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HABITAT FOR HUMANITY of CHARLOTTE

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY of CHARLOTTE ADOPT-A-HOME PROJECT PLANNING MANUAL Revised 1/07 0
HABITAT FOR HUMANITY of CHARLOTTE ADOPT-A-HOME PROJECT PLANNING MANUAL Revised 1/07 0
HABITAT FOR HUMANITY of CHARLOTTE ADOPT-A-HOME PROJECT PLANNING MANUAL Revised 1/07 0

ADOPT-A-HOME PROJECT PLANNING MANUAL

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY of CHARLOTTE ADOPT-A-HOME PROJECT PLANNING MANUAL Revised 1/07 0

Revised 1/07

Introduction

Your organization has taken on an exciting task: Adopting a Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte home which includes raising the money to finance a house and building that home in partnership with the family who will buy it. It is a task that will be both challenging and rewarding, and most importantly, it is a task that will make a real and lasting positive impact on our community.

This Adopt-A-Home Planning Manual is provided to give your group step by step instructions on organizing and executing your Adopt-A-Home. A project of this scope is best accomplished by a team of committed volunteers, called the Project Team in this manual, who are responsible for different functions. This manual suggests a break down of tasks, where each member of the Project Team has the responsibility for one of the tasks/sub-committees listed below. If a committee is needed for a task the person who sits on the Project Teams acts as the chair. There are many different ways to organize your Adopt-A-Home, the following are suggestions based on previous groups’ experiences. You may take a different approach and/or combine some responsibilities.

Please forward this manual to each member of the project team. We have inserted hyperlinks for your convenience.

Project Leader…………………………………page 11

House Leader…………………………………….page 14

Fund Raising Coordinator……………….……….page 21

Publicity Coordinator…………………………….page 25

page 28

Family Partner……………………………………page 32

Volunteer Coordinator……………………………page 36

Amenities Coordinator…………………………

Other information contained in this manual includes:

Building on Faith

page 45

Building Schedule - Typical

page 9

Construction Leader Skills Evaluation Form

page 47

Dedication –Sample Programs

page 59

Directions to Habitat office

page 3

Evaluation of Habitat form

page 44

In-kind donation Values, Material & Sub Specs

page 52

In-kind donation Report Form

page 55

Leadership Team Form

page 43

Minors Release of Liability

page 65

Mission Statement

page 5

Organizational Chart

page 7

Policies of Habitat Charlotte

page 10

Press Release Sample

page 58

Safety Guidelines

page 50

Sign in sheets/Release of Liability Forms

page 63

Sponsorship Agreement

page 3

Staff Contacts

page 2

Summary of Habitat Charlotte’s Work

page 56

Task Leader Job Description

page 20

Timeline for Project

page 41

Tool Requirements

page 49

Volunteer Confirmation Letter Sample

page 62

Volunteer Interest Sign-up Sheet

page 61

Youth Activities

page 38

Habitat Contact Information

The information below is included to facilitate your communication with Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte.

Mailing Address

Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte P. O. Box 220287 Charlotte, NC 28222-0287

Web Site: www.habitatcharlotte.org

Physical Address

Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte 3815 Latrobe Dr. Charlotte, NC 28211

Directions to Habitat Office: on web at http://www.habitatcharlotte.org/Direct-NewOffice.htm

From uptown - Go out of town on 7th Street which then becomes Monroe Road, turn right on Wendover. Turn right at the light on Latrobe. Turn right into the parking lot. The office is on the side of the building facing Latrobe, with the entrance under the tall canopy.

From south-east Charlotte –Take Providence or Randolph towards downtown, turn right on

Wendover/Runnymeade. Turn left at light at LaTrobe.

of the building facing Latrobe, with the entrance under the tall canopy.

Turn right into the parking lot. The office is on the side

From I-77 South Bound - Take the I-277 exit (Brookshire Freeway), towards downtown, stay in the left hand

lane to exit to Independence Boulevard. Take Wendover Road exit, (245A).

office is on the side of the building facing Latrobe, with the entrance under the tall canopy.

Turn right at light at Latrobe.

The

From I-77 North Bound - Take the second downtown - I-277 exit (Brookshire Freeway), towards downtown, stay

in the left hand lane to exit to Independence Boulevard. Take Wendover Road exit, (245A).

at Latrobe.

Turn right at light

The office is on the side of the building facing Latrobe, with the entrance under the tall canopy.

From I-85 (North & South bound) – Take the Brookshire Freeway exit turn towards downtown (Right turn for

northbound I-85, left turn for southbound I-85), stay in the left hand lane to exit to Independence Boulevard.

Take Wendover Road exit, (245A).

facing Latrobe, with the entrance under the tall canopy.

Turn right at light at Latrobe.

The office is on the side of the building

Habitat Staff Contacts

Habitat Fax Number.

704-342-1797

Habitat Phone Number

704-376-2054

Area

Staff member

E-mail

Phone

Construction & In Kind Materials

Brian Sanders

ext.7064

Fund Raising & Publicity

Linda Blum

ext.7073

Family Services

Darryl White

ext.7079

Nancy Pugh

ext.7074

Volunteer Coordination & Building on Faith

Beth Van Gorp

ext.7077

Executive Director

Bert Green

ext.7068

http://habitatcharlotte.org/about_staffList.cfm has information on how to contact other staff members or call Beth Van Gorp at 704-716-7077 with any other questions about Habitat.

Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte, Inc. 3815 Latrobe Dr. – PO Box 220287 Charlotte, NC 28222-0287

Sponsorship Agreement

This agreement entered into this Charlotte, Inc. and

(or a portion of a building project) to construct a simple, decent, affordable home which will be

purchased upon completion by a local low-income family.

Habitat agrees to:

day of

2009, between Habitat for Humanity of

, The parties agree to engage in a building project

1. Provide a fully developed building site, the necessary materials (excluding tools), hire sub- contractors, and obtain the necessary building permits and inspections. Habitat will also provide a qualified Habitat homeowner family.

2. Provide opportunities for volunteers from the sponsoring organization to participate in the building project, and provide a qualified Site Supervisor to assist our group during our project.

3. Provide financial management for the project.

The Sponsor agrees to:

1.

Make a contribution of:

a. $

cash

payment representing the full $60,000 sponsorship fee for 2007.

b. $

cash

payment representing a partial (

%)

sponsorship fee for 2007.

c. $

for

in-kind donations of materials and/or services (as outlined on pg. 51)

d. $

Total

Contribution

One-half of the cash contribution amount committed above is payable six weeks before the scheduled volunteer construction start date.

The balance is due immediately prior to commencement of volunteer construction.

 

In the event of a partial sponsorship, Sponsor has the option of finding a Co-Sponsor(s) to complete the full sponsorship; or Habitat will work to find a Co-Sponsor(s) to complete the sponsorship and schedule the start of volunteer construction at a mutually agreed upon schedule.

2.

Organize and participate in the building project by providing volunteers (some skilled volunteers

required) on each assigned workday.

Continue with the volunteer effort until the project is

completed. Sponsor expects volunteer work to commence in month of

,

2009

3.

Work in cooperation and partnership with Habitat staff and the future homeowner family to construct a well built, substantial home.

4.

Support, within its organization and the community at large, the Habitat concept of eliminating substandard housing in the Charlotte area and throughout the world. This includes cooperating with Habitat in any publicity and public relations activities associated with the project.

Accepted on

,

2009

Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte, Inc.

Sponsor

Signed:

Signed By:

Date:

Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte’s Mission

Founded as a Christian Ministry, Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte works in partnership with God and people from all walks of life to develop community with people in need by building and renovating homes, so that people can live and grow into all that God intended.

Habitat Charlotte’s mission is accomplished by:

Constructing simple, decent, and affordable houses,

Selling the houses at no profit and no interest and using the mortgage payments to build more houses.

Demonstrating the love and teachings of Jesus Christ,

Providing a way for sharing between the affluent and those in need,

Working in partnership with representative local leadership,

Selecting families in greatest need first, without favoritism or discrimination.

Overview of the Adopt-A-Home Process

1. Make the Decision.

Will the members or our group support the project with their time, talents and money?

Do we have the approval and support of our leadership?

Are there people within our group who have the skills and the time available to lead our project?

Can we raise the sponsorship fee?

2. Submit the Sponsorship Agreement.

Once a decision has been made to proceed with the AAH project, the Sponsorship Agreement enclosed in this packet should be submitted to Habitat. This Adopt-A-Home Planning Manual as well as a Construction Manual are provided to help your group organize and complete the project.

3. Organize a Project Team.

The Project Team’s responsibility is to guide your project through to completion. Habitat recommends that your Project Team, chaired by the Project Leader, consists of the following:

Publicity Coordinator, Fund Raising Coordinator, Volunteer Coordinator, Amenities Coordinator, as well as the Family Partner and your House Leader.

4. Raise the Funds.

Once your group is committed, you will need to determine how you will raise the funds. Sources of funding often include such things as special events, individual campaigns, and in kind donations of services and materials.

5.

Plan the Project.

With the Habitat staff set a start date and build schedule.

Recruit and organize volunteers.

Construction leaders meet with the Habitat Construction Superintendent

Plan for snacks & lunches.

Prepare publicity if desired.

Sign up volunteers for specific tasks.

6. Meet the Family.

Approximately four-to-six weeks before the start date of your house, an approved Habitat family will be paired with your group. This family will have already completed the first portion of sweat equity requirement (usually 75 hours), and chosen a lot and a house plan. Your Family

Partner should meet and get to know the family.

time to introduce the family to the group and build excitement for the project.

A pre-construction kick-off event is a good

7. Build the House.

Habitat’s construction staff is responsible for preparing your building site, laying the foundation, constructing the floor system and arranging for all building materials, sub-contractors and building inspections.

Your group of volunteers is responsible for framing, hanging drywall and vinyl siding, trimming out the house (doors, baseboards, cabinets, etc.), installing hardware, the concrete driveway and VCT tile, painting and landscaping. Habitat’s construction staff will provide guidance and direction for your building team.

After you are finished, final inspections are completed, carpet and appliances are installed and the family can move in. Our goal is to have homeowners move in with-in 45 days of the final volunteer construction day.

8. Dedicate the House.

The dedication ceremony is a celebratory service that provides a chance for recognition of your group, an opportunity to share, and sense of completion for all. Although we have occasional group dedications most Adopt-A-Home groups have the dedication service at the home. The program usually includes a house blessing, an opportunity to thank all those who helped on the project, a Bible presentation to the family, and recognition of your group. Samples programs are included in this manual.

Adopt-A-Home Organizational Chart

Project Leader Fund Raising Volunteer Amenities Family Publicity Coord. Coord. Coord. Coord. Partner House
Project
Leader
Fund Raising
Volunteer
Amenities
Family
Publicity
Coord.
Coord.
Coord.
Coord.
Partner
House Leader
Assistant/Co
House Leader
Framing Task
Siding Task
Drywall Task
Trim Task
Painting Task
Tile/Hardware/
Leader
Leader
Leader
Leader
Leader
Punch Leader
Crew Leaders
Crew Leaders
Crew Leaders
Crew Leaders
Crew Leaders
Crew Leaders
Crew Members
Crew Members
Crew Members
Crew Members
Crew Members
Crew Members

Volunteer Positions on a Habitat Project

Project Leader: Recruits and encourages all key volunteer positions. Leadership, communication, flexibility, and organizational skills are key aspects of this job.

House Leader & Co/Assistant House Leader: Ensures that volunteers have leadership and tools

on site, either directly or through Task Leaders. This person is the contact for Habitat construction

staff.

and teaching inexperienced volunteers. Select your construction team to insure leadership and construction skills will be present on the job site. For instance, if your House Leader is a strong leader but knows relatively little about construction, you could recruit an Assistant House Leader who knows construction but has less developed leadership skills.

Leadership and construction skills are desirable. This person should also enjoy working with

Construction Team of Task & Crew Leaders: Task Leaders are in charge of an entire

construction task, for example drywall or siding. They are experts on doing the task.

manage a small group of volunteers who will work together as a team on part of the house. For example, three siding crews (each of four members and a Crew Leader) would work together under the direction of the Siding Task Leader. Crew Leaders do not have to be experts, but should have worked on the task several times.

Crew Leaders

Family Partner: Acts as a liaison with the Habitat Family. Qualities of a good family partner include open-mindedness and appreciation of diversity, good listening skills, and patience. The Family Partner should have the capability to encourage their Habitat homeowner partners to use their strengths to solve their own problems. If the family is not a native English speaker, the ability to speak an additional language may be helpful.

Fund Raising Coordinator: Qualities of a good Fund Raising Chair include a knowledge of fund raising, the ability to convey excitement about the program, and persistence. This person and sub- committee are key in making the Adopt-A-Home happen.

Publicity Coordinator: Good written and oral communication skills are important. If you are looking for someone to get your group exposure in local media outlets, you may want to look for someone familiar with soliciting publicity. You will also want someone knowledgeable with the ways information is shared within your organization - its newsletters, meetings, etc.

Amenities Coordinator: As this person will arrange for food on the job site, you will want someone who has contacts with cooks and restaurants. This person will also plan the dedication. Someone who is organized and plans ahead will do best as it can be difficult to get food at the last minute.

Volunteer Coordinator: The Volunteer Coordinator should be someone with both organizational skills and the ability to persuade and energize other folks.

Other Possible Key Volunteers: A Project Secretary records Project Meetings and send out agendas and minutes; The Site Host is on the job site to register, welcome, and give out name; A Devotion Leader provides opening devotion and/or prayer; the Construction Buddy works beside homeowner; the Safety Leader explains safety requirements and stops unsafe activity; Child care allows other volunteers to work; A Tool Coordinator helps acquires tools, such as saws and ladders, for the job.

Typical Volunteer Building Schedule

Most sponsored homes are scheduled to be completed within a 4 to 12 week period. The schedule you choose will

depend primarily on the number, availability, and skill level of your volunteers.

bring to allow folks to have a good work day where folks are utilized effectively and safely. Please follow these

We list the number of volunteers to

guidelines.

PROJECT DAY

ACTIVITY

BY WHOM

No. OF VOL.

DATE CHOSEN

Pre-Project

Family and lot selection Footings/Foundation/Floor House Lay-out/Wall plates Porta-Jon/Saw Service/Materials

Habitat Staff

Project Day 1

Wall Framing

AAH Volunteers

15-25

TBA

Project Day 2

Roof Trusses

AAH Volunteers

15-25

TBA

Project Day 3

Sheathing & Misc. Framing

AAH Volunteers

15-20

TBA

Project Day 4

Roof Shingles/Windows/Doors

AAH Volunteers

15-20

TBA

Minimum of 10 weekdays before drywall*

Plumbing, electrical, Mechanical rough-ins Inspections

Sub-Contractors

Project Day 5

Siding Installation

AAH Volunteers

8-12

TBA

Project Day 6

Siding Installation

AAH Volunteers

8-12

TBA

Project Day 7

Drywall Installation

AAH Volunteers

15-20

TBA

Project Day 8

Drywall Installation

AAH Volunteers

15-20

TBA

Minimum of 5 weekdays before interior trim*

Drywall Taping and Finishing

Sub-Contractor

Project Day 9

Interior and Exterior Trim

AAH Volunteers

8-12

TBA

Project Day 10

Prime Painting, Shed

AAH Volunteers

15-20

TBA

Project Day 11

Finish Painting, Cabinets, Shed

AAH Volunteers

15-20

TBA

Project Day 12

Punch list items, VCT Tile, Hardware Installation

AAH Volunteers

6-8

TBA

After volunteer days of construction

sub-contractor trim out attic and floor insulation

Sub-Contractors

Inspections, Landscaping

Building Inspectors

 

After/Near Completion

House Dedication

Everyone

* For houses on a quicker schedule, Adopt-A-Home groups will need to make some arrangements themselves

Habitat for Humanity Policies

Why?

We have developed a few policies over the years that are the result of trial and error. Habitat’s aim is for your project to be safe, memorable, and life changing for all the participants. Please distribute these policies to all of the Project Team.

Board of Directors Policy about Adopt-A-Home Gifts to Homeowners

The Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte Board of Directors has approved a policy placing restrictions on Adopt-a-Home groups’ gifts to Habitat homeowners. The Habitat Board prohibits Adopt-a- Home groups from giving expensive items, such as new furniture, appliances, fencing, etc. to Habitat homeowners. Appropriate housewarming gifts are items such as a mailbox, a doormat, a nice plant, or a photo album with pictures from the project (Cost should not exceed $100 per home.)

Habitat for Humanity is a partnership, not a charity. Our philosophy is one of empowerment: we give a hand-up, not a hand-out. Adopt-a-Home groups may think that they are doing a favor for a family by giving an expensive gift, but this gift is actually a disservice to the family, because it makes the family more dependent on the Adopt-a-Home group and less dependent on themselves! In addition, giving an expensive gift to one Habitat family is not fair to the other homeowners who don’t have a relationship with an Adopt-a-Home group. Gifts given to homeowners are not tax- deductible.

Adopt-a-Home groups are also prohibited from seeking donations of new items to be given to the homeowner. Again, this is not fair to other homeowners. Also, solicitation of contributions could interfere with the fundraising that Habitat development staff and volunteers are already doing in the community. Gifts given directly to homeowners are not tax deductible.

Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte is not discouraging your generosity. If your organization has additional funding, Habitat recommends that you contribute this money to be used for the construction of another house for a family in need of decent, simple, and affordable housing.

Nail Guns

Nail guns are not to be used at the Habitat site. They are too much of a safety risk. In addition, the use of nail guns interferes with the effective use of volunteers. Volunteers come to the site to hammer, not to watch someone with a nail gun work.

Age Limitation

No one under the age of 16 will be permitted on a building site while work is being done. Teens, 16 and 17, may work on a construction site with some limitations. Those under 18 must not use power tools, work on the roof, or work from a height above six feet (for example on the 2nd level of scaffolding or from an extension ladder). Volunteers under the age of 18 and their

parent or legal guardian are required to complete and sign a special “Minor’s Release and Waiver of Liability” form. If your group has members younger than 16, encourage them to participate by

helping with fundraising, serving meals, decorating lunch bags or nail aprons, etc. available on page 38 or at http://habitatcharlotte.org/volunteer_youth.cfm .

More ideas are

Project Leader

Focus: Organization of an Adopt-A-Home project is an exciting and challenging proposition. As the Project Leader you play a key role in bringing together and empowering all of the volunteers you will be working with. You are the big picture person.

TASKS TO BE COMPLETED:

1. Recruit and organize the Project Team (send the list of the Project team to Beth Van Gorp at Habitat). Please help us by sending in the leadership team form is found on page 43) 2. Give applicable section of this Planning Manual to appropriate team members. A electronic copy is on our web site. 3. Organize and chair Project Team meetings. 4. Set dates for accomplishing tasks on timeline. 5. Forward the signed Sponsorship Agreement (page 3-4) to Habitat. 6. Set starting date and schedule with Habitat’s Beth Van Gorp and your House Leader. (a Typical Schedule is on page 9) 7. Attend the initial meeting of each sub-committee to present the overall vision and assure yourself that the sub-committee and its leadership clearly understand their responsibilities. 8. Continue to monitor the sub-committees and their progress. 9. Work with Habitat to determine date for dedication. More info in the Amenities Section 10. Send thank you notes. 11. Make sure that your in-kind forms have been submitted to Stephan Eichert. 12. At the end of the project, fill out evaluation form on page 44.

QUALITY CHECKPOINTS:

Review the planning packet thoroughly. Be sure that your Project Team members have the time available for their tasks and that they have a strong commitment to the project. If possible, have a back up plan in mind of who you will approach if one of your key volunteers is unable to fulfill his/her responsibilities. Set up a reporting system with your Project Team members so that they are reporting their progress to you weekly. Set up a time line showing when work is to be completed. Share progress reports with all sub-committees.

Project Leader

House Start Date

Habitat develops a building plan for the year in order to best coordinate construction supervision, land acquisition, and family approval. As part of this process we have prepared a list of preferred

start dates for Adopt-A-Homes.

Delays in your project may occur to due to rain, small crews, subcontractor delays, or failed

inspections.

glad to discuss the different buildings schedules with your group, although we reserve to right to limit your choices based on your group’s experience. It is important that your House Leader has approved the starting date and schedule. As a rule, no Habitat construction work is done on Sundays or Mondays.

Most houses take about 12 volunteer workdays to complete.

You may want to think about some contingency plans if this happens. Habitat will be

We want to provide your group with the best possible building experience so we do try and spread our start dates out throughout the year so that our construction staff is not spread among too many homes.

Meetings

The frequency of Project Team meetings depends on your group. You will probably need to meet several times at least, just to ensure that everyone’s efforts are coordinated. If you have a large group you may want to consider having a Project Secretary who would prepare minutes and distribute them to the Project Team. Habitat also recommends that you touch base with your key

volunteers between each meeting.

between you and the Habitat Development Staff.

Ongoing meetings (in person or by phone) are encouraged

A required construction meeting is held 4-6 weeks prior to the volunteer start date the sponsoring group is asked to send a designated volunteer(s) (Project Leader, Volunteer Coordinator and House Leader) to meet with the Habitat construction staff. This meeting is in addition to planning and coordination meetings that may have been scheduled with the Habitat development staff and is designed to establish points of contact for the individuals that will be most involved on site. During this meeting we’ll cover general guidelines and prepare the volunteer leadership teams for what their responsibilities are on site and throughout the project. If this meeting is not scheduled for you by the development staff you may call Beth Van Gorp directly at 704 716-7077.

Hints for Groups Building Together

Project Leader

Each year at Habitat for Humanity some of our Adopt-A-Homes are sponsored by more than one

group.

of volunteers available, and therefore decrease the demands on the key volunteers in each

organization. Many churches use this as a deliberate opportunity to interact with other people of faith in the Charlotte community. Groups have used the equalizing effect of working on a Habitat site to reach across the barriers of tradition (we’ve never done anything with them before), denomination, and race. For businesses, partnering with another business can help your group

strengthen ties and network with another business.

group to share in raising the Adopt-A-Home sponsorship fee.

There are many benefits to co-sponsoring a house. It can dramatically increase the number

Co-sponsoring a house, of course, allows your

However, there can be many challenges in working with another group. You will have to spend extra time and resources to reach out to members of all your sponsoring groups. You will probably need to have more meetings than if you planned the project in house. Different organizations may have significantly different expectations, skills, and methods of accomplishing tasks that may cause

conflict. If you have a lot of volunteers, it may be difficult to schedule everyone who wants to work

on the house.

one group on the site may make this more difficult.

If part of your goal is to develop a high level of group cohesion, having more than

The following ideas may help if you are planning a Multi-Group partnership:

Be deliberate in with whom you partner. Think of whom would you be excited to partner with and ask them. This may be the church across the street, or your customers or suppliers.

Start planning early and be clear in dividing responsibilities.

You will probably need to have more meetings to make sure everything is organized and every group knows what is happening.

Mix up the workdays so that you have folks from different organizations present on each day. You will have a good time getting to know each other.

Have representatives from each organization serve on key committees, and be sure to have on your Project Team members from all the organizations.

If groups have different experience levels working with Habitat methods. Help develop experience/leadership in new partner groups.

Plan a joint kick off event.

Take time to get to know one another.

Look for a group that complements your strengths and weaknesses.

Feel free to call Habitat for assistance.

House Leader

Focus: The position of House Leader for a Habitat for Humanity Adopt-A-Home is among the most intense and rewarding on the job site. The key to being successful in this position is leadership: concentrate on safety, quality, teaching, & morale. It is often said that an effective House or Task Leader never wears a tool belt or picks up a hammer. Work with your Volunteer Coordinator to create smoothly working teams out of a Task Leader, Crew Leaders and Crew Members.

TASKS TO BE COMPLETED BEFORE THE START OF THE HOUSE:

1. Work with your Volunteer Coordinator to recruit Task and Crew Leaders and to determine how many people will be needed on the site each work day. 2. Determine what your House Schedule will be (sample on page 9), hints on page 16. Work with your Project Leader and Beth Van Gorp, 704-716-7077,. The schedule must be agreed upon with Habitat staff before the schedule is sent to volunteers. 3. Review Construction Manual, as familiarity with Habitat building and safety methods is key to your group’s success. 4. Meet with your Task & Crew Leaders as a group to coordinate the overall building plan. 5. For their review, forward the volunteer job description to your Task Leader (on page 20 of this manual) and the applicable portions of your Habitat Charlotte Construction Manual. 6. Review your own and your Task Leaders completed “Skills Evaluation Form” (pages 47-48) and arrange for any training for yourself and your Task Leaders with Habitat. 7. Six weeks before project start day, contact Stephan Eichert at Habitat, 704-716-7064, to arrange a pre-construction meeting for you as House Leader and for the Task Leaders approximately 4-6 weeks before the volunteer start of the home 8. Have your Task Leaders assign specific tasks to each of their crew leaders and forward the appropriate section of the Construction Manual. Meeting together is a good idea. 9. Arrange to have appropriate tools on site. You may want to assign your Task and Crew Leaders to bring specific tools. Page 49 has a list of required tools (also found in construction manual.) 10. Assist in coordinating with Fund Raising Coordinator any in-kind materials and/or subcontractors your group may have had donated, see pages 52-55 for more info.

TASKS TO BE COMPLETED ON SITE:

1. Review task in Construction Manual before arriving and bring it with you to the job site. 2. Be the first person at the job site each work day. 3. Check materials and tools to be sure you have everything required for the day’s work. 4. Gather volunteers together in order to welcome them; open with a devotional/prayer; provide building, safety, first aid, and emergency instructions; and divide your members into their crews. Allow time for Crew Leaders to orient and instruct crews. 5. Circulate among crews checking quality and safety, and answering questions. 6. Meet with the Habitat Site Supervisor towards the end of the day to review work completed and plan for next work day. 7. Thank volunteers for their participation and ask for suggestions.

If the House Leader is not able to be present he or she should assign these tasks to others.

QUALITY CHECKPOINTS:

House Leader

You are following the Habitat Construction Manual. No one under 16 is present on the job site. You are watching for individuals and/or crews that are either struggling with a task or who appear to have nothing to do and intervene where necessary. Volunteers on the job site feel useful but are not working at a frantic pace. House, Task, and Crew Leaders are prepared for work on the job site. You are focused on the next task in your schedule so that you can reassign crews or reorganize with a minimum loss of time. Safety guidelines are being followed. No nail guns are being used.

House Leader

Things To Consider While Setting Your Schedule

See page 9 for a sample schedule. The following things may impact your schedule by affecting the availability of volunteers, subcontractors, and Habitat staff:

Are there any holidays during your building schedule? Our construction staff usually does not work on Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. They are also off on Sundays and Mondays.

During the time your house is under construction, is there is a Habitat sponsored blitz build occurring? If you are not part of the project, your Habitat Site Supervisor may not be as available as you would like during the blitz week. You would have to be prepared to carry the whole load.

Are volunteers really available during the week? Do you have a lot of retired people? If you are part of a company, are volunteers getting the day off, with or without pay?

If you are considering doing two days work in one day - Are you and your volunteers skilled enough to organize and plentiful enough to do it?

Did you leave enough time for sub-contractors to finish the work and the house to be inspected?

Does your schedule exclude, by either days chosen or speediness, a desired/needed constituency?

Have you made contingency plans in case of bad weather?

Have you added some time to finish the punch list at the end of the project?

Rapid builds

If you wish to build on a more rapid schedule (thereby forcing the subs to complete their work in a short period of time) you will be expected to recruit and make arrangements with the sub-contractors yourself, except for those participating in Building on Faith using the recommended schedule. See page 45-46 for more information on the Building on Faith blitz.

Changes in schedule

Arrangements for materials and sub-contractors begin when the original schedule is set. If prior to the start of the house you make a change in the schedule, you should contact Beth Van Gorp or Stephan Eichert. After construction has begun, please speak with your Site Supervisor about schedule modification. It can be very difficult to adjust material and sub-contractor schedules to happen sooner than the pre-arranged schedule. If the house is behind schedule, additional delays can occur if sub-contractors move on to other jobs.

Number of Volunteers

There is an optimum number of volunteers that can work effectively on any given day. This number will be determined by the skill level of the volunteers and the quality of the leadership provided by their Task Leaders and Crew Leaders. Yes, you can have too many volunteers, but consider having more volunteers if most of your volunteers have previous construction experience, or the Construction Leadership Team of House, Task, and Crew Leaders are skilled in construction and leadership. You will find a suggested number included with the Typical Volunteer Schedule (page 8), but your group will have to decide exactly how many people to recruit. You will need to work with the Volunteer Coordinator to determine the number needed on site each day. Having the appropriate number of volunteers on the site will enable everyone to feel satisfyingly useful, without feeling rushed. Over-extended volunteers may often act unsafely and without attention to quality. If you have too many volunteers, folks will not feel useful.

House Leader

Pre-Construction Meeting with Habitat

About six weeks before the start of the house, plan to bring your Task Leaders to a meeting with Habitat’s Construction Superintendent. The following is discussed at this meeting: the build schedule for the house, specific job responsibilities for you and for Habitat, the house and site plan (if available), in-kind donation plans and possibilities, job descriptions for participants, suggestions on how to organize and manage the work day, and a review the Habitat Construction Manual.

Construction Manual

Each Adopt-A-Home is issued one Habitat Construction Manual free of charge. Check out our web site at www.habitatcharlotte.org to see how you can order additional manuals. By mid-2007 we expect to have a .pdf version of each chapter on our web site for you to share with your Task and Crew Leaders. The manual was developed as a job-site resource guide to allow us to provide a

consistent method and quality of building. It is our expectation that you will conform to the methods

outlined in the manual.

quality concerns, but also because they are well suited for volunteers to perform. If something in the manual appears ambiguous to you, please let us know, as we are working to constantly update our

resources.

inexperienced volunteers, can be found on our web site at www.habitatcharlotte.org.

These construction procedures have been established not only because of

A shortened version called “Construction How To’s,” which is suitable for

Tools

Enclosed is a list of tools (page 49) needed for your Adopt-A-Home. You should begin arranging for tools as soon as possible. You may want to include the list of needed tools in the information your Volunteer Coordinator sends out to volunteers. Usually, someone in your group has these tools. You may also want to appoint a Tool Coordinator to find all the tools and make sure they get to the job site. However if you are having difficulties acquiring a specific tool, discuss it with Stephan Eichert or your Site Supervisor. Make sure that your leadership team is emphasizing the need for everyone to bring a basic set of tools: hammer, tape measure, pencil, and a nail apron.

Nail guns are not to be used on the job site. We do not consider them safe for volunteers to use. In addition, volunteers want to hammer. While with a nail gun only one or two folks to keep busy and you and the rest stand around and watch the person with the nail gun.

Release and Waiver of Liability

Everyone working on a Habitat construction site is required to complete and sign a “Release and

Waiver of Liability” form before they begin work on the site.

the forms for your group to use. An example is found on pages 63-64 of this manual. Each person should carefully read the form before signing as there is an inherent danger associated with a construction site. Volunteers should provide their own personal health insurance.

Habitat will provide a notebook with

No one under the age of 16 will be permitted on a building site while work is being

16 and 17, may work on a construction site provided their parent or guardian has filled out a Minor’s Release and Waiver of Liability. Those under 18 must not use power tools, work on the roof, or work from a height above six feet (for example on the 2nd level of scaffolding or from an extension n ladder). These guidelines are from Wage and Hour regulations of North Carolina, our insurance coverage, and the policies of Habitat International. We cannot make exceptions.

Teens,

House Leader

Goals for the House

At Habitat we often struggle with trying to accomplish goals of both process (volunteers and

homeowners working together in partnership) and progress (getting the house done). We know that

House Leaders struggle with these same issues.

of Habitat consists of people from all walks of life getting to know each other and also feeling like they are making a difference. Certain methods of working together either promote or add nothing to the relationship between volunteers. That is why nail guns are not permitted, as only one person can use it and other volunteers leave feeling that their time was misspent. On the other hand you have the responsibility for making sure the house gets finished. The advice that follows about quality control, safety and having skilled leadership on site also will allow you to have volunteers, ready and able to do the work, and still promote partnership. Volunteers who feel that they are safely building a quality home, using their time effectively, under skilled leadership will work harder, longer, and smarter and you will end up meeting your goal of finishing the home.

We want you to try to do both. An important part

What to say to get the day started

When it seems like most of your workers are present you should gather them together and include the following in your welcoming speech:

Introduce yourself, the Habitat supervisor(s), the homeowner, your Task and Crew Leaders and explain the role each will play.

Remind everyone to sign the Release of Liability (found on page 63-63).

Give thanks for the day with a devotion/prayer.

Announce plans for lunch, breaks, etc.

Outline the work to be done using the Task Lists provided in the construction manual.

Give safety instructions (pages 50-51 or in the construction manual) and remind everyone to report accidents.

Indicate the location of the first aid kit; assign who would telephone 911 and who would begin first aid in the case of an emergency.

Provide any basic instruction on how to complete the tasks that would pertain to the entire group.

Ask if anyone has any questions.

Divide into groups according to the work to be done and under the instruction of your Crew Leaders.

Safety

Enclosed (pages 50-51) is the list of safety guidelines that should be read at the beginning of each

construction work day. If you see a situation that violates Habitat safety rules, you must tactfully fix it. You can expect your Habitat Site Supervisor to support you in whatever measures you feel are appropriate to get the volunteer to follow safety guidelines. Beginning in 2006, hard hats and safety glasses are required on many work days. Volunteers who are unwilling to comply will be asked to leave. A good approach for situations is to say “You may not be aware, but Habitat has a safety rule

that requires

I would appreciate it if you would follow this rule.”

House Leader

Other Suggestions for Having a Safe Site

Plan how you are going to deal with unsafe situations and share that information with your Task & Crew Leaders. Have an emergency plan if someone does get injured.

Keep the site free of trash.

Have someone give a demonstration of how to use tools safely, especially power tools, and/or appoint specific people to use high risk tools.

In regards to safety, ask everyone on site to be their brother’s (or sister’s) keeper.

Encourage volunteers to take breaks for water, especially during hot weather. Make sure your amenities folks plan to bring plenty of liquids. Stop volunteers before they work to the point of exhaustion.

Sometimes experienced volunteers will rush through things because they are in a hurry to get things accomplished, so make sure that they are extra safety conscious.

Keep the pace of work at a determined but not frantic pace. Often people get hurt when they feel too rushed to move the ladder to a safer position or to watch where they are carrying lumber.

Set a good example. Wear hard hats and safety glasses as required.

Quality

There will be times when a volunteer may not want to follow the Habitat method of building. The

Habitat Construction Manual has been created to insure a level of quality as well as consistency in the construction of Habitat homes. There will be times when a volunteer might test

these issues with you, especially someone who has extensive construction experience.

feel that the quality of workmanship is less than what you deem acceptable, either out of lack of understanding or differences in opinion, try to come up with a tactful way to bring that person’s work to Habitat standards. You can use the manual as the authoritative source, ask the Site Supervisor for assistance, and acknowledge their experience while asking them to do it the Habitat way. If the volunteer seems unable to accomplish the task correctly or is at the point of frustration, you might consider thanking them for their work and diverting them to another task.

Should you

Other Suggestions for Building Quality Homes

Circulate often so that mistakes are caught early, while praising those who are doing a job well.

Check the construction manual if you have any questions, and if it is still unclear ask your Habitat Site Supervisor.

Have a daily walk-through with your Site Supervisor, so that he/she can help point out potential quality problems.

If needed, work on another home before your work day.

Closing

The closing date is set by Habitat based on inspections, punch list, homeowner hours and attorney availability. Walkthroughs by the construction Site Supervisor and homeowner, Construction Superintendent, and the Family Services staff must be completed and the punch list items repaired. Only the Habitat Family Services staff should notify the homeowner to give notice to his or her landlords of their moving day. Please do not give homeowners a false hope by promising any closing/move in day. Our current goal is to have a certificate of occupancy with-in four weeks of the last volunteer work day with move in/closing 2-4 weeks after that. The homeowner must complete all 250 hours of sweat equity before closing on the home.

Task Leader

Focus: The position of Task Leader for a Habitat for Humanity Adopt-A-Home is crucial to a well run job site. The Task Leader supervises crew leaders and crew members on a particular task. The key to this position is leadership: concentrating on safety, quality, teaching, & morale. It is often said that an effective House or Task Leader never wears a tool belt or picks up a hammer.

TASKS TO BE COMPLETED BEFORE THE START OF THE HOUSE:

1. Work with your Volunteer Coordinator to recruit Crew Leaders and evaluate their skills. 2. From your House Leader acquire and complete the “Skills Evaluation Form.”(pages 47-48) Arrange to work on another home if you need to increase your skill level. 3. Six weeks before the project start day, meet with the House Leader, other Task Leaders, and Habitat’s Construction Superintendent. During this meeting, plan to learn more about how to successfully complete your project. From the House Leader, acquire and review the Construction Manual, as familiarity with Habitat building and safety methods are important to your group’s success. 5. Meet with your crew leaders to plan the day’s work, and assign specific tasks to each of your crew leaders. Forward to them the appropriate section of the Construction Manual. 6. Working with the House Leader and Crew Leaders, arrange to have appropriate tools on site.

4

TASKS TO BE COMPLETED ON SITE:

1. Review task in Construction Manual, or on the website under “Construction How To’s”, before arriving and bring it with you to the job site. 2. Be among the first persons at the job site each work day. 3. Check materials and tools to be sure you have everything required for the day’s work. 4. If House Leader is not present, gather volunteers together in order to welcome them; open with a devotional/prayer; provide building and safety instructions; review tasks list; and divide your members into their crews. Allow time for Crew Leaders to orient and instruct crews. 5. Circulate among crews checking quality and safety, and answering questions. Think ahead so that all tasks will be completed. 6. Meet with the Habitat Site Supervisor & House Leader towards the end of the day to review work completed and plan for next work day. Clean the site and put away materials and tools. 7. Thank volunteers for their participation and ask for feedback.

QUALITY CHECKPOINTS:

You are focused on the next task in your schedule so that you can reassign crews or reorganize with a minimum loss of time so that volunteers on the job site feel useful but are not frantic. House, Task, and Crew Leaders are prepared for work on the job site. Safety guidelines are being followed. No nail guns are being used and everyone has hand tools. You are following the Habitat Construction Manual . No one under 16 is present on the job site. You are watching for individuals and/or crews that are either struggling with a task or who appear to have nothing to do and intervene where necessary.

Fund Raising Coordinator

Focus: This committee is involved in raising funds, involvement and awareness for your project’s Adopt-A-Home. This committee will vary in size, depending on your group’s financial situation. If you have one source of funds that is already committed, you may not need to form this committee. Other groups, however, may need a committee of 10 or so. If you are forming a large committee, you will probably want to have a variety of people involved, ranging from experienced fund raisers to worker bees to enthusiastic go-getters. Look for people who can convey their enthusiasm for the program to others. You may also wish to add the following specialists to your committee: Project Banker, In-kind Solicitation Coordinator & Special Events Coordinator

TASKS TO BE COMPLETED:

1. Recruit members for the Fund Raising sub-committee. 2. Create goals and plan for fund raising. 3. Decide if you are going to solicit for in-kind contributions of sub-contract or material. A list of common donations and their in-kind value is found on page 52. A list of material specifications is found on pages 53-54. Contact Stephan Eichert at 704-716-7064 if you have any questions about the value of donations or the types of donations that can be accepted. Send him the Adopt-A-Home In-Kind Donation Report sheet (found on page 55) for each donation. 4. Open a separate bank account if needed (see Tax Deductibility section). 5. Begin fund raising, keeping the Project Leader informed of project progress. 6. Six weeks before the house start day, forward at least 50% of money to Habitat. The 50% can include in-kind pledges with completed in-kind forms. 7. Immediately before construction begins, send remainder of money to Linda Blum at Habitat.

QUALITY CHECKPOINTS:

An accurate record of individual cash contributors has been kept. An accurate record of donations of materials or services by individuals and corporations has been kept. Those who donated money have been thanked by either your group or Habitat. Those who donated materials (food, construction materials, tools, etc.) have been thanked by either your group or Habitat.

Fund Raising Coordinator

Questions and Concerns

Business, schools, church and civic groups can contact Linda Blum, at 704-716-7073. She will be glad to answer your committee’s questions on fundraising plans, tax deductibility, displays, etc.

Accounting

Before you solicit any contributions, determine where the money will be deposited, to whom the checks will be mailed, to whom the checks will be written, and in what way your money will be tracked.

Ideally your group will collect checks and forward them to Habitat in batches. That way you are assured of your contribution total and donors. Past history has shown us that severe difficulties in accounting may occur if many small individual contributions are sent directly to Habitat. People often will not mark the checks and then the money would not be allocated to your AAH project. If your organization is tax exempt, we encourage you to use your banker to establish an account. Your group will want to have this plan in place before you solicit donations so that checks for your project can be made out correctly and deposited in a timely manner.

Tax Deductibility

The laws on what is or is not tax deductible can be complex. Tax deductible contributions include:

Donations of cash or stock.

Food given to feed volunteers.

Materials and/or services given by corporations for which they would normally receive payment.

To receive documentation from Habitat for tax purposes, donors must make the payment to Habitat Charlotte.

There are some advantages to donating stock rather than cash. Contact Linda Blum at Habitat, 704- 716-7073 if you have someone interested in making a stock donation.

Direct gifts to homeowners are not tax deductible as this is considered a personal gift.

In-kind Contributions

If you are interested in soliciting for in-kind items (donations of materials or professional services), please follow these steps:

The value of in-kind subcontractors and material specifications are on pages 52-54.

Contact

Stephan Eichert at 704-716-7064 if you have any questions about the appropriateness or value of

a donation.

Compile a list of businesses that you intend to contact then check with Habitat’s Development Director, Linda Blum at 704-716-7073. This will ensure that we have not recently solicited a business on your list.

After the donation is committed, communicate with Stephan Eichert by filling out the in-kind report form (page 55) so that he can schedule the use of the service or material

Complete your in-kind solicitations by the time the house begins and the final payment is due.

Some donations need to be finalized early (such as grading, windows, and plumbing on a slab foundation) in order to be used on your house.

Fund Raising Coordinator

You can solicit for double donations (i.e. two electrical contractors) and you’ll get credit for them. Of course, one will be used on another home.

The in-kind report form will generate a Habitat receipt for the donor’s tax records. This receipt will have a description of materials and/or services donated. The donor sets the value.

Donations to the Charlotte Re-Store do not count as an in-kind donation, and will not result in credit toward to sponsorship amount.

Displays

Work with your Publicity Committee and set up a display about Habitat. Call Habitat’s Development Director to borrow photos, videos, display board, or “We’re Hammering with Habitat” banners.

Extra Funds

Some groups raise more money than their goal. Various groups have done different things like saving the money for another project, giving the money to another organization as “seed” money, or helping to fund the tithe of $4000 per house which we give to our partner Habitat affiliate in El Salvador. This money cannot be used to purchase extras for your homeowner. Please refer to the policy below.

Gifts to Homeowners

The Board of Directors of Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte has approved a policy placing restrictions on Adopt-a-Home group’s gifts to Habitat homeowners. It prohibits Adopt-a-Home groups from giving expensive items, such as new furniture, appliances, fencing, etc. to Habitat homeowners. Appropriate housewarming gifts are items such as a mailbox, a doormat, a nice plant, or a photo album with pictures from the project (Cost should not exceed $100.) Adopt-a-Home groups are also prohibited from seeking donations of new items to be given to the homeowner.

Thank You’s

Habitat really wants each person or group who has donated money, raffle or auction items or in-kind materials or services to Habitat to receive a thank you from Habitat. We ask that you forward the name, complete address and what was donated, include donations of cash, materials, and food in

your list.

tax exempt, and you have already issued receipts to your contributors, our thank you note will indicate that.

Most groups also choose to write a thank you letter to their contributors. If your group is

Fund Raising Coordinator

Fund Raising Ideas Others Have Used

Following are some of the many terrific ideas groups have used to raise money for Habitat.

Sports Events: Consider hosting a golf, ping-pong, basketball, or other sports tournament where the proceeds benefit Habitat. Having these events in coordination with one of the sales events listed below can greatly increase your proceeds.

Kids Fund Raisers: Fundraising is an excellent opportunity to involve the youth in your group, who can organize money raising events, for example, car washes, carnivals, or various kinds of marathons (bike, dance, etc.). Habitat International also has available house banks (made of paper) to collect funds.

Sales Events: Most groups sell T-shirts not only to raise money but to build group cohesion. Habitat Charlotte prints shirts regularly that you could purchase and add your logo. Many groups, however, develop their own T-shirt design. Groups have had barbecue dinners, pancake breakfasts, and have sold programs. Often groups approach the Habitat staff with fund raising ideas (i.e. selling entertainment books) which we will be glad to discuss with your group.

Buying the House: Invite individuals to buy part of the house. For instance, offer the door for $100, windows for $50, and a box of nails for $5. This helps make the Adopt-A-Home house more real. Or charge folks $1 -$10 to sign a 2 X 4 board that will be used in the house.

Raffles & Auctions: Consider having an event to raise money which includes a raffle and/or a silent/live auction. Ask members in your group to provide merchandise or services for the raffle or auction (for instance a formal dinner from a chef, a house call from an electrician, doll & play houses, quilts, pro-sports paraphernalia, etc.) If your group has access to a high traffic area, such as the lobby of a large building, consider soliciting permission for a raffle there.

In-kind: Habitat has a list of items and services which your group can solicit to decrease the amount of cash needed to build your Adopt-A-Home.

Partner with Retailers: Many retailers are open to hosting fundraising events, especially during the holidays. You might send volunteers to gift wrap for donations, staff customer service booths, or arrange for a percentage of sales to be donated to your project. Habitat staff can provide banners and printed materials to support these efforts.

Publicity Coordinator

Focus: By publicizing your Adopt-A-Home both within your organization and to the community (optional), this committee plays an important part in both energizing and informing your group. For most groups one person can handle most of the details, as long as that person is working closely with the other committee chairs to acquire information. If your Adopt-A-Home consists of multiple organizations or has many volunteers, you may need to bring in more people.

TASKS TO BE COMPLETED-INTERNAL PUBLICITY:

1. Gather information about Habitat (background info on page 56) and your project. 2. Define your audience - who you wish to communicate with. 3. Determine the ways in which you can communicate to your group, i.e. newsletters, e-mail, bulletin inserts, etc. 4. Set a publicity plan in coordination with the Project Team, remembering to include information about all areas fund raising, special events and volunteering in construction. 5. Publicize dedication time, date, and location. 6. Follow through with your plan.

TASKS TO BE COMPLETED-COMMUNITY PUBLICITY:

1. Gather information about Habitat and your project. 2. Determine if your group desires community publicity. 3. Write a press release (sample on page 58) about your project in conjunction with Linda Blum at Habitat, 704-716-7073. 4. Investigate publications that have something in common with your group -for example trade publications, church newspapers, etc. 5. Time your release to a significant point in the project, i.e. ground breaking, completion of the house, or the point at which your money is raised. 6. Forward your release to the media. Be sure to send a copy to Linda

QUALITY CHECKPOINTS:

Press releases have been reviewed by Habitat's Communications Manager, Akilah Luke at

704-716-5630.

Everyone in your group is informed and up-to-date on the project's progress.

Publicity Coordinator

Internal Communication

You should work closely with the Fundraising and Volunteer Coordinator to acquire information about what you will need to convey to your members. Be sure to include information about the following:

Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte – background information on page 56.

The progress of fund raising and any special events.

Date and time of your kick off celebration.

When the house will begin.

The family with whom you will be building.

When volunteers are needed and for which tasks.

Age restrictions on construction volunteers.

What volunteers on the site need to know & bring.

When your dedication will occur.

What Every Construction Volunteer Needs to Know

Tools: Every volunteer needs to bring a hammer, nail apron, pencil and a tape measure. Many volunteers also bring small tools such as utility knives, chalk boxes, gloves, squares, levels, etc.

Clothing: Each volunteer should wear clothing that they do not mind getting quite dirty and that is appropriate for the season. Volunteers may also need a reminder to bring a hat, bandanna, and/or sunscreen. Sandals and other open-toed shoes are not allowed on the job site.

Job Site Location: Contact Beth Van Gorp at 704-716-7077 at Habitat if you need a map or other information about the job site. Information will also be on the Habitat web site.

Release of Liability: Let everyone know that they will be expected to assume responsibility for themselves on the job site.

Safety: From the very beginning, encourage volunteers to be safe. Remember Habitat's safety slogan is "No Job Is So Important that it Can't be Done Safely."

Age of Volunteers: No one under the age of 16 will be permitted on a building site while work is being done. No one under the age of 18 will be allowed to use any power equipment, work on the roof or at a height greater than 6’ (ie on the 2 nd level of scaffolding) or perform any other hazardous activity. Volunteers under the age of 18 and their parent or legal guardian are required to complete and sign a special "Minor's Release and Waiver of Liability" form.

Ideas to Build Excitement

Borrow Habitat’s display board, or use a bulletin board, with pictures of Habitat workers

Tell people about Habitat Charlotte’s web page at www.habitatcharlotte.org

Regularly e-mail interested folks about the progress. Create or utilize an in house web page, email or internet system for updates and photos.

Borrow Habitat’s video and/or slide show, or invite someone from Habitat to speak.

Have a nail driving contest

Hang up posters. Have a cubicle/door/etc. decorating contest

Display our “hammering with Habitat" banner

Wear pins that say “Ask me about Habitat.”

Have a day where folks wear construction clothes.

Publicity Coordinator

External Communication

How to Get Noticed

Send out a preliminary release 4 - 6 weeks before the project starts so that news sources about your participation in the Adopt-A-Home program. Follow up with immediately before the project (use the same release or a new one), as a reminder.

Use “active” language. Avoid passive forms of verbs.

Use contacts people in your group have. A personal letter or phone call may do wonders.

Talk with Linda Blum at Habitat, 704-716-7073, about the best timing for your release. It is to your advantage to distribute your release in coordination with other releases Habitat or other Adopt-A-Home groups may be sending at the same time.

Think beyond the local newspaper. Are there magazines, newsletters or web pages for your trade association, denomination or other organizations in which you’re involved?

What to include in the Press Release – Sample on page 58

A contact name and phone number, so they know who to call if they have questions.

What your goals are: for instance “We wanted to build bridges with our neighboring congregations.” Let them know why this is special and how this project fits in with your organization’s larger goals.

Habitat Charlotte builds more than 50 homes each year, so you’ll need to focus on what is unique about your project. Think about who your volunteers are, who your sponsors are, and what your reasons are for coming together.

Quotes from people involved showing their interest and excitement in the project.

When the project will be occurring.

Use “Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte” or “Habitat Charlotte” to avoid confusion with other local affiliates.

Use language that affirms Habitat homeowners. For example, you might say that Habitat works with "All God's people in need" rather than “needy families” or “deserving poor.” This wording recognizes that everyone involved in building a Habitat home, donors, volunteers, and homeowners, get something they “need” from a Habitat project. If you would be comfortable reading the release in front of the homeowner, and that homeowner was your relative, you’ve selected the right wording.

Reminders

We have included a sample press release as well as some background information about Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte.

You are encouraged to email or fax any press releases to Linda Blum at the Habitat office, phone – 704-716-7073, fax – 704-342-1797, prior to distributing them to the media. Allowing our development staff to review your releases in advance for accuracy, word choice and coordination with other releases assures both your group and Habitat the best possible coverage.

Amenities Coordinator

Focus: The Amenities Committee is responsible for organizing your Adopt-A-Home’s behind the scenes activities. These activities provide many opportunities for fellowship among volunteers, homeowners and non-construction volunteers. Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte recommends that this committee organize a kick-off event prior to house construction and provide food, water and refreshments on the job site, and plan the dedication. It may be helpful for your committee to include volunteers who will be responsible for each of these tasks.

TASKS TO BE COMPLETED- KICK OFF EVENT:

1. Work with the Project Team to plan date and time of Kick-Off Event. 2. Plan the event using the Project Team as resources, i.e. asking the Volunteer Coordinator for people to help, the Publicity Coordinator for help with publicizing the event, etc. 3. Be sure to include the homeowner in the planning. 4. Inform Beth Van Gorp, 704-716-7077 or Bert Green, 704-716-7068, of your plans. 5. Plan the program for the event. You may want to ask the homeowner, your Project Leader, House Leader, and/or a Habitat representative (Executive Director or Site Supervisor) to speak. 6. After the event, thank those who participated.

TASKS TO BE COMPLETED- FOOD & REFRESHMENTS:

1. Plan to acquire a water cooler and cups for the site. Check immediately before project with your Site Supervisor to see if tap water is available on the site. 2. Plan which meals & snacks and how you will provide them for your workers. 3. If you are planning to ask businesses for meals, touch base with the Habitat Development Director, Linda Blum, at 704-716-7073. 4. Work with your Volunteer Coordinator to recruit volunteers to solicit, prepare or serve food. 5. Remind volunteers and suppliers one week before their service date. 6. Arrange for supplies, such as plates, cups, napkins, etc., to be available. 7. If you feel you need a table, arrange for one to be brought to the site. 8. Remove any trash from the job site that would attract dogs and/or bugs. 9. Forward a list of names, addresses, and items which have been donated to Habitat and to your Fund Raising sub-committee.

TASKS TO BE COMPLETED- DEDICATION:

1. For a dedication to be held at the Habitat home, set date and time with House Leader, Project Leader, Habitat family, and Beth Van Gorp 704-716-7077. 2. Plan if any refreshments will be served, arrange for them if you do wish them served. 3. Using sample dedications, page 59, and working with homeowner, create program. Invite appropriate folks to participate. 4. Working with publicity folks, advertise dedication to your group. 5. On day of dedication, facilitate smooth execution.

QUALITY CHECKPOINTS:

Amenities Coordinator

You are communicating with your Volunteer Coordinator about volunteers you will need as well as the numbers of volunteers that will need to be fed each day at the job site. You are maintaining contact with the Fund Raising Coordinator about any businesses who are providing food. Your group is encouraging input from the Habitat homeowner about the kick off event. You are serving food that has been stored in a safe and hygienic situation. For example, do not serve sandwiches with mayonnaise that have been kept un-refrigerated all afternoon. You are communicating with homeowner and volunteer while planning the dedication.

Amenities Coordinator

Kick Off Event

An optional, but fun, event to connect your team and the homeowner. The Kick Off event can excite people about working in partnership with a Habitat family to build a home by giving your group a chance to meet the Habitat family, nurturing a sense of fellowship, and giving you a good opportunity to communicate specifics to construction volunteers. Many groups make this event a potluck dinner. Some groups have resources such as church cooks or business cafeterias that would be willing to provide the food.

Food and Refreshments

Many groups choose to provide food on the job site as it not only satisfies bodily hunger, but spiritual ones as well. It provides an opportunity for fellowship among your workers as well as allowing those who are not able to work on the job site to be part of the excitement. Having these meals on the job site will save time, maintain your group’s momentum, and keep your site secure.

Water

Remember your group is responsible for providing drinking water, water coolers, ice, and cups. You should plan to have plenty of water available for your work groups, particularly if you are building in the summer. To save money, consider partially filling with water and then freezing two-liter soda containers. When placed in your cooler, they will keep your water quite cool especially if the top left off of the two-liter container.

Solicitation

There are many different ways that your group can provide food during the times your house is under construction. Many groups solicit within their own organization, for instance a church could ask different church school classes, service organizations, circles, or youth groups to provide, make, and serve the food. Many business-sponsored Adopt-A-Homes ask restaurants or their own food services to provide meals for the workers.

Number of Meals

You need to work closely with your Volunteer Coordinator (the sample volunteer schedule on page 8 has approximate numbers per day) to have an accurate count to give the food suppliers. Remember to include the homeowner in your count as well as the Habitat Supervisor and or AmeriCorps members. Even though your group may have been working closely with the homeowner during the construction part of the day, the homeowner may feel isolated during meals. Encourage members of your group, if needed, to invite the homeowner to join them for lunch

Informing Habitat

You need to inform Habitat for Humanity’s Director of Development, Linda Blum at 704-716-7073, if you are thinking about soliciting from local restaurants to insure that you are not asking someone who has recently donated. Habitat may also be soliciting from the management of the organizations for larger contributions. After your group has completed the house, forward a list of the names, addresses, and items donated to Habitat so that we can thank them as well.

Amenities Coordinator

Habitat Neighborhoods

During the time that you are working on your house, someone who is not a worker or a perspective homeowner may approach your group about getting something to eat. It may be a child, a neighbor, or a drunk. Many groups reply with a stock answer that the food is for the Habitat volunteers while others give out what they have left. Individuals who have not signed up to work, and children, should not be on the job site. It is especially important that the kids stay away from the house, so encourage them to remain on the street or sidewalk.

Group Dedication

Most groups have a dedication at the Habitat home. The group and homeowner, in consultation with Habitat, choose the date and time. Your group will have a chance to speak, receive a plaque, and share the moment with the homeowner. You could also be a part of one of our periodic group dedications which are held at a local church. In this case, Habitat will arrange the program & refreshments

Responsibilities of the sponsor when the dedication is held at the house site:

Setting the day and time in conjunction with the homeowner and Habitat.

Communicating with the homeowner to make sure that they are aware of date, time, and place.

Setting the order of service – see sample programs on page 59-60. Feel free to be creative.

Creating a program to hand out to participants (optional).

Bringing and deciding what refreshments will be served (optional).

Providing the ribbon and scissors for a ribbon cutting (optional).

Responsibilities of Habitat when the dedication is held at the house site:

Providing the bible for the homeowner.

Having a representative present to thank your group.

Providing a small appreciation gift for your Project Leader and House Leader.

Providing a plaque given to your group in appreciation of your home sponsorship.

Things that should be included in program

Welcome

Opportunity for the Project Leader and House Leader to speak

Opportunity for Habitat representative(s) to speak (for example, Bert Green and the Site Supervisor)

Presentation of the Bible (done by the Family Partner, House Leader, minister, or Habitat Executive Director)

Opportunity for the homeowner to speak

Things that could be included in program

Music

Litany, prayer, or message by religious leader – Beth Van Gorp, 704-716-7077, at Habitat has scripture and prayers available

Remarks by family partner, minister, business executive or business owner

Presentation of a small housewarming gift (ie: mail box, picture album, potted plant)

Introductions of key people present

Opportunity for members of audience to speak, ribbon cutting

Family Partner

Focus: Habitat encourages each Adopt-A-Home group to find someone within the group to act as a liaison between your group and the homeowner. The Family Partner is asked to provide support to the Habitat homeowner partner throughout the periods of sweat equity, home-building, and moving- in. This lengthy process (at least six months) is exciting but can also be stressful to Habitat families. Habitat hopes that the partnership between the volunteer Family Partner and the Habitat homeowner partner will evolve into a lasting relationship.

TASKS TO BE COMPLETED:

1. Meet and get to know your Habitat homeowner partner 2. Encourage the Habitat family to be involved in all aspects of the project including pre- construction activities such as the kick-off dinner. This allows the family to feel included and facilitates other volunteers getting to know the family. 3. If your group has a kick off dinner, make arrangements for the family to be there. If transportation is a problem, arrange to pick them up. 4. Work with your Habitat homeowner partner on his/her/their home at least one day while it is under construction. (Working together is a great way to get to know each other). 5. Work with your Volunteer Coordinator to identify a person (called the Construction Buddy) to work with (side-by-side) the homeowner when you will not be present. The homeowner should be actively participating in each phase of construction and learning valuable construction skills. 6. During project make regular contact with homeowner partner by phone or at the work site. 7. Attend the House Dedication and involve the family in planning this event. (see notes) 8. Provide support and assistance to Habitat homeowner partner in dealing with concerns or problems relating to the Habitat program. Use Habitat staff as a resource. 9. Ensure that your group adheres to the Habitat Board of Directors policy which details restrictions on Adopt-a-Home groups’ gifts to homeowners.

QUALITY CHECKPOINTS:

Open lines of communication have developed between the volunteer Family Partner and the Habitat homeowner partner. Volunteers and homeowners have formed a relationship. Homeowner is actively involved in all aspects of project including each phase of construction as well as special events. Homeowner feels comfortable talking to Family Partner about concerns relating to Habitat program.

Family Partner

Who should be the Family Partner?

An individual, family, or couple may serve as the Family Partner. Some groups have designated two individuals to share the responsibilities of partnering. Qualities of a good family partner include open-mindedness and appreciation of diversity, good listening skills, and patience. Family partners should have the capability to empower their Habitat homeowner partners to use their own strengths to overcome obstacles and achieve their goals. The Family Partner should be excited about building a relationship with a Habitat family. No construction experience is needed, but an interest in construction of Habitat homes is encouraged.

Staff Support

Family Partners are encouraged to use the Habitat staff for support. Any concerns or questions about partnering should be addressed to Nancy Pugh at 704-716-7074.

Special Events

Each homeowner-in-process is required to attend a series of Homeowner-in-Process (HIP) classes. Partners are encouraged to attend at least one of these classes.

Dedication

Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte is a Christian Ministry and the house is dedicated to God. As a symbol of this commitment each family is presented with a bible. The dedication ceremony is a celebratory service that provides a chance for recognition of your group, an opportunity to share, and sense of completion for all.

Most groups plan and execute their own dedication at the house site although occasional group dedications are held in a local church. Information on planning the dedication is found in the

amenities section on page 31 and sample programs are found on pages 59-60.

If your group is

planning your own dedication, the Family Partner is often key in setting the program and making

sure that your group includes the homeowner in the planning process. Often times the Family Partner, presents the bible to the homeowner and/or brings a potluck item for the luncheon

Either way, the things that are usually included are: music, prayers or litanies, presentation of a plaque to your group(s), presentation of a small gift to the Project Leader and House Leader, and

presentation of a bible (provided by Habitat) to the homeowner. Leader and/or House Leader will speak as will the homeowner.

It is expected that the Project

Family Partner

Other Optional Tasks

The following is a list of other things you may wish to consider doing with your partner family.

Work beside the family during construction helping to integrate them with your group.

If the family hasn’t completed their HIP classes, attend a class.

Invite the family to attend your church/religious institution, reciprocate.

After construction, Family Partners are encouraged to attend the house closing.

Family Partners may wish to assist the Habitat homeowner with plans for moving and perhaps with unpacking.

Keep in contact with the family after they have moved into their own home.

The Family Partner is encouraged to spend time with the Habitat family away from the Habitat site. (Possible examples: invite the family to dinner, share a picnic in a park, go to a ball game, take the kids to a movie or rent a video, etc.).

Visit the family after they have moved into their new Habitat home

Attend one neighborhood association meeting with the Habitat homeowner partner in the family’s new neighborhood to encourage community involvement.

Lastly, the Family Partner and homeowner may want to share with each other their own talents and interests and perhaps take on a joint project such as sanding and refinishing a piece of furniture. Or if you like to garden, you may wish to assist with landscaping or give some tips on maintaining a nice yard.

Other ideas are available as well.

Pugh (704-716-7074) or other members of the Habitat staff if he/she has any questions or concerns about the partnering process.

The Family Partner should feel comfortable contacting Nancy

Homeowner Gift Policy

The Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte Board of Directors has approved a policy placing restrictions on Adopt-a-Home groups’ gifts to Habitat homeowners. The Habitat Board prohibits Adopt-a- Home groups from giving expensive items, such as new furniture, appliances, fencing, etc. to Habitat homeowners. Appropriate housewarming gifts are items such as a doormat, a nice plant, or a photo album with pictures from the project (Cost should not exceed $100.)

Habitat for Humanity is a partnership, not a charity. Our philosophy is one of empowerment: we

give a hand-up, not a hand-out.

fair to the other homeowners who don’t have a relationship with an Adopt-a-Home group. Gifts given to homeowners are not tax-deductible.

In addition, giving an expensive gift to one Habitat family is not

Adopt-a-Home groups are also prohibited from seeking donations of new items to be given to the homeowner as it is not fair to other homeowners. Also, solicitation of contributions could interfere with the fundraising that Habitat development staff and volunteers are already doing in the community.

Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte is not discouraging your generosity. If your organization has additional funding, Habitat recommends that you contribute this money to be used for the construction of another house for a family in need of decent, simple, and affordable housing.

Family Partner

Article from Charlotte Observer by Charlie Summers, Pastor of Siegle Avenue Presbyterian Church

After a decade of work in the inner city, I believe that there are two rules for dealing with our community problems. Whether we are talking about helping people on welfare go to work, or guiding children to do well in school, or helping blighted neighborhoods recover, there are two basic rules: the Golden Rule and the Iron Rule.

The Golden Rule, as taught by Jesus and other religious leaders, is “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” It is a rule of basic reciprocity. The Iron Rule, as coined by community organizer Saul Alinsky, is “Never do for others what they can do for themselves.” This is the rule of basic personal responsibility.

The Golden Rule reminds us that we are all in this together. The way we want to be treated is the key to how we should treat others. This rule applies to community decisions as well as personal relationships. What we want for our own children, school, jobs, is what we should help others have as well: dignity, equal opportunity, fair treatment.

I also think that this rule helps us remember that we did not get here on our own. As Moses warned the

people headed for the Promised Land “You will inherit houses you did not build, wells you did not dig, vineyards you did not plant.” None of us got here on our own. We did not build the schools where we studied, nor the highways that get us to work, nor develop the democracy that allows us to guide our community priorities. No one has pulled himself or herself up by bootstraps alone. We always stand on the shoulders of those who have gone before us.

To tell poor neighborhoods there is no money for their schools – or to tell low-wage employees they may only have part-time hours – we are breaking the Golden Rule. Not only should we treat others the way we want to be treated. We should share with others what we have received along the way. The Iron Rule reminds us that each person must respond to the gifts and challenges of life. Each of us must get up and do what needs to be done (as Garrison Keillor’s Powder Milk biscuits tell us). “Never do for others what they can do for themselves” because the only way we become better citizens, parents, community members is if we each contribute what we can.

We break the Iron Rule when we rush into poor neighborhoods and “fix” things for them. When we do not include them in deciding what to do and how to do it, then we are telling them that they have nothing to contribute that their ideas do not count. A civic group decided to “adopt” a run-down inner city school. When they looked around, they found that the worst thing about the place was the peeling facade. But when they talked with students and teachers, they learned that most of the restrooms were unusable. So together they worked on those restrooms. In the process, the students felt listened to, and the community group felt appreciated. They joined forces to do what neither could do alone.

I will tell you a more common experience. People from outside the low-income neighborhood come into

help. They look around and pick a project based on their needs, time and ability (like fixing the playground). Then they do the job, step back and say to the community, “We did this for you.” But within a few months

the playground will look the same as it used to. And the outsiders will complain about the ungrateful people who live over there. Never do for others what they can do for themselves.

Breaking the Iron Rule steals from the poor. It steals their initiative to make decisions about their own community. It robs them of self-esteem as it silently communicates, “your opinion does not matter.” It takes away an opportunity for

them to develop their gifts and to enjoy the satisfaction of accomplishment.

together. That way they can guide us to bear one another’s burden’s while each carries his or her own share of the load.

The Golden Rule and the Iron Rule belong

Volunteer Coordinator

Focus: The Volunteer Coordinator recruits volunteers and matches their interests and skills with the positions available. You may wish to organize a sub-committee, especially if the group is large and/or many groups are involved. In this latter case you may want to have one person from each organization serve as a point person and organize their group’s volunteers.

TASKS TO BE COMPLETED:

1. Recruit members for the Volunteer Committee, if needed. 2. Review volunteer needs for all sub-committees and for construction. 3. Prepare a system to track those interested, their skill level, and availability. Some organizations are creating on-line sign up programs and web sites to aid in their coordination. 4. Forward to your group information on types of volunteer work available, including a return form that assesses their skills and interest. Enclosed is a volunteer form that your group may want to use (page 61). 5. Work with the House Leader to identify and/or recruit key volunteers, especially Task and crew leaders. 6. After house schedule is set, sign up crew members for specific days. Inform folks of job site address, appropriate clothing and tools necessary, etc. A sample letter is found on page 61. 7. For construction volunteers aged 16-17, send the Minor’s Release of Liability for parent/ guardian to sign. This release is found on pages 65-66. Page 38 has information on Youth Participation for those younger than 16. 9. During the month before the house start date, check to see that training is occurring. 10. Remind volunteers one week before their work date. 11. Have volunteers sign the “Release of Liability Forms” on the job site (Habitat will have a notebook with the forms on the job site. Take to the job site. Make sure that volunteers realize that they are signing the Release of Liability and not just “signing” in. 12. If desired, acquire name tags and arrange for them to be present at the job site. 13. Turn in (or leave with Habitat staff) completed Volunteer Release of Liability Forms to Beth Van Gorp at Habitat for liability reasons. 14. Contact Beth Van Gorp for directions and/or a map to your job site. Your group will be posted each week on the Habitat web site with a link for your volunteers.

QUALITY CHECKPOINTS:

Help ensure enthusiasm for the project. Remember to thank all those involved. Keep accurate records of volunteers and when they want to volunteer. Check regularly to be sure that you are informed about the progress of the house and dedication schedule.

Volunteer Coordinator

Suggestions for Recruiting Volunteer

Ask! Set up a table and grab folks as they go by. Most people will say “yes.”

Stage a publicity event. I guarantee that you’ll get attention if you start hammering in the lobby of your building or outside your sanctuary (after services of course).

Book the whole day with a group. Smaller parts of your organization may be looking for team building activities. Try departments, church school classes, prayer groups, or suppliers.

Cubicle/door decorating contest based on Habitat.

Create a web page – consider using online sign up and posting photos

Construction clothes day, at church or on a casual day at work.

Pins that say, “Ask me about Habitat.”

Invite a Habitat homeowner to speak to your group.

Have folks sign a two by four. This can also be used as a fund-raiser.

Borrow Habitat’s display board.

Ask Habitat, we have groups that may be able to boost your numbers (they may however not be skilled).

Have Task Leaders and/or Crew Leaders help recruit volunteers.

Special Volunteer Jobs

You may want to recruit people for the following tasks:

Site Host: Greets volunteers as they arrive, insures that they sign the Release of Liability, hands out name tags. If people arrive late they direct them to the House Leader. When the homeowner

arrives on the site, they welcome them and introduce the homeowner to volunteers.

Host also directs volunteers to snacks, the first aid box and other amenities on site and could also sell T-shirts, bring water, and do other errands.

The Site

Devotion Leader: Someone already on the job site, or someone else who wants to contribute to the project, should begin each morning with devotions or a spiritual message.

Construction Buddy: Someone to work side by side with the Habitat family on the construction site on the days when the Family Partner will not be present.

Child Care: If your group has folks with small children, the Volunteer Coordinator may want to arrange child care during work times.

Translators: If your partner family’s English skills are not strong, your group may wish to recruit volunteer translators to help integrate the family on the job site as well as at any special events, including the dedication. If no one in your group has this skill, Nancy Pugh (704-716- 7074) with Habitat’s Family Service Staff, may be able to help you.

Safety Leader: Ask one person to outline the safety guidelines each day on the site and then check to make sure everyone is following them.

Web Designer: Create a web site that will assist with volunteer sign up and communication

Telephone Tree: Organize folks to help you make reminder calls to volunteers.

Tool Coordinator: Arrange for all the specialized tools to be on the job site (those beyond what every volunteer should bring). Tools are listed on page 49.

Volunteer Coordinator

Number of Volunteers

There is an optimum number of volunteers that can work effectively on any given day. This number

will be determined by the skill level of the volunteers and the quality of the leadership provided by

the Task Leaders and Crew Leaders.

recommended number per day. Consider having more volunteers if most of your volunteers have previous construction experience, or your House, Task, and Crew Leaders are skilled in construction

and leadership. If you recruit many more volunteers than we suggest, make sure that you have a good plan for using them. Otherwise, you may have many volunteers standing around without anything to do.

The sample volunteer schedule (on page 9) has the

Be sure to schedule some “extra” volunteers at the end of the project to help finish all the punch list items, those small things that make the house complete at the end.

Age Limitation:

No one under the age of 16 will be permitted on a building site while work is being done. Teens, 16 and 17, may work on a construction site with some limitations. Those under 18 must not use power tools, work on the roof, or work from a height above six feet (for example on the 2nd level of scaffolding or from an extension ladder). Volunteers under the age of 18 and their parent or legal guardian are required to complete and sign a special “Minor’s Release and Waiver of Liability” form.

Ideas to Involve Youth

For youth under 16 people encourage them to participate in our Building on Youth program http://habitatcharlotte.org/volunteer_youth.cfm. This program allows them to earn a Habitat pin or wristband. Other ways they can be help:

Prepare and serve meals.

Have youth sign a two by four that will then be used in the building of the house.

Take pictures and create a scrap book as a remembrance of the project.

Make banners, flyers and posters.

Make and deliver a dinner for the Habitat family to have on their first night in the new home.

Make up a skit or song to entertain and inform potential volunteers about Habitat.

Decorate lunch bags or nail aprons for volunteers. Write notes to workers to put in lunch bags.

Provide special music or a litany during the dedication and/or lead a devotion.

Help registrar volunteers at the job site first thing in the morning (for older kids).

Help with child care.

Make mail boxes, toy chests, or bird houses to give to homeowners or to be used as fund raisers.

Connect with kids in Habitat neighborhoods - tutoring, playing sports, reading programs, etc.

Design a t-shirt or note cards for the project.

Lead educational activities (ie awareness weeks, construction outfit day, or panel discussions).

Call to remind volunteers that they have volunteered to work.

Assist in recruiting volunteers by working at the sign-up table.

Raise funds by having tricycle races, car washes, penny drives etc.

Take pictures and post them and other information on your web site.

Habitat International has small banks where kids can collect change for the project. They also have a calendar to go with it that leads kids in contemplation of housing issues.

Volunteer Coordinator

Organizing Volunteers

Also included in this manual are several forms that your group may wish to use including:

A Typical Schedule, page 9, that outlines the number of volunteers that you will need each day. You will need to communicate with your House Leader in order to learn the exact dates for each task and the number of volunteers you need on each of these days.

A Volunteers Sign-up Sheet, page 60, to distribute to interested and potential volunteers.

Habitat will provide a notebook with Release of Liability/Sign Up Forms, Pages 63-64 are provided as an example, it is meant to be copied on both sides, with the release on one side and

the sign up form on the other side.

Minor’s Release of Liability, pages 65-66, that will need to be sent out ahead of time and kept

in the registration notebook when the volunteer brings it to the job site.

Please encourage people to sing the form as they arrive. A

A sample confirmation letter to volunteers is included on page 62.

Find skilled volunteers by assessing the general level of skill among your volunteer pool. Ask around and you will probably discover some hidden “gems,” people knowledgeable in construction and who are also strong instructors and leaders.

What Every Construction Volunteer Needs to Know

Tools: Every volunteer needs to bring a hammer, nail apron, pencil and a tape measure. Many volunteers also bring small tools such as utility knives, chalk boxes, gloves, squares, levels, etc.

Construction How To’s and safety information is provided at http://habitatcharlotte.org/construction_howTos.cfm From the very beginning, encourage volunteers to be safe. Remember Habitat's safety slogan is "No Job Is So Important that it can’t be Done Safely." Volunteers will be required to follow safety instructions and policies including wearing hard hats and safety glasses.

Clothing: Each volunteer should wear clothing that they do not mind getting quite dirty and that is appropriate for the season. Volunteers may also need a reminder to bring a hat, bandanna, and/or sunscreen. Sandals and other open-toed shoes are not allowed on the job site.

Job Site Location: The location will be posted on our web site or you can contact Beth Van Gorp at Habitat (704-716-7074) for a map.

Release of Liability: Let everyone know that they will be expected to assume responsibility for themselves on the job site.

Age of Volunteers: No one under the age of 16 will be permitted on a building site while work is being done. No one under the age of 18 will be allowed to use any power equipment, work on the roof or at a height greater than 6’ or participate in any hazardous activity. Volunteers under the age of 18 and their parent or legal guardian are required to complete and sign a special "Minor's Release and Waiver of Liability" form.

Promptness is important because key information is covered at the beginning of the day. Work hours are 8am – 4pm. However in July and August we work from 7:00am – 12:30pm because

of the heat.

Split shifts are not permitted.

Rain Plan: Have everyone show up rain or shine. It often clears by 8 am and it may not be raining where the house is located.

Contact: Let folks know who to contact if they have any questions.

Information about the Homeowner: This really makes the project more real to everyone. Let them also know that the homeowner should be included in your group.

Volunteer Coordinator

Common Problems & A Few Solutions

Problem: The stress is getting to your group, and people are beginning to grumble.

Solutions:

with the homeowner. Keep your eyes on the prize, which is working in partnership with the family to build their dream.

Smile, praise and thank people for participating! Encourage them to work on a team

Begin the day with devotions and/or reflection. As a Christian organization, we encourage beginning the day with reading a scripture, devotion and a prayer. However, we recognize that this may not be appropriate for your group and encourage you to use other inspiration material. This really does make the day go smoother! Habitat has some devotions available, but we encourage your group to be original.

Problem: You have too many volunteers on the job site, and inexperienced volunteers have nothing to do. Solution: Your House and Task Leader should be planning ahead so that when crew leaders and members ask what to do, they already have a plan. Some jobs can be done at any time, especially clean up! There will also be the times when people will need to step back and share the work. This may also be a good time for people to take breaks.

Help insure that your House Leader, Task Leaders, Crew Leaders and Crew Members receive training in their area of construction.

Problem: Not everyone in your group has tools. Solution: Even though you have carefully explained the need for each person to have a basic set of tools, folks will show up without them. Your group may want to purchase a small supply of tools to have on hand to borrow or rent. Or members of your leadership group may have extras to share.

Timeline for Adopt-A-Home Projects

Key to Volunteers on the Project Team ALL: All members of Project Team PL: Project Leader HL: House Leader FP: Family Partner

FC: Fund Raising Coordinator VC: Volunteer Coordinator AC: Amenities Coordinator PC: Publicity Coordinator

The following is set as an idealized time line and is meant to avoid a big rush of work at the last minute. Of course, your group may have less or more time available and will need to adjust your

dates accordingly. Planning Manual.

Detailed information on each of these tasks is found in this Adopt-A-Home

9 Months - 1 Year for groups having to raise funds, 5-6 Months for groups were the money is raised.

Name Project Leader Forward signed Sponsorship Agreement to Habitat found on page 3(PL) Name Fundraising Coordinator and committee (ALL) Determine who will collect funds and where they will be collected/mailed (PL & FC) Determine if you will solicit for in-kind contributions of sub-contractor work or materials(FC) Present program to your congregation, group, or business (PL) Consider having a speaker from Habitat speak to your group (ALL)

program to your congr egation, group, or business (PL) Consider having a speaker from Habitat speak
program to your congr egation, group, or business (PL) Consider having a speaker from Habitat speak
program to your congr egation, group, or business (PL) Consider having a speaker from Habitat speak
program to your congr egation, group, or business (PL) Consider having a speaker from Habitat speak
program to your congr egation, group, or business (PL) Consider having a speaker from Habitat speak
program to your congr egation, group, or business (PL) Consider having a speaker from Habitat speak

5-6 Months before house start Recruit/Determine Project Team (ALL) and forward the names to Habitat – page 43 Forward the appropriate part of AAH Manual for each person on team to review (PL) Set up a system for committee chairs to report to Project Leader (ALL) Have a beginning organizational meeting to set goals for accomplishing specific items (ALL)

4

3

Months before house start Set start date and schedule in conjunction with Habitat’s Volunteer Coordinator or Construction Superintendent. Determine number of people needed per day (PL & HL) Distribute start date and schedule to Project Team (PL) Set date, time, and location for kick off event (PL & AC) Decide which meals and snacks you will provide work crews. Go over prospective donor list with the Habitat Development Director to ensure these groups have not been asked recently. (AC) Begin recruitment of Task Leaders/Crew Leaders, use “Skills Evaluation Form” on page 46 & 47 to evaluate skills (HL & VC) Have meeting of each sub-committee, if applicable (ALL)

Months before house start Solicit for meals and snacks you will provide to volunteers at the site (AC) Begin plans for T-shirts if desired (FC) Acquire Construction Manual from Habitat and review (HL & TL) Give Task Leaders a copy of applicable section of Construction Manual (HL)

2

6

1

1

1

Months before house start Arrange for supplies of plates, cups, napkins, water coolers, etc. to be available (AC) Plan a meeting that includes Habitat Construction Superintendent and Task Leaders (HL) Forward to Habitat’s Construction Superintendent the in-kind donation form for each donation Solicit for crew member volunteers (VC) Contact Nancy Pugh at Habitat to discuss Family Partner responsibilities.(FP)

Weeks before house start Send half of sponsorship fee to Habitat (attn. Linda Blum) (FC) Confirm participation of food providers by letter (AC) Meet with Habitat Construction Superintendent (HL & TL) Solicit for volunteers to be devotion leaders, registrars, and construction buddies (VC) Locate tools and ladders that you will need during project (HL& TL) Meet with Habitat homeowner (FP)

Month before house start Assign specific tasks to each of the Crew Leaders and mail them copies of Construction Manual or have them go to www.habitatcharlotte.org. Encourage Task Leaders to meet or speak with Crew Leaders before the work day (TL) Visit job site (HL & TL) Complete solicitation of volunteers (VC) Mail confirmation letters or emails, including tools needed, location, etc., to volunteers (VC) Decide if you want a table on site, make arrangements if you do (VC) Arrange for volunteers to work one-on-one with the homeowner at the job site (FP & VC) Make contact with homeowner once a week (FP) Contact Habitat Charlotte’s Volunteer Coordinator to determine when next group dedication will be held or begin plans for a dedication at the house site (PL)

week before house start Send remainder of sponsorship fee to Habitat (attn: Linda Blum) FC Reconfirm plans for tools and organizational responsibilities with Task Leaders (HL) Acquire name tags and pens (VC) Communicate any final details with Habitat Site Supervisor (HL)

week before each work day Make reminder calls about food donations and pick up (AC) Contact volunteers to remind them of their commitment (VC)

After/during project Send thank you notes to donors (FC) Thank those who volunteer (ALL) Set dedication date and plan program (PL & AC) Send list of in-kind and food donors to Habitat Forward to Habitat signed Release of Liability forms Return AAH evaluation, found on page 43 At the end of the project, remove all items left in the trailers/house.

DATE

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY OF CHARLOTTE AAH VOLUNTEER LEADERSHIP TEAM SPONSOR:

Leadership Role: Name (printed) Complete mailing address (remember zip code) Phone No. FAX No. E-mail
Leadership Role:
Name (printed)
Complete mailing address
(remember zip code)
Phone No.
FAX No.
E-mail address
Project Leader, House
Leader, Fund Raising,
Amenities, T-shirts,
Family Partner, etc
Home &
Work

Please return to Beth Van Gorp, Habitat Charlotte; PO Box 220287; Charlotte, NC 28222-0287; FAX: 704-342-1797; Phone: 704-716-7077, bvangorp@habitatcharlotte.org

Adopt-A-Home Evaluation

Adopt-A-Home Group:

Your Name:

Role:

There are many different areas that are involved in the preparation and building of a Habitat home: family support, volunteer coordination, publicity, fund raising, and construction. Please consider all areas that are applicable to your experience when answering these questions.

In what ways were the written materials you received from Habitat Charlotte helpful? How can they be improved? What other information did you need?

During the time before you started building: What information was helpful? What do you wish you had known? What else could we have done to make this stage easier or more effective?

During the time the home was under construction what things/people/activities where helpful? What else could we do to help?

What advice and suggestions would you give other groups?

What could be done to make this program better?

What were the highlights for you? For your group?

Other comments? If necessary, please write on the back of this sheet. Please return to Beth Van Gorp, Habitat Charlotte, PO BOX 220287, Charlotte, NC 28222-0287; FAX: 704-342-1797:

Email: bvangorp@habitatcharlotte.org

Building on Faith Blitz

What is a blitz? Habitat folks use the word blitz in a couple of different ways.

It can refer to any construction that happens over a relatively short amount of time. For instance, many sponsors have a three-day framing blitz where the house is framed and shingled by the end of the third day.

It can also mean a week longer larger project where many houses are built at the same time. In Charlotte this could mean some houses are finished by the end of the week, and other’s have not yet finished the framing. Both these houses we would consider part of a blitz.

What is Building on Faith? Building on Faith is the name of Habitat Charlotte’s annual building week. Houses do not have to be on a rapid build schedule to participate, but they do need to start that week. Building on Faith usually occurs during the week before the 3rd Sunday in September. This Sunday is Habitat International’s Day of Prayer and Action for Human Habitat. All over the world during this week, Habitats’ try and draw people in the faith community into action to build homes. Here in Charlotte, we are excited to involve businesses, civic groups, and churches to participate in this exciting build.

Annually, over 200 cities world wide participate.

Why participate in a blitz?

It is fun and exciting to be a part of a larger project

The houses get done sooner, and folks enthusiasm may stay higher

There is often times more publicity associated with the project

What about the downside?

It can be more stressful, especially if you, the sub-contractors, or the inspectors fall behind.

If you do the majority of the work during the week, some of your volunteers may not be able to participate.

The Habitat site supervisor will have multiple houses to supervise during that week.

You will be very tired by the end of the week.

Details

We usually begin work on Saturday, Sunday is a day of rest, and continue work Monday through Saturday.

For most, using the schedule that Habitat recommends, the goal will be for the houses to have completed the siding and drywall by the end of the week. The rest of the work days will happen

during subsequent Saturdays and/or weekdays. other schedule requests.

We will work with groups to accommodate

If groups want to totally finish the house during Building on Faith week, they will be in charge of arranging for all sub contracted work (i.e. plumbing, HVAC, electrical, and drywall finishing.)

Expect the following if you participate in the Building on Faith Blitz:

Site: We always look to acquire a site where all the houses will be built close to each other. Sometimes, however, we may build in several neighborhoods.

Parking: Because often the houses are close together, only a few of the construction leaders will be able to park in front of the house. Other builders will have to park in more remote locations and walk at least several blocks to the house.

Lunches may be provided on the first and second Saturday of the project. Assume that your

group will need to make arrangements for lunches during the remainder of the week.

Saturdays that Habitat provides food, you will be told by your site supervisor when it is your turn to go and eat. You WILL have to provide your own coolers for water.

On the

Group Devotions: If there is a central site, there will be a devotion held for everyone at a central location.

T-shirts: You will probably be able to buy blitz t-shirts that can be personalized for your group. But, you will have to order them several months before the project.

Meetings: There will be several meetings for Project and House Leaders held by Habitat. Attendance is expected.

In-kind: Your list of in-kind contributors will have to be finalized at least a month before the project starts.

Habitation: A celebratory service will be held during or near the week of the blitz. This Habitation Service will have key note speaker and special music.

Habitat for Humanity of Charlotte Construction Leader Skills Evaluation

Name:

Date:

Address:

Group Affiliation:

Day Time Phone (if different):

Home Phone:

Current Volunteer Status: (circle all applicable)

Regular Crew Leader

For Adopt-A-Homes: House Leader

Week Day Volunteer

Task Leader

Full-Time Volunteer Crew Leader

AmeriCorps

SKILL: According to Habitat’s construction guidelines as written in the construction manual

NEVER

CAN DO IT WITH

CAN DO IT

CAN

DONE IT

WITH MIN.

TEACH IT

SUPER-

SUPER-

TO

 

VISION

VISION

OTHERS

PREP

       

Interpret plan, layout floors

       

Build wood floors

       

Pour footings for wood porches

       

Build wood porch & attach to band joist

       

Figure & cut stringers for steps

       

Set permanent posts

       

Create forms for concrete porches

       

Build & install crawl space door

       

LAYOUT

       

Chalk lines according to plan

       

Mark plates for studs, walls, windows, etc

       

FRAMING

       

Construct & raise wall sections

       

Porch beam installation

       

Temp/ beam installation (for trusses)

       

Straighten walls

       

Plumb & brace exterior walls