped run HMC’s Bates Aeronautics Program until her retirement in 1990.

Photographs of ʻApertureʼ cofounder gifted to Scripps
Scripps College announced the recent gift of 461 photographs by mid-century American photographer Dody Weston

Thompson. A key participant in the West Coast photography movement, Ms. Weston Thompson was also a major chronicler of that era. The gift of photographs, along with Ms. Weston Thompson’s archives, provide an unparalleled look into the work of this significant artist as well as that of some of the most important photographers of the 20th century, including Edward Weston and Ansel Adams. As assistant to both of them, Ms. Weston Thompson had unique access into the work and thoughts of these art history-changing artists. Ms. Weston Thompson was well known for writing and lecturing on the history of photography, camera and darkroom techniques and the work of her fellow artists. She cofounded the photography journal Aperture, then the only publication controlled by artists solely concerned with photography as an art. During exhibitions, the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery is open to the public, free of charge, Wednesday through Sunday, from 1 to 5 p.m. For information, contact the gallery at (909) 607-3397 or visit www. rcwg.scrippscollege.edu.

909.621.4761
Friday 01-03-14

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

23

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

CLASSIFIEDS
rentals..............23 services...........24 legals..............27 real estate.......28
RENTALS
Apartment For Rent
CLAREMONT: Three bedroom, two bathroom apartment. $1400 monthly. $800 security deposit on approved credit. 909-624-9958.

EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
TRUCK drivers, obtain Class A-CDL in two-and-a-half weeks. Company sponsored training. Also hiring recent truck school graduates, experienced drivers. Must be 21 or older. Call 866-275-2349. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: A-CDL train and work for us! Professional and focused training for your Class A-CDL. You choose between Company Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. 877-369-7091.
www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com.

MARKETPLACE
Antiques
A BARN and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! La Verne. www.kensoldenoddities.com. 909-593-1846.

MARKETPLACE

It's a Zoe TeBeau Estate Sale in Claremont!
Saturday and Sunday, January 4 and 5 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. 1115 Briarcroft Road, Claremont, CA 91711
Beautiful furnishings and decorative accessories. Sterling, Lalique, Venetian and Murano glass, Theodore Haviland Rosalinde pattern china, antiques, square Aerosonic piano, quilts, all newer major appliances, plants and patio furniture. Pictures will say it all. For more information and pictures, visit: http://www.Estate Sales.NET/estate-sales/CA/Claremont/91711/553554.
HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Donations
DONATE your car. Fast, free towing, 24-hour response. Tax deduction. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Providing free mammograms and breast cancer information. 888-792-1675. (Cal-SCAN)

Townhome For Rent
GATED courtyard with pool. Two bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms. Washer, dryer. Central heating and air. Gas fireplace. No pets, smoking. $1595 monthly. Water and trash paid. 605 Colby Cr. 909-455-3612. TWO bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms. Living room with laminate flooring and fireplace. Two-car garage, community pool. Includes refrigerator, washer and dryer. $1650 monthly. WSPM, 909-621-5941.

(Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: Owner Operator. Dedicated home weekly! Solos up to $175,000 yearly, $2500 sign-on bonus! Teams up to $350,000 yearly, $5000 sign-on bonus! Forward Air, 888-652-5611. (Cal-SCAN) WORK and travel. Energy jobs available in northern California. $500 to $1200 per week. Must be 18 or older. BBB accredited company. Apply online at www.endergyplus1.com, 208-590-2870. Equal opportunity employer. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: Top one percent pay and CSA friendly equipment. Full benefits and quality hometime. No slip seating, take truck home. CDL-A required. Call 877-258-8782. www.ad-drivers.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Financial
STRUGGLING with your mortgage and worried about foreclosure? Reduce your mortgage and save money. Legal loan modification services. Free consultation. Call Preferred Law, 800-5871350. (Cal-SCAN) GUARANTEED income for your retirement. Avoid market risk and get guaranteed income in retirement! Call for a free copy of our safe money guide plus annuity quotes from A-rated companies! 800375-8607. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Business
REDUCE your cable bill! Get a whole-home satellite system installed at no cost and programming starting at $19.99 monthly. Free HD/DVR. Upgrade to new callers, so call now, 866-9829562. (Cal-SCAN) DIRECTV. Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call now! Triple savings! $636 in savings, free upgrade to Genie and 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free! Start saving today! 800291-0350. (Cal-SCAN) AT&T U-Verse for just $29 a month! Bundle and save with AT&T internet, phone, TV and get a free pre-paid Visa card (select plans). Hurry, call now! 800-319-3280. (Cal-SCAN) REDUCE your cable bill! Get an All-Digital Satellite system installed for free and programming starting at $24.99 per month. Free HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, so call now! 877-366-4509. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Health
MEDICAL Guardian-Top rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a second waterproof alert button for free and more. Only $29.95 per month. 800761-2855. (Cal-SCAN) VIAGRA 100mg and CIALIS 20mg! 50 Pills $99 free shipping! One hundred percent guaranteed. Call now! 855320-5503. (Cal-SCAN) DO you take Cialis or Viagra? Save $500! Get 40 pills for only $99! Buy the blue pill! Call 888-547-7975, Satisfaction guaranteed. (Cal-SCAN) ALERT for seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic jets. Less than four-inch step-in. Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American made. Installation included. Call 800-7994811 for $750 off. (Cal-SCAN)

Want To Rent
RETIREE looking to relocate to Claremont, April 7, 2014. Prefer month-tomonth lease, one bedroom. Ken, 573-268-0044.

REAL ESTATE
House For Sale
OPEN house Sunday 1-4 p.m. 204 S. Mills, Claremont. Remodeled ready to move in three bedroom, 1.75 bathroom home plus separate guest house. Close to downtown, colleges and Metrolink. Fully landscaped front and backyard. 469,000. Agent, 909-625-2407.

Want To Buy
CASH paid for Diabetic strips! Don’t throw boxes away, help others! Unopened/unexpired boxes only. All brands considered! Call anytime, 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. 888491-1168. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Announcements
INJURED in an auto accident? Call InjuryFone for a free case evaluation. never a cost to you. Don’t wait, call now, 800-958-5341. (CalSCAN)

BULLETINS
Business
DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99 a month for 12 months and high speed internet starting at $14.95 a month (where available). Save! Ask about same day installation! Call now! 888-8067317. (Cal-SCAN) ONE call, does it all! Fast and reliable handyman services. Call ServiceLive and get referred to a pro today: Call 800-958-8267. (Cal-SCAN)

EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
NOW hiring: Financial Secretary. Full-time with benefits. $50,000 per year. Apply at claremontucc.org/about/ca reers-at-cucc/.

Education
YOU can become an expert in HVAC installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Institute Online HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVAC-OnlineEducation.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Antiques
AMERICAN and European antiques, furnishings, home and garden decor. New shipment weekly! The Ivy House. 214 W. Foothill Blvd. 909621-6628.

Personals
MEET singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now, 800-945-3392. (Cal-SCAN)

Rates and deadlines are subject to change without notice. The publisher reserves the right to edit, reclassify, revise or reject any classified advertisement. Please report any error that may be in your ad immediately. The Courier is not responsible for any unreported errors after the first publication. It is the advertiser’s obligation to verify the accuracy of his/her ad.

All new accounts and Garage Sale ads must be prepaid. Payment by cash, check. Credit cards now accepted. Sorry no refunds.

DEADLINES
Classified: Wednesday by noon Real Estate: Tuesday by 5 pm Service Pages: Tuesday by 5 pm

PRICING
Classified: 1-16 words $20.00, each additional word $1.25 Display Ad: $10 per column/inch, 3 column minimum Service Ad: Please call for pricing.
All phone numbers in the classified section are in the 909 area code unless otherwise noted.

SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic re-spray and drywall repairs. Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Friday 01-03-14

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

24

Carpet Service
ED EY The Carpet Guy. Carpet repairs and re-stretching. Claremont resident. Free estimates. 909-621-1867. ANDERSON Carpet Service. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency water damage service. Please call 621-1182.

Contractor
KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION
Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial. 946-8664 Lic.B710309 Visit us on Facebook!

Electrician
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist. 24-hour emergency service.

Gardening

Handyman

909-982-8910
* Senior Discount * Lic.359145

AC/Heating
DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning
Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.C20-383912. Call 626-3933.

Drywall

Fences & Gates
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-391-3495 or 909-239-3979. GARDEN Maintenance. Mowing, hand pull weeding, trimming, sprinkler work and cleanups. David, 374-1583.

HANDYMAN Service. "Your small job specialist." Steve Aldridge. Day: 909-455-4917. Evening: 909-625-1795.

Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates. Senior discount! WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE! 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, spark arrestors, masonry and dampers. BBB. Please call 909-467-9212.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243 THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required if you’re in business. You are required to file and publish a DBA in the local newspaper. You must renew every five (5) years. You must republish if any changes have been made to your business. If your business is in LA COUNTY, The Courier will provide the legal form, file it with the L.A. County Clerk, publish the Statement and provide you with proof of publication. Only $95.00 to publish plus a $26 county fee. Claremont Courier: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont. Call Vickie, 621-4761.

909-599-9530

Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service and repair. Spark arrestor supply and installation. Call 920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.

House Cleaning
Shirley's Cleaning Service 28 years in business. Office/residential No job too small. Free estimates. We do spring cleaning! 909-730-8564 EXPERIENCED cleaning lady will clean offices, homes, apartments. Great worker with references! Free estimates. 909-618-5402. ROSIE'S Spic Span Cleaning Service. Residential, commercial, vacant homes, apartments, offices. Free estimate. Licensed. 909-986-8009. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 20

Girl Friday

Electrician
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909-2417671, 909-949-8230. SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs! 626-890-8887 or 909-251-2013. Lic.922000

SAME DAY SERVICE Free service call with repair. Only $49.50 diagnostic fee without repair. All repairs—All brands Edison and Gas Company rebates. Great prices. Friendly service. We're local. 909-398-1208 www.novellcustom.com Lic.958830

TOP notch care. Errands, pet and house sitting. Bonded, experienced, reliable. References. Call Colleen 909-489-1862. I’M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Pet, plant, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027, anytime!

Concrete
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, broom, color finishes. Slate, flagstone, planters, walls and walkways.

STEVE’S HEATING & Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts. Lic.744873 909-985-5254

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Driveways/walkways, block walls, pavers, bricks, stone veneer, concrete staining, drainage. Lic.894245 C8, C29.

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.

Contractor Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite authorized dealer. Bathtubs and sinks. Showers, tile, countertops. Refinish - Reglaze - Restore Porcelain, ceramic, fiberglass. Quick and affordable. Please call 945-7775. www.bath-brite.com PPS General Contractor. Kitchen and bathroom remodeling. Flooring, windows, electrical and plumbing. Serving Claremont for 25 years. Lic.846995. 951-237-1547. WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381. Competitive pricing! 951-640-6616.

MOR ELECTRIC & HANDYMAN SERVICES Free estimates and senior discounts. 909-989-3454 Residential * Industrial * Commercial. We do it all. No job too big or small! 24/7 emergency services. Reasonable and reliable. Lic.400-990 30 years experience.

Garage Doors

DOT Will Do It! A full-service errand business. Dorothy "Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwilldoit.com. 909-621-9115 or 909-782-2885.

Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing, gates, brick block, concrete cutting, breaking and repair. 25 years in Claremont. Paul, 909-753-5360.
SERVICE * REPAIR * INSTALL Doors, Openers, Gates Same Day 24/7 Emergency Service 909-596-3300 accessdoorsco.com

years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Fire/water damage. Hauling. Move in/out. 10 percent discount to Claremont College staff and faculty. Robyn, 621-3929. ROSIES House Cleaning. 12 years experience, references. House, offices, apartments. Senior discount. 24hour service. 909-983-5834. 20 YEARS experience. Free estimates. Excellent references. Tailored to your individual needs. Senior care, day or night. Call Lupe, 909452-1086.

Claremont Handyman Service
Carpentry, repairs, gates, lighting, small painting projects. Odd jobs welcome! Free consultations. 909-921-6334 A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Lic.323243 30 years experience! Claremont area.

Serving Claremont Since 1995. Residential, Commercial.
Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, troubleshooting, landscape lighting, rewires and LED lighting. Free estimates. 24-hours emergency service. References.

Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award winning maintenance! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs and low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall, 909-224-3327. Lic.861685 and insured.

Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED rough to finish remodeler. Kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting. Lots more! Paul, 909-919-3315.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New and repairs.

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont for 30 years! Lic.323243

909-900-8930 909-626-2242 Lic.806149

909-621-5388

SERVICES
Irrigation
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small!

Friday 01-03-14

tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

25

Landscaping

Painting
COLLINS Painting & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 985-8484.

Plumbing
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 24-hour emergency service.

Sprinklers & Repair
DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic.540042. Call 909-982-1604.

Upholstery

24-hour emergency service. 909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING
Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic.542552

Tile
PINK UPHOLSTERY 48 years of experience. Up to 30 percent discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613. Regrout, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688. MASTER tile layer. Quick and clean. Stone and granite work. Residential, commercial. Lic.830249. Ray, 731-3511.

909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145 RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175.

Please call 909-989-9786.

Weed Abatement
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, repaired. Clean-up, hauling. Sod, seed, planting, lighting, drainage. Free written estimates. Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic.508671. Please call 909-989-1515.
AFFORDABLE. Traditional or green options. Custom work. No job too big or too small. 20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates. Lic.721041. 909-922-8042. www.vjpaint.com.

Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-224-3327. Contractor Lic.861685.

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.673558. 909-945-1995

Tree Care
Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist. Pruning and removals. Landscaping, corrective and restoration trimming and yard clean up. 909-982-5794 Lic#753381 MGT Professional Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 946-7444. TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909-629-6960. Johnny's Tree Service Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Lic.270275, insured. Please call: 909-946-1123 951-522-0992

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
JOHNNY'S Tree Service. Weed abatement/land clearing. Disking and mowing. Please call 909-946-1123, 951-522-0992. Lic.270275. TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

Learn Japanese

Landscaping
DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic.585007.

Party Staffing

GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING
Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds.

TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and evenings, for different levels. Tutoring available. Information: 909-626-3066.

Professional Servers and Bartenders Set-up, serve, clean-up 25 years experience 909-628-2866

Rain Gutters
INLAND Empire Sheet Metal, Rain Gutters, Down Spouts. Clean, repair, installation. Senior discount. 909-600-4874. 760-902-2556.

Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls.

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic.315050 Please call: 624-5080, 596-4095. D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024.

Window Washing
Always Cleaning Windows Residential-Screen & Tracks Commercial Buildings Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. BL00080998 909-287-6693 NACHOS Window Cleaning. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884. DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Lic.732789. Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

Call 909-992-9087 Lic.941734 GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening. Lic.520496 909-621-7770 ADVANCED DON DAVIES Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite. 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

Personal Driver
PERSONAL driver. I can drive you to the airport, a doctor’s appointment, or to visit family anywhere within California. 909-205-3247.

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic.614648. 984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Sprinklers & Repair
ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

BAUER TREE CARE 40 plus years in Claremont. Pruning of your small and medium perennials. 909-624-8238 www.bauertreecare.com

Tutoring
USC graduate. Tutoring K12 English, math, SAT in the convenience of your home. Experienced, references. $20 hourly. cdelabeg@usc.edu. 909-983-5834. CLASSROOM teacher, formerly of Lindamood-Bell, available to tutor all subjects, K-8. Specializing in literacy for those with learning issues. Upland, Claremont, surrounding areas. Gina 510-301-6004.

RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.

We can publish your LA County legal.

Plumbing
STEVE’S PLUMBING 24-hour service* Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters. Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured, Lic.744873. * 909-985-5254 *

KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting, 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron 909-615-4858 Lic.778506

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691
WASTING WATER? Poor Coverage? Sprinkler repair. Installations and modifications. C.F. Privett 621-5388 Lic.557151

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Dale's Tree & Landscape Services
Pruning, removal, planting, irrigation and yard cleanup. 909-982-5794 Lic#753381

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CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

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REALTORS!
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LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DEBORAH ANN SIMS CASE NO. BP147683 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of DEBORAH ANN SIMS A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by LAURA SIMS in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that LAURA SIMS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: Date: January 22, 2014 at Time: 8:30 A.M. in Dept. 9 located at: Superior Court Of California, County Of Los Angeles, 110 N. Grand Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90012 Central District IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE THE FILE KEPT BY THE COURT. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: Jerry T. Morgan SBN: 109666 500 N. State College Blvd., Suite 110 Orange, CA 92868 714-919-4250 Publish: December 20, 27, 2013 and January 3, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 254869 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as PAT’S ALTERATIONS, 455 W. Foothill Blvd., #102, Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Elvia Zavala, 8571 Kempster Ave., Fontana, CA 92335. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 10/31/2013. /s/ Elvia Zavala This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 12/12/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: December 20, 27, 2013, January 3 and 10, 2014 Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES If an application for a premises to premises transfer or original license at a premises located in a census tract with undue concentration of licenses, the following notice must be published once a week for three consecutive weeks pursuant to Government Code Section 6063, in a newspaper of general circulation other than a legal or professional trade publication. The publication must be in the city in which such premises are situated, or if such premises are not in a city, then publication shall be made in a newspaper of general circulation other than a legal or professional trade publication nearest the premises. Affidavit of publication shall be filed with the following office: Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control 222 E. Huntington Dr. Ste 114 Monrovia, CA 91016 (626) 256-3241 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: December 10, 2013 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of the Applicant(s) is/are: ZEE PIZZA CLAREMONT, INC. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 520 W 1ST ST CLAREMONT, CA 91711-4618 Type of license(s) applied for: 41 – On-Sale Beer And Wine – Eating Place CLAREMONT COURIER, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Ste 205B, Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761. Publish: December 20, 27, 2013 and January 3, 2014

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APN: 8305-002-001 TS No: CA08000832-13-1 TO No: 1471501 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED September 17, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On January 28, 2014 at 09:00 AM, behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766, MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on September 21, 2007 as Instrument No. 20072182175 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by ARTHUR SELAYANDIA, A SINGLE MAN AND, CAROLYN REFUERZO, A SINGLE WOMAN AS JOINT TENANTS., as Trustor(s), in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as nominee for SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 577 OCCIDENTAL DR, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee’s Sale is estimated to be $494,072.92 (Estimated). However, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary’s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee’s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to Potential Bidders If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property. Notice to Property Owner The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address listed below for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA08000832-13-1. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: December 27, 2013 TRUSTEE CORPS TS No. CA08000832-13-1 17100 Gillette Ave Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-8300 Joseph Barragan, Authorized Signatory SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1076667 1/3, 1/10, 01/17/2014 Trustee Sale No. : 20130134000602 Title Order No.: 130186881 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 10/19/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEx West, L.L.C., as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 10/27/2006 as Instrument No. 06 2387346 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: MARC GOGGINS AND RAQUEL GOGGINS, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by California Civil Code 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 01/23/2014 TIME OF SALE: 10:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA CA. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 690 WEST ARROW HIGHWAY, CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA 91711 APN#: 8316-005-001 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $350,552.46. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 916-939-0772 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.nationwideposting.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20130134000602. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: NATIONWIDE POSTING & PUBLICATION A DIVISION OF FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 5005 WINDPLAY DRIVE, SUITE 1 EL DORADO HILLS, CA 95762-9334 916939-0772 www.nationwideposting.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 12/19/2013 NPP0224919 To: CLAREMONT COURIER 01/03/2014, 01/10/2014, 01/17/2014 ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO: 2013 137625 Current File No: 2013 250506 The following person(s) has/have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name(s): Pat’s Alterations, located at 445 W. Foothill Blvd., #102, Claremont, CA 91711. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on 07/02/13 in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant(s): Maximiliano Ruiz , 437 Eucalyptus Dr., Redlands, CA 92373 The business was conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 12/06/13. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Maximiliano Ruiz Title: Owner Publish: December 13, 20, 27, 2013 and January 3, 2014

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, January 3, 2014
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No.: 9551-1175 TSG Order No.: 130194381-CAMAI A.P.N.: 8307-005-012 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED (The above statement is made pursuant to CA Civil Code Section 2923.3(c)(1). The Summary will be provided to Trustor(s) and/or vested owner(s) only, pursuant to CA Civil Code Section 2923.3(c)(2).) YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 02/17/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NBS Default Services, LLC, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded 03/03/2005 as Document No.: 05 0487382, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by: JULIANNE WINSLOW AND MATT R WINSLOW, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as Trustor, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable in full at time of sale by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and state, and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. Sale Date and Time: 01/27/2014 at 11:00 AM Sale Location: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 653 CLARION PL, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made in an "AS IS" condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $319,789.04 (Estimated) as of 01/15/2014. Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call, (714)730-2727 for information regarding the trustee`s sale or visit this Internet Web site, https://www.lpsasap.com/, for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, T.S.# 9551-1175. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. NBS Default Services, LLC 301 E. Ocean Blvd. Suite 1720 Long Beach, CA 90802 800-766-7751 For Trustee Sale Information Log On To: https://www.lpsasap.com/ or Call: (714)7302727. NBS Default Services, LLC "We are attempting to collect a debt, and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose." A-4435580 01/03/2014, 01/10/2014, 01/17/2014

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NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE (Division 6 of the Commercial Code) Escrow No. 21510-D (1) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to creditors of the within named Seller(s) that a bulk sale is about to be made on personal property hereinafter described. (2) The name and business addresses of the seller are: HOME-ORTIZ GROUP INC, BUSINESS LOCATED AT 1241 S. GRAND AVE, DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 (3) The location in California of the Chief Executive Office of the seller is: 1241 GRAND AVE, #B, DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 (4) The name and business address of the buyer(s) are: MIRANDA NGUYEN, 23730 TAPATIA RD, HOMELAND, CA 92548 (5) The location and general description of the assets to be sold are: FIXTURES, FILINGS AND EQUIPMENT, INVENTORY, GOODWILL, LEASEHOLD IMPROVEMENTS, COVENANT NOT TO COMPETE AND ALL OTHER ASSETS of that certain business located at: 1241 S. GRAND AVE, DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 (6) The business name used by the seller(s) at the said location is: DB GREENHILLS BAKERY (7) The anticipated date of the bulk sale is JANUARY 22, 2014, at the office of COLLEGE ESCROW INC., 1276 N. YALE AVE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711, Escrow No. 21510-F, Escrow Officer: DEBBY DEKONING (8) Claims may be filed the same as “7” above. (9) The last date for filling claims is: JANUARY 21, 2014 (10) This Bulk Sale is subject to Section 6106.2 of the Uniform Commercial (11) As listed by the Seller, all other business name(s) and addresses used by the Seller within three years before such list was sent or delivered to the Buyer are: DB GREENHILLS MARKET & FAST FOOD, 1241 GRAND AVE, #B, DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 Dated: DECEMBER 16, 2013 MIRANDA NGUYEN, Buyer(s) LA1370266 CLAREMONT COURIER 1/3/14

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 263472 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Crane House, 944 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: 396 Cardinal Lane, Upland, CA 91786. Registrant(s): Xuan Cui, 396 Cardinal Lane, Upland, CA 91786. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 11/28/2013. /s/ Xuan Cui Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 12/26/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: January 3, 10, 17 and 24, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013264907 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as DJ LU EVENTS, LASBROC PRODUCTIONS, 1793 Claremont Pl, Pomona, CA 91767. Registrant(s): Luis Jose Sumaran, 1793 Claremont Pl, Pomona, CA 91767. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 02/17/2012. /s/ Luis Jose Sumaran Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 12/30/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: January 3, 10, 17 and 24, 2014 ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO: 2013036554 Current file no.: 2013 263405 The following person has/have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name HK INVESTMENTS, HK FINANCIAL SERVICES, located at 420 Heidelburg Lane, Claremont, CA 91711. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on 02/22/2013 in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant(s): Heran Kim, 420 Heidelburg Lane, Claremont, CA 91711. The business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 12/26/13. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Heran Kim Title: Owner Publish: January 3, 10, 17 and 24, 2014

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Claremont COURIER Classifieds

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REAL ESTATE

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BRE# 01326104 & 01733616

LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE (UCC Sec. 6105) Escrow No. 14895-EY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale is about to be made. The name(s) and business address(es) of the seller(s) are: TTK UNITED CORPORATION, 1903 W. HOLT AVE, POMONA, CA 91768 Doing business as: TTK UNITED CORPORATION AKA TTK VALERO AKA ULTRAMAR GAS All other business name(s) and address(es) used by the seller(s) within the past three years, as stated by the seller(s), is/are: The name(s) and address of the buyer(s) is/are: LNDB HOLDINGS, LLC, 1142 S. DIAMOND BAR BLVD, #164 DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 The assets being sold are generally described as: FURNITURE, FIXTURES, EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, GOODWILL, TRADE NAME, LEASE, TENANT'S IMPROVEMENTS, AND COVENANT NOT TO COMPETE and are located at: 1903 W. HOLT AVE, POMONA, CA 91768 The bulk sale is intended to be consummated at the office of: AMERICAN CLASSIC ESCROW, 13215 SOUTH ST, CERRITOS, CA 90703 and the anticipated sale date is JANUARY 22, 2014 The bulk sale is subject to California Uniform Commercial Code Section 6106.2. [If the sale is subject to Sec. 6106.2, the following

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
information must be provided] The name and address of the person with whom claims may be filed is: AMERICAN CLASSIC ESCROW, 13215 SOUTH ST, CERRITOS, CA 90703 and the last day for filing claims by any creditor shall be JANUARY 21, 2014, which is the business day before the anticipated sale date specified above. LNDB HOLDINGS, LLC, Buyer(s) LA1371401 CLAREMONT COURIER 1/3/14 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No. : 20130015001449 Title Order No.: 130131315 FHA/VA/PMI No.: ATTENTION RECORDER: THE FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO AN ATTACHED SUMMARY APPLIES ONLY TO COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR, NOT TO THIS RECORDED ORIGINAL NOTICE. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 04/16/2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEx West, L.L.C., as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 04/28/2008 as Instrument No. 20080741206 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: DAVID K LEE AND SANDY SONGSIN LEE, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by California Civil Code 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 01/23/2014 TIME OF SALE: 11:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 309 ALAMOSA DR, CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA 91711 APN#: 8671-016-062 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $887,135.63. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20130015001449. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AGENCY SALES and POSTING 2 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 714-730-2727 www.lpsasap.com NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 12/30/2013 NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. 15000 Surveyor Boulevard, Suite 500 Addison, Texas 75001-9013 Telephone: (866) 795-1852 Telecopier: (972) 661-7800 A-4435431 01/03/2014, 01/10/2014, 01/17/2014

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, January 3, 2014

30

GEOFF T. HAMILL
BROKER ASSOCIATE, ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES

GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988

Celebrating 25 years of service 1988-2013!
NEW LISTING!

Tell a Friend...

"Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time!"

COMING SOON:
LA VERNE OAKS HILLSIDE ESTATE - $3,200,000 UPSCALE VILLAGE WALK END UNIT - $575,000
Home in north La Verne neighborhood featuring six bedrooms and seven bathrooms on two-acres of manicured landscape. Gated community in the Claremont school district. Unique characteristics such as a subterranean wine cellar and cigar bar, skylights and a masonry fireplace. Approximately 10,000 sq. ft. of living space, this home features large rooms, crown molding, wrought iron doors, custom lighting, French doors and windows with plantation shutters. Master suite is on ground floor with full bathroom, formal dining and living rooms, gourmet kitchen, music room with access to the lanai, media room, guest wing with two suites and chauffeur quarters. Two suites on second floor with three walk-in closets, family room and studio with full-ceiling skylight. Wrap around driveway, four-car garage and three-car porte-cochère. Pool with three waterfalls and Jacuzzi. (B25553)

CLAREMONT VILLAGE SPANISH MOORISH - $725,000

Built in 2007, best oriented townhome in the community! Downtown Claremont. This unique duplex-style property is one of only eight units that own their own patio and share only one common wall. Three bedrooms boast closets with built-is, plus a loft/office with a closet that could be a potential fourth bedroom. Upgrades include hardwood flooring, custom granite counters in kitchen, upgraded cabinets, granite in bathrooms and indoor laundry room. Glass loft office area with built-in storage behind mirrored doors. Two-car attached garage. Beautiful outdoor cobblestone patio and dripper system for plants. Earthquake insurance included in dues! (H116)

Historically known as the Hugh S. Shaw residence, designed and built by M.D. Hershey circa 1926. Mediterranean architectural elements including arches and patio colonnade. Wood accents and oak hardwood flooring plus wrought iron fixtures. Four bedrooms and two bathrooms. Large living room with coved ceiling and fireplace. Formal dining room. Kitchen with breakfast nook and separate laundry room. Bolted foundation. Two-car garage. Beautiful garden setting with tall mature trees and multiple patio and balcony areas. Spacious lot nearly 1/4 acres. (E505)

• Magnificent Historic Claremont Village Estate • Northeast Claremont Estate Area $625,000 • Custom San Antonio Heights - $750,000 • Padua Hills Artists Home - $525,000
• Claremont Condit School District - $2,400 monthly

FOR LEASE:
• One-Story Griswold's - $2,200 Monthly

SELLERS:
I have motivated and qualified buyers looking for a Claremont home. Please call today for a FREE complimentary market analysis of your property. Thank you!

SALE PENDING!

SALE PENDING!

NORTH CLAREMONT MEDITERRANEAN - $2,000,000 Tranquil setting in one of the most coveted neighborhoods near the Claremont foothills. Panoramic views! Custom built by Marti Enterprises in 2001. Main home offers six bedrooms and six-and-a-half bathrooms. Formal entry with limestone floors, a chandelier and staircase. Chef's kitchen features granite counters and stainless steel appliances plus a large breakfast room. Built-in entertainment center in family room. Formal living room, butler's pantry off formal dining room. Master suite features a lavish bathroom and walk-in closets. Three fireplaces, soaring ceilings, crown molding and builtins throughout. Separate guest house. Approximately 3/4 acre lot features park-like grounds with mature shade trees, swimming pool and spa plus a custom BBQ area. (B1042)

CLAREMONT SPANISH STYLE COMMERCIAL/PROFESSIONAL - $415,000

NORTH CLAREMONT FIVE BEDROOM OLIN/LEWIS HOME - $550,000

909.621.0500 Geoff@GeoffHamill.com

Just blocks away from the downtown Claremont Village. With prime Arrow Highway frontage, just west of Indian Hill. Built circa 1932. Although presently used as a professional office for decades, there is a potential formal living room with fireplace, and adjacent dining room. Two bedrooms plus tandem room off second bedroom. Kitchen with eating area. Inside laundry room. Covered porte cochere parking plus detached converted garage (used for storage only). (A445)

Beautiful one-story ranch-style home with a circular driveway and attractive curb appeal is perfectly nestled in the coveted Claremont Highlands neighborhood. Open floor plan includes a living room with fireplace and separate dining room area. Cheerful kitchen opens to family dining area. Majority of home has original oak hardwood floors under the carpet that could be refinished. Indoor laundry room. Attached two-car garage. Great locale convenient to local school, neighborhood park and shopping. (B1115)

D.R.E. #00997900

For more information, photos and virtual tours, please visit www.GeoffHamill.com or call 909.621.0500

M ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711

EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
Celebrating Over 25 Years Selling Real Estate in the Area

MALKA RINDE Broker - Owner
BRE# 00545647

Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842 www.malkarinde.com

909.447.7708 • Mason@MasonProphet.com

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

Mason Prophet

www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034
Read what my clients are saying. Visit www.MasonProphet.com and click on "Testimonials," or find me on www.Yelp.com.

Mason is an excellent realtor. We commend him for his diligence throughout the entire process of selecting and purchasing our new property. We're sure with his thoughtfulness and kindness he will do very well in his chosen field of endeavor.
—Garry & Dorothy L.

Your Local Real Estate Resource

NT O EM R A CL

NT O EM R A CL

ABSOLUTELY STUNNING ESTATE
Situated in northeast Claremont on just under one acre is this beautifully maintained property. The circular drive surrounded by impeccable grounds welcomes you to enter into the open and bright foyer. Hear the clink of glasses as guests mingle in the formal living and dining rooms spill over into the spacious family room that is open to the spectacular kitchen boasting double islands with granite counters. The spacious game room, allows for family fun and opens to the backyard, making informal entertaining a breeze. Play tennis on the north/south court or relax on the tasteful patio. The interior offers two downstairs bedroom suites plus an office, making the ideal floor plan for extended family, a nanny or working from home. Move upstairs to find the master suite with cozy sitting area featuring a dual-sided fireplace. This home gives many options upstairs including additional rooms that can be utilized as a teen room or a library area. A rare find, call now to schedule a tour, (909) 398-1810. $1,750,000. (P767)

WORLD CLASS RESIDENCE
Experience the majestic presence of this enchanting northeast Claremont custom estate beautifully situated on a rural acre. Enter through the mahogany double entry doors where masterful design unfolds from the imported crystal chandelier to the architectural columns and custom ceiling detailing. Exciting options abound in this spacious floor plan where all living is done downstairs with the exception of a fabulous master bedroom retreat located upstairs. There is a second master bedroom downstairs. This is an ideal scenario for multi-generational living. An aura of elegance surrounds this gracious estate, which boasts fountains as well as a pool and spa with a lovely manicured grass area perfect for playing croquet or badminton. Totally private with mountain views, this is a must see! (909) 398-1810. $1,798,000. (H3624)

NT O EM R A CL

NT O EM R A CL

Sale Pending! CLARABOYA CUSTOM
Romantics wanted for this Claraboya custom home with timeless elegance. Pass through the private courtyard to find this charmingly maintained home with lovely valley and city light views. Perfectly proportioned and designed to promote relaxation to ease the stress of an active lifestyle. Inviting family room features an ambient fireplace. The spacious living room is large enough for formal entertaining and an adjoining formal dining room gives sophistication for those special occasions. Updated kitchen has imported tile and stainless steel appliances; preparing meals will be a breeze with all the counter space. The cozy breakfast nook is perfect for enjoying coffee. You will find the backyard a sanctuary with its pool, spa and lush landscaping; a perfect oasis for entertaining and family living. (909) 398-1810. $778,000. (S2576)

FRENCH CHATEAU
Immerse yourself in the Manior Residence, perfectly situated in northeast Claremont on over one acre of land. Reminiscent of a classic, Brittany-styled French chateau with architectural and upscale details that surprise and delight. Embrace wood and travertine flooring, an elevator, game room, teen loft and more! Be the ultimate chef in the kitchen that Julia Child would have adored. Hand laid stone façade is the first blush of the exotic grounds which include a pool pavilion and a guest casita. Other exceptional features include a five-star energy rating. This is an exceptionally appealing residence with distinctive character that enjoys the proximity of downtown Claremont. Please call today for your appointment, (909) 398-1810. $2,995,000. (S1015)

NT O EM R A CL

NT O EM R A CL

NT O EM R A CL

NT O EM R A CL

Sold!
CUSTOM BUILT HENDERSON
This one-of-a-kind north Claremont custom combines urban sophistication with small town charm. This spacious single-story home is brilliantly created with a designers eye and a craftsman's hand. The formal living and dining rooms provide a perfect backdrop for entertaining while the remodeled kitchen opens to the generously-sized family room with a cozy fireplace. The kitchen nook overlooks the hillsides with streaming sunlight into the space. Four bedroom home with level and open backyard features fruit trees. (909) 398-1810. $675,000. (L2219)

Sold!
NOT JUST ANOTHER HOME
High ceilings and numerous windows bring in streams of natural light. Entertain guests in the interior courtyard and formal living spaces. For informal gatherings there is a generously-sized great room and family room with cozy fireplace. Open kitchen features granite counters, stainless steel appliances, center island and breakfast bar. Sparkling pool and spa set the stage for outdoor entertaining on a grand level. Easy to care for backyard. (909) 398-1810. $900,000. (C799)

CLAREMONT FIND!
Charming single-story home in a desirable neighborhood of Claremont. Home boasts beautiful hard wood floors, newer windows, sliding glass door, upgraded kitchen cabinets, newer heating and air. Family and friends will gather around the cozy fireplace in the family room. The backyard is a great size for entertaining! Call for your appointment today on this three bedroom plus den home so you do not miss this Claremont find! (909) 398-1810. $515,000. (A957)

YOU CAN SEE FOREVER
This spectacular single level Claraboya home is a work of art! There is a library for reading, living room with ambient fireplace for formal gatherings and master suite with remodeled master bathroom. Gourmet's dream kitchen features granite counters and custom cabinetry with an antique finish. The kitchen opens to the intimate family room. Other luxurious appointments include the sparking pool and lovely patio areas. (909) 3981810. $1,035,000. (V2772)

w w w. c b t c s o c a l . c o m

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated

The Real Estate Company
SALE PENDING

UPLAND Must see! Spacious, remodeled, tri-level home located in Upland. New paint, carpet, tile, kitchen cabinets, granite counter tops and stainless steel appliances. Large fenced front and backyard with all new landscaping and alley access. Large covered patio. Central air and heat throughout house with new windows and patio door. Nice backyard for entertaining. Automatic sprinkler system to keep the yard green all year. Two-car garage with lots of space in the driveway. Three bedrooms and a bathroom on third level, master bedroom/master bathroom on second level and common areas and guest bathroom on first level. Floor plan is great for entertaining! If you are looking for a turnkey property, this is it! $435,000. (Upl1337Arr)

EL MONTE Great opportunity, three bedroom,
one-and-a-half bathroom home in El Monte. Indoor laundry, formal dining room, outside patio area with a cozy backyard. Easy access to 605, 210 and 10 freeway. $349,000. (El12044Rose)

SALE PENDING

COVINA Tucked away behind a long private driveway is a exquisite home in the desirable Covina Hills area. This is a spectacular horse
property with four stalls, a shed and plenty of opportunities to expand. The floor plan offers a specious formal living room with a picture frame window overlooking the resort-like front yard. Formal dining room and a bright kitchen with a built-in grill. Four bedrooms, three bathrooms, large game room with wet bar and custom pool table lamp. Office with a separate entrance. Large master suite with a balcony overlooking the pool. New heating and air conditioning. 2766 sq. ft. of living area, two-car attached garage, room for RV/boat parking. The open floor plan makes it easy for entertaining while enjoying the spacious, secluded backyard with covered patio, green house with light, remodeled magnificent pool, poolside gazebo, fire pit, panoramic views, beautiful plants, roses and citrus trees. $759,000. (Cov20455Cov)

FOR LEASE

UPLAND Four bedroom, 2.75 bathroom home in a gated community. Newer tile and carpet. Downstairs contains kitchen, dining area, family room with fireplace and office/den adjacent to 3/4 bathroom. Upstairs the large master bedroom has a walk-in closet, dual sinks, separate shower, tub and toilet area. Three additional bedrooms, full bathroom and laundry room upstairs. Two-car garage with direct access. Association has security gate, pool and play area. Owner pays the association fee and gardener. $1995 monthly. (Upl1467Orange)

EASTVALE Price reduction! Fixer upper in
highly desired Eastvale location. Hard to find, single-story, three bedroom, two bathroom home for sale. Possible RV parking. Close to Providence Ranch Park, schools, shopping and 15 fwy. Exterior of home has recently been painted. $390,000. (East7165Ceda)

Property Management from a name you already trust. Call us today for a free market evaluation. 909-621-6761

TOP Listers
December 2013
Charlene Bolton & Collette Albanese

TOP Producer
December 2013

Téa Robertson
909-621-6761 1-800-420-9939

2 5 0 We s t F i r s t S t r e e t , S u i t e 1 0 0 , C l a r e m o n t , C A