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com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 120
COST OF CARE
NATION PAGE 7
GSW WIN
AT BUZZER
SPORTS PAGE 11
NEW ANGLES IN
‘PARANORMAL’
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19
SKIMPY HEALTH LAW PLANS LEAVE SOME
‘UNDERINSURED’
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — The first Sierra snow
survey of the winter on Friday confirmed the
fears of state water managers, who are warn-
ing of drought conditions in the coming
year unless the state receives significantly
more rain and snow.
Surveyors found mostly bare ground when
they tried to measure the snowpack near
South Lake Tahoe. Manual and electronic
readings showed the water content in the
statewide snowpack at just 20 percent of
average for this time of year. This year’s
reading and the one in January 2012 are the
lowest on record.
“While we hope conditions improve, we
are fully mobilized to streamline water
transfers and take every action possible to
ease the effects of dry weather on farms,
homes and businesses as we face a possible
third consecutive dry year,” Department of
Water Resources Director Mark Cowin said
in a statement.
The winter snowpack in the northern and
central Sierra provides about a third of the
state’s water supply.
At this rate, the state estimates it will be
able to deliver just 5 percent of the water
requested by 29 public agencies this year.
Those agencies supply more than 25 mil-
lion Californians and nearly a million acres
of irrigated farmland.
The calendar year that just ended was one
of the driest on record in California, leaving
reservoirs at historic lows and leading some
cities to implement water restrictions.
Water fears confirmed
Dry winter leads to lowsnow pack, precautions in California
Man killed on
Interstate 280
had stolen guns
GMC stolen out of Millbrae; driver
struck after trying to flee scene
By Sasha Lekach
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
Aman who was struck and killed on Interstate 280 in Daly
City after crashing Friday morning was in a car stolen out of
Millbrae and carrying stolen guns, a California Highway
Patrol officer said.
The incident started around 5:30 a.m. when a two-vehicle
crash was reported on northbound Interstate 280 near the
John Daly Boulevard off-ramp, CHP Officer Michael
Ferguson said.
A man in a GMC lost control of his vehicle and hit the
center divide. AHonda Civic driven by woman then hit the
stalled car, Ferguson said.
The Honda driver was taken to San Francisco General
Hospital with a complaint of pain. She is expected to sur-
Coast welcomes new lieutenant
John Munsey to oversee coastside
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
The New Year is bringing in a new San
Mateo County sheriff’s lieutenant to the
coastside.
Lt. John Munsey, 45, will be returning
to his Half Moon Bay hometown to work
with coastside communities and cities
starting Jan. 13.
“I’ve always had a fondness for the
coast and enjoyed my time over there growing up. I’m real-
ly looking forward to working a little more closely with the
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Alongtime Burlingame Avenue busi-
nessman is getting ready for a slew of
changes this new year.
In 2014, Sam Malouf, owner of Sam
Malouf’s luxury menswear store on
Burlingame Avenue plans to open a
women’s boutique, bring some of his
clothing sales online and sell his
brand of knits to other retail stores.
Malouf, who hails from Lubbock,
Texas, has retail sales in his blood.
The fourth of eight children, he has
various other siblings who own retail
stores and his father runs his own
clothing businesses. The Malouf fami-
ly currently owns five different busi-
nesses across the country. He himself
is married now and has three children
of his own.
“I grew up with business,” he said. “I
liked photography, painting, loved
art, aesthetics and clothing. I had an
actual passion.”
In 1991, he purchased the store
Robert W. Gates eight doors down
from his current location and opened
the clothing store Malouf’s. He transi-
tioned to Sam Malouf’s about three
Burlingame shop to expand sales
Sam Malouf to open women’s clothing store, do online sales
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Sam Malouf tidies up clothing at his 1460 Burlingame Ave. storefront.
John Munsey
See MUNSEY, Page 31
See KILLED, Page 31
See MALOUF, Page 23
See WATER, Page 23
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor Dave Foley is
51.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1964
Pope Paul VI began a visit to the Holy
Land, the first papal pilgrimage of its
kind.
“Happiness quite unshared can
scarcely be called happiness; it has no taste.”
— Charlotte Bronte, English author (1816-1855)
Country singer
Patty Loveless is
57.
Comedian-actress
Charlyne Yi is 28.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A man jogs through the snow in Riverside Park in upper Manhattan in New York City.
Saturday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the
lower 60s. Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Lows in the 40s. East winds 10 to 20
mph.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Highs in
the mid 60s. East winds 10 to 20 mph with gusts to around
35 mph...Becoming 5 to 10 mph in the afternoon.
Sunday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the mid to upper
40s. Northeast winds around 5 mph.
Monday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the lower 60s.
Monday night through Thursday: Mostly cloudy.
Lows in the 40s. Highs in the mid 50s.
Thursday night and Friday: Partly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1821, the first native-born American saint, Elizabeth
Ann Seton, died in Emmitsburg, Md.
I n 1896, Utah was admitted as the 45th state.
I n 1904, the Supreme Court, in Gonzalez v. Williams,
ruled that Puerto Ricans were not aliens and could enter the
United States freely; however, the court stopped short of
declaring them U.S. citizens. (Puerto Ricans received U.S.
citizenship in 1917.)
I n 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in his State of
the Union address, called for legislation to provide assis-
tance for the jobless, elderly, impoverished children and the
handicapped.
I n 1943, Soviet dictator Josef Stalin appeared on the cover
of Time as the magazine’s 1942 “Man of the Year. ”
I n 1944, Ralph Bunche became the first African-American
officer at the State Department as he was appointed to a post
in the Near East and African Section.
I n 1951, during the Korean War, North Korean and
Communist Chinese forces recaptured the city of Seoul
(sohl).
I n 1960, author and philosopher Albert Camus died in an
automobile accident in Villeblevin, France, at age 46.
I n 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson delivered his State
of the Union address in which he outlined the goals of his
“Great Society. ”
I n 1974, President Richard Nixon refused to hand over tape
recordings and documents subpoenaed by the Senate
Watergate Committee.
I n 1989, in an incident reminiscent of a 1981 confronta-
tion, two U.S. Navy F-14 fighters shot down a pair of
Libyan MiG-23 fighters in a clash over international waters
off the Libyan coast.
I n 2007, Nancy Pelosi was elected the first female speaker
of the House as Democrats took control of Congress.
T
he Pentagon has 100,000 miles
of telephone cable. The 23,000
employees make 200,000 tele-
phone calls per day.
***
A German shepherd named Buddy was
the first seeing eye dog in the United
States. His master was Morris Frank, a
blind college student from Nashville,
Tenn., who heard about seeing eye dogs
in Switzerland. Frank brought Buddy to
the United States from Switzerland in
1928. The two became famous when
they got the attention of reporters, who
were amazed to see the pair cross busy
New York streets safely.
***
The rocks used in hot-stone massage
are heated to 130 degrees Fahrenheit.
***
The audience of kids for the show
Howdy Doody (1954-1959) was called
*** Peanut Gallery.
***
A U.S. quarter has 119 grooves on its
circumference. Adime has 118 grooves.
***
The toothbrush was invented in 1498.
***
In 1855, the Farmers Almanac included
this recipe for toothpaste: 1 oz. myrrh
(fine powder), 2 spoonfuls of your best
honey, a pinch of green sage.
***
The maze in the Pac-man video game
has 240 dots. The four ghosts in Pac-
man have names and characteristics.
Pinky, the pink ghost, is fast. Blinky,
the red ghost, is always behind Pac-
man. Inky, the light blue ghost is shy
and runs away from Pac-man. Clyde, the
orange ghost, is slow.
***
Like fingerprints, everyone’s tongue
print is different.
***
“Foreign Language Syndrome” occurs
in some people very rarely after suffer-
ing a stroke or head injury. The condi-
tion causes subtle changes to vocal fea-
tures, making the sufferers adopt what
sounds like a foreign accent.
***
Herring is the most widely eaten fish in
the world. A“red herring” is a smoked
herring having a reddish color or some-
thing that draws attention away from
the central issue.
***
Can you name the dwarfs from the
Disney movie Snow White (1937)? See
answer at end.
***
Agatha Christie’s (1890-1976) charac-
ter Miss Marple is one of the most
famous and copied detectives of all
time. Miss Marple’s first name is Jane.
The last Miss Marple book was
“Sleeping Murder,” published in 1976.
***
Almost every normal body function
stops when you sneeze.
***
CQD was the international distress sig-
nal before SOS was adopted.
***
Crayola’s senior crayon maker,
Emerson Moser, revealed upon his
retirement that he was blue-green col-
orblind and couldn’t see all the colors.
He molded more than 1.4 billion
crayons in his 37-year career.
***
Sons will be colorblind if their mother
is colorblind and their father is not. In
this case, daughters will have normal
vision.
***
It is physically impossible for pigs to
look up into the sky.
***
“One thousand” contains the letter A,
but none of the words from one to 999
has an A.
***
Answer: The seven dwarfs in Disney’s
Snow White are Sleepy, Sneezy,
Bashful, Happy, Grumpy, Doc and
Dopey. Some of the names that were
rejected for the dwarfs were Gabby,
Jumpy, Lazy, Nifty and Weepy.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
5200 ext. 114.
(Answers Monday)
TROLL DIVOT EITHER ASTRAY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: He had his bowling ball and bowling shoes . . .
He was — READY TO ROLL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
TEYSZ
RAWOR
PONIOS
RICOIN
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
u
m
b
le

p
u
z
z
le

m
a
g
a
z
in
e
s

a
v
a
ila
b
le

a
t

p
e
n
n
y
d
e
llp
u
z
z
le
s
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
m
a
g
s
” “
-
Print your
answer here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners were Big Ben, No.
4, in first place; Lucky Charms, No. 12 in second
place; and Lucky Star, No. 2, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:45.76.
9 0 1
22 24 25 40 70 5
Mega number
Jan. 3 Mega Millions
15 24 40 48 52 23
Powerball
Jan. 1 Powerball
2 18 20 21 34
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
1 0 3 3
Daily Four
7 4 6
Daily three evening
3 9 19 24 42 16
Mega number
Jan. 1 Super Lotto Plus
Actress Barbara Rush is 87. Football Hall-of-Fame coach
Don Shula is 84. Opera singer Grace Bumbry is 77. Actress
Dyan Cannon is 75. Author-historian Doris Kearns Goodwin
is 71. Country singer Kathy Forester (The Forester Sisters) is
59. Actress Ann Magnuson is 58. Rock musician Bernard
Sumner (New Order, Joy Division) is 58. Rock singer Michael
Stipe is 54. Actor Patrick Cassidy is 52. Actress Dot Jones
(TV: “Glee”) is 50. Actor Rick Hearst is 49. Singer-musician
Cait O’Riordan is 49. Actress Julia Ormond is 49. Tennis play-
er Guy Forget is 49. Country singer Deana Carter is 48. Rock
musician Benjamin Darvill (Crash Test Dummies) is 47.
3
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Hours: Mon.- Sat. 10am to 7pm
Sun. Noon to 6pm
Phone: 650.588.0388
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BELMONT
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstance. A man was
selling tech items from his burgundy van on
Old County Road and Ralston Avenue before
11:17 a.m., Friday, Dec. 27.
Disturbance. Acomplaint was made about
motorcycles making exhaust noises for
more than 15 minutes on Lake Road before
3:17 p.m. Friday, Dec. 27.
Ci t i zen as s i s t . A woman requested to
speak with an officer about an “encounter”
with a phone repairman at her home on
Hastings Drive before 5:51 p.m. Thursday,
Dec. 26.
Burglary. Computer accessories, cash and
other items were stolen on Clipper Drive
before 11:08 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 26.
Publ i c works cal l . There was a clogged
drain on Adelaide Way before 9:45 a.m.
Thursday, Dec. 26.
FOSTER CITY
Theft. Alocked bicycle was reported stolen
from a parking lot on Shell Boulevard before
6:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13.
Petty theft. A cellphone was reported
stolen from an unlocked vehicle before 2:09
p.m. Friday, Dec. 13.
St ol en vehi cl e. A vehicle was stolen at
Sand Harbor on Shell Boulevard before
11:32 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 12.
Police reports
No thanks
Aman was punched in the face after giv-
ing directions to Highway 101 to two
men in a black BMWon Mystic Lane in
Foster City before 8:17 p.m. Thursday,
Dec. 26.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Marin County businessman charged
with attempted murder for allegedly trying
to throw his wife off the San Mateo-
Hayward Bridge after first crashing their car
into a guard rail pleaded not guilty Friday
through his attorney.
Xavier Jarrell McClinton’s reported
attempt on his wife’s life Dec. 13 came after
weeks of paranoid and uncharacteristic
behavior on his behalf, according to prose-
cutors.
The 47-year-old personal trainer and fit-
ness business owner, known in the Marin
fitness community by the moniker “X,” had
been acting normally up until a few weeks
ago when he began thinking people were
trying to break into his house to harm him-
self and the couple’s chil-
dren, according to the
District Attorneys’ Office.
The behavior culminat-
ed in an odd mid-day inci-
dent that snarled commute
traffic, left his wife of
eight years with a severe
gash on her cheek and
ended with his plunge
into the Bay and arrest.
McClinton appeared in
court shortly after his arrest but has been
absent the next two hearings. On Friday, his
attorney entered the pleas on his behalf.
That afternoon, the couple reportedly
drove through San Francisco, down the
Peninsula and east onto the bridge. The cou-
ple reportedly argued and prosecutors say
McClinton tried driving the vehicle off the
side but ended up crashing about 2:25 p.m.
He then allegedly pulled his wife from the
vehicle and tried to go over the bridge side
with her until passersby grabbed her legs
and held her dangling as he fell. Rescue
crews pulled him from the water and arrested
him.
All bridge lanes reopened shortly after 4
p.m. but traffic remained snarled for hours.
He is held without bail and barred from
contacting his wife.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Not guilty plea in alleged bridge wife toss
Xavier
McClinton
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A Redwood City taekwondo instructor
accused of groping a 9-year-old student dur-
ing a lesson last year and possessing child
pornography found after the child’s father
called police was sentenced Friday to more
than three years in prison.
Ralph Eugene Todd III, 32, faced up to
three years and eight months in prison after
pleading no contest in November to child
molestation and child pornography posses-
sion. On Friday, he received that maximum
and was ordered to regis-
ter as a sex offender for
life.
Prosecutors say, on
Dec. 17, 2012, the cry-
ing boy told his father,
who had come to pick
him up at Kim’s
TaeKwonDo Academy in
Woodside Plaza, that
Todd said he was not
doing his moves properly and squeezed his
genitals while correcting his form. Later
inside an office, he allegedly pulled down
the boy’s pants and fondled him again. The
father contacted police, who arrested Todd
Dec. 19 and seized his computer. Police
reported finding child pornography on the
computer.
Todd, who had been free on his own
recognizance after accepting the plea deal,
was immediately taken into custody. He has
credit of three days earned while in custody
on $200,000 bail before a judge agreed to
release him before sentencing.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Martial arts instructor jailed for touching student
Ralph Todd
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or share this story at
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Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Sidonie Augustine Canerot
Sidonie Augustine Canerot passed away December 29, 2013 at
the age of 103! Right up to the last few days of her life she
remained Independent and exceptionally healthy for her age.
She was born in France on Aug 23, 1910 and was one of
10 siblings. Sidonie grew up on a farm near the Pyrenees
where she had a strong sense of loyalty to the family
especially toward her sisters and brothers.
In 1927 Sidonie came to San Francisco to join some of
her family to work as a governess and nanny. A few years
later she met and married Denis Canerot, who also came
from France. Together they owned and operated 2 French
laundries in San Francisco and San Carlos. Their marriage
was very special and a wonderful model for the family.
Sidonie is survived by her daughter Jeannette KLebofski
(Dean Hoffman), son Leon Canerot (Carmen Leon), grandsons
Peter Klebofski and Damien Canerot, grand daughter Michelle
Klebofski, great granddaughter kristian Klebofski, and many
nieces and nephews in the U.S. and France.
She loved baking cookies, fixing delicious meals for family,
sharing stories of her past, playing Pedro (card game), and
gardening -- it kept her young beyond her years. Sidonie
will be greatly missed by her family and friends
Funeral services will be held at 11:00 a.m. on January 3rd
at the Crippen-Flynn Funeral Home at 400 Woodside Rd,
Redwood City.
Crippen & Flynn Woodside and Carlmont Chapels
Obituary
$1 robbery suspect to trial
The second of two San Mateo men
accused of using a fake handgun to rob
an audio store clerk of $1 was held to
answer on armed robbery charges the
same as his codefendant.
Tyler Aaron Ehrman, 21, has pleaded
not guilty but a judge found sufficient
evidence after a hearing in which one
police officer testified for the prosecu-
tion and the defense called no witness-
es. He returns to court Jan. 17 to enter
a Superior Court plea and set a trial
date.
Meanwhile, code-
fendant Cameron
Keyoun Nickravesh,
22, is already sched-
uled for trial April
7.
The two men
allegedly entered Tri
Audio Sound on
North San Mateo
Drive the evening
of Oct. 15 and pulled out a replica
handgun. They allegedly robbed the
worker of the single dollar in his wal-
let and fled in a Toyota Camry onto
Highway 101. Other officers stopped
the car traveling south and reported
finding the replica
gun in the vehicle
during the arrest.
After their arrest,
Ehrman’s attorney
expressed a doubt
about his mental
competency but two
c o u r t - a p p o i n t e d
doctors agreed he
was able to aid in
his own defense.
Ehrman is in custody on $100,000
and a no-bail probation hold for a
2011 residential burglary conviction.
Nickravesh is free from custody on a
$30,000 bail bond.
Tyler Ehrman Cameron
Nickravesh
Local brief
By Tarry Collins and Terence Chea
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Ajudge said Friday that the
mother of a 13-year-old girl who was
declared brain dead after tonsil surgery can
remove her daughter from a California hos-
pital if she assumes full responsibility for
the consequences.
Alameda County Superior Court Judge
Evelio Grillo said Jahi McMath can be
transferred under a deal with Children’s
Hospital Oakland that will hold Nailah
Winkfield accountable for developments
that could include Jahi going into cardiac
arrest.
The hospital has argued since before
Christmas that Jahi’s brain death means she
is legally dead and she should be discon-
nected from the ventilator that has kept her
heart pumping for 3 1/2 weeks.
Winkfield, refusing to believe her daugh-
ter is dead as long as her heart is beating,
has gone to court to stop the machine from
being disconnected. She wants to transfer
Jahi to another facility after forcing
Children’s Hospital to fit her daughter with
breathing and feeding tubes or allowing an
outside doctor to perform the surgical pro-
cedures.
Grillo on Friday rejected the family’s
move to have the hospital insert the tubes,
noting the girl could be moved with the
ventilator and intravenous fluid lines she
has now. He also refused to compel the hos-
pital to permit an outside doctor perform the
procedures on its premises.
The family’s attorney, Christopher
Dolan, nonetheless called the agreement a
big step in resolving the dispute.
Jahi McMath’s mom clear
to take her from hospital
REUTERS
Nailah Winkfield, right, mother of Jahi McMath, and Martin Winkfield arrive at the U.S. District
Courthouse for a settlement conference in Oakland.
6
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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San Mateo hosts Taste
and Talk speaker series
Draper University and the San Mateo
Public Works Department kicks off its
“Taste and Talk” speaker series 6 p.m.-
7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 9.
TEDx speaker, Jeffrey Tumlin, prin-
cipal with Nelson\Nygaard Consulting
Associates, will be featured in the first
of four public forums to provide the
San Mateo community with an oppor-
tunity to share its thoughts and ideas
on sustainable transportation.
Tumlin brings his TEDx lecture,
“Sex, Neuroscience and the City,” to
San Mateo to explore how cities
across the country are making the
most efficient use of limited trans-
portation resources while addressing
job creation, public health and estab-
lishing equity and happiness goals.
His concepts aim to help audiences
better understand the broader move-
ment toward sustainable communities.
He also encourages everyday citizens
to collaborate with elected officials to
define and implement the values that
are most reflective of a community’s
quality of life, social equity and eco-
logical goals, according to a city press
release.
In addition to the “Taste and Talk”
speaker series, public workshops will
be scheduled throughout 2014.
Speakers for the first quarter of 2014
“Taste and Talk” speaker series are
scheduled through April. The series
will be held in downtown San Mateo at
either Draper University or the San
Mateo Main Library. Upcoming pre-
sentations, in addition to the Jan. 9
event, include: Thursday, Feb. 6 — The
Key to Complete Streets: How to
Unlock its Powers, Wednesday, March
5 — Greening the Street Involves
More Than New Trees and Thursday,
April 10 — Completing the
Transportation Network by Seeing the
Bigger Picture.
The events are free, but space is lim-
ited. Please visit www.sustain-
ablestreetssanmateo.com to register
or for more information about the
“Taste and Talk” Speaker Series and the
Sustainable Streets Plan.
Police seeking suspect
in strong-arm robbery
South San Francisco police are look-
ing for a suspect in a strong-arm rob-
bery that occurred late Thursday night.
The victim was getting into his car
in the 200 block of Aspen Avenue
shortly after 11:30 p.m. when an
unknown male suspect approached
from behind and grabbed a gold chain
and pendant around his neck, police
said.
The chain broke and fell to the
ground, and the suspect fled on foot
with the pendant, running west on
Aspen Avenue, police said.
No weapon was displayed and the
victim did not suffer any injuries,
police said.
The suspect is described as a tall
Hispanic man who is between 30 and
35 years old with a thin build. He was
clean-shaven and wore a dark jacket
and dark jeans, police said.
Anyone with information about the
case should contact South San
Francisco police at (650) 877-8900 or
can call (650) 952-2244 to make an
anonymous tip.
Woman, 41, first
flu death of season
A 41-year-old woman who died
shortly before Christmas is Santa
Clara County’s first flu death of the sea-
son, county health officials said
Friday.
The woman died on Dec. 23 due to
the H1N1 virus, also known as swine
flu, according to the Santa Clara
County Public Health Department.
The county has also recorded seven
cases of severe flu so far this flu sea-
son, six of which were also confirmed
to be H1N1 and one of which was Flu
B, officials said.
However, only flu cases in persons
under 65 years of age that are severe
enough to require hospitalization in an
intensive care unit or result in death are
reported to the Public Health
Department.
Health officials are urging residents
to get vaccinated against the flu, say-
ing it is not too late. This year’s vac-
cine does protect against H1N1.
In addition, residents are reminded to
cover their nose and mouth with a tis-
sue when they sneeze or cough, wash
their hands often with plain soap and
water or alcohol-based hand cleaners,
avoid contact with those who are sick
and stay home if they are sick them-
selves.
Local briefs
Jean Baptiste Uhalde
Jean Baptiste Uhalde, born July 31,
1916, died peacefully Dec. 31, 2013,
at his home in
Millbrae.
He is survived by
his wife of 66 years,
Gracianne and their
four children
Joseph, Marie,
Therese and Jack.
He also had eight
g r a n d c h i l d r e n
Steven, Joselyn, Michelle, Justine,
Paul, Gina, Robert, Matthew and great-
grandfather to Audrey.
Jean loved attending the Basque
Cultural Center in South San Francisco
where he was a founding member. In
1936 he entered the French Army and,
four years later, in 1940, Jean was cap-
tured by the Germans where he spent
almost six years in a POW camp just
outside of Berlin, Germany. Born in
Ezterenzubi, France, a Basque town in
Southern France, Jean immigrated in
1950 to the United States with
Gracianne and young son Joseph.
“Through hard work, perseverance
and faith he and Gracianne prospered
and provided for their family. They ful-
filled the American Dream! Jean was a
very compassionate soul, as he donat-
ed to many causes involving under-
privileged children.”
He will be missed by the Basque
community and his loving family. The
funeral mass will be 7 p.m. Monday,
Jan. 6 at St. Dunstan Catholic Church,
1133 Broadway, Millbrae CA 94030.
Condolences my be sent to the Chapel
of the Highlands at 194 Millwood
Drive in Millbrae.
Nancy Jean Goerz
Nancy Jean Goerz, 69, of Lantana,
Texas, died Saturday, Dec. 28, 2013, at
her home.
She was born July 11, 1944, in San
Francisco to Robert
and Ruth (Spaid)
Cheshire. She was
married to Gary
Goerz on May 14,
1970, in San Matio.
She served as a
flight attendant for
Pan American
Airways, and later
became a German teacher at Johanson
High School in Modesto. She was a
member of the Methodist church.
Mrs. Goerz is survived by her hus-
band, Gary Goerz of Lantana, Texas,
sons, Daniel Goerz of Dallas, and
Jason Goerz of Modesto, and three
grandchildren.
Private family memorial services
will beld at a latere date. Online condo-
lences may be left at www.mulkeym-
sondenton.com.
Obituaries
N
ot re Dame de Namur
Uni vers i t y recently
announced Jason Murray’s
appointment as vice president for
enrollment management, effective
immediately. Murray joined the
Belmont college in 2011 as director of
admissions and most recently served as
dean of enrollment management.
The school also named Craig Brewer as dean of the
School of Busi ness and Management, effective
immediately. Brewer has served as interim dean since July 1,
2013.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The Burl i ngame Ci ty
Counci l will hold a study session
for a potential historic preservation
ordinance. Back in March 2013, the
City Council directed staff to move
toward drafting an ordinance that
would allow for a historic resource
program. There would be a specific plan for allowing peo-
ple to apply for making a place, within its downtown spe-
cific plan, a historic building. Staff has currently drafted
an ordinance and will use the study session to bring the
council up to speed on staff’s progress, said Bi l l
Meeker, community development director.
The City Council meets 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 6 at City
Hall, 501 Primrose Road.
It’s all here − the teachers, the traditions, the perfect class
size, the all-girls setting. It’s Notre Dame High School,
and it’s as amazing as the students themselves.
Apply Online
www.ndhsb.org
Notre Dame High School
1540 Ralston Avenue Belmont, CA 94002 650-595-1913 ext. 310
Final Application Date:
January 14, 2014
NATION 7
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — For working peo-
ple making modest wages and strug-
gling with high medical bills from
chronic disease, President Barack
Obama’s health care plan sounds like
long-awaited relief. But the promise
could go unfulfilled.
It’s true that patients with cancer and
difficult conditions such as multiple
sclerosis or Crohn’s disease will be
able to get insurance and financial help
with monthly premiums.
But their annual out-of-pocket costs
could still be so high they’ll have trou-
ble staying out of debt.
You couldn’t call them uninsured any
longer. You might say they’re “under-
insured.”
These gaps “need to be addressed in
order to fulfill the intention of the
Affordable Care Act,” said Brian
Rosen, a senior vice president of the
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.
“There are certainly challenges for
cancer patients.”
“Cost may still be an issue for those
in need of the most care,” said Steven
Weiss, spokesman for the American
Cancer Society Cancer Action
Network. That “makes it critically
important for patients looking at pre-
miums to also consider out-of-pocket
costs when choosing a plan.”
Out-of-pocket costs include a health
plan’s annual deductible, which is the
amount before insurance starts paying,
as well as any copayments and cost-
sharing.
A few numbers tell the story. Take
someone under 65 with no access to
health insurance on the job and mak-
ing $24,000 a year — about what
many service jobs pay.
Under the health care law, that per-
son’s premiums would be capped
below 7 percent of his income, about
$130 a month. A stretch on a tight
budget, yet doable.
But if he gets really sick or has an
accident, his out-of-pocket expenses
could go as high as $5,200 a year in a
worst-case scenario. That’s even with
additional financial subsidies that the
law provides people with modest
incomes and high out-of-pocket costs.
The $5,200 would be more than 20
percent of the person’s income, well
above a common threshold for being
underinsured.
Skimpy health law plans leave some ‘underinsured’
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — You were patient
with the government’s kooky website,
and now you have your health insur-
ance card. That’s good, since your fam-
ily is expecting a new baby.
But you may have jump through
more hoops to get the child formally
added to your policy. The Obama
administration confirms there is no
quick and easy way for consumers to
update their coverage under the new
health law for the birth of a baby and
other common life changes.
With regular private insurance, par-
ents just notify the health plan.
Insurers still must cover new babies,
officials say, but parents will also have
to contact the government at some
point later.
For now, the HealthCare.gov web-
site can’t handle new baby updates,
along with a list of other life changes
including marriage and divorce, a death
in the family, a new job or a change in
income, even moving to a different
community.
Such changes affect not only cover-
age but also the financial assistance
available under the law, so the govern-
ment has to be brought into the loop.
But the system’s wiring for that vital
federal function isn’t yet fully con-
nected.
At least 2 million people have
signed up for private health policies
through new government markets
under President Barack Obama’s over-
haul. Coverage started Wednesday, and
so far, things appear to be running
fairly smoothly, although it may take
time for problems to bubble up. Health
and Human Services Secretary
Kathleen Sebelius calls it “a new day in
health care.”
Adding a baby to new health law plans not easy
By Jesse J. Holland
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Obama administration urged a
Supreme Court justice Friday to stop blocking the new
health care law’s requirement that some religion-affiliated
organizations provide health insurance that includes birth
control.
The Justice Department called on Justice Sonia
Sotomayor to dissolve her last-minute stay on the contra-
ceptive coverage requirement of the Affordable Care Act,
also known as Obamacare. Sotomayor issued the stay on
New Year’s Eve, only hours before the law’s coverage went
into effect.
Under the health care law, most health insurance plans
have to cover all FDA-approved contraceptives as preven-
tive care for women, free of cost to the patient. Churches
and other houses of worship are exempt from the birth
control requirement, but affiliated institutions that serve
the general public are not. That includes charitable organ-
izations, universities and hospitals.
In response to an outcry, the government came up with a
compromise that requires insurers or health plan adminis-
trators to provide birth control coverage but allows the
religious group to distance itself from that action. The
exemption is triggered when the religious group signs a
form for the insurer saying that it objects to the coverage.
The insurer can then go forward with the coverage.
Agroup of Denver nuns who run nursing homes for the
poor, called the Little Sisters of the Poor Home for the
Aged, say signing that form makes them complicit in pro-
viding contraceptive coverage, and therefore violates
their religious beliefs. They want Sotomayor to make the
injunction permanent until the case can be hashed out in
court, or for the Supreme Court to agree to take their case
now.
Government officials “are simply blind to the religious
exercise at issue: The Little Sisters and other applicants
cannot execute the form because they cannot deputize a
third party to sin on their behalf,” said their lawyer, Mark
Rienzi, who is also senior counsel for the Becket Fund for
Religious Liberty.
But Solicitor General Donald Verrilli said in court papers
that nothing in the law will make those nuns pay for birth
control for their employees. The nuns’ insurance is pro-
vided through a church plan that is not required to provide
contraceptive coverage and has said it will not, he said,
making their complaint baseless.
Government says birth control
mandate should not be blocked
REUTERS
Jaime Corona, patient care coordinator at AltaMed, speaks to a woman during a
community outreach on Obamacare in Los Angeles.
NATION 8
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm
www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Lutheran
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)
2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am
Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
By Stephen Braun and Kimberly Dozier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A secretive U.S. spy
court has ruled again that the National
Security Agency can keep collecting every
American’s telephone records every day,
in the midst of dueling decisions in two
civilian federal courts about whether the
surveillance program is constitutional.
The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance
Court on Friday renewed the NSA phone
collection program, said Shawn Turner, a
spokesman for the Office of the Director of
National Intelligence. Such periodic
requests are somewhat formulaic but
required since the program started in 2006.
The latest approval was the first since
two conflicting court decisions about
whether the program is lawful and since a
presidential advisory panel recommended
that the NSA no longer be allowed to col-
lect and store the phone records and search
them without obtaining separate court
approval for each search.
In a statement, Turner said that 15 judges
on the U.S. Foreign Intelligence
Surveillance Court on 36 occasions over
the past seven years have approved the
NSA’s collection of U.S. phone records as
lawful.
Also Friday, government lawyers turned
to U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of
Columbia Circuit to block one federal
judge’s decision that threatens the NSA
phone records program.
The opposing lawyer who spearheaded
the effort that led to the ruling said he
hopes to take the issue directly to the
Supreme Court.
The Justice Department filed a one-page
notice of appeal asking the appeals court
to overturn U.S. District Judge Richard
Leon’s ruling last month that the program
was likely unconstitutional. The govern-
ment’s move had been expected.
Larry Klayman, who filed the class-
action suit against President Barack
Obama and top administration national
security officials, said he intends to peti-
tion the federal appeals court next week to
send the case directly to the Supreme
Court. Klayman said the move was justified
because the NSA case was a matter of great
public importance.
“There are exigent circumstances here,”
Klayman said. “We can’t allow this situa-
tion to continue. The NSA’s continuing to
spy on everybody. ”
Turner said U.S. intelligence agencies
would be willing to modify the phone
records surveillance program to provide
additional privacy and civil liberties pro-
tections as long as it was still operational-
ly beneficial. He said the Obama adminis-
tration was carefully evaluating the advi-
sory panel’s recent recommendations.
Judges sitting on the secretive spy
court have repeatedly approved the pro-
gram for 90-day periods. They also have
repeatedly upheld the constitutionality of
the program — a judicial bulwark that
held strong until Leon’s surprise decision
last month.
Leon said the NSA’s program was
“almost Orwellian,” a reference to writer
George Orwell’s futuristic novel “1984,”
and that there was little evidence the oper-
ation had prevented terrorist attacks. He
ruled against the government but agreed to
postpone shutting down the program until
the government could appeal.
In a separate case involving the same
NSA phone records program, a district
judge in New York last month upheld the
government’s data collection as lawful.
The American Civil Liberties Union,
which lost that case, said this week it will
appeal to a federal appeals court in New
York.
U.S. spy court: NSA to keep collecting phone records
By M.L. Johnson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MILWAUKEE — The federal govern-
ment on Friday proposed eliminating
restrictions on the use of corn and soy-
bean seeds that are genetically engi-
neered to resist a common weed killer,
a move welcomed by many farmers but
feared by scientists and environmen-
talists who worry it could invite grow-
ers to use more chemicals.
The herbicide known as 2,4-D has
had limited use in corn and soybean
farming because it becomes toxic to
the plants early in their growth. The
new seeds would allow farmers to use
the weed killer throughout the plants’
lives.
Farmers have been eager for a new
generation of herbicide-resistant seeds
because of the prevalence of weeds that
have become immune to Monsanto’s
Roundup. But skeptics are concerned
that use of the new seeds and 2,4-D will
only lead to similar problems as weeds
acquire resistance to that chemical too.
“It’s just so clear. You can see that
you have this pesticide treadmill
effect,” said Bill Freese, a chemist
with the Washington, D.C.-based
Center For Food Safety, which pro-
motes organic agriculture.
Most corn and soybeans grown in
the U.S. are already genetically engi-
neered, largely to resist Roundup,
which was introduced in 1976. Before
that, most farmers tilled their fields
prior to planting, flipping the soil
over and burying the weeds to kill
them. The technique also exposed
tilled earth to the air, creating prob-
lems with erosion and runoff.
Herbicide-resistant seeds permitted
most farmers to stop tilling because
they could spray fields after their
plants emerged, killing the weeds but
leaving crops unharmed.
The new generation of plants
“allowed us to do a better job of con-
trolling the weeds, and therefore,
we’ve been able to do a better job of
preserving the soil, which is our pri-
mary natural resource,” said Ron
Moore, who grows 2,000 acres of corn
and soybeans with his brother in west-
ern Illinois.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s
plant-inspection agency concluded
that the greatest risk from the new
seeds developed by Dow AgroSciences
was increased use of 2,4-D, which
could hasten the evolution of weeds
resistant to it.
But, the agency said, resistance
could develop anyway because 2,4-D is
the third most-used weed-killer in the
nation.
Freese and other advocates also
raised concerns about possible health
risks from increased use of 2,4-D and
the chemical’s tendency to drift
beyond the area where it is sprayed,
threatening neighboring crops and
wild plants.
Government might deregulate corn, soybean seeds
Florida to pass New York State’s population
ORLANDO, Fla. — Sometime this year, Florida will sur-
pass New York in population, becoming the nation’s third-
most populous state, and sun-seeking seniors are not driving
the growth.
The milestone is validation of the increasing influence of
the Sunshine State as it approaches being home to 20 million
residents. Once Florida passes New York, only California and
Texas will have more people.
“Florida is kind of an icon of the 21st century in terms of
the shifting population and the growing role Latin America is
playing in transforming the country,” said James Johnson, a
business professor at the University of North Carolina. “I
think it’s going to be for the 21st century what California or
New York was for the 20th century.”
Florida encompasses many trends in America: an aging
population, a service-oriented economy with many low-wage
jobs and an ethnic diversity propelled by Hispanic growth.
Like the United States, Florida is a haven for migrants and
people making fresh starts, and the state’s 29 electoral votes
are the nation’s most coveted given Florida is the nation’s
largest swing state. Florida also has myriad problems, some
the result of its explosive growth, which must be addressed
for the state to keep thriving.
Obama proposes firearm background check changes
HONOLULU — The Obama administration on Friday
announced a pair of executive actions aimed at strengthening
federal background checks for gun purchasers, with a particu-
lar focus on limiting firearm access for those with mental
health issues.
One proposed rule change aims to clarify terminology used
by federal law to prohibit people from purchasing a firearm
for mental health reasons. The administration said states
have complained that some wording is ambiguous, making it
difficult to determine who should be blocked from buying a
weapon.
Digging out: Extreme cold grips snowy Northeast
BOSTON — Homeowners and motorists dug out across the
white-blanketed Northeast on Friday as extreme cold ushered
in by the storm threatened fingers and toes but kept the snow
powdery and mercifully easy to shovel. At least 15 deaths
were blamed on the storm as it swept across the nation’s east-
ern half.
While the snowfall had all but stopped by morning across
the hard-hit Philadelphia-to-Boston corridor and many high-
ways and streets were soon plowed and reopened, tempera-
tures were in the single digits and teens, with wind chills well
below zero.
Around the nation
SamTrans bus hit, at least three injured
At least three people were injured when a pickup truck
rear-ended a Samtrans bus in South San Francisco Friday
evening, a Samtrans spokeswoman said.
The truck hit the bus at about 5:50 p.m. near the intersec-
tion of El Camino Real and Arroyo Drive, Samtrans spokes-
woman Jayme Ackemann said.
The bus driver and two passengers were taken to a hospi-
tal to be treated for their injuries, Ackemann said. She did
not have information on the extent of their injuries nor
whether anyone in the pickup truck was injured.
Investigators remain at the scene, Ackemann said.
Local brief
“There are exigent circumstances here. ...
We can’t allow this situation to continue.
The NSA’s continuing to spy on everybody.”
— Larry Klayman
OPINION 9
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Charles “Chip” Huggins
H
ow many more Newtown
massacres must be experi-
enced before Congress
overhauls the nation’s federal men-
tal health policies? Pennsylvania
Rep. Tim Murphy, a psychologist
by training, has spent the last year
studying the ineffective federal
mental health system that takes up
to $125 billion to fund. Funds are
used for “mental health” via pro-
grams ranging from Medicaid to the
Social Security Administration. Mr.
Murphy’s committee, Energy and
Commerce subcommittee on over-
sight and investigations, discov-
ered that most of the funds go to
vague and ineffective services
rarely focused on treating the most
serious illnesses — schizophrenia,
bipolar disorder or severe depres-
sion. The committee also discov-
ered that there is little interagency
coordination, little government
data collection on treatment out-
comes and no central effort to drive
evidence-based care.
Mr. Murphy’s bill will reorient all
current programs and create a new
Health and Human Services assis-
tant secretary for mental health and
substance-use disorders who would
lead federal mental illness efforts.
The secretary would have to be a
medical professional with experi-
ence in evidence-based mental
health care and would be responsi-
ble for promoting the medically
oriented models of
care adopted by
the National
Institute of Mental
Health. Federal
dollars need to
support programs
which treat when
first signs of psy-
chosis appear.
All mental health grants should
be based on programs meeting evi-
dence-based practice standards.
Those programs achieving treat-
ment outcomes should be receiving
the majority of federal funding.
The standard for involuntary con-
finement needs to be addressed
since it is really impossible to
meet, and even psychotics are often
able to present a brief facade of nor-
malcy. Many are unaware they’re
even ill and won’t voluntarily get
help.
The Murphy bill would only fund
mental health centers that have
state laws that support “need for
treatment” standards, which gives
families and physicians greater
ability to get help for the mentally
ill. The state of New York passed
Kendra’s Law which has been a
model for how outpatient treatment
laws can help the most vulnerable
and save lives. With Kendra’s Law,
courts can require the mentally ill,
as a condition of remaining in the
community, to receive treatment.
The Murphy bill also addresses
one of the more destructive forces
in the mental health system, the
legal lobby. Tax dollars are funding
a small army of self-appointed
“advocates” who encourage the
mentally ill to avoid treatment, and
who fight parental and court
attempts to get them care. The
Murphy bill stops this funding. It
also provides physicians legal safe
harbors to volunteer at understaffed
mental health centers, something
many currently won’t do for fear of
malpractice suits.
Can this bill muster bipartisan
support and will the Obama admin-
istration accept a GOP initiative?
Or does our federal government
continue through $100 million at a
failed system as Vice President Joe
Biden has proposed. All the money
in the world won’t help the mental-
ly ill if it isn’t getting to them or is
squandered on ineffective treat-
ments. Rep. Murphy’s bill is an
informed attempt to overhaul a bro-
ken system. It might even prevent
the next Newtown.
Charles “Chip” Huggins is CEO of
Caminar for Mental Health. He can
be reached by email at
ChipH@Caminar.org.
Time for mental health overhaul
Billionaire bullies
By John McDowell
T
he other day I saw “The Hobbit: The Desolation of
Smaug,” which I thoroughly enjoyed. In it, the wizard
Gandalf laments the growth of the “Power of the
Shadow” and how the forces of good had been blind to its
resurgence. That same week, Organizing for Action (President
Obama’s political army) tweeted “On one side: Shadowy
groups spending millions to obscure the
facts.” I realized there was a connection
between the two. OFAis right, the power
of shadowy groups grows, and dark
money spreads across our body politic.
Yet many have been blind to the destruc-
tive power these groups and their secre-
tive donors wield, just as the forces of
good are blind in The Hobbit.
Acabal of 1 percenters, billionaires
who use the levers of power to enact their
own agenda, funds much of the “Power of the Shadow.” The
wealthy use innocuous sounding front groups, foundations
that don’t reveal the source of their funding and pass-through
organizations to obscure their plans, hide their power and
attempt to fool middle class, working Americans into sup-
porting polices that protect the powerful at the expense of the
people.
The billionaire bullies who fund these groups hide their
trail, but a few researchers have delved deep into campaign
finance reports and IRS filings to report on their machina-
tions. It’s time to reveal their findings and put a spotlight on
the inner workings of the elite.
Aleading member is San Francisco’s own progressive-lib-
eral billionaire Tom Steyer. Steyer made his money the old-
fashioned way, as a hedge fund manager using financial
manipulations unavailable to middle class investors. While
Occupy protesters marched naked in San Francisco’s streets,
Steyer was busy behind the scenes trying to bend public poli-
cy to his will. He poured almost $22 million into
Proposition 39, a measure sold to voters as a feel-good pro-
gram, but in reality, it raises taxes by $1 billion a year on
California businesses.
He then turned his eye to the Senate race in Massachusetts.
There, according to the Los Angeles Times, his intervention
and bullying in the Democratic primary enraged local voters
to the point that his preferred candidate had to tell him to
“back off.” Not satisfied with meddling in Massachusetts, the
billionaire funded an $8 million “independent expenditure” in
the Virginia governor’s race on behalf of the corrupt crony-
capitalist Terry McAuliffe.
Steyer’s secretive political operation is now going after the
Keystone XLpipeline, a project that will generate thousands
of high-paying jobs, help close the income gap and keep oil
off collision prone trains. But, follow the money. Steyer’s
former hedge fund, Farallon Capital Management, is heavily
invested in Kinder Morgan, the giant oil and gas pipeline
firm that owns the TransMoutain pipeline, a competitor to
Keystone XL. According to Forbes magazine, killing
Keystone XLwill allow Kinder Morgan to reap windfall prof-
its. Not a bad day’s work for a billionaire bully.
Another of the shadowy cabal is the Hungarian-born
George Soros. Soros has made a career out of funding innocu-
ous sounding, interlocking political front groups funded
through foundations and other organizations that do not
reveal their sources of income. In 2004, he along with bil-
lionaire buddy Peter Lewis (now deceased) donated almost $40
million to defeat George W. Bush.
However, that spending is only a part of Soros’ attempts to
control American politics. He and his Open Society Institute,
as documented by DiscoverTheNetwork.org, have funded liter-
ally hundreds of interlocking and networked groups that then
go on to fund “coalitions” that obscure Soros as the ultimate
source of their millions in dark money.
One of the most egregious efforts of Soros and other 1 per-
centers was an attempt to wrest control of American elections
through the bland sounding Secretary of State Project. In real-
ity, this was an attempt to elect and influence secretaries of
state — who just happen to control vote counting — who
would bend to Soros’ will. As Joseph Stalin pointed out, “The
people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who
count the votes decide everything.” Thankfully, the project is
shuttered, but not before propelling to power several secre-
taries of state, including in Ohio and Minnesota, where well-
documented vote counting irregularities have subsequently
taken place.
There is more to the secretive “Power of the Shadow” dark
money that infects our land. Both Democracy Alliance (co-
founded by Soros) and the Tides Foundation solicit millions
in secret donations that flow in an unseen river from million-
aires and billionaires to progressive-liberal groups across the
country.
The people may not have a hero hobbit on our side who can
help fight off the attempts to take control of our government
and our lives. Nevertheless, we do have the power to name
Steyer, Soros, Democracy Alliance and the Tides Foundation
for what they are, and to bring their secretive activities into
the light of day. After all, sunlight is the best disinfectant.
John McDowell is a longtime county resident having first
moved to San Carlos in 1963. In the intervening years, he
has worked as a political volunteer and staff member in local,
state and federal government, including time spent as a press
secretary on Capitol Hill and in the second Bush administra-
tion.
Sacramento Bee
T
he new year isn’t starting
well for 213,793
Californians; their unem-
ployment benefits expired last
Saturday, owing to inaction by
House Republicans.
Democrats on the House Ways and
Means Committee released a state
by state count of American workers
who lost their benefits. California
is one of the hardest-hit, as is
Nevada.
In addition to the 213,793
Californians whose jobless benefits
ended over the weekend, 325,800
others stand to lose their benefits in
the first half of 2014, unless they
find work or Congress acts upon its
return to Washington, D.C.
California’s unemployment rate of
8.3 percent remains above the
national average. Parts of the
Central Valley are far above the
average. Consider these numbers:
In Tulare County, unemployment
is 12.9 percent and 3,256 people
lost their benefits. In Fresno
County, 12.6 percent of the work-
force is out of work and 7,108 peo-
ple lost benefits. In Merced County,
unemployment is 13.6 percent and
1,939 lost benefits.
St ani sl aus Count y: 12. 1 per-
cent unempl oyment and 3, 749
l ost benefi t s. San Joaqui n
Count y: 12. 2 percent unempl oy-
ment and 4, 942 l ost benefi t s.
Sacrament o Count y: 8. 1 percent
unempl oyment and 8, 599 l ost
benef i t s.
For perspective, the average
unemployment check is $1,166 per
month. Multiply that by 8,599
Sacramento County people who
won’t get checks in January. That’s
$10 million per month. The cut will
hurt individuals. It also will hurt
people selling gasoline and food.
The Fresno Bee recently quoted
Rep. Tom McClintock, R-Elk
Grove, as saying extending unem-
ployment “hurts the unemployed”
because it “reduces the incentive
they have to get into the work-
force.”
Unemployed workers won’t be
getting checks, but still will have a
vote.
Come November, perhaps they
will use their votes to help House
Republicans who oppose the exten-
sion test their theory.
Impact of jobless benefits expiration
Other voices
Guest
perspective
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 16,469.99 +28.64 10-Yr Bond 3.00 +0.01
Nasdaq 4,131.91 -11.16 Oil (per barrel) 94.15
S&P 500 1,831.37 -0.61 Gold 1,236.10
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday
on the New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock
Market:
NYSE
General Motors Co., down $1.38 to $39.57
The automaker’s U.S.sales fell about 6 percent in December
as its top-selling pickup truck came under pressure from
competition.
Sprint Corp., down 46 cents to $9.94
A Stifel analyst downgraded the wireless carrier’s stock
rating on doubts it will be able to pull off a takeover of
rival T-Mobile.
Rite Aid Corp., up 43 cents to $5.47
The drugstore chain said that sales at stores open at least
a year grew nearly 3 percent during the month of
December.
WhiteWave Foods Co., up $1.11 to $23.68
The maker of Silk soy milk and Land O Lakes creamers
closed its $600 million acquisition of organic food maker
Earthbound Farm.
La-Z-Boy Inc., up 79 cents to $30.97
A Raymond James analyst raised his price target on the
furniture seller’s stock, saying its sales may increase.
Delta Air Lines Inc., up $1.53 to $29.23
A key airline sales measure rose a bigger-than-expected
10 percent in December because Thanksgiving was later
than usual last year.
Nasdaq
Finisar Corp., up 46 cents to $23.72
A Raymond James analyst upgraded the optic component
supplier’s shares on possible higher demand for its
products by data centers.
Real Goods Solar Inc., up 16 cents to $3.35
The company said that it was working with solar energy
company BlueWave Capital to build four solar projects in
Massachusetts.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — After last year’s big
party in the stock market, 2014 is
starting off with a nagging hangover.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
edged a fraction of a point lower on
Friday, beginning a year with a two-
day losing streak for the first time
since 2005.
While few analysts expect 2014 to
produce gains comparable to last
year’s advance of nearly 30 percent,
many see a moderate increase as the
economy continues to improve and
investors move funds out of bonds and
into stocks, which are generating
much bigger returns for investors.
“The market is trying to find some
direction here,” said Scott Wren, a
senior equity strategist at Wells Fargo
Advisors. “We’re in for a few days of
trying to figure out whether we inch a
little higher or see some down days.”
The S&P 500 index fell 0.61 points,
or 0.03 percent, to 1,831.37 and was
0.5 percent lower for the week.
The Dow Jones industrial average
gained 28.64 points, or 0.2 percent,
to 16,469.99. The Nasdaq composite
fell 11.16 points, or 0.3 percent, to
4, 131. 91.
General Motors was among the
stocks that posted the biggest losses
in the S&P 500. The automaker fell
$1.38, or 3.4 percent, to $39.57 after
reporting a U.S. sale slump of more
than 6 percent in December.
Energy companies have also started
the year with declines as the price of
oil falls.
On Friday, oil extended a weeklong
skid by falling $1.48, or 1.6 percent,
to $93.96 a barrel. A strengthening
U.S. economy drove the dollar higher,
which hurts oil, and signs emerged of
ample supply worldwide.
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke on Friday predicted stronger
growth in 2014 and said that factors
that have kept the economy from
accelerating appear to be abating.
“The combination of financial heal-
ing, greater balance in the housing
market, less fiscal restraint, and, of
course, continued monetary accommo-
dation bodes well for U.S. economic
growth in coming quarters,” Bernanke
said in comments to the annual meet-
ing of the American Economic
Association in Philadelphia.
The encouraging economic back-
drop is one reason for investors to
remain positive about stocks, despite
the slow start to the year, said Bill
Barker, a senior portfolio analyst at
Motley Fool Funds, which manages
about $600 million in stock mutual
funds.
“As long as there is no inflation and
a good economy, with low interest
rates ... that’s the kind of thing that
stocks love,” Barker said.
Among the stock market winners on
Friday was Delta Air Lines.
The carrier’s stock jumped $1.53, or
5.5 percent, to $29.23 after a measure
of its revenue for December rose 10
percent. Delta benefited from strong
demand and the late Thanksgiving
holiday. Analysts at S&P Capital IQ
raised their earnings estimates for the
carrier and boosted their recommenda-
tion on the stock to “strong buy. ”
Trading was muted Friday after a
winter storm hit the U.S. Northeast.
The governors of New York and New
Jersey declared states of emergency
and urged people to avoid travelling.
Trading was quiet this week, before
and after the New Year’s Day holiday
on Wednesday.
In government bond trading, the
yield on the 10-year Treasury note was
unchanged from Thursday at 2.99 per-
cent.
The yield on the note climbed from
1.76 percent last year to as high as 3
percent as investors sold bonds in an
improving economy. Many analysts
expect the yield to continue rising
this year as the Federal Reserve
reduces, or “tapers,” its stimulus.
S&P starts 2014 with a two-day decline
REUTERS
A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange
By Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke on Friday predicted
a stronger year for the U.S. economy in
2014, saying several factors that have held
back growth appear to be abating.
Americans’ finances have improved and
the outlook for home sales is brighter,
Bernanke said. He also expects less drag
from federal spending cuts and tax increases.
The combination “bodes well for U.S.
economic growth in coming quarters,”
Bernanke said during a speech to the annual
meeting of the American Economic
Association in Philadelphia.
Bernanke made a similar assessment of
the economy at a Dec. 18 news conference
after the Fed’s last meeting. At the meeting,
the Fed announced it
would begin in January to
reduce its monthly bond
purchases from $85 bil-
lion to $75 billion, not-
ing signs of an improv-
ing economy.
The bond purchases
are intended to keep
long-term interest rates
low and encourage more
borrowing and spend-
i ng.
Friday’s appearance was expected to be
one of Bernanke’s final speeches as Fed
chairman. He is stepping down at the end of
this month after eight years leading the
central bank.
The Senate is expected to confirm Janet
Yellen on Monday to be the next Fed chair-
man. She would take over on Feb. 1.
In his speech, Bernanke said that he tried
to make the Fed more transparent and
accountable while at the same time com-
bating a deep recession and severe finan-
cial crisis.
Making the Fed more transparent was an
important goal for him when he took over
in 2006. He cited his participation in more
television interviews, his efforts to hold
more town hall meetings and his visits to
universities. Bernanke also added a quarter-
ly news conference after four of the Fed’s
eight policy meetings.
“We took extraordinary measures to meet
extraordinary economic challenges and we
had to explain those measures to earn the
public’s support and confidence,” Bernanke
said.
Bernanke said while the financial crisis
has passed “the Fed’s need to educate and
explain will only grow. ”
Bernanke also used his speech to make
some pointed remarks at Congress. He said
“excessively tight” budget policies had
been counterproductive.
“With fiscal and monetary policy work-
ing in opposite directions, the recovery is
weaker than it otherwise would be,”
Bernanke said.
Bernanke also defended the central bank
against critics who say the Fed’s massive
bond purchases have had little effect on
jumpstarting the recovery.
“Economic growth might well have been
considerably weaker, or even negative,
without substantial monetary policy sup-
port,” Bernanke said. He noted economic
research that supported the benefits of the
Fed’s bond purchases.
Bernanke: 2014 could be better year for economy
Ben Bernanke
By Dee-Ann Durbin and Tom Kirisher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — Automakers are going to
have to work a little harder for your busi-
ness in 2014.
After four years of strong sales increases
— and few discounts — as the economy
improved, U.S. demand for new cars and
trucks is expected to slow this year. That
could mean better deals for buyers as car
companies fight to increase their share of
the market.
The industry got a taste of what’s to come
in December, when General Motors, Toyota
and Volkswagen all saw their sales fall from
a year ago. One reason: Competitors like
Ford and Honda increased their incentive
spending on hot sellers like pickup trucks
and midsize cars, according to TrueCar.com,
which tracks car prices. Cold weather and
strong sales over Black Friday in November
also pinched December sales, automakers
said.
This year’s slowdown is inevitable, ana-
lysts say. Many people who held on to their
cars through the recession have now bought
new ones. Those who haven’t may not be in
any rush, because cars are lasting longer
than ever before. And unless there’s a
strong uptick in the economy, families
aren’t likely to buy a third car.
Alec Gutierrez, senior analyst for Kelley
Blue Book, expects U.S. sales to increase
by around 700,000 to 16.3 million in
2014.
BlackBerry sues startup
founded by Ryan Seacrest
SAN FRANCISCO — Troubled smartphone
maker BlackBerry Ltd. is accusing a compa-
ny backed by “American Idol” host Ryan
Seacrest of being a rip-off artist.
The allegations emerged in a patent
infringement lawsuit filed Friday in a San
Francisco federal court by BlackBerry. The
suit targets an iPhone keyboard made by
Typo Products LLC, a Los Angeles startup
co-founded by Seacrest and entrepreneur
Laurence Hallier.
The complaint contends that Typo
Products’ keyboard for recent iPhone models
illegally copies technology and designs that
BlackBerry pioneered years ago for its line
of smartphones. BlackBerry is seeking
unspecified damages and a court order that
would prevent Typo Products from selling
the keyboard without a licensing agreement.
Typo Products didn’t immediately respond
to requests for comment.
The keyboard in dispute hasn’t hit the mar-
ket yet, though Typo Products has been tak-
ing early orders for the $99 accessory on its
website and says it’s meant to ship in
January. It’s designed to slip on to the
iPhone 5 and iPhone 5S so it can serve as a
substitute for the touch-screen keyboard
built into the software on those devices.
The physical keyboards on BlackBerry’s
phones helped reshape the way that people
used mobile devices.
But those phones have been waning in
popularity since Apple Inc. released the first
iPhone in 2007, threatening BlackBerry’s
survival. As part of its efforts to adapt,
BlackBerry has introduced smartphones fea-
turing touch-screen keyboards, but the
Canadian company is still struggling after
suffering a $4.4 billion loss in its most
recent quarter.
Auto sales best in six years,
but demand seen dropping
Business brief
<<< Page 15,Boldin exceeds
expectations in first season with 49ers
Weekend, Jan. 4-5, 2014
OFFENSE REIGNS IN COLLEGE: DEFENSES PLAYING CATCHUP IN COLLEGE FOOTBALL >> PAGE 13
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
If you’re a high school sports fan, one of
the first questions asked of new year is: who
will win the Peninsula Athletic League
boys’ basketball title?
If you’re looking at the South Division,
the answer is: who knows? As usual, there
are several of the 10 teams that have a legit-
imate chance at clinching the division
crown. It’s the usual suspects, but is this the
year there’s a surprise?
The following is a breakdown of the PAL
South Division, in alphabetical order. All
records are through Thursday and are based
off results given to MaxPreps.com.
Aragon (6-5)
With Alex Manu’s ability to penetrate
defenses off the dribble, it opens up the
Dons’ inside-out game, with wings Kevin
Hahn and Toby Liebergesell to circle around
and knock down the 3-pointers. When Manu
is on and hitting his shot, Aragon can be
hard to stop. The Dons can turn games into
frenzied, end-to-end track meets. If the Dons
struggle from the outside, however, they’ll
be in trouble.
Burlingame (9-2)
The Panthers may have the two best play-
ers at their position in the PAL. Frankie
Ferrari returns to run the show at point guard
a year after transferring to Riordan and then
No clear-cut favorite in PAL South
Boys’ basketball preview
See SOUTH, Page 14
By Genaro C. Armas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GREEN BAY, Wis. — As a reward for finish-
ing the regular season tied for the second-best
record in the NFL, the San Francisco 49ers get
what may be one of the coldest playoff games
in league history.
Doesn’t seem fair to the defending NFC
champions. But the playoff-tested 49ers are
up for the challenge of hitting the road, trying
to return to the Super Bowl. It starts Sunday
with a wild-card game against the Green Bay
Packers at frigid Lambeau Field.
“Even when you have a home playoff game
it’s not easy. We understand that it’s all about
the team that’s playing the best at the moment
and that’s how you do it,” safety Donte
Whitner said. “It doesn’t matter where we
play.”
Well, maybe this weekend it might.
The high temperature on Sunday might be
in the single digits — if the 49ers (12-4) and
Packers (8-7-1) are lucky. The wind promises
to make it feel even colder.
The coldest game on record is the 1967
championship game, known as the “Ice
Bowl” won by the Packers 21-17 over the
Dallas Cowboys at Lambeau on New Year’s
Eve. The temperature dipped to minus-13, and
the wind chill that day made it feel like minus-
48.
“Cold weather in Lambeau Field, it’s a tough
place to play,” Packers fullback John Kuhn
said. “I’m sure they’ve got all kinds of ideas
See 49ERS, Page 16
SPORTS 12
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever been
entrusted to make
final arrangements
for a funeral?
Those of you
who’ve had this
experience know
that important decisions are required and
must be made in a timely manner. The next
of kin is many times required to search for
information about the deceased which may
not be easily accessible, and must answer
questions without the time to think things
out. Even though your Funeral Director is
trained to guide you every step of the way, it
is still best for you to be prepared with the
proper information if the need should arise.
Ask your Funeral Director what info is
needed before you meet with him/her.
Making funeral arrangements can be very
simple, or can become difficult at times if
you are not prepared. A good Funeral
Director is experienced in leading you with
the necessary requirements, and will offer
details that you may not have thought about
or previously considered as an option.
Allowing him/her to guide you will make
the arrangements go by quickly and easily.
A number of items should be considered
in preparation for the future:
1. Talk to your loved ones about the
inevitable. Give them an indication on what
your wishes are regarding the type of funeral
you want, burial or cremation, etc., and ask
them their feelings about plans for their own
funeral. This is only conversation, but it is
an important topic which will help break the
ice and prevent any type of confusion when
the time comes.
2. Talk to your Funeral Director. Write
down a list of questions and make a phone
call to your Funeral Director asking how to
be prepared. He/she will gladly provide
detailed information and can mail this
information to you for your reference.
Asking questions doesn’t cost anything and
will help you with being organized.
3. Make an appointment and Pre-plan a
Funeral. Many more people are following
through with this step by making Pre-Need
Arrangements. Completing arrangements
ahead of time makes this process more
relaxed, and putting these details behind you
will take a weight off your shoulders. Your
wishes will be finalized and kept on file at
the Mortuary. Your Funeral Director will
even help you set aside funding now as to
cover costs at the time of death. Families
who meet with us at the CHAPEL OF THE
HIGHLANDS are grateful for the chance to
make Pre-Need Arrangements. With their
final details in place it helps to make matters
more calming for surviving loved-ones.
4. Enjoy Life. There are those who dwell
on situations that can’t be controlled.
Taking time to stop and look around at
beauty in the world and appreciate good
things can be therapeutic. If you need to use
a negative statement, try re-wording it into a
positive. Change “I had a lousy day today”
into “Today was demanding, but it made me
appreciate my better days.” As the song
goes: “Accentuate the positive; Eliminate
the negative; Latch on to the affirmative.”
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Accentuating The Positive
Can Eliminate The Negative
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
While certainly there are those on the
Aragon boys’ soccer team who don’t remem-
ber, as it turns out, a Viking never forgets.
Ayear ago, when the Dons and Mills met
on the soccer pitch, the battle was extreme-
ly brutal and the Vikings walked away with a
loss and bruises to show for their efforts.
But this season, as the Peninsula Athletic
League schedule lurks around the corner,
Mills head coach Craig Dillie said his team
came into a Friday non-league contest anx-
ious to avenge a 2013 loss to the Dons.
“The boys have matured,” he said. “And
they came out ready to atone for last sea-
son’s mishaps.”
Mills’ revenge arrived midway through
the second half when Robert Thorgeson
headed a corner kick into the Aragon net for
the lone goal of the contest. From there, a
focused Vikings’ defense was the difference
in a 1-0 victory for the visitors.
“We’re grown,” Dillie said. “Last year, our
team was very young. These boys have
matured. They’ve played a lot together and
it’s helped out.”
Aragon, on the other hand, is the oppo-
site of Mills. In the 1-0 loss, the Dons
showed its inexperience — the team that
finished near the top of the Ocean Division
last season graduated eight seniors. Thus,
when it comes to the leadership and commu-
nication a soccer team needs, the Dons are
still very much a work in progress.
“That’s the most difficult thing we’re fac-
ing right now — the communication on the
field,” said Aragon head coach Gregory
Markoulakis. “Last year, we almost had too
many players taking charge. This year,
we’re still looking for someone to come out
of their shell.”
For the most part Friday, Aragon con-
trolled possession. Ricky Villaseñor and
Mannie Rivas had a couple of clear looks at
goal in the first half but did not have that lit-
tle extra to see the ball into the net.
Mills’ Jun Jang had the half’s best oppor-
tunity on a shot that Julio-Garcia Salazar
made a diving stop on halfway through the
first half. Salazar actually thwarted a couple
of clear looks at goal for the Vi ki ngs
throughout.
But he could do nothing against
Thorgeson’s header in the second half. Until
then, Michael Lanthier and German Perez
Meza put on a couple of great chances on the
Mills’ net in an attempt to give the Dons the
early second-half momentum.
But in the 62nd minute, Mills earned a
corner kick that Aoi Hernadez sent toward
the near post. Thorgeson began his run from
the defender position and its quickness sur-
prised the Aragon defense. No one could do
anything as an unmarked Thorgeson rocket-
ed the ball into the Dons’ goal for the 1-0
score.
“The team played well,” Dillie said. “They
were focused and they improved from last
year.”
A Rivas run in the game’s latter parts
almost netted Aragon with the equalizing
goal. Villaseñor also came very close to
tying things up. But it wasn’t meant to be
for the Dons who drop to 3-2-1 on the sea-
son.
Mills atones for 2013 loss
Memorial held for former
Terra Nova coach Jim Soden
The main gymnasium at Terra Nova High
School was a fitting location for a celebra-
tion of the life of the late Jim Soden this
past weekend.
Soden, a former history teacher and bas-
ketball coach at the Pacifica school, com-
piled a sterling record there, beginning in
the 1970s.
His teams recorded a total of 447 wins,
multiple league championships and one
Central Coast Section title. Most of those
victories came on the girls’ side of the
ledger.
Soden, who died unexpectedly in August at
the age of 70, was a San Mateo County pio-
neer coaching the girls’ game after passage
of Title IX, the landmark federal legislation
that mandated equal athletic opportunities
for females.
The father of two daughters who eventual-
ly played for him at Terra Nova, Soden was
described as being “good at whatever he did”
by a former colleague, Bud Bresnahan.
“He believed that girls should be given a
chance to play,” Bresnahan noted during the
Sunday ceremony.
Agraduate of Marin Catholic High School
and the University of San Francisco, Soden
was a strong voice for girls’ basketball on
the Peninsula and he lobbied tirelessly for
equitable treatment (facilities, schedules,
referees, etc.) for them.
His dominating presence on the Terra
Nova bench helped to raise the local profile
of the sport during the 1980s and early
1990s.
As Bresnahan put it, “I don’t think any-
one will match his record in this facility. ”
Soden is a member of the Peninsula Sports
Hall of Fame and the Pacifica Sports Hall of
Fame.
Sports brief
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Mills’ Robert Thorgeson gets sandwiched
between a pair of Aragon defenders as all
three battle for the ball. Thorgeson would
score the only goal in a 1-0 Mills win.
By George Henry
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA— Andre Iguodala hit a 3-pointer
at the buzzer, David Lee scored 23 points and
the Golden State Warriors won their eighth
straight game with a 101-100 victory over the
Atlanta Hawks on Friday
night.
Stephen Curry added 22
points with nine assists
and Klay Thompson 21 for
Golden State, which
recovered from a 15-point
deficit in the fourth quarter
to get back in the game
and extend its road win-
ning streak to five
straight.
Pero Antic finished with a career-high 16
points and Shelvin Mack had 15 for the
Hawks. Atlanta had won three of four and six
of eight.
Iguodala was inbounding the ball with 2.8
seconds remaining near the Hawks’ bench and
had 6-foot-11 center Antic defending him
when he passed the ball to Curry near the half-
court line.
Mack was guarding Curry closely enough
that Iguodala moved a few feet inside and was
Down 14 in 4th,
Warriors beat
Hawks at horn
Warriors 101, Hawks 100
See WARRIORS, Page 13
Andre Iguodala
open when Antic moved up to help Mack close space on
Curry.
Iguodala took Curry’s bounce pass, squared up and hit the
game-winner as Jeff Teague made a frantic attempt to disrupt the
shot.
The Warriors were just 6 for 27 on 3-point attempts, includ-
ing a 1 for 7 night from Curry. In a stirring 123-114 victory at
two-time defending NBA champion Miami on Thursday,
Golden State matched a season high by hitting 15 3s, includ-
ing eight from Curry.
Golden State called timeout after Iguodala grabbed Paul
Millsap’s missed jumper with 2.8 seconds remaining, and
coach Mark Jackson drew up the winning play.
Teague finished with 14 points and seven assists while
Millsap had 12 points and 11 rebounds for Atlanta.
Curry cut the lead to 11 with a fast-break reverse layup that
banked in high off the left side of the backboard with 6:10
remaining.
Coming out of the ensuing timeout, Thompson blocked
Teague’s layup attempt, and Golden State quickly made it 91-84
on a layup by Harrison Barnes and Lee’s two free throws.
Curry hit his first 3 with 5:05 remaining, cutting the lead to
93-87, but committed turnovers on three of Golden State’s next
four possessions and was upset enough to throw his mouth-
piece away in frustration on Atlanta baseline after getting
called for discontinued dribble.
Even so, the Warriors kept the pace frantic with tight defense
to fuel their fast break and go on a 20-4 run that ended with 2:21
remaining on Curry’s runner. Golden State led 96-95.
Atlanta went back up by four on Teague’s free throw, but
Curry hit a layup to cut the lead to 100-98 with 25.3 seconds
remaining.
SPORTS 13
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
By Eddie Pells
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWPORT BEACH — With apologies to Florida State,
the question must be asked: Can anyone out there play
defense?
The Seminoles come into the BCS title game ranked first
in the country in points allowed.
Auburn and the rest of them? Pretty much every one-liner
about busy scoreboard operators and video-game line scores
applies.
Including Tuesday night’s Chik-fil-A bowl, there have
been nine games this season involving teams from BCS
automatic-qualifier conferences that produced 100 or more
points, according to STATS. Included among those:
Auburn’s 59-42 win over Missouri in the Southeastern
Conference title game.
As for anything resembling the “Game of the Century” —
the 1946 classic between No. 1 Army and No. 2 Notre Dame
that ended in a 0-0 deadlock:
“That’s an impossibility. That won’t happen,” Oklahoma
defensive coordinator Mike Stoops said. “It’s trickling
down now to where all the Southeastern Conference teams
have parts or variations of spread offenses. They’re very dif-
ficult to defend because of the space on the field, and then the
quarterbacks running with the ball makes it even more chal-
lenging.”
The over-under for Monday night’s title game, despite
Florida State’s nation-leading 11.1 points-per-game
allowed, is 67 1/2.
The average over-under for this season’s bowl games: 58.
Through the first 30 games of bowl season, winners aver-
aged 34.6 points.
“Back in the day, games were decided 10-3 and that was
great stuff and hopefully we can get back to that,” said
Central Florida linebacker Terrance Plummer, a few days
before the Knights topped Baylor 52-42 in the Fiesta Bowl.
It was the third bowl game this season to produce more than
90 points.
But Plummer’s vision probably won’t materialize any-
time soon, at least not with the way the numbers are trend-
ing.
Thanks to the influx of spread offenses that don’t huddle,
along with a rapid-fire substitution patterns and more athlet-
ic quarterbacks, defenses have been taking an increasingly
steady drubbing over the past decade or so.
Teams in automatic-qualifier conferences averaged 30.8
points per game this season, according to STATS, continu-
ing an upward trend from that dates to 2006, when the big
schools averaged 25.4 points per game.
And by “big schools,” that includes some of the most hal-
lowed programs in football.
Remember tough-nosed Big Ten football? This year, the
conference’s marquee matchup produced this score: Ohio
State 42, Michigan 41. So much for three yards and a cloud
of dust. Another Michigan final from this season:
Wolverines 63, Indiana Hoosiers 47 — in football, not
hoops.
“With the way the rules have changed and the evolution of
the spread offense and all those things, not too much shocks
me,” Georgia Tech defensive coordinator Ted Roof said. “I
pretty much can roll with it. As long as we win, I’m good.”
The Auburn-Alabama game, another bastion of old-time,
grind-it-out football, was a 34-28 blockbuster this season,
capped by arguably the most memorable play in the sport’s
history — Chris Davis’ 109-yard return of a missed field
goal with no time left in regulation.
That was once-in-a-lifetime.
Some of these other 2013 final scores are simply routine:
—Duke 58, Pittsburgh 55
—Arizona State 62, USC 41
—SMU 55, Rutgers 52
The list goes on. It cuts across virtually all the big con-
ferences, led by the Pac-12, where teams averaged 33.5
points a game this season — 6.5 more than they did only
five years ago. That’s an increase of 24 percent.
“It’s kind of like fast-break basketball when you’re play-
ing football and get the ball in the playmaker’s hands,” said
Charlie Strong, coach of a Louisville team that ranks fourth
in the country in points allowed. “They’re looking for mis-
matches and it’s what you do on offense. Now it’s a mis-
matched game, so get the ball to your best player’s hand and
let him see if he can go make a guy miss just defensively.”
Over the 30 bowl games played through Thursday night’s
Sugar Bowl (Final: Oklahoma 45, Alabama 31), Louisville
was one of only four teams to hold its opponent to single
digits.
Auburn will come into the title game ranked a mediocre
38th in points allowed (24 per game) and a downright bad
88th in yards allowed (423.5).
“We have got terrible-looking overall statistics and some
of them are not misleading,” Auburn defensive coordinator
Ellis Johnson said. “But we make critical stops at critical
times and we’re good on third and fourth down percentage
and good in the red zone and good in the fourth quarter.”
Though offense has been slowly, steadily taking over the
game for decades, some suggest the most recent uptick orig-
inates with Chip Kelly, whose offense at Oregon, at its peak
in 2010, averaged 49 points a game. Kelly got snapped up
by the Philadelphia Eagles before this season and, in a turn-
around from decades past, many an NFL coach is now look-
ing to the college game to find new wrinkles in offense.
2013 produces big numbers, not much defense
Thanks to the influx of spread offenses
that don’t huddle, along with a rapid-fire
substitution patterns and more athletic
quarterbacks, defenses have been
taking an increasingly steady
drubbing over the past decade or so.
Continued from page 12
WARRIORS
SPORTS 14
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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transferring back. The USF-bound
Ferrari finally has the body to match
his game. He’s grown at least six
inches since his sophomore year
and can be deadly inside and out.
Team him with power
forward/center Nick Loew and
Burlingame will be hard to beat. As
long as Loew can avoid foul trouble,
he is nearly unstoppable in the
post. He can also get out and run the
floor and is an option on the fast
break.
Justin Gutang is the Panthers’
wild card. Ajunior wing, he has not
shied away from looking for his
shot and, if his midrange game is
on, he could be that third piece cru-
cial to winning championships.
Capuchino (2-7)
Looks like it could be a long
year for the Mustangs. Things
aren’t looking much better in
2014 than they did last season
when they went winless in PAL
play and won only three games
overall.
Capuchino is ridiculously
young, with four sophomore mak-
ing the varsity squad. Those soph-
omores, however, give the
Mustangs some size — a pair of
posts (Lucas Magni and Dylan
Mayor) in the 6-2 range and two 5-
8 guards (Jarrod Pascual and Raoul
Ligon). Much like freshmen on
the varsity team, it is expected
sophomores will get a lot of play-
ing time.
Carlmont (4-6)
It’s a bit of a rebuilding year for
the Scots: new coach and upwards
of four starters from the team that
advanced to the CCS semifinals
last season.
Michael Costello, who devel-
oped into one of the better shoot-
ers in the PAL last season, returns
for new coach Patrick Smith —
Dave Low’s assistant the last sev-
eral years. Joe Pitocchi returns in
the front court and gives the Scots
an inside presence.
The Scots’ biggest issue in the
preseason has been consistency.
They play a good game followed
by a stinker. They played well in
an 11-point loss to Aragon, but
were buried by Half Moon Bay, 68-
41. Carlmont needs to improve at
both ends of the court to compete
for a playoff spot.
Hillsdale (4-7)
The Knights’ preseason record
could easily be reversed. Hillsdale’s
biggest losing margin was 13
points. Afew more baskets here and
a few more defensive stops there and
Hillsdale could have seven or eight
wins.
The Knights’ biggest question is
can they find a complement to Brian
Houle, a senior guard/forward who
paced the offense in the preseason.
Hillsdale is young this year with
only six seniors on a roster of 16.
They lost a bulk of their scoring and
leadership to graduation, so the
Knights are going to have to get
after it on each possession — both
offensively and defensively — if
they want to have sustained success
in PALplay.
Menlo-Atherton (6-3)
The Bears still have games
against St. Francis and Half Moon
Bay looming, but six preseason
wins would be quite the accomplish-
ment given their schedule.
Four of their wins have come
against private schools — includ-
ing neighbors Sacred Heart Prep and
Menlo School, two squads that will
be in the mix for the West Bay
Athletic League title.
Two of their losses have come
against Sacred Heart Cathedral —
one of three West Catholic Athletic
League teams on their schedule —
and Half Moon Bay, the presump-
tive favorite to win the PAL North
Division title.
As long as the Bears stay within
striking distance of an opponent,
they have a chance to win thanks to
the pure shooting stroke of guard
Royce Branning. He poured in 29 in
a 65-62 loss to Burlingame, and led
the Bears in scoring against both
Anderson and St. Francis-
Watsonville.
Mills (9-2)
The Vikings quietly enter PAL
play as a contender to the South title
— like they do seemingly every
year.
One would have expected some
growing pains this season after
Mills lost its two best players to
graduation in point guard Matty
Wong and forward Joseph Worku.
Instead, they’ve been successful dur-
ing a tough preseason campaign.
The Vikings do return several
players from last season’s CCS
semifinal squad, including Jeremy
Gibbs and Marquise Adkins, but not
a lot of experience. Listed as a for-
ward, Gibbs has the propensity to
knock down the 3-pointer consis-
tently. Adkins’ game is more suited
to do the dirty work — cleaning up
around the glass and rebounding.
San Mateo (5-5)
The Bearcats can go nowhere but
up. They have already won more
games during the preseason than the
three they won all of last season
when they went 1-11 in PAL play
and 3-19 overall.
They are 3-0 against the PAL dur-
ing the preseason, including a 48-
46 win over division rival
Carlmont, so the Bearcats should
have some confidence going into
PALaction.
Sequoia (2-2)
An opposing coach had to be
quick if he wanted to scout the
Cherokees. After a pair of games
locally, Sequoia took it to the road
—Arizona, specifically — where
the Cherokees went 1-2 at the
Cactus Jam tournament.
Sequoia has been consistent
offensively, averaging more than
50 points in their two wins. They
put up 65 in a loss to Boulder Creek-
Ariz., but only 35 in a loss to
Scottsdale Christian.
If nothing else, Sequoia appears
to have the size to make other teams
uncomfortable, with 11 players on
the roster 6-foot or taller.
The Cherokees will also be fairly
young, with three sophomores and
eight juniors.
Woodside (3-5)
The Wildcats got off to a slow
start, winning only one of their first
six games, getting blown out
against Clear Lake by 44 points and
Piedmont Hills by 33 points.
The low point came on back-to-
back, one-point losses to Stagg-
Stockton and Silver Creek. They
finally turned the corner with a win
over Westmoor and then holding off
Millennium-Tracy for a two-point
victory.
Josh Holman has made a smooth
transition from football to basket-
ball and look for the senior guard to
lead the Wildcats’ offense this year.
Michael Thompson and Kevin
Kahriman have shown flashes of
offense this season, but Woodside
needs to get more consistent pro-
duction from the entire team.
Keep an on N’Jai LeBlanc and
Evan Yedinak, a pair of freshman
who figure to be a major part of the
Woodside rotation. Acoach does not
usually keep freshmen on the varsi-
ty squad unless they are going to be
a major part of the program.
Continued from page 11
SOUTH
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
A four-year varsity player,Burlingame forward/center NickLoew is arguably
the best low-post player in the PAL.
SPORTS 15
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — Jim Harbaugh got the
scouting report on Anquan Boldin from his
brother right around the time of the offsea-
son trade that send Boldin from John’s
Baltimore Ravens to Jim’s San Francisco
49ers.
A meticulous worker who never takes a
snap off even in practice. Afierce competitor
who only gets better when the stakes get
larger. The consummate pro.
Through 16 regular-season games that fea-
tured 85 catches for 1,179 yards and seven
touchdowns, Boldin more than lived up to
his billing in his first season with the 49ers,
and was chosen the winner of the Bill Walsh
Award as team MVP on Friday.
“Anquan Boldin is a football player,” Jim
Harbaugh said this week. “Let me say it
again, Anquan Boldin is a football player.
And, that sums up everything. That’s the
highest compliment you could give some-
body that plays the game of football.”
The Niners saw firsthand what Boldin can
do on the stage of the postseason a year ago
when he played a big role in winning the
Super Bowl for the Ravens and denying the
49ers their sixth title.
He caught a 13-yard pass for the first score
of the game, and finished with six receptions
for 104 yards. The biggest of those catches
might have come in the fourth quarter when
Boldin caught a 15-yard pass from Joe Flacco
on third-and-1 with Carlos Rogers draped all
over him.
That set up Baltimore’s last field goal that
forced the 49ers to go for a touchdown on
their final drive instead of being able to win
the game with a field goal.
Now Boldin tries to get the Niners past that
last hurdle in this postseason, starting
Sunday in Green Bay.
“I felt like I fit right in,” he said. “‘Just
coming off a Super Bowl loss, everybody
wanted to get back to that game and make
things right. I’ve been in that position, lost
a Super Bowl, and it left a bitter taste in my
mouth. Every time I get the chance to wipe
that taste off, I’m going to take advantage of
it.”
Despite his importance to the team, the
Ravens dealt Boldin to San Francisco for a
sixth-round pick when he wouldn’t restruc-
ture the contract that owed him $6 million
this season.
While the Ravens failed to make the play-
offs, the 49ers won 12 games in part because
Boldin helped fill the void created by an off-
season torn right Achilles tendon that side-
lined Michael Crabtree for the first 11 games.
With an offense that has an abundance of
threats for quarterback Colin Kaepernick,
including tight end Vernon Davis and run-
ning back Frank Gore, and a stingy defense,
Boldin sees a team that can do just what his
Ravens did a year ago.
“I don’t see why we can’t,” he said. “I think
we’re suited perfectly.”
Boldin has always been one of the most
reliable receivers in the game with his 857
career catches since entering the league in
2003, ranking fifth in that span. He had 62
catches go for first downs this season,
including a league-leading 27 on third down.
He became the same kind of security blanket
for Kaepernick that he was for Flacco in
Baltimore and Kurt Warner in Arizona.
He has thrived when opposing defenses
have tried to stack up against the run.
“Certain players, when they see that hap-
pening, it becomes a feeding frenzy,” offen-
sive coordinator Greg Roman said. “And he
is one of those, and there’s not too many of
them out there. You saw it a little bit last
week with him. But, he’s always been a great
football player, somebody I’ve admired from
afar and even more now that we’ve had a
chance to work with him.”
Boldin was at his best in his debut for San
Francisco when he caught 13 passes for 208
yards and a touchdown in a 34-28 win over
Green Bay.
He then capped his season with his second
best game with nine catches for 149 yards
and a score in a season-ending win over
Arizona that clinched the fifth seed for San
Francisco.
“He’s one of the stronger receivers in the
league, a very good route runner,” Packers
quarterback Aaron Rodgers said. “Knows how
to get open, very good after the catch. He
runs strong with the football. He goes up and
gets the ball, he has very good hands. He’s a
talented guy. I think the Niners are probably
looking back at that and pretty happy about
that acquisition.”
NOTES: The 49ers will hold a walk-
through at Lambeau Field on Saturday to try
to acclimate to the cold. ... Rogers did not
practice for a third straight day and is ques-
tionable with a hamstring injury. ... CB Eric
Wright (hamstring) and LB Dan Skuta (foot)
are also questionable.
Boldin meets expectations with 49ers
KIRBY LEE/USA TODAY SPORTS
Anquan Boldin finished his first season with
the 49ers with 85 cateches for nearly 1,200
yards and seven touchdowns.
By Barry Wilner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Peyton Manning was the only unanimous
choice for the 2013 Associated Press NFL
All-Pro team Friday. It was his seventh time
as a first-teamer, tying Hall of Famer Otto
Graham for the most by a quarterback.
The Denver star set NFL records this sea-
son with 55 touchdown passes and 5,477
yards through the air.
He was chosen on all 50 ballots from
media members who regularly cover the
NFL. Manning also was an All-Pro for
Indianapolis in 2003, ’04, ’05, ’08 and ’09
and last season made it as
a Bronco. He’s been on
the All-Pro team in both
seasons since missing
2011 after several neck
surgeries.
“I think it’s well docu-
mented that this is the
second chapter of my
career, and didn’t know
what to expect off that
injury and new team, new
players and new physical state after an
injury,” said Manning, a four-time league
MVP. “So I had no idea what to expect, and
I’ve put a lot of time and a lot of hard work
in to it. But I’ve received a lot of help along
the way from coaches and trainers and
strength coaches and teammates. So I’m
very grateful.”
Manning still has a ways to go to set the
record for most All-Pro appearances at any
position. Among the players ahead of him
is Hall of Fame receiver Jerry Rice with 10.
New Orleans tight end Jimmy Graham and
Indianapolis outside linebacker Robert
Mathis each drew 49 votes. Philadelphia
running back LeSean McCoy and Seattle
cornerback Richard Sherman had 48.
Minnesota kick returner Cordarrelle
Patterson was the only rookie on the squad.
Eighteen NFC players and nine from the
AFC made the team. Carolina and
Philadelphia each had three: linebacker
Luke Kuechly, center Ryan Kalil and full-
back Mike Tolbert for the Panthers; NFL
rushing leader McCoy, guard Evan Mathis
and tackle Jason Peters for the coach Chip
Kelly’s Eagles.
“Just when Chip came here, we knew we
were going to run the ball,” McCoy said.
“The linemen, they’ve all been healthy this
whole year. They’ve been blocking so well
Denver’s Manning only unanimous All-Pro choice
Peyton
Manning
See ALL-PRO, Page 17
16
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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and plans of how they’re going to prepare for
the weather, so it’s going to come down to exe-
cution on game day and whoever does that
best.”
Five things to watch ahead of Sunday’s game:
Warm-weather team?
Quarterback Aaron Rodgers shared his trick
for playing in the bitter cold: “Eat a lot of chick-
en noodle soup.”
San Francisco linebacker Patrick Willis liked
that one: “Chicken noodle soup’s pretty good,
can’t argue with that. Give me a ‘W’and that will
take care of all the warmth I need.”
The 49ers took the practice field on New
Year’s Day with the temperature in the mid-60s.
Sunday’s high in Green Bay is projected to be 8
degrees.
Captain comeback
Funny how one player can change the
Packers’ playoff outlook.
When that guy is Rodgers, anything is possi-
ble.
Green Bay won a third straight NFC North
title in large part because of the fourth-quarter
drive led by Rodgers last week in a 33-28 win
over the Bears. It culminated with a stunning
48-yard touchdown pass to Randall Cobb on
fourth-and-8 with 38 seconds left.
That left collarbone that kept him out for
nearly two months is fine now. He’s healthy just
in time to face a nasty defense that’s ranked fifth
in the league.
Stopping Boldin
Among the tall tasks for the Packers’ defense
will be dealing with receiver Anquan Boldin.
Green Bay got thoroughly embarrassed by
Boldin in Week 1, when the wideout had 13
catches for 208 yards and a touchdown. He fin-
ished the regular season with 85 catches for
1,179 yards and seven TDs.
The 49ers also have Michael Crabtree back
after the receiver missed the opener with an
Achilles tendon injury.
Spy game
In two games, Colin Kaepernick has
beaten the Packers with his arm and his
legs.
Kaepernick was on the passing end of
Boldin’s big day in September. Ayear ago,
he had a quarterback playoff record of 181
yards rushing against the Packers out of the
read-option.
Making things tougher for the Packers is that
they’ll be without linebacker Clay Matthews
(right thumb), the defender Capers would have
employed to “spy” on Kaepernick.
Easing Eddie
Rookie running back Eddie Lacy apparently
won’t let a sprained right ankle slow him down.
Coach Mike McCarthy said his 1,100-yard
rusher looked good this week in practice. The
ankle has bothered Lacy for much of the past
month, though the bruising back keeps on bar-
reling over defenders.
It presents the 49ers with an unwelcome
dilemma: focus on Rodgers or Lacy?
“He’s hard to bring down. You have to pick
and choose your poison,” Whitner said. “He
takes a load off Aaron Rodgers.”
Continued from page 11
49ERS
SPORTS 17
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Only two members of the top teams in
each conference made the All-Pro team.
Joining Manning from the Broncos (13-3)
was guard Louis Vasquez. Joining Sherman
from the Seahawks (13-3) was safety Earl
Thomas.
“It is very special, especially in a special
season,” Sherman said. “If you’re having a
special season and your team has four wins
or five wins, I’m sure it doesn’t feel as good.
But when your team is winning, your
defense is No. 1 in every category and
you’re just contributing, you’re not even
trying to do anything special individually,
you’re just contributing to the entire group.
It really feels special. And with the chance
to do what we have a chance to do this year,
it would be fantastic.”
Unlike Sherman, many of the players
chosen did not enjoy huge team success this
season: 12 of the 27 failed to make the play-
offs.
Rounding out the offense were receivers
Calvin Johnson of Detroit and Josh Gordon
of Cleveland; running back Jamaal Charles
of Kansas City; and tackle Joe Thomas of
Cleveland.
Other All-Pros on defense were ends J.J.
Watt of Houston and Robert Quinn of St.
Louis; tackles Gerald McCoy of Tampa Bay
and Ndamukong Suh of Detroit; outside line-
backer Lavonte David of Tampa Bay; inside
linebacker NaVorro Bowman of San
Francisco; cornerback Patrick Peterson of
Arizona; and safety Eric Berry of Kansas
City.
The special teamers were Patterson, kick-
er Justin Tucker of Baltimore and punter
Johnny Hekker of St. Louis.
Continued from page 15
ALL-PRO
Wednesday, Jan. 1
Heart of Dallas Bowl
At Dallas
North Texas 36, UNLV 14
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Nebraska 24, Georgia 19
Capital OneBowl
At Orlando, Fla.
South Carolina 34,Wisconsin 24
OutbackBowl
At Tampa, Fla.
LSU 21, Iowa 14
RoseBowl
At Pasadena
Michigan State 24, Stanford 20
FiestaBowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
UCF 52, Baylor 42
Thursday, Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Oklahoma 45, Alabama 31
Friday, Jan. 3
OrangeBowl
At Miami
Ohio State (12-1) vs. Clemson (10-2), 5 p.m. (ESPN)
CottonBowl
At Arlington,Texas
Missouri (11-2) vs.Oklahoma State (10-2),4:30 p.m.
(FOX)
Saturday, Jan. 4
BBVACompass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. Houston (8-4), 10 a.m. (ESPN)
Sunday, Jan. 5
GoDaddy.comBowl
At Mobile, Ala.
ArkansasState(7-5) vs.Ball State(10-2),6p.m.(ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 6
BCSNational Championship
At Pasadena, Calif.
Florida State (13-0) vs. Auburn (12-1), 5:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
BOWL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 16 15 .516 —
Boston 13 20 .394 4
Brooklyn 11 21 .344 5 1/2
Philadelphia 11 21 .344 5 1/2
New York 10 22 .313 6 1/2
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 24 8 .750 —
Atlanta 18 15 .545 6 1/2
Washington 14 16 .467 9
Charlotte 14 20 .412 11
Orlando 10 22 .313 14
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 25 6 .806 —
Detroit 14 19 .424 12
Chicago 13 18 .419 12
Cleveland 11 21 .344 14 1/2
Milwaukee 7 25 .219 18 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 25 8 .758 —
Houston 22 13 .629 4
Dallas 19 14 .576 6
New Orleans 15 16 .484 9
Memphis 14 17 .452 10
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Portland 26 7 .788 —
Oklahoma City 25 7 .781 1/2
Minnesota 16 16 .500 9 1/2
Denver 14 17 .452 11
Utah 11 24 .314 16
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 23 12 .657 —
Golden State 22 13 .629 1
Phoenix 19 12 .613 2
L.A. Lakers 13 19 .406 8 1/2
Sacramento 10 21 .323 11
Friday’sGames
Toronto 101,Washington 88
New Orleans 95, Boston 92
Golden State 101, Atlanta 100
Houston 102, New York 100
L.A. Clippers 119, Dallas 112
Memphis at Denver, late
Utah at L.A. Lakers, late
Saturday’sGames
Miami at Orlando, 4 p.m.
New Orleans at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Cleveland at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at Portland, 7p.m.
Charlotte at Sacramento, 7 p.m.
Sunday’sGames
Memphis at Detroit, 10 a.m.
Golden State at Washington,3p.m.
NBA GLANCE
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 4
Kansas City at Indianapolis, 1:35 p.m. (NBC)
New Orleans at Philadelphia, 5:10 p.m. (NBC)
Sunday, Jan. 5
San Diego at Cincinnati, 10:05 a.m. (CBS)
San Francisco at Green Bay, 1:40 p.m. (FOX)
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 11
Green Bay, San Francisco or New Orleans at Seat-
tle, 1:35 p.m. (FOX)
Cincinnati, Indianpolis or Kansas City at New Eng-
land, 5:15 p.m. (CBS)
Sunday, Jan. 12
Philadelphia, Green Bay or San Francisco at Car-
olina, 10:05 a.m. (FOX)
Indianapolis, Kansas City or San Diego at Denver,
4:40 p.m. (CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 19
AFC, 3 p.m. (CBS)
NFC, 6:30 p.m. (FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 26
At Honolulu
TBD, 4:30 p.m. (NBC)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 2
At East Rutherford, N.J.
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m. (FOX)
NFL PLAYOFF GLANCE
@GreenBay
1:30p.m.
FOX
1/5
Season
over
vs. Detroit
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/9
@Colorado
noon
CSN-CAL
1/4
@Chicago
5p.m.
NBCSN
1/5
@Nashville
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/7
@Capitals
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/14
vs.Boston
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/11
@Brooklyn
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/8
@Atlanta
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/3
@Wizards
3p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/5
@Bucks
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/7
vs. Denver
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/15
vs. Boston
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/10
@Florida
4:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/16
@OKC
6:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/17
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 41 27 12 2 56 120 88
Tampa Bay 40 24 12 4 52 114 95
Montreal 42 24 14 4 52 109 98
Toronto 42 21 16 5 47 118 120
Detroit 42 18 14 10 46 109 120
Ottawa 43 18 18 7 43 122 138
Florida 41 15 20 6 36 96 130
Buffalo 41 11 26 4 26 72 117
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 43 30 12 1 61 136 98
Washington 41 20 15 6 46 125 123
Philadelphia 41 20 17 4 44 106 113
New Jersey 42 17 17 8 42 100 108
N.Y. Rangers 42 20 20 2 42 98 114
Carolina 41 16 16 9 41 100 121
Columbus 41 18 19 4 40 111 117
N.Y. Islanders 42 14 21 7 35 110 140
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 44 29 7 8 66 165 121
St. Louis 40 28 7 5 61 144 93
Colorado 40 25 11 4 54 116 101
Dallas 40 20 13 7 47 119 119
Minnesota 43 21 17 5 47 101 110
Winnipeg 43 19 19 5 43 117 125
Nashville 41 18 18 5 41 97 122
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 42 29 8 5 63 137 106
San Jose 41 26 9 6 58 136 105
Los Angeles 42 25 13 4 54 110 88
Vancouver 42 23 12 7 53 113 101
Phoenix 40 20 11 9 49 120 122
Calgary 40 14 20 6 34 96 126
Edmonton 43 13 25 5 31 110 148
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday’sGames
Chicago 5, New Jersey 3
Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Rangers 2
Tampa Bay at Calgary, late
Edmonton at Anaheim, late
Saturday’sGames
Winnipeg at Boston, 10 a.m.
San Jose at Colorado, noon
New Jersey at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Toronto, 4 p.m.
Ottawa at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Nashville at Florida, 4 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m.
Columbus at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Detroit at Dallas, 5 p.m.
Washington at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Philadelphia at Phoenix, 5 p.m.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 7 p.m.
Sunday’sGames
Winnipeg at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
Nashville at Carolina, 4 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
18
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Qassim Abdul-Zahra
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD — Two Iraqi cities that were
strongholds of Sunni insurgents during the
U.S. war in the country are battlegrounds once
more after al-Qaida militants largely took
them over, fending off government forces that
have been besieging them for days.
The overrunning of the cities this week by
al-Qaida’s Iraqi branch in the Sunni heartland
of western Anbar provinces is a blow to the
Shiite-led government of Prime Minister
Nouri al-Malik. His government has been
struggling to contain discontent among the
Sunni minority over Shiite political domina-
tion that has flared into increased violence
for the past year.
On Friday, al-Qaida gunmen sought to win
over the population in Fallujah, one of the
cities they swept into on Wednesday. Amili-
tant commander appeared among worship-
pers holding Friday prayers in the main city
street, proclaiming that his fighters were
there to defend Sunnis from the government,
one resident said.
“We are your brothers from the Islamic
State in Iraq and Levant,” militants circulat-
ing through the city in a stolen police car
proclaimed through a loudspeaker, using the
name of the al-Qaida branch. “We are here to
protect you from the government. We call on
you to cooperate with us.”
Government troops, backed by Sunni
tribesmen who oppose al-Qaida, have encir-
cled Fallujah for several days, and have
entered parts of the provincial capital
Ramadi, also overrun by militants. On
Friday, troops bombarded militant positions
outside Fallujah with artillery, a military
official said, speaking on condition of
anonymity as he was not authorized to
release information.
Anbar province, a vast desert area on the
borders with Syria and Jordan with an almost
entirely Sunni population was the heartland
of the Sunni insurgency that rose up against
American troops and the Iraqi government
after the 2003 U.S.-led invasion that toppled
Saddam Hussein. The insurgency was fueled
by anger over the dislodgment of their com-
munity from power during Saddam’s rule and
the rise of Shiites. It was then that al-Qaida
established its branch in the country.
Al-Qaida sweep in Iraq cities revives battleground
REUTERS
Gunmen walk in the streets of the city of Falluja, Iraq.
By Annika Ulrich
T
he “Season of Giving” is an apt
name for the holidays. As the year
comes to a close and the tempera-
ture continues to drop (well, maybe not
this year in the Bay Area), giving comes in
the form of special gifts, parties or hospi-
tality. Generosity is a tradition during the
holidays, one that can be counted on to
continue year after year.
While the spirit of
giving is unchanging,
the way we express our
gratitude is not. As email
and social media contin-
ue to grow as the pri-
mary method of commu-
nication for many, the
traditional, handwritten
thank-you card is on the decline.
Many etiquette experts are appalled, and
over the last few weeks I have seen several
columns and op-eds about thank-you cards.
Aconsiderable number of experts argue that
the handwritten thank-you card tradition
must be continued, and some even labeled
younger generations as entitled and
ungrateful due to their abandonment of pen
and paper.
In a Nov. 11, 2013, letter to Dear Abby,
“Elinor in Surprise, Ariz.” wrote: “People:
Don’t forget those thank-you notes! I don’t
mean an email, but a real, honest-to-gosh
thank-you note sent through the mail with
postage. … This is especially true for
young people today, who seemingly were
not taught this in school or by their par-
ents. … I can’t tell you how many parents
comment on the absence of this display of
etiquette. Good manners are never out of
date. They are noticed and appreciated.”
I agree with the above letter writer and
those who are advocating for the impor-
tance of manners. Having grown up with a
mother whose impeccable penmanship
graces many thank-you cards, I can recog-
nize that thank-you cards not only are
The evolution
of ‘thank you’
Paul Walker
Car in crash may have
been going 100 mph
SEE PAGE 21
By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
With all the talk about fact-based films
and how accurate they should or shouldn’t
be, it’s worth noting that some stories are
best brought to screen as simply and purely
as possible.
This is especially true with a film like
“Lone Survivor,” Peter Berg’s expertly ren-
dered account of a disastrous 2005 military
operation in Afghanistan. War is messy,
and politics are messy. But Berg has wisely
chosen to focus pretty squarely on the
action, and to present it as straightforward-
ly as possible.
And he’s executed that approach with
admirable skill, down to using autopsy
reports to get the number of wounds a sol-
dier suffered exactly right. “Lone Survivor”
doesn’t have nearly the sweep of a major
war film like Spielberg’s “Saving Private
Ryan.” But the action scenes — basically,
one protracted, harrowing firefight — feel
as realistic as any we’ve seen on the screen
for some time.
That firefight, for those unfamiliar with
the story (Berg also penned the screenplay,
based on the memoir by former Navy SEAL
Marcus Luttrell), took place on June 28,
2005 in the craggy mountains of
Afghanistan’s Kunar province. As part of
Operation Red Wings, Luttrell and three fel-
low SEALS were positioned on a hillside,
tracking a Taliban commander in the village
below, when they suddenly encountered a
few local shepherds. Their agonized deci-
sion on what to do with those shepherds,
one of them a teenager, led to a string of
events that ultimately resulted in 19
Superb action scenes anchor ‘Lone Survivor’
By Andrew Barker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — It would
be a wild exaggeration to sug-
gest that “Paranormal
Activity: The Marked Ones”
breathes new life into the
increasingly fumes-fueled
found-footage horror sub-
genre, but it certainly repre-
sents a shot in the arm for this
series after 2012’s poorly
regarded “Paranormal
Activity 4.”
Functioning more as a
mythology-expanding spinoff
than a proper sequel, this fifth
installment (the first directed
by longtime series writer
Christopher Landon) smartly
switches the setting away
from airy suburbs to over-
crowded working-class apart-
ments, and introduces a win-
ning sense of humor that
almost compensates for its
relentless reliance on every
terror trope in the book.
At this point, the conven-
tions and limitations of the
found-footage horror film are
almost as well-worn and
cliched as those of horror
flicks at large: “Put down the
New ‘Paranormal’ angles
See MARKED, Page 20
Mark Wahlberg stars in ‘Lone Survivor.’
See STUDENT, Page 20
See SURVIVOR, Page 20
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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American deaths.
Of course, the title, “Lone Survivor,” and
the fact that Luttrell is played by the
movie’s star (Mark Wahlberg, in a strong
and moving performance) tells you much of
what’s going to happen from the get-go.
But that doesn’t hurt the film’s immediacy
and power. In fact, you may have a hard time
sitting still.
Berg opens with footage of real Navy
SEAL training and the extremes it reaches
— some might call it unnecessary and over-
ly worshipful, but for people who don’t
know a lot about the SEALS, it’s helpful and
effective.
We’re also given a sense of the lightheart-
ed camaraderie at the military base, in
between operations, as the men joke about
wives and girlfriends back home, or com-
pete in foot races. One of the SEALS worries
about how to afford a wedding present for
his bride. The veterans engage in a little
good-natured ribbing of a new arrival —
involving some silly dancing.
But all lightness disappears suddenly, and
for good. Soon, Luttrell is hunkered in the
mountains with his comrades: Michael
Murphy (Taylor Kitsch), Danny Dietz
(Emile Hirsch), and Matt “Axe” Axelson
(Ben Foster). All seems to be going well
until the moment they encounter the vil-
lagers; the ensuing debate is a painful one.
Do they let them go and risk certain discov-
ery? Or do they “terminate” the problem?
The men also touch on a heavier question:
what connection, in a deeper sense, do these
shepherds have with the enemy?
But a decision comes, and then the battle,
with the men literally falling down the
mountainside, smashing repeatedly into
rocks, their bodies gashed and broken.
Several of them fight while shot and grave-
ly wounded. One virtually sacrifices himself
to call for help. A rescue effort goes cata-
strophically badly.
And then comes the amazing end to the
story: How, and with whose help, Luttrell
manages to survive to tell his tale. Though
it’s a matter of record, we’ll keep the sus-
pense alive here.
At the end, we see photos of the actual
casualties of Operation Red Wings. It does
not seem gratuitous, and no further explana-
tion or exposition is given, or needed.
Again, the best thing about Berg’s work
here is its simplicity.
“Lone Survivor,” a Universal Studios
release, is rated R by the Motion Picture
Association of America for “strong bloody
war violence and pervasive language.”
Running time: 121 minutes. Three stars out
of four.
Continued from page 19
SURVIVOR
camera, stupid!” has now probably been
shouted at just as many screens as “Don’t go
down into the basement!” (Look for “Tilt
your viewfinder 20 degrees to the left!” to
finally supplant “Look out behind you!”
within the present decade.)
Appropriately, the hapless heroes of “The
Marked Ones” never put down the camera
even as they venture into dark basements,
or struggle to start a stalled car, or split up
in the middle of a haunted mansion — and
it’s to the credit of the film’s primary cast
that these bits of genre-appropriate stupidi-
ty generate more laughs than groans.
Kicking off with a high-school gradua-
tion, “The Marked Ones” centers on likably
lunkheaded teenage buddies Jesse (Andrew
Jacobs) and Hector (Jorge Diaz), as well as
Jesse’s tag-along relative Marisol
(Gabrielle Walsh). Set in gritty Oxnard,
Calif., the film boasts an almost entirely
Latino cast of characters — a welcome ges-
ture toward a huge filmgoing demographic
that rarely gets to see itself onscreen —
while smart casting and production design
help capture the flavor of the environs with
only moderate deployment of cultural
stereotypes.
Seemingly possessing no greater post-
grad ambitions than milling around and
attempting “Jackass” stunts with their
omnipresent video camera, Jesse and Hector
harass Jesse’s abuela (Renee Victor), smoke
pot, play basketball, occasionally run afoul
of some local gangsters, draw penises on
one another’s faces, and generally break
each other’s balls for a decent chunk of the
film. Fortunately, Jacobs and Diaz boast an
easy “Beavis and Butt-head”-esque chem-
istry throughout, making for pleasant com-
pany as the audience waits for the inevitable
horrors to befall them.
The first complication comes from Jesse’s
elderly downstairs neighbor, Anna (Gloria
Sandoval), whose reclusive behavior is
strange enough for Hector to postulate that
“maybe the bitch is a bruja.” The two
attempt to spy on her by lowering a camera
down through a ventilation shaft, where
they witness Anna scrawling arcane sym-
bols on the belly of a nude younger woman.
Being teenage boys, they’re far too
intrigued by the boobs on display to fret
over the obvious occult ritual taking place,
but when Anna is subsequently murdered,
they decide to attempt some amateur late-
night sleuthing, with predictably unpleas-
ant results.
While the film hardly plays it coy about
where this is all heading, it doesn’t seem to
be in a rush to get there, and it springs a
number of smart ideas along the way.
Replacing the typical Ouija board with a
haunted Simon game is sure to provoke
howls of laughter from those in the appro-
priate age bracket, and the idea that a victim
of demonic possession would rush to
YouTube to show off his gnarly new abili-
ties — and be promptly torn to shreds by
comment section trolls — is sadly in keep-
ing with the times.
The haunted house set-pieces provide reli-
able doses of jolts, even if one can see the
scaffolding of each scare being built from
miles away, and director Landon has fun
with some clever camera placement here and
there. Avery meta twist ending promises to
either open up new narrative possibilities,
or else push the franchise deep into a self-
referential rabbit hole.
“Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones,”
a Paramount release, is rated R by the
Motion Picture Association of America for
“pervasive language, some violence,
graphic nudity and some drug use.” Running
time: 84 minutes.
Continued from page 19
MARKED
polite, but sincere. Taking the time to
write out your appreciation is more power-
ful and meaningful than a simple, verbal
“thank you” will ever be.
However, I don’t think it is possible for
handwritten thank-you notes to make a
comeback as the premier polite way of
expressing appreciation. Among my peers,
I’ve found that anything handwritten feels
out of place.
But, even if handwritten thank-you notes
no longer feel like the right way to express
gratitude, manners are still just as impor-
tant as they’ve always been. This holiday
season, I said “thank you” in a couple of
different ways, and found benefits in some
methods that cannot be found in handwrit-
ten notes.
In recent years, my grandparents have
preferred emails to thank-you cards because
emails allow the easy attachment of digital
photos. By sending emails instead of
cards, I am able to express my appreciation
in words and pictures. The bodies of my
emails sound a lot like what my thank-you
cards would say, and then I attach a picture
of me using or wearing the gift I received.
This is especially effective for saying
“thank you” for a gift card.
Emailing pictures of what I
purchased with a gift card says more than
“thank you”; it involves the people who
gave me the gift in the next step of the
process and prompts them to respond. I
also send emails to most family members
and all of my friends.
This holiday season, I also said “thank
you” via Skype for the first time. Since my
uncle was unable to make it to San Mateo
for Christmas, my family used the webcam
software to thank him for the gifts he sent
us. While the talk started as a “thank you,”
it grew into a complete conversation.
While it did not replace his absence during
the day, this 20-minute conversation was
more special than a thank-you note would
have been.
I still keep some personalized stationery
for family members who are not quite as
tech-savvy. While these notes are not
interactive like emails or Skype, they still
feel good, especially when getting letters
in the mailbox is becoming less and less
frequent.
In all, what matters is that you show sin-
cerity and express “thank you” more than
just in spoken words. How you choose to
do so is up to you and your lifestyle. As
“Elinor in Surprise, Ariz.” wrote: “Good
manners are never out of style.”
This all being said, thank you for taking
the time to read my columns in 2013, and
cheers to a happy and healthy 2014!
Annika Ulrich is a senior at Aragon High School in
San Mateo. Student News appears in the weekend
edition. You can email Student News at
news@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 19
STUDENT
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
www.UNrealestate.info
A blog dedicated to UNreal events in Real Estate
Happy NewYear 2014! The UN-year in Residential Real Estate!
John King has been serving home sellers and buyers on The Peninsula and Silicon Valley for almost 30 years.
Top 1% of Keller Williams agents.
So what grves here?  Thrs comrng year ol 2014 may just be the UN-est year ol
a||.  Let me exp|arn.  
As we begrn thrs year, we have an UN-usua||y |ow rnventory ol homes lor sa|e,
maybe the |owest on record.  There rs str|| an UN-be|revab|y |ow rnterest rate lor
mortgages.  The prrces lor homes have reached over therr UN-rmagrnab|e peak
prrces lrom 2008, settrng a|| trme hrgh medran and average prrces.  Yet, potentra|
Home Se||ers remarn UN-moved by these lacts and are contrnurng to stay rn therr
homes, Then, UN-lorgrveab|y, the tax
rmp|rcatrons ol se||rng a hrgh|y
apprecrated asset |rke a home whrch
has been |rved rn lor a lew decades,
has rncreased srgnrlrcant|y as we||.  
Further, the UN-emp|oyment |eve| rn
thrs area has raprd|y la||en and the cars
and G-buses are jammrng up the
hrghways agarn.  
What do you get when you combrne
a|| ol these UN's and an a|| trme record
hrgh on the Dow Jones rndex?  You get
an UN-precedented resrdentra| rea|
estate market as 2014 begrns.  Start
your UN-grnes!
FLESH AND METAL: BODY AND MACHINE IN EARLY 20TH-CENTURY ART IS JOINTLY
ORGANIZED BY THE CANTOR ARTS CENTER AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY AND
THE SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART.
FERNAND LÉGER, DEUX FEMMES SUR FOND BLEU (TWO WOMEN ON A BLUE
BACKGROUND), 1927; SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, FRACTIONAL
GIFT OF HELEN AND CHARLES SCHWAB; © ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS),
NEW YORK/ADAGP, PARIS; PHOTO: BEN BLACKWELL.
NOV 13

MAR 16
museum.stanford.edu
F L E S H
AND
M E T A L
Body and Machine in Early 20th-Century Art
By Andrew Dalton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — The Porsche carrying
“Fast & Furious” star Paul Walker may have
been going 100 mph or more before it
crashed, killing both Walker and the driver,
according to a coroner’s report released
Friday.
Investigators found no mechanical prob-
lems with the 2005 Porsche Carrera GT or
debris or other problems on the roadway.
The street forms an approximately 1-mile
loop amid industrial office parks and is
rimmed by hills and isolated from traffic,
especially on weekends. The downed light
pole the car hit had a speed limit sign of 45
mph. The area in Santa Clarita is about 30
miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles.
Roger Rodas, Walker’s friend and finan-
cial adviser, was driving the Porsche at an
unsafe speed, and witnesses interviewed by
deputies estimated it was going 100 mph or
more.
No alcohol or drugs were detected in the
system of either man on the day of the fiery
one-car crash.
The Nov. 30 deaths were ruled acci-
dents and were due to combined traumatic
and thermal injuries, the report said. It
said both men were burned over 100 per-
cent of their bodies.
Rodas had fourth-degree burns on his head
and neck and severe skull fractures, the
report said.
Walker had broken bones throughout his
body including his jaw, arm, ribs and
pelvis, it said.
The car slammed into a tree and a light
pole on the driver’s side then after spin-
ning, hit a second tree on Walker’s side of
the car and caught fire.
The report says the red Porsche was travel-
ing “at an unsafe speed, approximately
100+ mph,” according to a deputy who took
testimony from witnesses at the scene.
“For unknown reasons, the driver lost
control of his vehicle,” the report says.
The Sheriff’s Department had previously
cited speed as a factor in the crash, but had
released no estimate of how fast the Porsche
was going.
Sheriff’s investigators are working with
Porsche officials and the California
Highway Patrol to determine the speed more
exactly. Three data recorders survived the
crash and fire and may produce information
to pinpoint the speed.
Rodas, 38, and Walker, 40, co-owned an
auto racing team. Rodas also was a profes-
sional driver who competed in 10 Pirelli
World Challenge GTS races last year.
Car in Walker crash may
have been going 100 mph
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Crowds gather at an unofficial memorial event for ‘Fast & Furious’star Paul Walker in Santa Clarita.
By Jason Keyser
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — It’s the kind of puzzle that
might have amused Sherlock Holmes himself.
Now that copyright protections have
expired on nearly all of Sir Arthur Conan
Doyle’s tales about the pipe-puffing detective
in the deerstalker hat, are writers free to depict
the character in new mysteries without seek-
ing permission or paying license fees?
Afederal judge in Chicago says yes, so long
as they don’t stray into territory covered in the
10 stories still protected by copyright. Not so
fast, says the Doyle estate, which is consider-
ing an appeal this month. Descendants of the
Scottish physician and author argue he contin-
ued to develop the characters of Holmes and
Dr. Watson in the later works so they should
remain off-limits until the remaining copy-
rights run out at the end of 2022.
“It’s a bogus argument. It means you can
reprint Conan Doyle’s own stories freely but
you can’t make up a new story? It doesn’t
make logical sense,” said author Leslie
Klinger, who brought the case against the
Conan Doyle Estate Ltd. to settle the matter.
With last week’s ruling in hand, Klinger
plans to finish work on “In the Company of
Sherlock Holmes,” a book of original short
stories featuring characters and other ele-
ments from Conan Doyle’s work. He is co-
editing the book with plans to publish this
fall.
If appeals judges hold it up, the ruling could
lift the threat of legal action for the untold
scores of writers out there churning out pas-
tiches and fan fiction without permission.
Most of them fly under the radar. In Klinger’s
case, the estate demanded $5,000, he said.
“Whatever decision they make will essen-
tially determine the fate of many characters,
not just Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, but
very intricate characters such as James Bond.
... What happens as copyrights expire on Ian
Fleming’s original stories?” said Doyle estate
attorney William Zieske.
The ruling could also weaken the value of
the Sherlock franchise to the point that major
publishers and movie producers could also
decide to move ahead with projects without
licensing deals, said Paul Supnik, a Beverly
Hills, Calif., attorney specializing in copy-
right and entertainment law who was not con-
nected with the case.
“At the very least it’s going to affect the
bargaining power as to what the estate can do
in trying to sell it to the studio,” Supnik said.
At the heart of the dispute is whether a char-
acter can be copyright protected over an
entire series of works. The Doyle estate
argues that a basic element of copyright law
allows for that if the character is highly delin-
eated, as opposed to a two-dimensional car-
toon-like character who doesn’t change much
over time.
In ruling against the estate, Judge Ruben
Castillo called that a “novel legal argument”
that was “counter to the goals of the
Copyright Act.” The lawsuit was filed in
Chicago because a literary agent for the Doyle
estate is based in Illinois.
There’s no question that Holmes and
Watson are highly complex characters.
Conan Doyle produced a total of four Sherlock
Holmes novels and 56 stories between 1887
and 1927.
Klinger argues that everything you really
need to know about Holmes and Watson is in
the novels and stories published before 1923
that are in the public domain in the U.S. That
includes their family backgrounds, education
and a slew of character traits: Holmes’
Bohemian nature and cocaine use, erratic eat-
ing habits, his Baker Street lodgings, his
methods of reasoning, his clever use of dis-
guise, his skill in chemistry and even his
weapon of choice, a loaded hunting crop.
Writer, Doyle estate dispute
copyright on Sherlock Holmes
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, JAN. 4
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Enjoy a vari-
ety of Lego creations made by
members of the club, featuring train
layouts, Bay Area landmarks, castles,
miniature cities, sculptures and
more. Admission is $2. Exhibit runs
through Jan. 19 on Fridays,
Saturdays and Sundays.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more
information call 430-6500.
Historical, Cultural and Social
Links to Downton Abbey. 1 p.m. to
3:30 pm. San Mateo Main Library, 55
W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Dr. DiAnn
Ellis will cover the world of
Downton Abbey and Victorian and
Edwardian periods. Tea and biscuits
will be served at intermission. Free.
For more information or to RSVP, call
522-7818.
Feast of Epiphany. 4:30 p.m.
Robert’s Church, 1380 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Free. For
more information call 589-2800.
SUNDAY, JAN. 5
Feast of Epiphany. 7:30 a.m., 9:30
a.m., 11:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Robert’s
Church, 1380 Crystal Springs Road,
San Bruno. Free. For more informa-
tion call 589-2800.
Rose Pruning Symposium. 1 p.m.
to 3 p.m. Kohl Pumphouse, San
Mateo Central Park, enter at Ninth
and Palm avenues. Bring pruning
shears and gloves. Free but reserva-
tions required. For more information
or to reserve a spot call 574-1677.
First Sunday Line Dance with Tina
Beare and Jeanette Feinberg. 1
p.m. to 4 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road,
San Bruno. $5. For more information
call 616-7150.
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Enjoy a vari-
ety of Lego creations made by
members of the club, featuring train
layouts, Bay Area landmarks, castles,
miniature cities, sculptures and
more. Admission is $2. Exhibit runs
through Jan. 19 on Fridays,
Saturdays and Sundays.
MONDAY, JAN. 6
Dance Connection with Live
Music by Bobby Gutierrez. Free
dance lessons 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m., open
dance 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Burlingame
Woman’s Club, 241 Park Road,
Burlingame. $8 members, $10
guests. Free admission for male
dance hosts. Light refreshments. For
more information call 342-2221.
TUESDAY, JAN. 7
Launch Your Successful Business-
Orientation. 10 a.m. Redwood City
Public Library, 1044 Middlefield
Road, Redwood City. Free. For more
information go to
www.phase2careers.org.
Hearing Loss Association of the
Peninsula Meeting. 1:30 p.m.
Veterans Memorial Senior Center,
1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City.
The program will be presented by
Sharif Frink with the California
Telephone Access Program. Learn
about this free phone program and
be able to try it out. Free. For more
information call 345-4551.
New Year’s Career Kick-Off. 6 p.m.
to 8:30 p.m. FIrst Presbyterian
Church, 1700 Easton Drive,
Burlingame. Dennis Ranahan will
share guidelines for success in the
job search ‘game’ of life. Free. For
more information call 522-0701.
Covered California information
session. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Burlingame
Public Library, 480 Primrose,
Burlingame. Free.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 8
Building an Effective Resume. 9
a.m. Silicon Valley Community
Foundation, 1300 S. El Camino Real,
San Mateo. Free. For more informa-
tion go to www.phase2careers.org.
Facebook information session.
10:30 a.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Learn about the popular social net-
working site and how to stay safe
online. Previous computer basics
suggested. For more information
contact conrad@smcl.org.
Pantry Makeover: 30 Minute
Healthy Eating Tour. 10 a.m. Whole
Foods Market, 1010 Park Place, San
Mateo. Participants will be auto-
matically entered to win a $500
Pantry Makeover with the Regional
Healthy Eating Specialist. Space is
limited to 20. For more information
and to sign up go to
http://www.dairyfreeglutenfreek-
itchen.com/sample-page.
Canadian Women’s Club January
luncheon and speaker series. 11
a.m. Basque Cultural Center, 599
Railroad Ave., South San Francisco.
Reservation required. $35. Guests
and gentlemen welcome. To reserve
a seat, call (415) 824-9745 or email
President@canadianwomensclub.or
g.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more
information call 430-6500.
City Talk Toastmasters Club
Meeting. 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Redwood City Main Library
Community Room, 1044 Middlefield
Road, Redwood City. Join us in a
friendly and supportive atmosphere
while learning to improve your
communication and leadership
skills. Free. For more information
email johnmcd@hotmail.com.
Listening Live: Celebrating Live at
Mission Blue 10th Season. 7 p.m.
Brisbane Public Library, 250
Visitacion Ave., Brisbane. Free. For
more information email jennifer-
bousquet@yahoo.com.
Lifetree Cafe Conversations:
Dangerous Foods. 7 p.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Lifetree Cafe will host an
hour-long conversation exploring
and discussing hints and strategies
for healthy eating. Complimentary
snacks and beverages will be
served. For more information go to
lifetreecafe.com.
Willamette University Choirs to
Perform on Tour. 7 p.m. St.
Gregory’s Catholic Church, 2715
Hacienda St., San Mateo. Free. For
more information email
npate@willamette.edu.
Art Demonstration by Gary
Bukovnik. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Burlingame Recreation Center, 850
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame. Free.
For more information email artbe-
gay@gmail.com.
THURSDAY, JAN. 9
School-Age Thursday Afternoon
Storytelling Series. 4 p.m. Menlo
Park Library, 800 Alma St., Menlo
Park. Free. For more information go
to www.menloparklibrary.org
Four Calm Steps to Conflict
Resolution: HR Business Leader
Series. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Sequoia, 1850 Gateway Drive, Suite
600, San Mateo. $35 for general
admission and free to NCHRA mem-
bers. For more information call (415)
291-1992.
FRIDAY, JAN. 10
Guest speaker: Lena Potts,
Community Manager of HIP
Housing. 7:30 a.m. Crystal Springs
Golf Course, 6650 Golf Course Drive,
Burlingame. Potts will present:
‘Creative Solutions to the Housing
Crisis: How Home Sharing Helps
Everyone.’ Sponsored by the San
Mateo Rotary Club. Fee is $15 and
includes breakfast. For information
or to RSVP call Jake at 515-5891.
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Enjoy a vari-
ety of Lego creations made by
members of the club, featuring train
layouts, Bay Area landmarks, castles,
miniature cities, sculptures and
more. Admission is $2. Exhibit runs
through Jan. 19 on Fridays,
Saturdays and Sundays.
Tween Evening: An After-Hours in
the Library Program. 5 p.m. to 7:30
p.m. San Mateo Main Library, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. Tweens (kids
in fifth-, sixth-, seventh- and eighth-
grades) will create crafty projects
and compete in a clue hunt and triv-
ia contests. Food will be provided.
Free. For more information or to reg-
ister call 522-7838.
Opening: Annual Members’
Exhibit and Contemporary
Pakistani Art. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Pacific Art League, 227 Forest Ave.,
Palo Alto. Free. For more information
e m a i l
frontdesk@pacificartleague.org.
Roger Glenn Latin Jazz Ensemble.
7 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Angelicas, 863
Main St., Redwood City. Roger
Glenn, master musician, composer
and entertainer on the flute, sax and
vibraphone and son of the late
Tyree Glenn who was one of the 57
notable jazz musicians pictured in
the historic photo ‘A Great Day in
Harlem.’ Advance tickets begin at
$25 and tickets at the door are $31.
Valet parking available. For more
information call 679-8184 or go to
www.angelicasllc.com/entertain-
ment.
‘Cautionary Tales Reconsidered’
exhibit opening. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
1220 Linda Mar Blvd., Sanchez Art
Center, Pacifica. Exhibit will be open
Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. through Feb. 9.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
years ago. He said he enjoys that his
block of the street has more independ-
ent stores, as opposed to the other
parts, which are mostly chains now.
“Having a mix of independent and
chain stores is better,” he said. “Every
dollar you spend in the community
keeps 65 cents in the community. ”
The store is Neapolitan themed and
focuses on a polished and casual look,
Malouf said. Items for sale include
shoes, accessories, jackets, pants and
ties from brands such as Ermenegildo
Zegna, Kiton, Loro Piana and Brunello
Cucinelli.
“It matches with the Bay Area,” he
said.
He took a break in between his cur-
rent business and old one to spend time
with family, he said. The new store has
been a success for him, he said, and he
travels to New York and Italy to look at
new products.
“We’ve seen a 10 percent increase
in sales every year,” he said. “The
products are all good quality and
this store is more focused on
authentic craftsmanship.”
Malouf is also looking forward to
the beatification of Burlingame Avenue
through the streetscape project, which
will shut down his block of the street
starting this month.
“I’m excited about Burlingame
Avenue getting a remodel,” said
Malouf, who lives in San Mateo. “It’s
a project that’s been in the making for
18 years.”
Malouf actually presented the idea
for the revamp to the Burlingame City
Council himself after he moved to the
Bay Area, noticing the street seemed
outdated. With the necessity of replac-
ing the sewer lateral system, the plan
finally came into place. He does worry
a bit about the project’s impact on traf-
fic.
“I saw a wonderful little avenue,” he
said. “Now I see improvements that
create a feeling of a boulevard over an
avenue.”
He puts in about 60 hours a week to
the job and said those interested in
entrepreneurship should embrace men-
tors. For him, living in a family of
businesspeople, he ended up learning
by osmosis while working as a young
boy during junior high school and
high school.
“You have to put your heart and soul
into it,” said Malouf, who is now in
his mid-50s. “It’s good if you want to
control your own destiny.”
Will his daughters, ages 2, 8 and 11,
follow in his footsteps?
“I don’t want to push them toward
it,” he said. “Retail is good for helping
you learn to socialize though. Social
skills are important in going far in
life.”
He also acknowledges his daughters
have more opportunities in the Bay
Area as opposed to Texas since they’re
exposed to more here.
The new women’s boutique will be in
Burlingame, but the opening date is
still to be announced.
In addition to the clothing, shoe and
accessory sales, Sam Malouf’s offers
personal shopping, alterations, home
delivery and shipping, gift packaging,
shoe repair and other services. The
1460 Burlingame Ave. store is open
10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Saturday
and will open on Sundays once the
streetscape project is completed on the
1400 block. For more information
visit sammalouf.com.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
MALOUF
Farmers also are taking steps to pre-
pare for a severe reduction in water dur-
ing the summer growing season, con-
ditions that could force them to fallow
crops and sell off livestock.
Gayle Holman, spokeswoman for
the Fresno-based Westlands Water
District, the nation’s largest federal
irrigation district, said growers in the
San Joaquin Valley would likely fallow
hundreds of thousands of acres. They
would opt against planting row crops
while they save water for permanent
crops such as fruits and nuts.
Some already are pulling up orchards
they can’t afford to irrigate.
“What that means then is less of a
food supply that we pretty much take
for granted,” Holman said.
As if to underscore how dry
California’s winter has been so far,
firefighters were monitoring a 200-acre
blaze that started Thursday in the
Lassen National Forest in far Northern
California, an area that usually is cov-
ered with snow this time of year.
The immediate culprit is a stubborn
ridge of high atmospheric pressure
that is pushing storms north of
California, said Michelle Mead, a fore-
cast meteorologist with the National
Weather Service in Sacramento. The
ridge is expected to weaken next week,
bringing some rain and snow to
Northern California, before it builds
once again by mid-January.
The rest of the winter is projected to
bring below normal precipitation to
Southern California, while she said it
is too soon to tell whether late winter
in Northern California will be wet, dry
or average.
Also Friday, an interagency task
force held an organizational meeting
to begin planning for a possible
drought but plans to wait until late
February to see how the winter plays
out.
Randall Osterhuber, a researcher at
UC Berkeley’s Central Sierra Snow
Lab near the Sierra summit, said the
snowpack there is about 35 percent of
its historic average, although he’s not
panicking.
“We have the bulk of the winter in
front of us,” he said. “It’s really these
big storms that carry the year, so this
all could change in just a matter of
days.”
Just three years ago, the Sierra snow-
pack was so heavy it was crushing the
roofs on mountain cabins.
Folsom Lake, east of Sacramento, is
particularly hard hit and is having the
largest effect so far on both the sur-
rounding communities and the fish that
depend on releases from its dam. The
lake is less than 20 percent of its
capacity.
Last month, the neighboring city of
Folsom took the most drastic action in
the region by requiring residents to
trim their water use by 20 percent and
restricting lawn watering to twice a
week. Unlike nearby cities, Folsom
gets all its water from the lake.
Mayor Kerri Howell said the city
might ban all outdoor landscape water-
ing, end construction permits for
swimming pools and consider building
an above-ground pipeline to a neigh-
boring water district.
Earlier this week, the U.S. Bureau of
Reclamation reduced flows from
Folsom Lake into the lower American
River despite fears that it could leave
salmon eggs high and dry. More cut-
backs are likely in the coming days as
the bureau balances the needs of
wildlife against those of farmers and
cities.
“Nobody wants to see a bad salmon
season,” Howell said. “But at some
point, you have to make a decision
which is more important: the salmon
run or people having water in their
kitchens.”
Continued from page 1
WATER
COMICS/GAMES
1-4-14
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PREVIOUS
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Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
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Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
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top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Bilko’s rank
4 Cartoon frame
7 Lake fish
11 Raven’s call
12 Pilot’s test
13 WWW addresses
14 TV (2 wds.)
16 Plaid wearers
17 One kind of flight
18 Synthesizer inventor
19 Marlins’ st.
20 Olive yield
21 Poetry
24 Swiss financial hub
27 Debt ltrs.
28 Stout pole
30 Baby’s bed
32 Mr. Rooney
34 Scholarly org.
36 Lyric poem
37 Ghostly meet
39 Age
41 Extinct bird
42 787, for one
43 Rooster’s crest
45 Male relative
48 Give off vapors
49 Strong inclination
52 Livy’s route
53 Court ritual
54 PBS “Science Guy”
55 Gymnasts’ goals
56 Time period
57 Square dance partner
DOWN
1 Lab course
2 Traipses (about)
3 Kid
4 Mongoose prey
5 “Xanadu” band
6 Bagel partner
7 Pastoral
8 “— and Janis”
9 Steel mill refuse
10 FICA number
12 Pasture entrances
15 Louts
18 USSR space station
20 Mine and thine
21 By way of
22 Time beyond measure
23 Bad-mannered
24 Novelist — Grey
25 Harvest
26 Drop out of sight
29 Typewriter type
31 London’s Big —
33 Whines
35 Ditch
38 San Francisco hill
40 Hankering
42 Coup plotters
43 Appealing
44 Comet, to an ancient
46 Director Fritz —
47 Gaelic singer
48 Dovetail
49 Baltimore bard
50 Corn serving
51 Util. bill
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
SATURDAY, JANUARY 4, 2014
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — It’s best to lie low
and allow someone else to take the lead. You will
discover far more about this person if you remain
passive. Don’t be forthcoming about your plans, or
someone may try to beat you to the finish line.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Be honest; it will
be impossible to hide your feelings. Make your
needs clear and search for a way to sort out existing
problems. People who don’t understand your values
should be regarded as acquaintances — not friends.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Make a point of
mingling today. This will be a good time to network.
If you are in the right place at the right time, an
investment opportunity will arise. Stay motivated.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Decisions may
be clouded by emotional issues. To avoid a
misunderstanding, be open about whatever is
distracting you. Face difficulties methodically so
they don’t resurface later.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — A physical activity may
lead to new friendships. Someone from your past may
turn up unexpectedly. Be cautious in order to avoid
this person taking advantage of you.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Meeting up with chums
will be inspiring. Travel will stimulate you, and you may
make new friends. As long as you are conservative
with your money, investments can be made.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Reading will lead to
valuable information. Idleness is the enemy. Make
adjustments to your home environment, but stick to a
budget. Keeping busy will help your mood.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Your ego will be bruised
if you have allowed someone to make a fool of you.
Trying to feel better through extravagance will not help.
Choose to be a passive observer today.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — A financial endeavor
may leave you disillusioned. Don’t allow loved ones to
meddle in your finances — their suggestions won’t pay
off. Offer advice, but don’t lend money.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Now is a great time to
travel. You can learn, have fun and make new friends.
Conversations with fascinating and unique individuals
will inspire and energize you.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Professional
changes are necessary. Look into taking a new
direction or starting your own business. Others are
unlikely to be helpful, but you will find satisfaction
in doing the work yourself.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Today, you will
need to say “no.” Avoid projects that make you uneasy.
Employ tact when handling other people’s concerns.
Try not to get wrapped up in someone else’s drama.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Weekend • Jan. 4-5, 2014
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Weekend • Jan. 4-5, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TAXI & Limo Driver, Wanted, full time,
paid weekly, between $500 and $700
cash, (650)921-2071
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
180 Businesses For Sale
ESTABLISHED BUSINESS FOR SALE
in Downtown San Mateo (510)962-1569
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258881
The following person is doing business
as: Shabuway, 145 E. 3rd St., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered by
the following owner: 168 International,
Inc, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN.
/s/ Yim Murphy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14, 01/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258793
The following person is doing business
as: Fox Window Gutter and House
Cleaning Service, 2217 Shelter Creek
Ln., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Welli-
da Goncalves Leite and Joci R. Leite,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN.
/s/ Wellida G. Leite /
/s/ Joci R. Leite /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14, 01/25/14).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523137
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Sidney Likitoni Kauvaka
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Sidney Likitoni Kauvaka filed
a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Sidney Likitoni Kauvaka
Propsed Name: Sidney Likitoni Afeaki
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on January 19,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 12/19/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 12/19/2013
(Published, 12/21/13, 12/28/2013,
01/04/2013, 01/11/2013)
CASE# CIV 525608
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Scott Ivan York
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Scott Ivan York filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Scott Ivan York
Propsed Name: Skot Ivan Walker
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on February 14,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 12/18/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 12/17/2013
(Published, 12/21/13, 12/28/2013,
01/04/2013, 01/11/2013)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 525739
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Ling Wu
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Ling Wu filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name
as follows:
Present name: Ling Wu
Propsed Name: Rihanna Wu
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on February 4,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 12/18/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 12/17/2013
(Published, 12/21/13, 12/28/2013,
01/04/2013, 01/11/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258537
The following person is doing business
as: V. I. S. Trucking, 625 Woodside Way,
#A, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Vivian
Santos, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN.
/s/ Vivian Santos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/14/13, 12/21/13, 12/28/13, 01/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258814
The following person is doing business
as: Four Seasons Day Spa, 160 W. 25th,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Suhua Li,
242 A St., South San Francisco, CA
94080. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN.
/s/ Vivian Santos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/14/13, 12/21/13, 12/28/13, 01/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258551
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Palm Avenue Liquors, 2) Palm Liq-
uors, 116 South Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Citrin Componies, LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Conpany. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN .
/s/ Stuart Citrin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/14/13, 12/21/13, 12/28/13, 01/04/13).
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
26 Weekend • Jan. 4-5, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
º work well with others
º Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
º A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258727
The following person is doing business
as: International Painting & Decorating,
218 24th Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94403
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Stanko Vranjes, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN .
/s/ Stanko Vranjes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/14/13, 12/21/13, 12/28/13, 01/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258695
The following person is doing business
as: Hero City at Draper University, 55 E.
Third Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Draper Collective, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Libility
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN
08/01/2013.
/s/ Carol Lo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/14/13, 12/21/13, 12/28/13, 01/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258800
The following person is doing business
as: California Equities, 20 La Solano,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030, is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Daniel Li,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN 06/19/2013.
/s/ Daniel Li /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/21/13, 12/28/13, 01/04/13, 01/11/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258765
The following person is doing business
as: Handsome Imports, 501 Broadway,
Po Box 96, MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Kevin Hsiao, 1350 Millbrae Ave., Mill-
brae, CA 94030. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN .
/s/ Kevin Hsiao /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/21/13, 12/28/13, 01/04/13, 01/11/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258738
The following person is doing business
as: Sachdev Enterprises, 1161 Elmer St.,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Anita Sach-
dev, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN .
/s/ Anita Sachdev /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/21/13, 12/28/13, 01/04/13, 01/11/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259021
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Panini Time, 2) The Box Lunch
Company, 360 Shaw Rd., #8, South San
Francisco, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Esposto’s
Fine Foods, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 12/23/2013.
/s/ William Esposto /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/28/13, 01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259041
The following person is doing business
as: Yllakusi, 941 Glennan Dr., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Lianides,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 12/01/2013.
/s/ Matthew Lianides /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/28/13, 01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258649
The following person is doing business
as: BWE Bay Mortgage, 1410 B Burlin-
game Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Reic Marenco, same address, and
Carlos Bone, 215 Victoria Rd., #1, Burlin-
game, CA 94010 The business is con-
ducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN.
/s/ Eric Marenco/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/28/13, 01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258839
The following person is doing business
as: Pacific Work Apparel, 881 Sneath
Ln., Ste. 113, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Automotive Workwear, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN.
/s/ Jonathan Sullivan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/28/13, 01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259022
The following person is doing business
as: MC Accountancy, 1415 Rollins Rd.,
Ste 204, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Yu Ming Chen, 684 Higate Dr., Daly City,
CA 94015. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN N/A.
/s/ Yu Ming Chen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/28/13, 01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258720
The following person is doing business
as: Magic Foot Massage, 2948-A S. Nor-
folk St., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Feng Xu, 228 Thrift St., San Francisco,
CA 94112. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN 12/03/2013.
/s/ Feng Xu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/28/13, 01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258737
The following person is doing business
as: Projects Capital Worldwide, 215 Sev-
enth St., MONTARA, CA 94037 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Ire-
na Savvon, 7708 Imogene St., Houston,
TX, 77074. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN.
/s/ Irena Savvon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14, 01/25/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258944
The following person is doing business
as: Meet.FM, 425 Broadway St., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: OSIX Cor-
poration, DE. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN 01/13/2011.
/s/ Cary Cole /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14, 01/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259023
The following person is doing business
as: Leave It to Sarah!, 250 New Bridge
St., MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Sarah
Magnuski, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 10/07/2013.
/s/ Sarah Magnuski /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14, 01/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259061
The following person is doing business
as: Kestrel Knives, 946 King St., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Nathan
Chun-Chreech, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN .
/s/ Nathan Chun-Chreech /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/14, 01/11/14, 01/18/14, 01/25/14).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Dec. 24, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
SHARON HEIGHTS GOLF &
COUNTRY CLUB
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
2900 Sand Hill Rd.
MENLO PARK, CA 94025-7006
Type of license applied for:
20-Off Sale Beer And Wine
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
January 4, 11, 18, 2014.
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #M-248086
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Gold-
en Mongoose, 111 Industrial Way #7,
BELMONT, CA 94002. The fictitious
business name was filed on 12/19/2011
in the county of San Mateo. The busi-
ness was conducted by: Brew4U LLC,
111 Industrial Way #7, BELMONT, CA
94002
/s/ Kristiann Garrett /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 12/04/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 12/14/2013,
12/212013, 12/28/2013, 01/04/2014).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #M-248581
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Gold-
en Mongoose, LLC, 111 Industrial Way
#7, BELMONT, CA 94002. The fictitious
business name was filed on 12/19/2011
in the county of San Mateo. The busi-
ness was conducted by: Brew4U LLC,
111 Industrial Way #7, BELMONT, CA
94002
/s/ Kristiann Garrett /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 12/04/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 12/14/2013,
12/212013, 12/28/2013, 01/04/2014).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
John P. Sheehan, aka John Sheehan,
aka Jack Sheehan
Case Number: 124038
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: John P. Sheehan, aka
John Sheehan, aka Jack Sheehan. A Pe-
tition for Probate has been filed by Di-
ane Key in the Superior Court of Califor-
nia, County of San Mateo. The Petition
for Probate requests that Diane Key be
appointed as personal representative to
administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
able for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ister the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: February 3, 2014 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal au-
thority may affect your rights as a cred-
itor. You may want to consult with an at-
torney knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Karl R. Vorsatz, Esq.
1601 Bayshore Highway, Ste. 350
BURLINGAME, CA 94010
(650)697-9591
Dated: December 31, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on January 4, 11, 18, 2014.
203 Public Notices
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #M-232490
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Pani-
ni Time, 319 S. Maple St., Ste. 206,
South San Francisco, CA 94080. The fic-
titious business name was filed on
12/09/2009 in the county of San Mateo.
The business was conducted by: The
Box Lunch Company, same address.
/s/ Julie DeMason/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 12/24/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 12/28/2013,
01/04/2014, 01/11/2014, 01/18/2014).
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
295 Art
ART: 5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”,
signed Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all.
650-345-3277
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! SOLD!
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! (650)430-6556
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! SOLD!
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
(650)430-6556
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL REFRIGERATOR great for of-
fice or studio apartment . Good condition
$40.00 (650)504-6058
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 (650)591-3313
SCHWINN 20” Boy’s Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, (650)787-8600
120 Foreign (70), U.S. (50) USED Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$5.00 all, 650-787-8600
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRAMED 19X15 BARBIE USPS Post-
mark picture Gallery First Day of issue
1960. Limited edition $85.
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
27 Weekend • Jan. 4-5, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
MAHJONG SET 166 tiles in case good
condition $35.00 SOLD
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TONKA EXCAVATOR, two arms move,
articulated,only $22 SOLD!
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BOX FULL TOYS Original Pkg., 40’s -
50’s, $90 for all (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
32 “ FLAT SCREEN TV - Slightly Used.
HDMI 1080, $100 SOLD
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPAD 4, brand new! 16 GB, Wi-Fi, black,
still unopened in box. Tired of the same
old re-gifts? Get yourself something you
really want... an iPad! $500. Call
(954)479-8716 (San Carlos)
303 Electronics
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SAMSUNG, FLAT screenTV, 32” like
new! With Memorex DVD player, $185
(650)274-4337
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO (650)515-2605
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO (650)515-2605
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
AMOIRE ENTERTAINMENT cabinet $50
(650)622-6695
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
SOLD
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE SET, round 42" glass table,
with 4 chairs, pick up Foster City. Free.
(650)578-9045
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINING ROOM SET. Oval 60” x 45” ta-
ble + 2 leaves 18” each + Hutch with 3
glass doors. Hard Wood. Circa 1950’s
$275 call 650-344-6923
DINNING ROOM table with chairs excel-
lent condition like new. $99.00 (650)504-
6058
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50 SOLD
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $200 OBO
SOLD!
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
304 Furniture
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $85
RETAIL $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, SOLD
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable
coast $600.00 sacrifice $80.00
(650)504-6058
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72” tall x 13”
wide, $20 (650)591-3313
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
TWIN BED including frame good condi-
tion $45.00 (650)504-6058
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. (650)322-2814
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS(3) stainless steel
21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5 gal. - $10 all
(650)574-3229
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GAS STOVE - Roper, Oven w 4 Burners,
good condition $95 (650)515-2605
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO SOLD!01976533
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
308 Tools
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 (650)368-0748
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench 20-150 lbs,
warranty & case $25 650-595-3933
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW 18VOLT Drill/Driver w/ light,
warranty, only $29.99 SOLD!
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
WINCHESTER POCKETKNIFE scis-
sors, bade, sdriver file $10 650-595-3933
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
PANASONIC FAX machine, works
great, $20. (650-578-9045)
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
16 BOOKS on Histoy if WWII Excllent
condition $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BALANCING SANTA, Mint condition,
Santa rocks back/forth, 20 in high, sturdy
metal, snowman, chimney, $12.00
(650)578-9208
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used
( 26"x49") aqua - $15 each
(650)574-3229
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used(
26"x49") aqua - $15 each (650)574-3229
BLACK LEATHER Organizer, Unop-
ened, Any Year, Cell Holder, Wallet, Cal-
ender., In Box $12 (650)578-9208
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CEILING FAN 44", three lights, Excel-
lent condition, white or wood grain rever-
sible blades. $25. 650-339-1816
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRIC IMPACT wrench sockets
case warranty $39.95 SOLD!
ELECTRIC OMELET Maker quesadillas
& sandwich too $9 650-595-3933
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FRONT LOADER, bucket & arm move,
articulated $12.50 SOLD!
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
310 Misc. For Sale
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO SOLD!
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER CURTAIN set: royal blue
vinyl curtain with white nylon over-curtain
$15 (650)574-3229
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$40. (650)873-8167
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR no brand $65
(650)348-6428
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
NEAPOLITAN MANDOLIN With case
sounds good $75 SOLD!
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $10
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB LOUNGE exercise machine cost
$100. sell for $25. Call 650-570-6023
BASEBALLS & softballs 6 in all for only
$5 650-595-3933
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
28 Weekend • Jan. 4-5, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 End of a descent
11 Alternate courses
15 Gwadar Bay is
an inlet of it
16 Fertile Crescent
land
17 Commit, in a way
18 Indiana city
where the
International
Circus Hall of
Fame is located
19 Take up
20 Dedicated lines
21 Telephone __
22 Big name in
shaving
24 French 101 verb
26 “Mrs. Battle’s
Opinions on
Whist” essayist
27 Sound of waves
28 Uncovered
29 Delay cause
30 How some
equipment is
acquired
32 Drift
34 Oil source
35 “Long-lasting”
chocolate brand
39 Collectible sheets
41 Routine that’s not
funny
42 Colorful flowers
45 Not
procrastinating
47 Wax
48 Crucifix
49 Nitrogen
compound
50 Downs
51 At a previous
time
52 Jack insert,
briefly
53 Barrett of Pink
Floyd
54 Support piece
55 Weather vane
60 __ noche: tonight
61 Traces
62 Put one’s foot
down
63 Drop-down item
that hopefully
doesn’t have to
DOWN
1 Sonoran Desert
natives
2 Coolant giant
3 Some gridiron
passes
4 See 43-Down
5 It’s not a good
thing
6 Witchy woman
7 Evidence of
descent
8 James, whose
company
published the first
U.S. edition of
“The Prince and
the Pauper”
9 More unkempt,
lawn-wise
10 “Unsafe at
Any Speed”
author
11 Orderly traffic
pattern
12 Ring of color
13 Bruschetta
ingredient
14 Barely get (by)
23 Phone book
feature
24 Adams of
filmdom?
25 Saturn SUV
29 Take no action
31 Former Food &
Wine publisher,
familiarly
33 Make a delivery
36 City south of
Tampa
37 Adaptable
subspecies
38 Paper
department
40 Aid for the
restless
41 Divest
42 Examines closely
43 With 4-Down,
one-time White
House nickname
44 Pinpoint
46 Well
49 “Dona Flor and
Her Two
Husbands”
author
56 Eurasian aircraft
acronym
57 Unified
58 Hill fig.
59 Carolina
quarterback
Newton
By Barry C. Silk
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
01/04/14
01/04/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
318 Sports Equipment
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
SMALL TRAMPOLINE $5.00 SOLD
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
SOLD!
TAYLOR MADE 200, driver & Fairway
metals. 9 PC iron set $99 OBO.
650-349-6969
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $45., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
WOMAN'S BOWLING ball, 12 lbs, "Lin-
da", with size 7 shoes and bag, $15.
(650)578-9045
322 Garage Sales
MOVING OUT
OF STATE!
THU, FRI, SAT
Starts at 8am - 4pm
1403 Floribunda
BURLINGAME
650-291-5298
Antiques, furniture,
collectibles, electronics,
and too much more to list!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
335 Garden Equipment
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
SOLD
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
INVERSION TABLE relieves pressure
on back. Cost $100.00 sell for $25
SOLD
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
REDWOOD CITY 1 bedroom apartment
$1350. month, $1000 deposit, close to
Downtown RWC, Absolutely no animals.
Call (650)361-1200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
SAN MATEO Complete remodeled 2
bdrm 1 bath. Includes parking spot.. Wa-
ter and garbage paid. . $2500/month +
dep. RENTED!
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2,400 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
ISUZU ‘96 RODEO, V-6, 153K miles,
clean body, red, no dents, immaculate in-
terior. Kenwood stereeo with boom box
included. Great car! Asking $3,750. Call
(650)270-5242.
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
670 Auto Parts
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
29 Weekend • Jan. 4-5, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services • General
Errands • Event Help
$65 Holiday Special,
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Concrete
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTERS AND ROOF
REPAIR
• New Installation seamless,
• Cleaning and Screening,
• Commercial and Residential
Power Washing
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1976
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
GUTTER
CLEANING
30 Weekend • Jan. 4-5, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
MINK JACKET faux, hip length, satin lin-
ing. Looks feels real. Perfect condition
$99 OBO 650-349-6969
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Furniture
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Massage Therapy
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
LOCAL/WORLD 31
Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
Senior Showcase
FREE
ADMISSION
Senior Resources and Services
from all of San Mateo County
— over 40 exhibitors!
Fer mere ìn|ermcIìen cc|| ó50·344·5200 º www.smdcì|yjeurnc|.cemJsenìershewccse
* While supplies last. Some restrictions apply. Events subject to change.
Free Services include
º Reíieslmenrs
º Dooi Piizes anu Giveavays
º Documenr Slieuuing, íiee íoi
seniois age 62+ Ly Niiacle Slieu
º Bloou Piessuie/Clolesreiol Cleck
º Healrl Scieening Srarions
anu NORL
Senior Showcase
Health &
Wellness Fair
Saruiuay, ]anuaiy 25, 2014
9:00am ro 1:00µm
NillLiae Reciearion Cenrei
4¯¯ Lincoln Ciicle, NillLiae
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
Goody Bags for first
250 attendees
Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal
community,” Munsey said.
Munsey attended local coastside elemen-
tary and middle schools before moving to
Redwood City. He earned a master’s degree
in public administration before joining the
Sheriff’s Office in 1994.
Routinely, the Sheriff’s Office rotates its
staff and Munsey will be leaving his current
position as commander of the county’s
Narcotics and Vehicle Theft task forces and
stepping in as the current Lt. Lisa Williams
transfers to a position in the Sheriff’s Office
Correctional Division.
To support the career development of its
staff, the Sheriff’s Office assigns deputies to
various positions throughout their tenure,
said San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office
spokeswoman Rebecca Rosenblatt. The law
enforcement realm is broad, and rotating
staff not only broadens a person’s experi-
ence, but it allows them to translate knowl-
edge from previous positions, Rosenblatt
said.
“With such a large agency, it’s kind of like
spreading the wealth. … It’s all related in
making each individual member of the
Sheriff’s Office a quality resource,”
Rosenblatt said.
Munsey has worked in law enforcement
for 20 years and will bring an extensive
background of experience with SWAT, nar-
cotics, gangs and sexual assault teams.
Having worked throughout the county and
with difference agencies, he’s looking for-
ward to translating his background to his
new role as the coastside lieutenant,
Munsey said.
“In my current position, I work with all
the municipalities in the county. So I’ve
made a lot of contacts. ... I’ll be able to
bring that over to the coast,” Munsey said.
As a commander who’s overseen special
teams, he didn’t have a lot of direct contact
with the public, Munsey said. Although he’s
enjoyed the various positions he’s held
within the Sheriff’s Office, he is looking
forward to taking on a different role,
Munsey said.
When the coastside lieutenant position
opened up, he interviewed with the city
manager and is happy to have been chosen
to work with city officials and the public,
Munsey said.
“I’m really looking forward to getting
over there and meeting with the stakehold-
ers … find out what their needs are and what
they need to accomplish,” Munsey said.
He plans on attending City Council meet-
ings and working closely with city staff and
the public to establish goals and determine
how he can best serve the coastside, Munsey
said.
“In this new capacity, I’m going to be
directly working day in and day out with the
community,” Munsey said. “It’s going to be
a nice change.”
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Four dead after
Cambodian police fire on protesters
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia — At least four
people were killed Friday when police out-
side Cambodia’s capital opened fire to break
up a protest by striking garment workers
demanding a doubling of the minimum wage,
police and human rights workers said.
Chuon Narin, deputy chief of the Phnom
Penh Municipal Police, said the four were
killed and about 20 others wounded in a
southern suburb of the capital after several
hundred workers blocking a road began burn-
ing tires and throwing objects at police offi-
cers. Witnesses said some officers fired AK-
47 rifles into the air and that others shot at
ground level.
Workers at most of Cambodia’s more than
500 garment factories are on strike, demand-
ing an increase in the minimum wage to
$160 a month, double the current rate. The
government has offered $100 a month.
The local human rights group LICADHO
said in a statement that at least four civilians
were shot dead and 21 injured in what it
described as “the worst state violence
against civilians to hit Cambodia in 15
years.”
Continued from page 1
MUNSEY
vive her injuries, Ferguson said.
The driver of the GMC got out of the car
carrying a yellow duffel bag and tried to run
away and ran across northbound lanes.
According to witnesses, he realized he was
above city streets and then ran back to the
center divide, Ferguson said.
Once back, someone who had pulled over
to help tried to tell the man to stay out of the
road.
The GMC driver then threw a punch at the
Good Samaritan, who ducked and the driver
missed him.
He then took off running and jumped over
the median into a southbound lane where he
was struck by a car and killed, Ferguson
said. Other vehicles also hit him.
Acar that struck him did not initially stop
at the scene, but the CHP believes the driver
did not know that a person was hit and
authorities will not be pressing charges,
Ferguson said.
By mid-afternoon, two drivers had con-
tacted the CHP about possibly being
involved in hitting the man.
Anyone who was driving in that area at
that time is asked to contact the CHP, he
said. Anyone involved is not considered a
suspect and most likely not at fault.
Ferguson said the car was stolen out of
Millbrae sometime Thursday night or early
Friday morning.
The driver also had a small-caliber rifle
and a BB gun in the car that were reported
stolen overnight, Ferguson said.
The duffel bag the man had taken with him
when he fled contained what appeared to be
the man’s personal belongings, Ferguson
said.
The man was also found with a driver’s
license that said he was a 53-year-old man,
however witnesses have said the man
appeared to be in his late 20s or early 30s,
Ferguson said.
The CHP is investigating if the ID was
also stolen, he said.
After the fatality, all southbound lanes
were shut down and two northbound lanes
closed.
The northbound lanes opened around 7:45
a.m. and one southbound lane was opened.
All lanes reopened just before 11 a.m.,
Ferguson said.
Continued from page 1
KILLED
Around the world
By Rod McGuirk
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CANBERRA, Australia — An Australian
icebreaker carrying 52 passengers who were
retrieved from an icebound ship in the
Antarctic resumed its journey home on
Saturday after it was halted for a second
potential rescue operation.
The Aurora Australis had been slowly
cracking through thick ice toward open
water after a Chinese ship’s helicopter on
Thursday plucked the passengers from their
stranded Russian research ship and carried
them to an ice floe near the Australian ship.
But on Friday afternoon, the crew of the
Chinese icebreaker that had provided the
helicopter said they were worried about
their own ship’s ability to move through
the ice.
The Australian Maritime Safety
Authority’s Rescue Coordination Centre,
which oversaw the rescue, told the Aurora
on Friday afternoon to stay in the area in
case help was needed.
Under international conventions
observed by most countries, ships’ crews
are obliged to take part in such rescues and
the owners carry the costs.
AMSA said the Aurora was allowed on
Saturday to continue its journey despite the
Chinese ship Snow Dragon, or Xue Long in
Chinese, remaining stuck in ice.
“The master of Xue Long has confirmed to
AMSAthat the ship is safe, it is not in dis-
tress and does not require assistance at this
time,” AMSAsaid in a statement.
The Aurora had been put on standby as a
precaution while the Snow Dragon attempt-
ed to manoeuver through the pack ice during
optimal tidal conditions early Saturday,
AMSAsaid.
That attempt failed. The Chinese ship
remains stuck several kilometers (miles)
from the Russian icebreaker Akademik
Shokalskiy, from which the passengers
were rescued. The Russian ship has been
immobile since Christmas Eve.
“The masters of both Akademik
Shokalskiy and Xue Long agree that further
assistance from Aurora Australis is no
longer required and they will be able to pro-
vide mutual support to each other,” AMSA
said.
AMSAsaid the Aurora resumed its journey
to Australia’s Antarctic base on a resupply
mission before returning to the Australian
island state of Tasmania in mid-January
with the rescued scientists, journalists and
tourists.
Rescued Antarctic passengers resume journey home
REUTERS
A helicopter from the Xue Long (Snow Dragon) Chinese icebreaker unloads rescued passengers
from the ice-bound Russian ship, Akademik Shokalskiy, in East Antarctica.
32 Weekend • Jan. 4, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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