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“From without, no won- derful effect is wrought within ourselves, unless some interior, responding won- der meets it.” — Herman Melville

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Melville T T OMORROW OMORROW ’ ’ S S W W EA EA THER THER Partly

Partly Cloudy

High 72

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MASS DAILY NUMBERS

drawn Saturday night were:

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MASS. DAILY NUMBERS

drawn Sunday

afternoon were:

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drawn Sunday night were:

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LOCAL Local events Page A3 SPORTS Around the Track Page A10
LOCAL
Local events
Page A3
SPORTS
Around the Track
Page A10

OOPINIONPINION

KRIS REARDON MAKES THINGS CLEAR

PAGE A4

Southbridge Evening News Daily Question

Are you in favor of longer school days (i.e. Extended Learning Time) in schools?

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Search down to three

STURBRIDGE CLOSER TO NEW ADMINISTRATOR

BY CHRISTOPHER TANGUAY

NEWS STAFF WRITER

STURBRIDGE — The tenure of interim Town Administrator Michael Racicot is winding down. Although no date for hav- ing a permanent replace- ment for former Town Administrator James Malloy has been set, the Town Administrator Search Committee will

present its three suggested finalists to the Board of Selectmen on Monday, Sept. 8 at the Senior Center. Malloy departed Sturbridge after nearly 14 years to accept a similar position in Westborough in April. “The three names will be announced that night at 7:30,” said Scott Garieri, the selectman representative

on the search committee. Besides Garieri, the Search Committee is made up of Chairman Reed Hillman, Finance Director Barbara Barry, Finance Committee Chairman Kevin Smith and Tony Celuzza. The three candidates pre- sented by the committee

Celuzza. The three candidates pre- sented by the committee Please Read SEARCH, page A7 AFTERAFTER THETHE
Celuzza. The three candidates pre- sented by the committee Please Read SEARCH, page A7 AFTERAFTER THETHE

Please Read SEARCH, page A7

AFTERAFTER THETHE STORMSTORM Shawn Kelley photos CHARLTON — A kayaker took advantage of Sunday’s sunny
AFTERAFTER THETHE
STORMSTORM
Shawn Kelley photos
CHARLTON — A kayaker took
advantage of Sunday’s sunny
weather at Buffumville State
Park, above. Left, Yamaira
Vega, 5, of Southbridge, plays
in the sand. Originally fore-
cast as overcast, Sunday’s
sun was a welcome change
from Saturday’s chill rains.
sun was a welcome change from Saturday’s chill rains. Christopher Tanguay photo Pianist Joel Ayau and

Christopher Tanguay photo

Pianist Joel Ayau and vocalists Lauren Boutillette and Katie Lora received a standing ovation at the end of Saturday night’s performance.

Serenade for a hometown crowd

JOEL AYAU RETURNS TO SOUTHRBIDGE FOR CONCERT

BY CHRISTOPHER TANGUAY

NEWS STAFF WRITER

SOUTHBRIDGE — Piano lessons can be very lonely. Or so says Anne Marie Maynard, a Southbridge piano teacher, referring to the hours spent one-on-one between teacher and stu- dent. For the majority of people who begin learning an instrument early in life, the idea of traveling the globe to perform, and taking the stage at the most prestigious concert halls in the world is little more than a dream. For a former Southbridge resident, and pupil of Maynard, that dream has become a reality. Joel Ayau, now a world- class pianist, returned to Southbridge on Saturday to

perform at Southbridge High School. The concert was the first live broadcast from the school, and was made possible by John Gatti Jr. and Larry Beinema of the cable access program “Eye on Southbridge.” Ayau, who attended Southbridge public schools from second through fifth grade before moving to Woodstock, Conn., earned a bachelor’s degree in piano performance from New York University (NYU) and a mas- ter’s degree in collaborative piano from the Julliard School. Currently Ayau is working on a doctoral degree in piano accompani- ment from the University of Michigan.

in piano accompani- ment from the University of Michigan. Please Read PIANIST, page A7 Stores’ employees
in piano accompani- ment from the University of Michigan. Please Read PIANIST, page A7 Stores’ employees

Please Read PIANIST, page A7

Stores’ employees get in the giving spirit

page A7 Stores’ employees get in the giving spirit V OTE TO DONATE TO ANIMAL SHELTERS

VOTE TO DONATE TO ANIMAL SHELTERS

BY CHRISTOPHER TANGUAY

NEWS STAFF WRITER

STURBRIDGE — Here’s a toast to local animal shelters. Yankee Spirits liquor store in Sturbridge, along with Yankee Spirits Inc. establishments in South Attleboro and Swansea, announced last week that they would make a $15,000 donation to various animal shelters in the area of each store. According to Michael Cimini, chairman of the Sturbridge Economic Development Committee and owner of the Sturbridge Yankee Spirits

locale, the stores have a long his- tory of making annual dona- tions to multiple charities. This year, rather than help multiple entities on a small scale, the employees of Yankee Spirits decided to consolidate efforts and make a single dona- tion to a single cause. “We were giving away about that amount, but to 100 little groups,” Cimini said of $5,000 per store contribution. Seeing the effects of the eco- nomic downturn in his own

Seeing the effects of the eco- nomic downturn in his own Please Read DONATION, page A8
Seeing the effects of the eco- nomic downturn in his own Please Read DONATION, page A8

Please Read DONATION, page A8

nomic downturn in his own Please Read DONATION, page A8 Christopher Tanguay photos A dog owner

Christopher Tanguay photos

A dog owner all his life, Brendan Coates, shown here wait- ing on customers at Yankee Spirits in Sturbridge. He voted to give the business’s annual charity donation to local ani- mal shelters in an employee poll.

A boots-on-the-ground look at forestry

A boots-on-the-ground look at forestry Christopher Tanguay photos Forester John Clarke of Rocky Mountain Wood Company

Christopher Tanguay photos

Forester John Clarke of Rocky Mountain Wood Company discussed differ- ent forest management options with members of the Conservation Commission, the Public Lands Advisory Committee and the Trails

Committee during a walk-through of Sturbridge’s public lands on Sunday.

STURBRIDGE COMMITTEE DOES ITS FIELD WORK

BY CHRISTOPHER TANGUAY

NEWS STAFF WRITER

STURBRIDGE — Sturbridge officials donned their hiking boots and bug spray on Sunday to get a lesson in forest management. Members of the Conservation Commission, Public Lands Advisory Committee (PLAC), and Trails Committee were joined by forester John Clarke of Rocky Mountain Wood Company of Wilbraham for a walk through of different sections of the Leadmine Mountain Conservation Area to discuss different aspects of forest management. According to Ed Goodwin of the Conservation Commission, one stipulation of the agreement between the town of Sturbridge and State Department of Fish and Game made when the for- mer Camp Robinson Crusoe (CRC) was jointly pur- chased as conservation land, is that the town must draft a land management plan for Fish and Game’s approval.

draft a land management plan for Fish and Game’s approval. Please Read FORESTRY, page A8 One
draft a land management plan for Fish and Game’s approval. Please Read FORESTRY, page A8 One

Please Read FORESTRY, page A8

Fish and Game’s approval. Please Read FORESTRY, page A8 One aspect of the forest man- agement

One aspect of the forest man- agement plan is to place more signs, marking trails and dif- ferent plant species in Sturbridge’s public forests.

2

2 • Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

• Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

2 • Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009 A A C C C C U U R R

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THE SOUTHBRIDGE EVENING NEWS IS COMMITTED TO ACCU- RACY IN ALL ITS NEWS REPORTS. ALTHOUGH NUMEROUS SAFE- GUARDS ARE IN PLACE TO ENSURE ACCURATE REPORTING, MIS- TAKES CAN OCCUR. CONFIRMED FACT ERRORS WILL BE CORRECTED AT THE TOP LEFT HAND CORNER OF PAGE A2 IN A TIMELY MANNER. IF YOU FIND A MISTAKE, CALL (508)764-4325, EXT. 107 DURING NORMAL BUSINESS HOURS. AFTER 5 P.M., PRESS EXT. 152 FOR THE NEWSROOM HOTLINE.

The Southbridge Evening News (USPS 504-380) is pub- lisheddailyMondaythroughFriday, except holidays (NewYear’s Day,

The Southbridge Evening News (USPS 504-380) is pub- lisheddailyMondaythroughFriday, except holidays (NewYear’s Day, Memorial Day, IndependenceDay, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas), by

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Southbridge, MA 01550. Periodicals postage paid at Southbridge, Mass. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News at address listed above. Rates by carrier and motor route are $19.25 for 8 weeks, $31.25 for 13 weeks, $61.00 for 26 weeks and $120 for 52 weeks. Mail (in county) rates are $45.60 for 13 weeks, $90.50 for 26 weeks, and $162.60 for 52 weeks. Mail (out of county) rates are $61.50 for 13 weeks, $111.00 for 26 weeks, and $197.50 for 52 weeks. Student rate is $104 for 32 weeks. Minimum mail subscription is four weeks. All mail subscriptions are payable in advance to The News.

Why read the Southbridge Evening News?

Quite simply because you won’t find a bigger concentration of local news — your news — anywhere else. Period. If it matters to you, you’re going to find it here.

Guiding youth along God’s path

YOUTH GROUP PUTS OAK HILL BIBLE CHURCH MISSION INTO PRACTICE

BY JOY RICHARD

STONEBRIDGE PRESS STAFF WRITER

OXFORD — To see youth pas- sionate about their church and community is something that the Pastor of Oak Hill Bible Church hopes makes their parish special. Pastor Glenn Rice said he is proud of the members of his church for putting forth the ideas of the church’s mission to practice in their everyday lives. He said he is especially happy with the large role the youth have taken in the church. This is due in part to members including the youth taking the reigns of the community serv- ices projects and making them a success. “The youth in this parish understand that this is their time,” said Rice. “They are active and reach out to the com- munity through many different ministries. It is this dedication that makes me happy.” According to Rice, Oak Hill Bible Church, which is of the Advent Christian denomina- tion, was originally founded in the mid-1800s in the town of Salem. “Hundreds of thousands of people came to join the church at that point and even today people from many different for- mer denominations now make up our parish,” said Rice. The church itself is centered in the belief of an “evangelical, Bible-believing church,” according to Rice. “We are open and welcoming to anyone who would like to join us for our Sunday servic- es,” he said. Located in Oxford since 1979, the church made the trip into town via Worcester, where it was located for more than 100 years. The church even has a school located directly next to the parish, “Oak Hill Christian School,” and has approximately 40 students, but the attendance

and has approximately 40 students, but the attendance Courtesy photo Members of the Oak Hill Bible

Courtesy photo

Members of the Oak Hill Bible Church pick up trash as one of the locally based missions to service the community.

fluctuates with each year, according to Rice. Classes for the fall semester began, Monday, Aug. 24, and the school houses grades pre- kindergarten through eighth. The school holds its own mis- sion statement Rice describes as students being able to learn what they are studying with the influence of the teachings of God. “We are providing a founda- tion for life and learning in a Christ-centered environment,” said Rice, adding there are chil- dren from as far as Worcester and Rhode Island who attend the school, and the ministry of the school is designed for par- ents who want their children to learn in a Christian-based envi- ronment. Opening its doors in 2003

after parents from the church had come up with the idea, Rice said the school has made steady growth during the past six years. Rice explained people in the parish help give back to the community by helping in soup kitchens as well as street min- istries. Other areas where they have had recent missions around the world are Honduras and Guatemala, where they helped put in bathrooms, and went out into the community to speak to people with the help of local churches. This summer, the church has planned special events during the months of June, July and August where members held “Good News at the Gazebo” nights at Oxford’s Bandstand

on the common. “The response has been good and at our last night in July we had around 80 people,” said Rice. The next night will be held Saturday, Aug. 29, at 6 p.m., and along with Oak Hill Bible Church are other churches in Oxford who are also taking part in the night. Their names are, Tabernacle of Praise and Cross Point Christian Church. The members of the church pride themselves in the work that it has done in regards to missions they have had a part in throughout the community and the world.

Joy Richard may be reached at

at

508-909-4129

or

by

e-mail

jrichard@stonebridgepress.com.

Historic vote crushes Japan’s ruling conservatives

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's opposition swept to a historic victory in elections Sunday, crushing the ruling conservative party that has run the country for most of the postwar era and assum- ing the daunting task of pulling the economy out of its worst slump since World War II. A grim-looking Prime Minister Taro Aso con- ceded defeat just a couple hours after polls had closed, suggesting he would quit as president of the Liberal Democratic Party, which has ruled Japan for all but 11 months since 1955. "The results are very severe," Aso said. "There has been a deep dissatisfaction with our party." Unemployment and deflation — and an aging, shrinking population — have left fami- lies fearful of what the future holds. Fed up with the LDP, voters turned over- whelmingly to the opposition Democratic Party of Japan, which ran a populist-leaning platform with plans for cash handouts to families with children and expanding the social safety net.

American combat exit from Iraq now underway

BAGHDAD (AP) — The U.S. military is pack- ing up to leave Iraq in what has been deemed the largest movement of manpower and equip- ment in modern military history — shipping

BEYOND OUR BORDERS N EWS IN A N UTSHEL L
BEYOND OUR
BORDERS
N EWS IN A
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out more than 1.5 million pieces of equipment from tanks to antennas along with a force the size of a small city. The massive operation already under way a year ahead of the Aug. 31, 2010 deadline to remove all U.S. combat troops from Iraq shows the U.S. military has picked up the pace of a planned exit from Iraq that could cost billions. The goal is to withdraw tens of thousands of troops and about 60 percent of equipment out of Iraq by the end of next March, Brig. Gen. Heidi Brown, a deputy commander charged with over- seeing the withdrawal, told The Associated Press in one of the first detailed accounts of how the U.S. military plans to leave Iraq. Convoys carrying everything from armored trucks to radios have been rolling near daily through southern Iraq to Kuwait and the west- ern desert to Jordan since President Barack Obama announced the deadline to remove combat troops, leaving up to 50,000 troops under a U.S.-Iraqi security agreement until the end of 2011. First out, Brown said, will be the early with- drawal of an Army combat brigade of about 5,000. Defense Secretary Robert Gates has said

a brigade would leave by the end of the year, months ahead of schedule, if violence in Iraq did not escalate beyond current levels.

Los Angeles wildfire moves north, grows out of control

Los Angeles wildfire moves north, grows out of control LOS ANGELES (AP) — A growing wildfire

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A growing wildfire in the moun- tains above Los Angeles surged north Sunday, forcing more evacuations and threatening some 12,000 homes. Residents of the small town of Acton were ordered to evac- uate as the 4-day-old blaze headed into the Antelope Valley. The fire spread in all direc- tions, leaving three people burned, destroying at least three homes and forc- ing thousands to flee. "The leading edge, the one they're really focused on, is that northern edge. It's moving pretty fast up in that direction," said U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman Randi Jorgenson. For the third straight day, humidity was very low and temperatures were expected in the high

90s.Some 2,000 firefighters were battling the blaze. Mandatory evacuations were in effect for neigh- borhoods in Acton,Altadena,Glendale,Pasadena, La Crescenta and Big Tujunga Canyon.

At 40, Internet sees threats to its openness

NEW YORK (AP) — Goofy videos weren't on the minds of Len Kleinrock and his team at UCLA when they began tests 40 years ago on what would become the Internet. Neither was social networking, for that matter, nor were most of the other easy-to-use applications that have drawn more than a billion people online. Instead the researchers sought to create an open network for freely exchanging informa- tion, an openness that ultimately spurred the innovation that would later spawn the likes of YouTube, Facebook and the World Wide Web. There's still plenty of room for innovation today, yet the openness fostering it may be eroding. While the Internet is more widely available and faster than ever, artificial barri- ers threaten to constrict its growth. Call it a mid-life crisis. A variety of factors are to blame. Spam and hacking attacks force network operators to erect security firewalls. Authoritarian regimes block access to many sites and servic- es within their borders. And commercial con- siderations spur policies that can thwart rivals, particularly on mobile devices like the iPhone.

Editorial cartoons from the “Eye of the Commonwealth”

www.marketticartoons.com

Characters from two popular PBS children’s shows to appear at OSV

STURBRIDGE — Popular children’s public television characters Curious George and Ruff Ruffman star of the show “Fetch!” will appear at Old Sturbridge Village from 9:30 – 5 p.m. Sun., Sept. 6 as part of a Family Fun Day honoring Public Broadcasting System (PBS) member sta- tions WGBH-Boston and WGBY-

Springfield. OSV will offer a full day-long schedule of family-friend- ly activities and “make-and-take” crafts. As part of the Sept. 6 celebration, WGBH and WGBY members will receive 2-for-1 admission to OSV and up to two children admitted free. (Children under 3 are always free at OSV). The day’s events are also open to the general public with museum admission. For times and details: call 1-800-SEE-1830 or visit www.osv.org

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Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009 • 3

3

Events planned to celebrate Fall in the Last Green Valley

It’s that time of year again when the air becomes crisp and the leaves morph into brilliant autumnal splendor. What better way to celebrate the season than by getting out of the house and partaking in at least one of the nearly 100 free guided hikes, walks and paddles during the month of October and more than 25 special events sched- uled throughout the months of October and November, all throughout the 35 towns of The Last Green Valley in northeast- ern Connecticut and south cen- tral Massachusetts. Choose from among walks and paddles like: Rails, Mills and A River in Willimantic, Conn., at the Conn. Eastern Railroad Museum and learn about railroad history as partic-

ipants walk along the Willimantic River; or perhaps a 5-mile Foliage Paddle on the Quinebaug beginning in Wauregan, Conn., and travers- ing through scenic countryside along one of the most bucolic sections of the river; or how about an invigorating and more difficult hike along the Airline State Park Trail to the Tri-State Marker to enjoy spectacular views in Thompson, Conn. There is another old favorite returning this year in Brooklyn, Conn., entitled, Where the Buffalo Roam, a walk to see hun- dreds of American Bison and then warm up afterwards with a sample of bison chili. History buffs will not want to miss, Civil War: Trying To Do My Duty in Brimfield, Mass., at

the Hitchcock Academy where Kitty and Larry Lowenthal will share excerpts from their book with the same title. The multitude of special events featured during Walktober includes three differ- ent corn mazes in Coventry, Preston, and Thompson, Conn., the NE CT Great Pumpkin Festival in Putnam, Conn., a Lantern Light Graveyard Walk in Norwich, Conn., led by ghost hunter, Donna Kent and featur- ing the Old Norwichtown Burial Ground & the Norwichtown Green, the Annual Fine Arts and Crafts Festival at Roseland Cottage in Woodstock, Conn., and the Farmer’s Market Kitchen in Storrs, Conn., which is a series of five “farm-to-fork” cooking

demonstrations using fresh ingredients from local farms. But that’s not all. Also show- cased during the months of October and November are the abundant farms found through- out The Last Green Valley where you can tag your Christmas tree and select a farm-fresh turkey in time for the holidays. Call The Last Green Valley toll-free at (866) 363-7226 for a brochure, or visit our website www.thelastgreenvalley.org to view or download the complete Walktober schedule (available after Sept. 7). Get out and enjoy the splendors of the season right here in your own backyard! — Submitted Michelle Bourgeois Tourism Coordinator

Town Clerk: Street List Books now available

SOUTHBRIDGE — The 2009 Street List Book for the Town of Southbridge is now available at the Town Clerk’s office. The cost to purchase a book is $12. According to Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 51, Section 6, any person wishing to purchase a Street List Book must sign their name and address in a log. If you have any questions, call the Town Clerk’s office at 508-764-5408.

Synagogue schedules High Holidays services

Ohavath Zion is a small, unaffiliated syna- gogue whose congregants hail from Brimfield, Sturbridge, Southbridge, and the surrounding communities and welcome all to services, requiring no membership fees. The first Rosh Hashanah service will be held at 7 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 18, at the Overlook Chapel of the Masonic Home at 88 Masonic Home Road (Route 31, off Route 20 in the center of Charlton). On Saturday, Sept. 19, the servic- es begin at 9:30 a.m. at the synagogue, 65 Eastford Road in Southbridge. Yom Kippur services on Sunday, Sept. 27, will begin at 6:15 p.m. at the Masonic Home, and on Monday, Sept. 28, at the synagogue at 9:30 a.m. Rabbi Irving L. Luchans will lead the services. A potluck dinner to break the fast will follow services on Monday at 7 p.m. at the synagogue. For more information leave a message at the synagogue at 508-765-5797, email Ohavathzion@gmail.com, or contact Julie Tamarkin at 413-245-0336.

or contact Julie Tamarkin at 413-245-0336. — Submitted by Ohavath Zion Anti-casino meeting is planned

— Submitted by Ohavath Zion

Anti-casino meeting is planned for Wednesday

PALMER — Quaboag Valley Against Casinos will meet at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 2 at the Schoolhouse Commons on Park St, Palmer. Letters to State Senators and Representatives will be written at the meeting. Templates, paper, etc. will be provided. With the loss of the major ally to the anti-casino position in the House of Representatives, it is more important than ever that the voices in the area be heard. In addition, there will be a report from the subcommittee planning a forum scheduled in the fall. All are welcome to attend. For more infor- mation, call 267-5210. For directions to the Schoolhouse Commons, go to www.palmer.casinofacts.org.

NEWS BRIEFS

Commons, go to www.palmer.casinofacts.org. N EWS B RIEFS Tales from the trail HOLLAND — The Opacum
Commons, go to www.palmer.casinofacts.org. N EWS B RIEFS Tales from the trail HOLLAND — The Opacum

Tales from the trail

HOLLAND — The Opacum Land Trust presents “Loop Year: 365 Days on the Trail,” a talk by Connecticut author John

Sheirer at 7 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 24 in the Holland Senior Center, 40 Brimfield Road. Admission is free to Opacum members, $2 for non members. Light refreshments will be served. What do you do if you’re an amateur adventurer and environmentalist who dreams of hiking the Appalachian Trail or saving the rainforest, but you can’t quit your day job or abandon personal commitments? John Sheirer created his own project.

From May 17, 2005 to May 16 2006, Sheirer hiked the same trail in Somers, Conn. — once a day, every day. He chroni- cled the year in daily 365-word essays pub- lished in his book also titled “Loop Year: 365 Days on the Trail.” Along the way,

Sheirer discovered that an obsession with hiking and caring for the same New England trail every day can be surprisingly adventurous—ranging from blistering heat, flooding rain, white- out snowstorms, early mornings, dark nights, and everything in between. (Plus there’s an unexpected love story and a real- ly cute dog.) The book will be available for sale, as well as other titles by the author. Sheirer is a professor of English at Asnuntuck Community College in Enfield, Conn. To reserve a seat or more informa- tion, contact the Opacum Land Trust at 508-347-9144 or info@opacumlt.org. For more information on Sheirer and his work, see www.johnsheirer.com.

on Sheirer and his work, see www.johnsheirer.com. Phragmites australis Volunteers sought to weed out invasive
on Sheirer and his work, see www.johnsheirer.com. Phragmites australis Volunteers sought to weed out invasive

Phragmites australis

Volunteers sought to weed out invasive plants

HOLLAND — Want to help Opacum Land Trust weed our wetland? An Invasive Species Work Day will be held from 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 12. Meet at the Best Western, corner of New Boston Road and Route 20. Phragmites australis or giant reed is a non-native invasive species has taken root in a small area at Opacum Woods.

The discovery of a rare plant at this site last year has prompted us to do all we can to protect and encourage this plant and its habitat. Opacum Land Trust is seeking volun- teers to assist in removal. Participants must be willing to get wet and dirty! Please bring boots or waders, gloves and hand clippers. This project is being over- seen by Ted Elliman of the New England Wildflower Society. For more informa- tion, please contact the Opacum Land Trust, www.opacumlt.org or at 508-347-

9144.

— Submitted by Opacum Land Trust

Gateway uncorks wine and beer tasting event

Land Trust Gateway uncorks wine and beer tasting event SOUTHBRIDGE — Gateway Players announces Kegs &

SOUTHBRIDGE — Gateway Players announces Kegs & Casks, its wine and beer tasting fundrais- er at 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 26 at the Arts Center, 111 Main St. Southbridge. Taste six wines and six beers from the United States, hors d’oeuvres and good company. Tickets are $20 per person, and can be ordered online at www.gateway- players.org or by calling 508-764-4531. A very limited number will be available at the door.

Benefit held for Radius Healthcare staff member

SOUTHBRIDGE — A benefit will be held for Radius Healthcare Center’s Activities Director JoAnn Moen from 7 – 11 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 26 at the VFW on Everett Street. Moen, who has worked at Radius for 13

years, is battling stage 3 ovarian cancer. She

is undergoing a very aggressive and experi-

mental chemotherapy.

Tickets for the benefit are $15 each. DJ Dave Wiley will be donating his services and

a silent auction will be held. For tickets,

please contact Radius staffers Lorie Kelley, Meegan Bullock, Paulette Haglund, Rose

Houle, Rita Lamontagne, Christ McTigue or

the Radius receptionis for tickets at 508-765-

9133.

— Submitted by Radius Healthcare Center

www.theheartofmassachusetts.com

PUBLIC MEETINGS

P U B L I C M EETINGS Editor’s Note: Meetings as listed are retrieved in
P U B L I C M EETINGS Editor’s Note: Meetings as listed are retrieved in

Editor’s Note: Meetings as listed are retrieved in advance from multiple sources, including town halls and the Internet. The Southbridge Evening News is not responsible for changes and cancel- lations.

CHARLTON Tuesday, Sept. 1 The Board of Assessors will meet at 6 p.m. in the Town Hall.

Wednesday, Sept. 2 The Council on Aging will meet at 9:30 a.m. in the Town Hall. The Conservation Commission will meet at 7 p.m. in the Town Hall. The Board of Selectmen will meet at 7:30 p.m. in the Town Hall. The Cable Access committee will meet at 4:30 p.m. in the Town Hall. The Planning Board will meet at 7 p.m. in the Town Hall.

Thursday, Sept. 3 The Ad-Hoc Wildlife Committee will meet at 6:30 p.m. in the Town Hall.

Monday, Sept. 7 The Recreation Committee will meet at 6:30 p.m. in the Town Hall.

Tuesday, Sept. 8 The Charlton Housing Authority will meet at 3 p.m. at their Meadowview Drive location. The Board of Selectmen will meet at 6:30 p.m. in the Town Hall.

SOUTHBRIDGE Tuesday, Sept. 1 Protection of Persons & Property, 7 p.m. at Town Hall

Wednesday, Sept. 2 Planning Board, 6:30 p.m. at Town Hall Local Historic District Committee, 7 p.m. at Town Hall Charter Review Committee, 7 p.m. at Town Hall (first meeting)

Thursday, Sept. 3 Recreation Committee, 7 p.m. at Town Hall Board of Assessors, 7:30 p.m. at Town Hall

Tuesday, Sept. 8 School Committee, 6 p.m. at Town Hall (superintendent’s evaluation, followed by regular meeting)

Wednesday, Sept. 9 Redevelopment Authority, 6:30 p.m. at Town Hall

STURBRIDGE Tuesday, Sept. 1 Planning Board, 6 p.m., Town Hall, Room 55 Housing Partnership, 7 p.m., Room 37, OSV, 371 Main St. Town Administrator Search Committee, 7 p.m., Public Safety Meeting Room

Wednesday, Sept. 2 School Building Committee, 6:30 p.m., Burgess Media Center TRSD, 7 p.m., junior high school library Town Administrator Search Committee, 7 p.m., Public Safety meeting room

Thursday, Sept. 3 Conservation Commission, 7 p.m., Senior Center Town Hall/Center Office Building Construction Committee, 7 p.m., Sturbridge Senior Center Sturbridge School Committee, 7 p.m., Burgess Elementary School

Monday, Sept. 7 Town Hall Closed

Tuesday, Sept. 8 Tri-EPIC, 8 a.m., Harrington Hospital Cable Advisory Committee, 3:15 p.m., Town Administrator’s Office, Room 47 Board of Assessors, 4 p.m., Room 40, Town Hall Selectmen, 6:30 p.m., Sturbridge Senior Center Board of Health, 7 p.m., Town Hall Room 33 Town Administrator Search Committee, 7:30 p.m., Senior Center

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ESTABLISHED 1923

4 • Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009 E STABLISHED 1923 25 E LM S T . S

25 ELM ST.

SOUTHBRIDGE, MA 01550

TELEPHONE: (508) 764-4325 FAX: (508) 764-8015 www.theheartofmassachusetts.com

F RANK G.

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WALTER C. B IRD J R .

EDITOR

T RACY F. S EELYE

MANAGING EDITOR

EDITORIAL

. E DITOR T RACY F. S EELYE M ANAGING E DITOR E DITORIAL Local biz

Local biz successes are good news

Don’t look now, but things aren’t all doom and gloom when it comes to local businesses and the econo- my. Actually, go ahead. Look. Up on the crest of Dresser Street, framed on the other side by Route 131, Southbridge’s Harrington Memorial Hospital is doing some- thing not all businesses have been able to do in recent months — expanding. Finishing up his second year as hospital CEO, Ed Moore is oversee- ing a hospital that has built a state- of-the-art cancer center and has put its name on another hospital’s cam- pus in Webster. It is also building offices in Charlton and, after post- ing a $3.5-million loss in revenue the year Moore came on board, is, as AC/DC once said, back in black. Moving down 131, turning onto Route 20 and turning off a few hun- dred yards down, you’ll enter Old Sturbridge Village. Having seen a fall-off in visitors in recent years and struggled as much as any other entertainment- themed venue in this recession, OSV is now poised to have its best year ever. Good management has helped, as have two rounds of lay- offs that, while landing some folks in the unemployment line, helped keep Sturbridge’s signature attrac- tion on pace for a stellar year. It is, in fact, a sad reality that many area businesses have had to trim their work force in order to save costs. Even that move hasn’t guaranteed success. Others have had to take additional steps, such as wage reductions. The bottom line in business, how- ever, is survival, an at a time when many businesses have either col- lapsed or are on life support, it is heartening to have local examples of a successful business model. It doesn’t mean the tough times are over. There’s no guarantee, for example, that OSV will enjoy the same type of success next year, just as Harrington’s many moves this year do not offer sure-fire protec- tion from future fiscal woes. What it does offer, however, is hope. We see in these and other local businesses a survivor’s atti- tude. It is one communities them- selves have to adopt as they strug- gle to balance budgets and plant the seeds for business growth so as to sidestep future financial troubles. You see it in Southbridge, where a partnership of town officials, resi- dents, businesses and other folks are joining forces to host an eco- nomic development summit of sorts later this year. No, the recession is not over. The success of local businesses howev- er bodes well for a national recov- ery. In that regard, the gains at Harrington, OSV and other busi- nesses are very good news indeed.

OPINION

Viewpoints and commentary from the Tri-Community and beyond

Viewpoints and commentary from the Tri-Community and beyond S OUND O FF ! Al-Magrahi deserved to
Viewpoints and commentary from the Tri-Community and beyond S OUND O FF ! Al-Magrahi deserved to
Viewpoints and commentary from the Tri-Community and beyond S OUND O FF ! Al-Magrahi deserved to

SOUND OFF!

commentary from the Tri-Community and beyond S OUND O FF ! Al-Magrahi deserved to be released
commentary from the Tri-Community and beyond S OUND O FF ! Al-Magrahi deserved to be released

Al-Magrahi deserved to be released to die

Sound Off:

I must begin by admitting

a feeling of unease at having to disagree with a man of the cloth. However, I wish to respond to a letter to the edi- tor written by the V. Rev. Fr. Peter-Michael Preble (“Release of plane bomber ‘is just wrong,’” Southbridge Evening News, Aug. 26). “Compassion. Mercy. Restitution. Reconciliation. Forgiveness. Correction.” Two of these words should seem out of place:

“Restitution” and “Correction.” The millennia-long

method of punishment for a

transgression is antiquated. No longer should society think that when a person does something bad, some- thing bad should be done to them. A transgressor owes society nothing more than not to repeat his or her offense. The transgressor owes the victim whatever can be done to reasonably make them whole; in seri- ous crimes, this is impossi- ble. Society owes the trans- gressor protection from those who may seek vengeance. Mr. al-Megrahi deserved to be released so that he can

die in a n emotionally warm environment. It is true that his countrymen had not right to brand him a hero, but this is no reason to blame those who released him. Father Preble is cor- rect that religion is a very good place to turn to for questions of morality. However, it must be remem- bered that though the man we call Jesus demanded a strict code of ethics, he believed that no sin was unforgivable. Letting al- Megrahi go has no relation to the severity of his crime or the dignity of the people he killed.

To stop Casella, stop sending them trash

Sound Off:

I’m calling about the land- fill contract.

I just want to know why, if

all these people are against Casella, which I am too, why do they send the dump their trash from Southbridge, Sturbridge, Spencer, Charlton? It all comes in from BFI and Casella. If they really want to stop the dump, and they stop

sending their trash to the Southbridge dump, then they would stop Casella and

probably put them out of business that way. That would be the most sensible thing in the world to do, instead of trying to sue them and all that stuff. But they still, all those people, still put their trash in our dump. So why doesn’t a reporter

do a story on that, and ask these people why do they live in Sturbridge and still send their trash to Southbridge? If they stop doing that, they’re going to have to ship their trash to somebody else’s town, and it’s going to cost three times as much to get rid of the trash. Ask them that. That’s all I’m asking.

Buses and back-to-school pangs

D o you feel butterflies in your stom- ach when you see a school bus? The sight of these yellow giants

fills me with a mixture of excite- ment and carsickness. I remember the smell when someone threw up on the bus and the anxiety that I might be next. I was afraid of the big kids yet eager to hear what they talked about. What we learn on the school bus is invaluable in

life, even if much of it is erroneous, off- color and sometimes mean. I recall the exhilara-

tion of mounting the big steps into the yawning door of the bus. I was leaving my mother, my fox terriers and my life as a little girl behind and joining the big kids at school. School buses carry us from one world to another in a long

series of groans, shifting gears and hard seats. We become passen- gers on a journey with a driver at the wheel and a random assortment of other kids with whom we will share a variety of life lessons, including the certainty that we should never carry smelly egg salad sandwiches in close quarters. As the giant vehicles roll along, I mar- vel at the skill of the drivers, who navi- gate our twisting back roads with smiles on their faces and a precious cargo of 60 students. A non-scientific sample shows that the majority of drivers are women, something quite different from my child- hood when all bus drivers where men, often local farmers, handling the bus route between milking cows. My neighbor drives a school bus. She reminded me of how much a driver needs to consider. “There is so much to think about,” she said. Adding, “Parents should ride the bus just once,” to know

NANCY WEISS

NANCYWEISS

WEISS

what it is like in today’s world. She is referring to both the rudeness of people in traffic as well as surly students and dreamy ones who look for direction. More parents drive their children to school than in the past. This may be a symptom of our child-oriented world or

a reflection that in an economic down-

turn the primary caretaker, perhaps once employed, is now at home and can pick the children up. Another mother and I used to alternate driving our daughters for dance lessons. I worked miles from school and I was always running late. I dreaded getting behind a school bus, as it would slow me up. I understand the frenzied look on the faces of parents in the morning and after- noon when they are stretched thin by the tightrope of doing meaningful things for their children while also acting as responsible employees. My bus driver friend told me that driv- er undergo extensive training. Recently she went to a safety refresher class where they worked on adjusting the crossover mirrors. With these mirrors, the driver can see a child in front of the bus or as much as 400 feet behind it. The red signs that pop out of the side of the bus remind drivers to stop, although we have all see the crazy people who barrel past in a blind, insensitive fury. Where is the state cop when that happens, I wonder? The kids I rode the bus with have scat- tered in a million directions. One hopes the drivers have been rewarded for their

patience. As I watch a little line of back- pack laden kids hop on local buses, I feel

a pang of nostalgia for school days and a

sense of relief that I don’t need to worry about getting sick on the bus.

Nancy

Weiss

writes

a

column

for

Stonebridge Press Newspapers

‘Indexing’

history

T oday we’re taking a page from President Obama’s game plan and promoting public service. And you are invited to take part in the “dig- ging” project. Only a couple of

things are really needed: access to a computer; as much (or as little) time as you want to give; and a desire to learn something about geneal- ogy work — the history of the family of man. The work is being done by volunteers from around the world and around the corner, but more help is needed. Specifically, you’re being invited to help record U.S. Census indexes and other vital records (births, deaths, marriages, etc.) through FamilySearch.org, which provides free fami- ly history, family tree, and genealogical information via the Internet to family histo- rians all over the world. On its home page (familysearch.org), the organization explains index- ing work in terms of pre- serving and sharing “the key life events of billions of peo- ple.” Using FamilySearch’s

online indexing system, “vol- unteers from around the world are able to quickly and

A S I S EE I T MARK ASHTON

AS I

SEE IT

A S I S EE I T MARK ASHTON

MARK

ASHTON

easily transcribe

records

from the convenience of their homes.” These indexes are then posted — for free, for all the world to use and see — at familysearch.org. Millions of rolls of micro- film (from more than 100

countries) provide the cen- sus information. Volunteers are asked to “index” these vital statistics, probate, and church records by downloading images and then filling in online surveys that preserve the data for genealogical use. The work can take 10 minutes or two hours; a project can be done all at once or in piecemeal fashion as the volun- teer finds time between work, supper, and coaching Little League. The point is, there’s no set commitment of time. It’s all determined by the volunteer, his or her interest in the project, and the desire to learn more, say, about the marriage records of the township of Nelson, British Columbia, in 1917. That’s the last project I helped with, in fact, and it was both fascinating and fun to learn about the names, occupations, ages, and fami- ly situations of an earlier generation of North Americans. Not everything in the records is indexed (recorded for genealogical use), but it’s all there for the viewing. The occupations of those I recently helped docu- ment included miners, teachers, tanners, and ministers; the brides (all listed as “spinsters” in the official records) ranged in age from 17 to 34. Special instructions were offered for those of Indian (Native American) heritage, but none were listed in last week’s project. Some of the microfilmed records are typed, others are handwritten. Sometimes it’s a chal- lenge to decipher clerical flourishes or to understand local period abbreviations, but online tutorials and item-by-item work guides assist indexers in turning even centuries-old data into contemporary, useful, information. FamilySearch indexing is open to volun- teers from anywhere. Promotional info says it takes only 20 minutes to sign on as a volun- teer, but I’m slow. I took all the tests, tutorials, and training exercises they offered, so it took me a couple of hours. From there you’re invit- ed to view and/or download projects at what- ever pace works for you. I was just getting good at deciphering one set of records (Irish births) when that project was declared com- plete. I thought another one would be quicker (central Illinois census info from 150 years ago), but it ended up with hundreds of names and took about an hour and a half. When a project is finished, it is checked by others for accuracy, style, and format (you can also volunteer to become a checker with a little more training and time commitment) and eventually sent to FamilySearch for inclusion in its vast listings of information for researchers from around the world. A lot of indexing volunteers get into the work because of their own family history work, and FamilySearch invites all website visitors to take advantage of free family his- tory lessons, special resources for African American or Jewish families, and free Personal Ancestral File (PAF) software. Since FamilySearch indexing projects span the world, you aren’t limited (except by way of your language skills) to American or English-speaking projects. Current indexing efforts span everything from Spanish regis- ters (from as early as 1530) to the Mexican federal census of 1930, from U.S. Freedmen Marriages (1861-1869) to Russian (Ukrainian) parish registers of 1840-1842. You may not be surprised to learn that fam- ilysearch.org is an official Web site of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which routinely asks members to research four generations of family, but indexers come from all faiths — or no faith at all. One warning, however: the work can become addictive.Because it’s performed at home,at the volunteer’s convenience, it can be carried out as often or as occasionally as even a busy schedule allows. Yet there’s something truly rewarding in translating the work of an 18th-century Irish clerk into a modern digital record that can help family researchers discover long-lost ancestors or turn dry statistical information into new additions to personal pedigree charts. It’s a great way to reunite families — and to remind ourselves that, taken far enough back, all human history springs from the same loving source.

Mark Ashton writes a weekly column for Stonebridge Press publications.

Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009 • 5

5

CALENDAR

LISTINGS

TTHHUURRSSDDAAYY

SEPT. 3

BIG BAND CONCERT

STURBRIDGE — The 2009 Sturbridge Summer Concert Series concludes with the Lou Borelli Big Band, a ’40’s swing band, sponsored by the Betterment Commission at 6:30 p.m. on the Sturbridge Town Common. Please bring your lawn chair and a blanket. Rain location to be announced.

FFRRIIDDAAYY

SEPT. 4

CPR/FIRST AID CLASSES

STURBRIDGE — There will be Adult CPR and First Aid Certification Classes taught by certified instructors from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. at Rehabilitative Resources, Inc., 1 Picker Road. Classes are held bi-monthly. The cost is $50 per person and includes both full certifica- tioins. Call for information on recer- tification or child/infant certifi- cation. To register, contact Jennifer Petraitis, Rehabilitative Resources, Inc., P.O. Box 38, Sturbridge, MA 01566, 508-347-8181 ext 104 or jpe- traitis@rehabresourcesinc.org Visit the web site at www.rehabresourcesinc.org for more information and addition- al dates.

TTUUEESSDDAAYY

SEPT. 8

COIN CLUB FORMING

WEBSTER — Calling all coin and currency collectors — A

new coin club is forming and they will have their first meet- ing at 6:30 p.m. in the Webster Public Library. Anyone from Southern Worcester County, northeast- ern Connecticut and the sur- rounding areas is invited. Whether you are a new col- lector or a long-time collector, come join us as we share our knowledge and learn from each other about this great hobby. Contact Tom Lisi at 508-450-

at

1282

or

tomlisigeronimo@comcast.net for more information. Also, Tom is available for general questions regarding coins and currency.

WWEEDDNNEESSDDAAYY

SEPT. 9

LIVING FREE SEMINAR

QUINEBAUG, Conn. — A free “Living Free” seminar will be held at the Quinebaug Volunteer Fire Department at 720 Quinebaug Road from 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30 and Oct. 7 and 14. Registration is free for all six nights, but there is a $25 charge for the workbook which is strongly recommended. To register for this free Lifestyle Matters Living Free seminar, call 860-935-5412 or e-

WHAT TO DO CALENDAR

LISTINGS

mail

mrquinebaug@snet.net.

your

reservation

to

Website:

http://quinebaug22.adven-

tistchurchconnect.org.

WIB TO MEET

STURBRIDGE — Woman in Business, Inc. will hold its monthly breakfast meeting at 6:45 a.m. at the Oliver Wight Tavern at Old Sturbridge Village. This month’s guest speaker will be Fr. Peter- Michael Preble, the pastor of St. Michael’s Orthodox

is to expand membership of the existing Republican Town Committee and to elect officers to the committee. Any Southbridge resident enrolled as a Republican voter in Southbridge will be allowed to join the town committee as a full voting member. Therefore, registered Republicans from Southbridge are encouraged to attend. For more information, con-

tact Rod Murphy at 508-764-6735 or Kevin Christo at 774-452-

6957. FFRRIIDDAAYY

Relay for Life 2010

SOUTHBRIDGE — The American Cancer Society Relay For Life of the Greater Southbridge Area is beginning its fall fund raising for the 2010 Relay. This year, along with our signature “Smelly Jelly'” room fresheners, we have added a couple new items. Car fresheners and gour- met-flavored lollipops along with last year's great new seller “Smencils” will be for sale.

MONDAY, SEPT. 7

We will be on the com- mon for Charlton Old Home Day from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 12

We will be at St Anne's in Fiskdale for their yard sale. Along with the Smelly Jelly jars, gourmet lollipops, Smencils and car freshen-

ers we will also have yard sale items and all proceeds benefit the Relay For Life of the Greater Southbridge Area 2010.

SATURDAY, OCT. 17

We will be in the tent

behind Sadie Green’s at the Publick House Harvest Festival from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct.

18.

Other dates and events are being confirmed so please keep checking the Southbridge Evening News for dates and places.

For more information on any of the fund raising items please contact Ron Ravenelle at 508-347-3826 or ronrave@charter.net or con- tact Faye Fulone Sweeney at 508-735-5206 or

faye4889@aol.com.

Christian Church, 16 Romanian Avenue in Southbridge. Fr. Preble will be talking about the difficult sub- ject of death and dying. If you are interested in join- ing us for breakfast, please call ahead two days before the meeting to reserve a seat. You can find Woman in Business, Inc. online at www.wibsturbridge.org or by calling (508) 764-1657.

PPACC TO MEET

SOUTHBRIDGE — Members of the Pilsudski Polish American Citizens Club will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the club quarters on Ballard Court. Plans are underway for the annual Picnic to be held Sept. 13th and we need your support and ideas. Check out the web site WWW.PPACC.ORG.

TTHHUURRSSDDAAYY

SEPT. 10

REPUBLICANS TO MEET

SOUTHBRIDGE — The Southbridge Republican Town Committee will be meeting at 7 p.m. at the 12 Crane Street building, street level floor. The purpose of this meeting

SEPT. 11

CBA TO MEET

STURBRIDGE — Community Business Associates (CBA) network- ing/referral group meets from 7:15 - 8:30 a.m in the Oliver Wight Tavern, Old Sturbridge Village, on the second and fourth Friday each month for networking, business news

updates and presentations. Business and professional peo- ple interested in southwest Worcester County and vicini- ty are welcome. Free admis- sion and coffee. CBA is a program of the Central Mass South Chamber of Commerce. More information at

www.communitybusinessas-

sociates.org or e-mail

info@communitybusinessas-

sociates.org.

LAUGHS AT PUBLICK HOUSE

STURBRIDGE — St. Mary’s St. Vincent de Paul Society presents “Misgivings” — An Evening of “Divine” Comedy, a night of bellylaughs, blessings, blarney and bingo. Join Father Parick Aloysious for this divine evening of stories and one liners about growing up

Catholic. Cocktails at 6:30 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m. and showtime at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $35 per person. For tickets call 508-764-3226.

SSAATTUURRDDAAYY

SEPT. 12

CONCERT ON

COMMON

SOUTHBRIDGE — The Southbridge Downtown Partnership concludes its 2009 Summer Concert Series on the Town Commonfrom 5 - 7 p.m. Today’s concert features Classic Brass (35-piece brass band).

DISTRICT SCHOOL MEMORIES

CHARLTON — “Things were

a lot different when I went to

school.” That’s what each gen- eration hears from the previ- ous one. Courses of study, dress code, discipline, class size, homework, and holidays

are only a few of the topics that have changed. Now we can hear personal district school experiences. Everyone is invited to District School Memories at 10 a.m. at the #2 School, 145 Northside Road. In 1949 schools #2, #4, and #6 were the last district schools in town to close. Share memories of your school days in a Charlton district school, and listen to others reminisce about theirs. Or just sit back and enjoy the stories. This informal time is for both those who attended a district school and for those who would like to listen, even if you did not attend one of the local schools. Refreshments will be served. For more information, visit CharltonHistoricalSociety.org or call Cindy Cooper at 508-248-

7840.

ANNUAL OSV GALA

STURBRIDGE — A 20-mem- ber committee of Old Sturbridge Village supporters, led by Elizabeth Peppel of Charlton, will host the second annual Old Sturbridge Village Gala beginning at 5:30 p.m. at OSV’s Oliver Wight Tavern. The event, themed “The

Magic of Old Sturbridge Village,” will feature cocktails, dining, dancing to the music of Lynn Jolicoeur and the Pulse, and one-of-a-kind live and silent auction items, and will benefit OSV’s historical costume pro- gram. Cost is $150 per person, and tables of 10 are available. For reservations and more information: (508) 347-0210;

d e v e l o p m e n t @ o s v. o r g .

Main corporate sponsors of the Gala include Hometown Bank, Bollus Lynch, Xtra-Mart Convenience Stores, Schmidt Equipment, and J. S. Fleming Associates, Inc.

Schmidt Equipment, and J. S. Fleming Associates, Inc. Please Read CALENDAR, page A9 P OLICE L
Schmidt Equipment, and J. S. Fleming Associates, Inc. Please Read CALENDAR, page A9 P OLICE L

Please Read CALENDAR, page A9

POLICE LOGS

The arrests and offenses below were listed in each town’s police department logs. People charged are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. This newspaper will publish dispen- sations of cases at the request of the accused, with proper documentation.

LOG HIGHLIGHTS

SATURDAY, AUG. 29

SOUTHBRIDGE – 4:02 p.m. – An acci- dent with property damage was investi- gated, River Road. SOUTHBRIDGE – 5:13 p.m. – Larceny was investigated at Big Bunny, West Main Street. STURBRIDGE – 12:20 p.m. – An accident with property damage was investigated, Leadmine Road. STURBRIDGE – 1:31 p.m. – A 911 trace call was investigated at Outdoor World, Mashapaug Road. STURBRIDGE – 1:39 p.m. – An accident with property damage was investigated, Route 20. STURBRIDGE – 4:08 p.m. – An investi- gation was initiated, Route 131. STURBRIDGE – 11:35 p.m. – A domestic dispute was investigated, Main Street. STURBRIDGE – 11:38 p.m. – A distur-

Main Street. STURBRIDGE – 11:38 p.m. – A distur- bance/dispute was investigated at Hampton Inn, Main
Main Street. STURBRIDGE – 11:38 p.m. – A distur- bance/dispute was investigated at Hampton Inn, Main

bance/dispute was investigated at Hampton Inn, Main Street. STURBRIDGE – 11:43 p.m. – A suspi- cious vehicle was investigated, Cedar Street.

SUNDAY, AUG. 30

SOUTHBRIDGE – 3:37 p.m. – Peace was restored at a domestic disturbance, Chestnut Street. STURBRIDGE – 6:09 a.m. – A 911 trace call was investigated, Main Street. STURBRIDGE – 11:04 a.m. – A 911 trace call was investigated, New Boston Road. STURBRIDGE – 2:02 p.m. – An investi-

gation was initiated at JC Penney’s, Main Street. STURBRIDGE – 2:59 p.m. – An accident involving a pedestrian was investigated, Brookfield Road and Church Street. STURBRIDGE – 3:58 p.m. – An arrest was made at a motor vehicle stop, Route

20.

ARRESTS

SATURDAY, AUG. 29

SUNDAY, AUG. 30

SOUTHBRIDGE – 2:24 a.m. – Joseph M. McDonald, 23, of 127 Pleasant Street, was arrested for operating a motor vehicle

Pleasant Street, was arrested for operating a motor vehicle under the influence of liquor, leaving the

under the influence of liquor, leaving the scene of an accident with property dam- age, unlicensed operation of a motor vehi- cle, Paige Hill Road. STURBRIDGE – 12:49 a.m. – Tammy Jo Dunn, 43, of 40 Sturbridge Road, Charlton, was arrested for operating a motor vehicle under the influence of liquor, Heritage Green Drive.

www.theheartofmassachusetts.com

Weight loss tied to prescription medication

DEAR DR. GOTT: I’m a

79-year-old

prescription medication DEAR DR. GOTT: I’m a 79-year-old HOUSE female and CALLS have always enjoyed good

HOUSE

female and

CALLS

have always enjoyed good

PETER

health. About a year

GOTT

enjoyed good PETER health. About a year GOTT ago, I was diagnosed with early signs of

ago, I was diagnosed with early signs of Parkinson’s dis- ease. My handwriting has become poor. My symptoms have not wors- ened, but in January of this year, I decided to try Sinemet prescribed by my doctor. It has helped my handwriting; however, I have lost my sense of smell and taste. It was subtle at first, but now I taste and smell nothing. I have lost 12 pounds because eating is not a pleasant experience for me anymore. My neurologist said I lost my smell and taste due to the Parkinson’s medication. My gener- al practitioner had never heard of that with other Parkinson’s patients he sees. A friend with the condition doesn’t have the problem. I also suffer from Restless Legs Syndrome most nights. Is there help that wouldn’t involve more pills? I exercise three times a week at a fitness center for about an hour each day, but need help. DEAR READER: Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurological disorder that carries a host of symptoms, includ- ing cramped handwriting, tremor, gait abnormalities, loss of appetite and taste, and worsening of involuntary movements. Your neurologist is right on the money when he attributes your weight loss and lack of interest in food to the medication. In defense of your

general practitioner, however, each indi- vidual may react differently and as a result, his or her symptoms will vary.

A loss or diminished sense of smell

linked to the medication is quite com- mon. When you can’t smell the deli- cious aroma of food, it is usually fol- lowed by little interest in eating. This is likely the cause of your weight loss. I can only recommend you make your food “presentations” attractive by adding a dash of color. Perhaps steamed broccoli with julienne carrot sticks can be arranged alongside a salmon steak or boneless chicken breast. Or add a couple of strawberry or kiwi slices to a bed of lettuce. This might just be appealing enough to stimulate your appetite. Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) is a ghastly affliction of unknown cause. It has several criteria to be appropriately labeled. There is compulsion to move the legs while at rest. That need is often accompanied by unpleasant sensations of burning, prickling and crawling. Symptoms become worse or present

when the patient is at rest, lying down or has been sitting for a prolonged period. Symptoms can be relieved by activities such as walking, stretching and mas- sage. Sensations often exacerbate in the evening.

If this describes your RLS, you should

locate a local physician who specializes in the disorder and can get you on the right track. If it doesn’t, you might be suffering from a worsening of involun- tary movements from the Sinemet. If you are opposed to taking additional medication, perhaps the doctor can rec- ommend acupuncture, reflexology, yoga or nutritional supplements. Speak with your physician about your prescription to determine if you are being helped or hindered. While your handwriting might not be as cramped as it was, you certainly appear to have picked up a number of the unpleasant side effects the drug carries.

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6 • Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

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Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009 • 7

7

Sturbridge administrator search in final phase

SEARCH

continued from page A1

will be the sole survivors of an original applicant pool of more than 50 prospects. “Forty nine applicants came in on time, two came in late,” Garieri said. “We narrowed it down.” The vetting process took that original figure down to 10, then five, and eventually down to the three that will be presented to the selectmen. The interviews conduct- ed by the Search Committee in closed-session meetings at the town’s Public Safety Complex should be com- plete by Tuesday, Sept. 1, according to Garieri, after

which the Board of Selectmen will establish a set of criteria for their fol- low up interviews of the three finalists, which will be conducted in open ses- sion meetings. According to Hillman, while each member of the Search Committee had their own questions and areas of interest or expert- ise when interviewing can- didates. “There were five of us on the committee,” Hillman said. “We each had our own priorities. Each looked at their own things.” The bottom line for every- one on the committee though, Hillman said, was “Who can best manage the

town of Sturbridge?” Although the specific questions could not be made public, as the inter- viewing process is not yet complete, Garieri said, “There were a couple sce- nario question to see how they would handle things.” “Basically, what we were trying to find out was what kind of style of leadership they possess,” he added. While site visits to the applicants’ current places of employment were not entertained by the Search Committee, Garieri said they may be part of the Board of Selectmen’s screening process. One possible speed bump that may slow the selection

process down is the avail- ability of acceptable appli- cants, though members of the Search Committee do not necessarily see that becoming an issue. “From what I’ve seen of the applicant pool and the finalists, I’m pleased with the quality of the candi- dates that have come our way,” Hillman said. Garieri agrees. “We had some very good candidates,” he said, explaining that the best candidates are usually the most elusive. “The one problem that you always run up against — and we’ve already run up against this — when candi- dates are top in considera-

tion, they may have also had their applications out to other towns,” Garieri said. “So some of the top candidates have with-

drawn,” to accept positions

in different towns.

“Between now and the final pick, any candidate could

withdraw his name to accept

a position someplace else,”

Garieri continued. “But that’s a situation we won’t really know until the end.” Hillman said he is aware of that possibility, but feels the committee will have well qualified candidates to bring to the meeting on the

eighth. “We’re looking forward to our meeting with the selectmen,” Hillman said.

“I am confident at that time, given how the committee has functioned so well together so far, I’m confi- dent that the time we will have coalesced around three candidates.” Hillman also took the time to thank his col- leagues for the time and

effort they put into helping find the best person to over- see Sturbridge’s operations. “I’m very lucky to be serving with four such out- standing people,” he said.

writer

Christopher Tanguay may be reached at (508) 909-4132,

or

ctanguay@stonebridge-

at

News

by

staff

e-mail

press.com.

Noted pianist returns home to Southbridge for concert

PIANIST

continued from page A1

Ayau’s credits include performances at New York’s Carnegie Hall, Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center in New York City, the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. and the National Concert Hall in Taipei, Taiwan. Upon returning to Southbridge to play at the high school, Ayau said, “It’s an honor. It is yet another challenge in a long list of endeavors that I’ve had the pleasure of enjoying.” As people filed into the high school’s auditorium for the Saturday evening concert, Ayau said he was flattered by all the familiar faces he saw in the crowd. During the performance, Ayau was joined by two Southbridge High students, Lauren Boutillette and Katie Lora, who provided vocal accompaniment on “Just Around the River Bend,” from the Disney movie Pocahontas, “Part of

Your World,” from The Little Mermaid and several other selections. High School Principal William Bishop, during the introductions at the begin- ning of the show, said Ayau was “very gracious,” in working with the two young ladies on the collabo- rations. Scott Lazo of the Southbridge School Committee said to have stu- dents performing along side Ayau was a “very proud moment for Southbridge and Southbridge High School.” Following the perform- ance, during which Ayau played selections from Chopin, Schumann, Liszt, Beethoven and Rachmaninoff, as well as a few show tunes and rag- time numbers from George Gershwin, Scott Joplin and others, Ayau, Boutillette and Lora received a stand- ing ovation from the crowd that included members of the Town Council, Town Hall workers and plenty of friends and family of the

performers. “It was an outstanding performance,” Beinema said when the house lights came on after the show. “He’s very talented.” Gatti, who saw the event as a good moral booster for the town, said “He’s as good as anyone you’ll ever see in Boston, New York, any- where.” “And I thought the stu- dents were phenomenal,” Gatti added. Beinema and Gatti also took the time to thank everyone who donated their time and effort to make the concert possible. Before heading to the after concert reception at the Vienna Restaurant, Maynard, who was Ayau’s instructor for nine years, said she was extremely proud of her former stu- dent. “I knew someday it would culminate in this,” Maynard said. “He’s just so very gifted and talented. He really feels his music.” With one year left of his studies, Ayau said he is not

With one year left of his studies, Ayau said he is not Christopher Tanguay photo Southbridge

Christopher Tanguay photo

Southbridge High School student Lauren Boutillette accompanied pianist Joel Ayau on the Disney song “Just Around the River Bend.”

sure just where his career will take him after he com- pletes school. He will how- ever, return to Southbridge to play for his hometown

audience, “Any time they have the time,” he said. “And I’m on vacation.”

News

staff

writer

Christopher Tanguay may

be reached at (508) 909-4132,

or

ctanguay@stonebridge-

at

by

e-mail

press.com.

Fall classes and programs are set to start at Hitchcock Academy

BRIMFIELD — Register now for Fall classes at Hitchcock Academy. Check out our flyer or website to see new course offerings as well as some favorites back by popular demand. Youth programs include Ballet for ages 7 – adult, Children’s Martial Arts, Garden and Nature I for preschool- ers and now G & N II for kindergarteners – grade 3, Guitar for ages 8 - adult, Holiday Decoration-making during the Artists’ Studio tour in December, and Pilates for all ages. Adult programs include Aerobics, Ballet, 10 different Concrete Casting classes, CPR and First Aid, Puppy Preschool, Buddies: Dog Training Basics, Canine Good Citizenship classes and certification, Drawing, Elements of Poetry, Financial Workshops, Fitness Fusion, Grant- Writing workshops, a “Grow Your Own Nutrition” work- shop, Guitar or Voice, Knitting and Crocheting, Pilates, Practical Awareness and Self-Defense, Tai Chi, QVCDC Computer Classes, Watercolors, Weight Watchers, “Winter Sport Shape-Up” and Yoga. Check out our Fitness Fusion, Tai Chi and Yoga Try-it-Out fundraisers the first two weeks of September; all proceeds benefit Hitchcock Academy. Free programs include Art Group, a “Walktober” program on Saturday, Oct. 10, weekly AA meetings, an Artists’ Studio Tour on Saturday, Dec. 5, a “Find-a-Way” work- shop, our Brown Baggers speaker series,

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playgroup, and an inspirational speaker series which begins with “Life: Live it by Choice, Not Chance”. We also house Brownie, Girl Scout, Cub Scout and 4-H meet- ings. And, our Farmers’ Market continues each Saturday through Oct. 10. Come join the fun, see old friends or make new ones, and try something new! Our fliers are available at local libraries, senior centers, and outside our front door. For information call 413-245-9977 or visit us on the web at www.hitchcockacademy.org . Hitchcock Academy is a non-profit community center providing educational, recreational, and cultural pro- grams to residents of all ages. Below are some of our upcoming programs; *prices listed are for residents of Brimfield, Holland, Sturbridge, and Wales. All others please add $5. For more information or to register, call 413-245-9977, or visit us on the web: www.hitchcockacad- emy.org .

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8

8 • Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

• Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

Store’s employees make donation to shelters

DONATION

continued from page A1

store, Cimini said the deci- sion was made that $25 and $50 contributions given out in different directions would not have the same impact as one hefty dona- tion with a specific pur- pose. “We decided we weren’t truly making a difference,” Cimini said. “We can make a bigger impact if we just focused it in a certain area.”

Cimini explained an out- side consultant was hired by the company to survey all three neighborhoods, looking for a charity that linked all three areas. Not finding one, they turned to the employees. “We gave ballots to all of our employees, Cimini said, “and it ended up being ani- mal shelters.” Other options Cimini said, included cultural and historic preservation. “It’s something that I’ve always wanted to do and certainly the members of

the management team thought was a good idea,” Cimini said of the “deeper, broader, more meaningful impact,” the donation will make. Specific animal shelters receiving donations will be named in coming weeks. “Hopefully it does engage us more in the community,” Cimini said. For some of the employ- ees who cast their votes, the donation carries a signifi- cant meaning as well. Manager Jim McCarthy, an Army veteran who

served in Vietnam, said he worked with dogs while in the service. “I have a soft spot in my heart for dogs,” McCarthy said. “And people get enough protection,” he con- tinued. “The animals need the protection.” McCarthy said the option of donating to animal shel- ters probably won out because “a lot of employees here have cats and dogs at home.” Adam Halterman also voted to make the donation to animal shelters, saying,

“I’ve been a life-long animal lover.” In fact, prior to working at Yankee Spirits, Halterman worked with farm animals at Old Sturbridge Village. Michael Astukewicz does not have any pets, but said, “it seemed like it would do the most good for the com- munity.” He voted to send the money to the shelters as well. Cimini said this method of making charitable dona- tions went over so well with employees that it will hap-

pen again next year. “Next year, we’ll have another vote,” he said, though he didn’t know just what would be on the ballot. “We’ll put the ballots back out again to employees at some time next year and we’ll see if we end up in the same bucket.”

writer

Christopher Tanguay may

be reached at (508) 909-4132,

or

ctanguay@stonebridge-

at

News

by

staff

e-mail

press.com.

Sturbridge committee does field work on forestry plan

FORESTRY

continued from page A1

“That’s the essence of what we’re trying to do,” Goodwin said, walking along a CRC trail on Sunday. In a report presented to the Conservation Commission on Thursday, Aug. 6, Clarke said the management plan should promote forest regeneration and diversify habitats in the total 996 acres of the Leadmine conservancy. In order to achieve both of those goals, Clarke explained thinning out certain areas of the forest would be necessary. Goodwin said one of Fish and Game’s requirements for the plan is to maintain an open area, which will most likely be in what was once a gravel pit near the town-owned entrance to the CRC property. Clarke explained having an open space, approximately 10 acres in a non-uniform shape, would help reintroduce small ani- mal species into the area. Mowing the 10 acres once a year, would encourage new ground cover to grow providing ideal habitat for small animals to begin repopulating the forest. “The whole purpose of young growth is to bring in species that are declining,” Clarke said. Clarke went on to say that for the purpose of promoting animal habi- tat, the 10-acre area would have to be

completely void of all trees. A com- mon mistake, he said, when execut- ing such forest management maneu- vers, is leaving a single shade tree in an otherwise open field. “It may look nice, but you just left a perch for a hawk,” he said. Accessibility of the area may become an issue in the future, as Old Sturbridge Village owns the area commonly used as the park- ing lot for CRC trails, and once inside the property, wetlands stand between the entrance and suggested 10-acre area that would have to be traversed with logging equipment. At the other end of the conser- vation land, off Leadmine Road, a different aspect of logging became the topic of conversation. In order to promote regeneration of the forest with the most beneficial trees, Clarke explained trees not suitable for sawtimber should be taken out en masse, leaving seedbeds for the more desirable white pines and different varieties of oak and maples, which can be hewn in the future and sold for lumber as a source of revenue for the town. The first trees extracted from the forest may be sold as well, as wood chips, or to be used in mak- ing wood pellets for stoves. “The goal is to get rid of the lower quality trees first,” Clarke said, adding that logging, while still a major operation requiring 100,000 lbs. trucks, would be more feasible on that end of the conser-

vancy than the CRC end. “These are mostly all old logging roads and it would be great to use them again,” Clarke said, pointing to a scar on a trailside tree evidenc- ing past logging activities. The logistics of setting up parking and staging areas for a logging opera- tion though would still have to be worked out in detail to accommo- date modern equipment. Clarke’s presentation also high- lighted trail establishment and ongoing maintenance as essential to proper forest management in areas that are intended for recre- ational use as well. With a mountain of work before the town in that respect, Randy Redetzke of the Trails Committee is seeking volunteers to serve as team leaders for a Saturday, Sept. 26 work day that will focus on trail maintenance in the Leadmine conservancy. Workers and trac- tors are needed for the work day. For more information on the September work day or the town’s public forests, visit www.town.sturbridge.ma.us.

News staff writer Christopher Tanguay may be reached at (508) 909-4132, or by e-mail at ctan- guay@stonebridgepress.com.

909-4132, or by e-mail at ctan- guay@stonebridgepress.com. Christopher Tanguay photo Forester John Clarke of Rocky
909-4132, or by e-mail at ctan- guay@stonebridgepress.com. Christopher Tanguay photo Forester John Clarke of Rocky

Christopher Tanguay photo

Forester John Clarke of Rocky Mountain Wood Company discussed different for- est management options with members of the Conservation Commission.

LEGALS

options with members of the Conservation Commission. LEGALS Town of Sturbridge Zoning Board of Appeals Public

Town of Sturbridge Zoning Board of Appeals Public Hearing Notice Special Permit In accordance with the provisions of M.G.L. Ch. 40A, §11, the Zoning Board of Appeals will hold a Public Hearing in Senior Center at 480 Main Street, on Wednesday, September 9, 2009 at 7:05 PM on the application of Thomas & Sharon McConnell of 34 Cedar Lake Road, Sturbridge, MA 01566. The appli- cant is requesting a Special Permit to con- struct a second floor addition and 6’ over- hang over the existing deck area. The Special Permit is requested pursuant to Section 20.05 of the Zoning Bylaw to permit alteration of a pre-existing, non-conforming single-family residence. A copy of the petition may be inspected at the office of the Town Clerk during regular busi- ness hours. Any person interested or wishing to be heard on this petition should appear at the time and place designated. Adam Gaudette, Chairman Sturbridge Zoning Board of Appeals August 25, 2009 September 1, 2009

LEGAL NOTICE MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE By virtue of and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Norman L. Benoit and Nancy C. Benoit to Equity Concepts, Inc., dated March 26, 2007 and recorded with the Worcester County (Worcester District) Registry of Deeds in Book 40993, Page 147 of which mortgage Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as Trustee for Option One Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-6 Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2007-6, is the present holder by assignment recorded in said deeds in Book 42386, Page 25, for breach of conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same, the mortgaged premises located at 16 Old Sturbridge Road, Southbridge, MA will be sold at a Public Auction at 1:00 PM on September 29, 2009, at the mortgaged premises, more particularly described below, all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, to wit:

The land in Southbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, situated on the northerly side of Old Sturbridge Road, and the easterly side of a private way known as Red Oak Lane, designated as Lot 1 on a plan entitled, “Plan of Lots in Southbridge, Mass. Owned by Varyland Developers, H.A. Racicot, R.L.S., June 7, 1961”, recorded with Worcester Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 279, Plan 55, bounded and described as fol- lows: Beginning at an iron pin in the south- westerly corner of the premises herein

described, said point being situated on the northerly line of Old Sturbridge Road at the easterly intersection of Old Sturbridge Road with the private way known as Red Oak Lane; Thence by the easterly line of said Red Oak Lane, N. 36 degrees 21’ E., a distance of 125 feet to a point; Thence S. 53 degrees 01’ E., a distance of 61.5 feet to a point; Thence by land now or formerly of Stanley Steplowski, et ux, southwesterly a distance of 125 feet, more or less, to an iron pin in the easterly line of Old Sturbridge Road, said iron pin being at the southwesterly corner of said Steplowski land, and the southeasterly corner of the above-described premises. Thence N. 53 degrees 01’ W. by the easterly line of Old Sturbridge Road, a distance of 75 feet to the point of beginning. For mortgagor’s title see deed recorded with the Worcester County (Worcester District) Registry of Deeds in Book 18398, Page 210. The premises will be sold subject to any and all unpaid taxes and other municipal assessments and liens, and subject to prior liens or other enforceable encumbrances of record entitled to precedence over this mort- gage, and subject to and with the benefit of all easements, restrictions, reservations and conditions of record and subject to all tenan- cies and/or rights of parties in possession. Terms of the Sale: Cash, cashier’s or cer- tified check in the sum of $5,000.00 as a deposit must be shown at the time and place of the sale in order to qualify as a bidder (the mortgage holder and its designee(s) are exempt from this requirement); high bidder to sign written Memorandum of Sale upon acceptance of bid; balance of purchase price payable in cash or current funds in thirty (30) days from the date of the sale at the offices of mortgagee’s attorney, Korde & Associates, P.C., 321 Billerica Road, Suite 210, Chelmsford, MA 01824-4100, or such other time as may be designated by mortgagee. The description for the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event of a typographical error in this publication. Other terms to be announced at the sale. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as Trustee for Option One Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-6 Asset- Backed Certificates, Series 2007-6 Korde & Associates, P.C. 321 Billerica Road, Suite 210 Chelmsford, MA 01824-4100 (978) 256-1500 (OOM 08-050404/Benoit)(09/01/09, 09/08/09, 09/15/09)(167000) September 1, 2009 September 8, 2009 September 15, 2009

Public Hearing Notice Town of Brimfield In accordance with the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act, Chapter 131, Section 40. The Brimfield Conservation Commission will hold a public hearing on September 8, 2009 at 8:15 pm at the Brimfield Annex Building to act on a Notice of Intent filed on the request of Thomas & Elizabeth Halchuk of 46 Walnut Street, Natick MA for the purpose of: replace & repair foundation of existing building, replace an existing deck, add a new deck, repair existing wall, cut trees, at 41 6 th Street, Brimfield MA. Any person(s) interested or wishing to be heard on the request should appear at the time and place designated for the public hearing. Gerard Morin, Chairperson September 1, 2009

Holland Conservation Commission LEGAL NOTICE In accordance with the Wetlands Protection Act, Chapter 131, Section 40, a public hear- ing will be held by the Holland Conservation Commission on the Notice of Intent filed by Edward Manicki of 189 Mashapaug Rd. wants to replace lakeside retaining wall. The meeting will be held Tuessday, September 8, 2009 at the Town Hall, 27 Sturbridge Road at 7:30 p.m. September 1, 2009

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Worcester Division Docket No. WO09P2273EA In the Estate of: Ramona R Zaghi Late of: Sturbridge, MA 01566 Date of Death: 06/20/2009 NOTICE OF PETITION FOR PROBATE OF WILL To all persons interested in the above cap- tioned estate, a petition has been presented requesting that a document purporting to be the last will of said decedent be proved and allowed, and that John M Zaghi of Charlton, MA be appointed executor/trix, named in the will to serve Without Surety. IF YOU DESIRE TO OBJECT THERETO, YOU OR YOUR ATTORNEY MUST FILE A WRITTEN APPEARANCE IN SAID COURT AT WORCESTER ON OR BEFORE TEN O’CLOCK IN THE MORNING (10:00 AM) ON SEPTEMBER 08, 2009. In addition, you must file a written affidavit of objections to the petition, stating specific facts and grounds upon which the objection is based, within thirty (30) days after the return day (or such other time as the court, on motion with notice to the petitioner, may

allow) in accordance with Probate Rule 16. WITNESS, Hon. Denise L. Meagher, First Justice of this Court. Date: August 12, 2009.

Stephen G. Abraham Register of Probate

September 1, 2009

SOUTHBRIDGE PLANNING BOARD In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 40A, §11, M.G.L. and Chapter 41, §81T and §81U, M.G.L., the Southbridge Planning Board will hold concurrent public hearings on Wednesday, September 16, 2009 at 6:45 PM, in GAR Hall at Southbridge Town Hall, 41 Elm Street, Southbridge, Massachusetts. The purpose of the public hearings is to act on applications submitted by SCKD Realty Trust for approval of a 34-lot definitive subdi- vision plan designed by Bertin Engineering Associates, Inc., 39 Elm Street, Southbridge, MA 01550, and a special permit for a clus- ter development of 32 units of housing restricted to persons who are fifty-five years of age or older. Both applications are for property located off Wall Street, Assessors’ Map 32, Lot 58A, and Map 19, Lots 15 through 48. A copy of the application and plan may be inspected at the Town Clerk's Office from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM Monday to Thursday, Thursday evening from 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM, and 8:00 AM to 12:00 Noon Friday. Any person interested or wishing to be heard on the application should appear at the time and place designated. Paul J. St. Jean

Chairman, Southbridge Planning Board September 1, 2009 September 8, 2009

Public Hearing Notice Town of Brimfield In accordance with the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act, Chapter 131, Section 40. The Brimfield Conservation Commission will hold a public hearing on September 8, 2009 at 8:40 pm at the Brimfield Annex Building Conference Room to act on a Notice of Intent filed on the request of Jose Martinez of 134 East Hill Road, Brimfield MA for the purpose of:

stream crossing to access upland area for a single family house, commercial/industrial at Map 15 Lot B, Champeaux Road, Brimfield MA. Any person(s) interested or wishing to be heard on the request should appear at the time and place designated for the public hearing.

Gerard Morin, Chairperson September 1, 2009

Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009 • 9

9

OBITUARIES

Thomas R. Remy, 87

THIS DAY IN THE SOUTHBRIDGE NEWS

SEPT. 1

Editor’s Note: The information fea- tured here is taken from archived issues of the Southbridge Evening News and is not current. The bound issues have been borrowed from the Jacob Edwards Library.

1944

Southbridge residents were prepar- ing today for the last long weekend of the Summer. A message from Pvt. Joseph Wargo of

Sturbridge, a prisoner of the Germans, to his wife was heard over the German short-wave radio last night by a Southbridge man. Second Lieut. Howard R. Cole, Southbridge pilot reported Monday to be missing in action in France, is hos- pitalized with injuries received when he was forced to bail out of his plane, according to news received this morn- ing by his parents. New England Stores was selling three cans of Campbells tomato soup for 25 cents. Pete Savageau will make his first boxing appearance of the season on Vic

Lotti’s first boxing show.

THIS DAY IN HISTORY

SEPT. 1

Atlanta falls to Union forces

On this day in 1864, Union Army General William Tecumseh Sherman lays siege to Atlanta, Georgia, a critical Confederate hub, shelling civilians and cutting off supply lines. The Confederates retreated, destroying the city's munitions as they went. On November 15 of that year, Sherman's troops burned much of the city before continuing their march through the South. Sherman's Atlanta campaign was one of the most decisive victories of the Civil War. Sherman's Atlanta campaign began on May 4, 1864, and in the first few months his troops engaged in several fierce battles with Confederate soldiers on the out- skirts of the city, including the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, which the Union forces lost. However, on September 1, Sherman's men successfully cap- tured Atlanta and continued to defend it through mid-November against Confederate forces led by John Hood. Before he set off on his famous March to the Sea on November 15, Sherman ordered that Atlanta's military resources, including munitions factories, clothing mills and railway yards, be burned. The fire got out of con- trol and left Atlanta in ruins. Sherman and 60,000 of his sol- diers then headed toward Savannah, Georgia, destroying everything in their path that could help the Confederates. They cap- tured Savannah and completed their March to the Sea on December 23, 1864. The Civil War ended on April 9, 1865, when the Confederate commander in chief, Robert E. Lee, surrendered to Grant at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia.

Information from www.history.com.

WEBSTER — Thomas R. Remy, 87, of East Main Street, passed away Saturday, August 29in Webster Manor surround- ed by his beloved family. He leaves his wife of 62 years, Lorraine A. (Pariseau) Remy; three children, Jacqueline M. Proko and her husband Steven of Holland, John P. Remy and his wife Nancy of Atkinson, N.H., and James F. Remy of Webster; eight grandchildren, Jessica, Alyssa, Meghan, Jeremiah, Jonathan, Michelle, Gabrielle and Nicholas Remy; a sister, Marguerite M. Dion of Webster; nephews and nieces. A brother, Reverend Adrien T.

STURBRIDGE — Marguerite Theresa Lea (LeClerc) Arseneau, 87, died at 2:30 a.m. August 27 in Quaboag on the Common Nursing Home, after a short illness. She leaves three children, Arthur H. Papineau of Fiskdale, Blanche M. Waleski of Sturbridge and retired U.S. Army Captain Daniel M. Arseneau and his wife, Dorothy of Bristol, N.H.; four

Remy of Holyoke, died on Feb.

28.

He was born in Dudley, a son of Albert and Cora (Dion) Remy, and lived in Webster most of his life. Mr. Remy worked as the sex- ton at Sacred Heart of Jesus Church. He was then employed by Mohegan Bowl-A-Drome in Webster and by Pratt-Whitney Aircraft in Hartford. He was a stationary fireman at Cranston Print Works Company for many years, retiring in 1985. In his retirement, he was a security guard at Cranston and also a professional pall bearer at the Sitkowski & Malboeuf Funeral

Home. He was a communicant of

Sacred Heart of Jesus Church,

a life member of its League of

the Sacred Heart, and a weekly adorer at the Blessed Sacrament Chapel. He had the patience to learn any new skill until he mastered it.

For many years, he enjoyed summer gatherings at "Chez Nous," the family camp at Colonial Park on Webster Lake. He was devoted to his wife, to his children and especially to his grandchildren. The funeral will be held Wednesday, Sept. 2, from the

Sitkowski & Malboeuf Funeral Home, 340 School St., with a Mass at 10 a.m. in Sacred Heart

of Jesus Church, 16 East Main St. Burial will be in Sacred Heart Cemetery. Calling hours will be from 5 - 8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 1, in the funeral home. Memorial donations may be made to either Tri-Valley Inc.,

10 Mill St., Dudley, MA 01571 or to the Blessed Sacrament Chapel, 17 East Main St., or to Webster Manor Patient Activities Fund, 745 School St., both in Webster, MA 01570.

w w w. s i t k o w s k i -

malboeuf.com

Marguerite Arseneau, 87

brothers, Arthur LeClerc and his wife Priscilla of Templeton, Camille LeClerc and his wife Anita of Troy, Mich., Anthony LeClerc of Waltham and Roland LeClerc and his wife Joan of Templeton; three sisters, Theresa LeClerc of Gardner, Rita St. Pierre of Winchendon and Blanche Holland of Somerville; many grandchil- dren; many great-grandchil-

dren; three great-great-grand- children; many nieces and nephews and their children. Two brothers, Edmond LeClerc and Albert LeClerc, predeceased her. She was born in Manchester, N.H. on May 24, 1922, the daughter of Albert Joseph LeClerc and Blanche Louise (Lemire) LeClerc. She lived her childhood in East Templeton and lived in Cambridge for

many years before moving to Sturbridge in 1996. She worked for many years at the Massachusetts Government Center in Boston,

until retiring in 1992 at the age of 70. She loved yard sales, Bible study, shopping, and going out to eat with her loving friends.

A private funeral Mass for

the family will be at Holy Cross Church in East Templeton.

WHAT TO DO

CALENDAR

continued from page A5

SSUUNNDDAAYY

SEPT. 13

MOTORCYCLE RIDE FOR DIABETES

OXFORD — The Barton Center for Diabetes Education is hosting

a motorcycle ride to benefit the summer camp programs at the

Barton Center and Camp Joslin. The ride starts at noon at the Central Massachusetts Safety

Council, 186 West Boylston St, (Route 12, Wachusett Plaza), and ends with a cook-out, music and

a raffle at the Barton Center. The

cost is $20 per rider. Registration

will take place at the Safety Council at 10 a.m. All proceeds to to benefit the Campership scholarship fund. For more information, contact the Barton Center at (508) 987- 2056 or visit us at www.barton- center.org.

YOUTH GROUP MEETING

SOUTHBRIDGE — The Notre Dame and Sacred Heart Youth Group will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the CCD Center, first floor level. All junior and high school students are welcome.

TOUR RIDER TAVERN

CHARLTON — Tour the Rider Tavern, 255 Stafford St. between 1 and 3 p.m. Donation is $1 per person. Watch a demonstration of weaving on the period loom, and hear about the creation of textiles in Charlton. Guides at the tavern will tell about the ballroom and taproom, Victorian room renovations, the Militia lot, Marquis de Lafayette's visit, the Worcester and Stafford Turnpike, County Gore, stagecoaches, taverns, and prominent residents in the early 1800s while you tour the building. Plus, view two rooms with displays related to Charlton history. For more information, call Cindy Cooper at 508-248-7840.

MMOONNDDAAYY

SEPT. 14

GATEWAY AUDITIONS

SOUTHBRIDGE — Gateway Players Theatre, Inc. will hold auditions for its holiday play, “A Candle in the Window” by L. Don Swartz at 6:30 p.m. in the Gateway Arts Barn, 111 Main St. Production dates are Dec. 4, 5 and 6. Men and Women, age 18+ are needed for a variety of roles: a college student, an aspiring writer, 2 senior citizen sisters, a teacher who has abruptly left

her job, an abusive husband and his meek wife and two station masters. Auditions will consist of cold readings from the script. For more information, leave a message on the Gateway machine (508-764-4531) or go to the Gateway website, www.gate- wayplayers.org.

TTUUEESSDDAAYY

SEPT. 15

SIGN UP FOR SCOUTING

SOUTHBRIDGE — Join Girl

Scouts today! Girls entering Kindergarten through sixth grade this fall, and their parents and guardians, are invited to an information and registration ses- sion at 6 p.m. at the Trinity Catholic Academy, 11 Pine Street.

Folks will gather in the cafeteria. The event is free. Girls must be accompanied by their parent or guardian to attend. Girl Scout representatives will share the benefits of Girl Scouting and make registration

for

parents/guardians. Girl Scouting is the ultimate leader- ship experience available to all girls ages 5 to 17. For more information contact Michele Desmarais at deco- mad@aol.com or Bonnie Scanlan at bscanlan@gscwm.org or call Bonnie at (800) 462-9100, ext. 3612.

convenient

WWEEDDNNEESSDDAAYY

SEPT. 16

FRIENDS TO MEET

STURBRIDGE

The

Friends

of

Sturbridge/Fiskdale Seniors

will meet at 1 p.m. in the meet- ing room at the Senior Center in Fiskdale. Jim O'Brien, Events and Music Coordinator at Old Sturbridge Village will be pres- ent after the meeting to enter- tain with his violin and with his knowledge of music and entertainment in the 19th cen- tury. All are welcome to enjoy his presentation which will be followed with refreshments.

FFRRIIDDAAYY

SEPT. 18

TEEN DANCE

STURBRIDGE – The Federated Church of Sturbridge and Fiskdale will hosting a junior high dance from 7-10 p.m. in Fellowship Hall. There will be a DJ. These area fun evenings for all junior high kids. There is a “Once you’re in, you’re in” policy. Parents can pick up their youth outside on the front steps of the Federated Church at 10 p.m. The cost per youth is $7 and a snack bar is available.

CPR/FIRST AID CLASSES

STURBRIDGE — There will be Adult CPR and First Aid Certification Classes taught by certified instructors from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. at Rehabilitative Resources, Inc., 1 Picker Road. Classes are held bi-monthly. The cost is $50 per person and includes both full certifica-

tioins. Call for information on recer- tification or child/infant certifi- cation. To register, contact Jennifer Petraitis, Rehabilitative Resources, Inc., P.O. Box 38, Sturbridge, MA 01566, 508-347-8181 ext 104 or jpe- traitis@rehabresourcesinc.org Visit the web site at www.rehabresourcesinc.org for more information and addition-

al dates.

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SEPT. 19

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MEGA YARD SALE

SOUTHBRIDGE – There will be a Yard Sale from 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. at the LaSalle Reception Center, Main Street, on the out- side front plaza if weather per- mits. If the weather is bad, the yard sale will be held inside on the lower level. Any donations, priced acord- ingly, will be accepted. Proceeds will benefit the Youth Group Scholarship Fund and support youth activities.

SEMA TO HOST YARD

SPENCER — The Spencer Emergency Management Agency will be holding a yard sale from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (rain or shine) at Klem's on Route 9. Spaces are $25 for 10 feet by 10 feet, and $40 for 10 feet by 20

feet. The Lions food trailer will be available for lunch. For more information, please call Sheila Phoenix at (508) 885-

2138.

TTUUEESSDDAAYY

SEPT. 22

INVASIVE PLANT CRISIS

SOUTHBRIDGE — The Southbridge Garden Club will present “The Invasive Alien Plant Crisis in Massachusetts” with world renowned natural- ist, lecturer and Ecotourism guide Peter Alden at 7 p.m. at the Arts Center Theater, 111 Main St.

What is going on?

Let your neighbors know what’s happening by including your event in What To Do! E-mail information to

atremblay@stonebridge-

press.com or mail to Southbridge Evening News, 25 Elm St., Southbridge, MA 01550

information to atremblay@stonebridge- press.com or mail to Southbridge Evening News, 25 Elm St., Southbridge, MA 01550

10

10 • Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

• Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

SPORTS

Seuss scores True Value Series win at Thompson

THOMPSON, Conn. — On Thursday night, the third time was certainly a charm for Andy Seuss of Hampstead, N.H., who scored the victory in the third attempt to get the True Value Modified Series event in the books at Thompson International Speedway. The event was postponed on two different occasions earlier in the season. It was the fourth career series victory for Seuss, who passed Stephen Masse of Bellingham on lap 52 and held off repeated challenges from Masse, Rowan Pennink and eventual runner-up Richard Savary over the final laps. “That race was pretty wild,” said Seuss. “There was a lot of side by side racing. It’s really easy to race here side by side. This is a big win for us at Thompson.” Pennink led the first 35 laps of the event as Seuss worked his way up from the sixth starting position. On a lap 35 restart, Pennink was penalized for jumping the start and placed to the rear. Seuss inherited the lead but lost it on the next restart as Masse was able to power his way past Seuss to the front. Seuss and Masse waged a spirited duel for the lead. Seuss grabbed the top spot on lap 52 and nine laps later the pair raced side by side down the backstretch with Masse spinning just before the entrance to Turn 3. On the restart Pennink, who had worked his way back to second, made his bid for the lead and pressured Seuss until he ran out of fuel on lap 68. Seuss held off Savary on the final restart and led the final six laps to claim the victory. Seuss ran out of fuel moments after the race ended. Series point leader Jon McKennedy retired from the event on lap 35 after an inci- dent in Turn 2. McKennedy now leads the series unofficially with 425 points. Rob Goodenough gained the most ground on

McKennedy and now sits unofficially second in the standings with 408 points. Pennink, who entered the event second in the stand- ings, missed a golden opportunity to gain on the leader and now sits third with 399 points. Also Thursday night, in NASCAR Whelen All-American Series action, Woody Pitkat of Stafford, Conn., scored his second win of the season in the Sunoco Modifieds. Mike O’Sullivan of Springfield also took down his second win of the season in the Super Late Models.

John Materas of Voluntown, Conn., swept the action in twin features for the Late Model division. Shawn Monahan of Waterford, Conn., scored his first Limited Sportsman feature event of the year in dominating fash- ion. Brian Tagg of Oxford was tops in the TIS Modifieds, while Steve Michalski of Brooklyn, Conn., was the winner in the Mini Stocks. True Value Modified Racing Series 75-Lap Feature Event Finish (Top 10): 1. Andy Seuss Hampstead, N.H.; 2. Richard Savary, Canton;

3. Todd Owen, Somers, Conn.; 4. Ted

Christopher, Plainville, Conn.; 5. Chris Pasteryak, Jewett City, Conn.; 6. Jeff Malave,

South Windsor, Conn.; 7. Rob Goodenough, Swanzey, N.H.; 8. Shelly Perry, Westerly, R.I.;

9. Peter Jarvis, Ascutney, Vt.; 10. Jack

Bateman, Canaan, N.H.

Sunoco Modified Feature Finish (Top 10):

1. Woody Pitkat, Stafford, Conn.; 2. Bert

Marvin, Waterford, Conn.; 3. Kerry Malone, Needham; 4. Ricky Shawn, Bradford, R.I.; 5. Keith Rocco, Wallingford, Conn.; 6. Dave LaCroix, Fitchburg; 7. Harry Rheaume,

Oakdale, Conn.; 8. John Catania, Agawam; 9. Andy Gaspar, Andover, Conn.; 10. Jimmy Blewett, Howell, N.J. Super Late Model Feature Finish (Top 10):

1. Mike O’Sullivan, Springfield; 2. Norm

Wrenn, Nashua, N.H.; 3. Les Rose Jr., Southbridge; 4. George Bessette, Danbury,

Conn.; 5. Mike Stefanik, Coventry, R.I.; 6. Jim Banfield, South Glastonbury, Conn.; 7. Dennis Maxfield, Fitchburg; 8. Daryl Stampfl, Norwood; 9. Kraig Coffin, Uxbridge; 10. Derek Ramstrom, Worcester. Late Model June 11 Make-Up Feature Finish (Top 10): 1. John Materas, Voluntown, Conn.; 2. Tommy O’Sullivan, Springfield; 3. Mark Oliveira, Blackstone; 4. Tom Fox, Plainfield, Conn.; 5. Randy Waterman, Killingly, Conn.; 6. Jeff Zuidema, North Brookfield; 8. Jay Stuart, Preston, Conn.; 9. Mike Scorzelli, Malta, N.Y.; 10. Frank Marabito, Willington, Conn. Late Model Feature Event Finish (Top 10):

1. John Materas, Voluntown, Conn.; 2. Corey Hutchings, Salem, Conn.; 3. Randy Waterman, Killingly, Conn.; 4. Dennis Perry, Pawcatuck, Conn.; 5. Tommy O’Sullivan, Springfield; 6. Jeff Hartwell, East Putnam, Conn.; 7. Jeremy Sadowski, Voluntown, Conn.; 8. Damon Tinio, Mendon; 9. Tom Fox, Plainfield, Conn.; 10. Mark Oliveira, Blackstone. Limited Sportsman Feature Finish (Top 10): 1. Shawn Monahan, Waterford, Conn.; 2. Tommy Shea, New London, Conn.; 3. Jay Sundeen, Douglas; 4. Larry Barnett, Moosup, Conn.; 5. Scott Sundeen, Douglas; 6. Joe Arena, Bristol, Conn.; 7. Gerald Sevigny, Brooklyn, Conn.; 8. Jesse Gleason, Lisbon, Conn.; 9. Joe Campbell, Moosup, Conn.; 10. Paul Palen, Pelham, N.H. Mini Stock Feature Finish (Top 10): 1. Steve Michalski, Brooklyn, Conn.; 2. Mike Gorgievski, Auburn; 3. Randy Churchill, Niantic, Conn.; 4. Rick Blanchard, Pascoag, R.I.; 5. Fred Michalski, Dayville, Conn.; 6. Scott Michalski, South Killingly, Conn.; 7. Nate Taylor, Wauregan, Conn.; 8. Mike Viens, Seekonk; 9. Scott Jassaume, Danielson, Conn.; 10. Brad Caddick, New London, Conn. TIS Modified Feature Finish (Top 10): 1.

New London, Conn. TIS Modified Feature Finish (Top 10): 1. Scott and Trevor Nickel photo Andy

Scott and Trevor Nickel photo

Andy Seuss of Hampstead, N.H., earned the victory in the third attempt Thursday, Aug. 27 to get the True Value Modified Series event in the books at Thompson International Speedway. The event was postponed on two different occasions earlier in the season.

Brian Tagg, Oxford, Conn.; 2. Richie Ferreira, Raynham; 3. R.J. Marcotte, Millville; 4. Cam McDermott, Scituate, R.I.; 5. Jay Sundeen, Douglas; 6. John Michael Shenette, Thompson, Conn.; 7. Denis Leger, North Reading; 8. Bart Ramos, Putnam, Conn.; 9. Jeff Barrows, Worcester; 10. Glenn Boss, Danielson, Conn.

Brimfield farm riders do well at New York competition

Conn. Brimfield farm riders do well at New York competition Members of Morning Light Team 1

Members of Morning Light Team 1 receive their third-place award.

of Morning Light Team 1 receive their third-place award. Meghan Gail Drysdale came in second in

Meghan Gail Drysdale came in second in the Training Level 9-11 age division.

came in second in the Training Level 9-11 age division. Katie Moran placed third overall in

Katie Moran placed third overall in the First Level 17-21 age division, and was a member of the third-place team.

Morning Light Farm last month returned to Lendon Gray’s Dressage4kids competition held annually in Saugerties, N.Y. This competition is open to all riders up to the age of 21. In the individual competitions, there were many standouts this year. Brooke Galonek placed first in the Training Level 9-11 age divi- sion, while fellow teammate Meghan Gail Drysdale came in sec- ond. Also in the Training Level 15- 16 division, Katie Peik came in third overall, and her sister, Kristen, placed eighth in the 16-17 age division. Katie Moran placed third overall in the First Level 17-21 age divi-

sion, and Katie Peik placed fifth in the 15-17 Division. In the Introduction Division aged 10-16, Abigail Wolf placed ninth. In the team divisions, team Morning Light 1 placed third over- all in points and consisted of Brooke Galonek, Katie Moran and Katie Peik. Morning Light 2, which placed ninth overall, included Meghan Gail Drysdale and Kristen Peik. Morning Light Farm is located in Brimfield and owned and oper- ated by Doris Carlson, who offers lessons for all ages, as well as boarding.

who offers lessons for all ages, as well as boarding. Courtesy photos The team from Morning

Courtesy photos

The team from Morning Light Farm: back row, Kristen Peik, Katie Peik, Olivia Truax and Abigail Wolf; second row, Katie Moran and Meghan Gail Drysdale; and front, Kyra Galonek and Brooke Galonek.

Gail Drysdale; and front, Kyra Galonek and Brooke Galonek. Brooke Galonek placed first in the Training

Brooke Galonek placed first in the Training Level 9-11 age division, and her team placed third overall in points.

TEAMS TEAMS INJURIES INJURIES HEROICS HEROICS STATISTICS STATISTICS STRATEGIES STRATEGIES
TEAMS TEAMS
INJURIES INJURIES
HEROICS HEROICS
STATISTICS STATISTICS
STRATEGIES STRATEGIES

SPORTS SECTION

STATISTICS STATISTICS STRATEGIES STRATEGIES SPORTS SECTION Win or lose, we’ve got every sport covered 764-4325

Win or lose, we’ve got every sport covered

STATISTICS STATISTICS STRATEGIES STRATEGIES SPORTS SECTION Win or lose, we’ve got every sport covered 764-4325

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STATISTICS STATISTICS STRATEGIES STRATEGIES SPORTS SECTION Win or lose, we’ve got every sport covered 764-4325

Southbridge Little League to offer Fall Baseball

SOUTHBRIDGE — As Labor Day and the start of fall near, many local baseball play- ers who don’t play other sports are often left with nothing to do. The Southbridge Little League is looking to change that by offering Fall Baseball for players from Tee Ball through Senior League. Anyone interested in playing Fall Baseball should contact Ted Hilli at ted- hilli@hotmail.com, Edwin DeLeon at edeleonl@gmail.com, any member of the Southbridge Little League Board of Directors, or visit southbridgelittle- league.com. Games start soon, and to play in as many games as possible, interested players or their parents should contact Ted or Edwin today to sign up for Fall Baseball 2009.

SPORTS BRIEFS

today to sign up for Fall Baseball 2009. S PORTS B RIEFS Optimists to host Pass,

Optimists to host Pass, Punt and Kick Competition

SOUTHBRIDGE — The Southbridge Optimist Club, in cooperation with the National Football League and Pepsi, pres- ents the Pepsi Pass, Punt and Kick Competition at McMahon Field, Dresser Street, from 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 15. Awards will be presented in all age groups. The competition will be in passing, punting and kicking and is open to boys and girls between the ages of 5 and 15. Awards and prizes will be presented imme- diately after the competition. Local win- ners will be eligible to go on to national competition. Rain date will be Tuesday, Sept. 22.

Kennedy-Donovan to hold ‘Fore Kids’ tournament

SOUTHBRIDGE — Mark your calendar:

the fourth annual Kennedy-Donovan Early Intervention “Fore Kids” Golf Tournament will be held Monday, Sept. 21 at beautiful Cohasse Country Club in Southbridge. The cost is $100 per person and includes a golfer gift bag, 18 holes of golf, golf cart, snacks, a sit-down meal and participation in all five games. Games include closest to the pin, closest to the line, longest drive, a $20,000 hole-in-one contest and a $5,000 put- ting contest. The tournament is a Florida Scramble format, with registration at 9 a.m. and a 10 a.m. shotgun start. Super prizes will be awarded for first, second and third place teams, as well as special golfer’s raffles. Foursomes, twosomes and singles are welcome to sign up.

For more information, call Lauren Boisvert at (508) 765-0292, ext. 210. Registration must be returned by Sept. 1. Also available are Hole Sponsors ($100), Contest Sponsors ($500, includes a free golf registration) and Event Sponsor ($1,000, includes a free team).

Senior Bowling League to kick off new season

SOUTHBRIDGE — The Senior Bowling League will start its new season at 9 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 9 at American Lanes, 123 North St. Last year’s members as well as new bowlers with an average of less than 100 and are 50 years or older may register at the bowling alley between 9 a.m. and noon Monday, Wednesday and Friday. All participants must be registered by Sept. 4 and must be present on Wednesday, Sept. 9. If there are any questions, call league president Jackie Smith at (508) 347-5539.

Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009 • 11

11

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David Buccelli Tree Removal • Chipping Service Pruning • Professional Climbing Bark/Mulch • Fire Wood

David Buccelli

David Buccelli Tree Removal • Chipping Service Pruning • Professional Climbing Bark/Mulch • Fire Wood 60

Tree Removal • Chipping Service Pruning • Professional Climbing Bark/Mulch • Fire Wood 60 ft. Bucket Truck

24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

Free Estimates • 25 Years Experience Senior Discounts

413-245-9752

Fully Insured

Holland, MA

Discounts 413-245-9752 Fully Insured Holland, MA WE BUY GOLD Cormier Jewelers Central St. Southbridge

WE BUY GOLD

WE BUY GOLD Cormier Jewelers Central St. Southbridge (508) 764-7415 Bring this ad in and receive

Cormier Jewelers

Central St. Southbridge (508) 764-7415 Bring this ad in and receive an extra 5% on your gold

SEN

Bring this ad in and receive an extra 5% on your gold SEN 570 M AIN

570 M AIN STREET • RT. 20 • FISKDALE, MA

TEL: 508-347-0116 • FAX: 508-347-6985

THIS

WEEK S

FEATURES !

PINK LADY

APPLES

69¢ lb.

CERTIFIED

ANGUS BEEF

GROUND

CHUCK

$2.99 lb.

JUMBO GREEN

PEPPERS

69¢ lb.

PINT GRAPE

BOARS HEAD

GOLDEN RIPE

$3.99 ea.

Monday - Friday 8:30 - 7:00 • Saturday 9:00 - 6:00 • Sunday 9:00 - 5:00

Prices effective Tues. Sept. 1, 2009 - Sun. Sept. 6, 2009

We reserve the right to limit quantities

Steve’s Collision Center, Inc “Established 1985” For the Best in Auto Body Repair, Go Where
Steve’s Collision
Center, Inc
“Established 1985”
For the Best
in Auto Body Repair,
Go Where
People in the Know Go
Rt. 20 • Sturbridge, MA
(508) 347-9116
(508) 347-2309
Steve Brunelle - President
RS# 626
JOIN ONE OF OUR FALL LEAGUES STARTING SEPTEMBER Candlepin Mon. Nite Men’s League Women’s League
JOIN ONE OF OUR FALL LEAGUES
STARTING SEPTEMBER
Candlepin
Mon. Nite
Men’s
League
Women’s
League
Tues. Nite
Women’s
League
Thurs. Nite
Fri. Nite
Mixed
League
Wed.
Senior
League
Couples
League
(New)
Wed. Nite
Women’s
League
Sun. Nite
Sat. Morn 9:30
Childrens
League
(Boys & Girls)
Ten Pin
Mon. Nite
Women’s
League
Fri. Nite
Men’s
League
Wed. Nite
Men’s
League
Sun. Nite
Couples
League (New)
American Lanes
123 North St. • Southbridge, MA 01550
Leagues start first week in Sept.
Join individually or by team.
Call 508-764-6004 • 508-764-4479

TOMATOES

AMERICAN

PINEAPPLES

$1.49 ea.

CHEESE

$1.99 ea.

12

12 • Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

• Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

Great grilling tips to make the most of summer’s close

S ummer may be winding down, but backyard grills are still firing up, as outdoor chefs every- where are perfecting

their creative cooking skills. Whether you prefer the fla- vor of cooking over hot coals or the convenience of a gas grill, the following barbecue tips and recipes are geared to inspire great grilling!

***

As a rule of thumb, when you grill with charcoal, it takes about 30 minutes for coals to reach a medium temperature and become ash covered. When cook- ing on a gas grill, be sure to pre- heat the grill on high for up to 10 minutes before adjusting to desired temperature.

***

Did you know if you flip your steak more than once, you’re probably cooking it wrong? Grilling experts say you can properly sear meat by using higher heat, and turning it just once. A nice crust will form and seal in the flavor, and keep foods from sticking.

***

When grilling hamburger pat- ties, you’ll get a juicier burger if you rub each side of the meat with cold water before grilling.

***

When assembling shish kabob, be sure to leave a small space between the food threaded on the skewer to allow the heat to pene- trate the food evenly. And to avoid burning the wooden or bamboo

the food evenly. And to avoid burning the wooden or bamboo T AKE THE H INT

TAKE

THE

HINT

avoid burning the wooden or bamboo T AKE THE H INT KAREN TRAINOR A Reader Exchange

KAREN

TRAINOR

the wooden or bamboo T AKE THE H INT KAREN TRAINOR A Reader Exchange of Helpful

A Reader Exchange of Helpful Hints and Handy Tips

sticks, soak them in water for at least a half hour before placing on the grill. As an extra measure wrap a sheet of tinfoil on the ends to prevent scorching.

***

If you choose to marinade steak, allow the meat to soak for at least 30 minutes, and longer for more flavor. Be sure to pat the meat dry with paper towels so the cut cooks evenly on the grill.

***

Always apply sweet basting sauces made with sugar, honey or syrup during the last few min- utes of grilling only to prevent burning.

***

As a general rule, meats should be placed about three quarters of an inch apart to ensure uneven

about three quarters of an inch apart to ensure uneven grilling. *** Did you know steaks

grilling.

***

Did you know steaks should be seasoned only after each side has browned to keep the cut tender? And for perfect steaks, turn when juices start bubbling on uncooked side and grill second side of steak for less time than first.

***

To reduce flame flare up, trim off fat edges from steaks. And score remaining fat edges of steak to keep them from curling on the grill. Test for doneness by making knife slit alongside bone.

CAJUN GRILLED CORN ON THE COB

Native corn gets a Cajun kick with this BBQ trick! Ingredients: six ears corn, husked and cleaned; one half cup butter, softened; six tablespoons Cajun seasoning. Instructions: Peel back husks form the corn, remove strings and leave just a few layers of

husk on the corn. Spread butter or margarine over each ear of corn. Sprinkle Cajun seasoning lightly over each ear, or to taste. Fold corn husks back over the corn. Wrap in foil. Place on grill for 25 minutes, turning occasion- ally. Unwrap foil, peel back husks and enjoy.

CLASSIC BBQ SIZZLING SAUCE

This old fashioned sauce has been a favorite for decades. Best of all , it’s made with common kitchen ingredients. Ingredients: One cup con- densed Tomato Soup; one quarter cup vinegar; one quarter cup veg- etable oil; two tablespoons packed brown sugar; one table- spoon Worcestershire sauce; one teaspoon garlic powder; one eighth teaspoon hot sauce (optional) Directions: In small bowl, combine soup, vinegar, oil, brown sugar, Worcestershire sauce, gar- lic powder and hot sauce; set aside. Use sauce to baste ribs, chicken, hamburgers or steak during broiling or grilling. Makes about 1/3 cups sauce

NO FAIL MARINADE

Few marinades make meat more tender, or garner as many rave reviews as this unconven- tional recipe. Ingredients: one third cup steak sauce; one half cup packed brown sugar; one twelve ounce can Up or Sprite; one half cup melted butter; four tablespoons red wine vinegar; one quarter teaspoon each onion powder, gar- lic powder, salt and pepper. Directions: Combine all in a bowl or zip lock bag. Allow meat

to marinate in mixture for at least an hour, or even overnight.

***

WIN DINNER FOR TWO AT THE PUBLICK HOUSE

Your tips can win you a great dinner for two at the historic Publick House Historic Inn in Sturbridge! Simply send in a hint to be entered into a random draw- ing. One winner per month will win a fabulous dinner for two (a $60 value) at the renown restau- rant, located on Route 131 across the town common in historic Sturbridge. Because I'm in the business of dispensing tips, not inventing them (although I can take credit for some), I'm count- ing on you readers out there to share your best helpful hints!

***

Do you have a helpful hint or handy tip that has worked for you? Do you have a question regarding household or garden matters? If so, why not share them with readers of The Southbridge Evening News? Send questions and/or hints to:

Take the Hint!, c/o the Southbridge Evening News, 25 Elm St., Southbridge, MA 01550. Or E-mail KDRR@aol.com. Hints are entered into a drawing for dinner for two at the historic Publick House Inn. For more great hints, tune into Take the Hint! one minute snip- pet tips aired twice daily on ORC FM Oldies 98.9. And for more tips and talk, be sure to listen to my live hour long show that runs from 9 to 10 a.m. each Friday on WARE 1250.

CLASS REUNIONS

MARY E. WELLS CLASS OF 1960 REUNION

SOUTHBRIDGE — The Mary E. Wells High School Class of 1960 is finalizing plans for its 50- year Reunion Weekend. The Reunion will be held June 11-13, 2010 at both the Southbridge Hotel & Conference Center and Cohasse on the Green. The current Reunion Committee members are Jack Harrald and Judy Page Harrald

of Claiborne Md.; Al Labelle of Marshfield Wisc.; Judy Hmielowski Zaido, Linda Dubreuil Regis, and Imelda Curboy Lundstrom, all of Southbridge. The tentative schedule is:

FRIDAY, JUNE 11, 2010

• Registration in the evening in the lobby of the Southbridge Hotel & Conference Center. A Meet and Greet will be held in the lounge with free hors d’ oeu- vres.

• Group picture with the returning Class members on the steps of Mary E. Wells High School at 1:30 p.m. • Meal at Cohasse on the Green Saturday evening, followed by a program honoring returning and deceased members.

SUNDAY, JUNE 13, 2010

• Bon Voyage Brunch at the

Southbridge Hotel & Conference Center during the morning.

A block of rooms have been set

aside for the Reunion Weekend by Southbridge Hotel & Conference Center with a cut-off

date of April 1, 2010.

Village Photos of Southbridge will take the group picture on the steps of Wells High School and pictures of the various

events. Shortly, an awareness e-mail or letter will be mailed to class members, giving even more spe- cific information. The Reunion Committee has

established a web page at the following site http://web-

pages.charter.net/wellshigh-

school/1960_Reunion.htm. The web page will contain updated information periodically. Reunion information will be also available at www.dickwhit- ney.net under the Southbridge History Page (and More) site. A Reunion Program Committee is being formed. Anyone interested in participat-

ing contact Al Labelle at al.labelle.dav@hotmail.com; Judy Hmielowski Zaido at jzai- do@yahoo.com; or Linda Dubreuil Regis at lindastan@juno.com. At the moment, the Reunion Committee is attempting to

locate the following classmates:

John Barnard, Jane Davis Lenz, Ronald Demerjian, Ronald Lafortune, Henry Martin, and Madeline Proulx Cournoyer. If you have any knowledge of their whereabouts, contact Judy

Harrald at

SOUTHBRIDGE — The Mary E. Wells Class of 1959 is hold- ing its 50th reunion on Saturday, Sept. 19 at Cohasse Country Club. In addition to the reunion on Saturday, an informal get together is planned for 6:30 p.m. Friday evening, Sept 18 at Fins and Tales. The committee is still trying to locate the following class members: Catherine Apte Precanico, Leo Boucher, Muriel Gaulin Lachapelle, Walter Gauthier, Leonard Loranger, Judith MacLaren, Mary Ann Miller, Alexander Papaloucas, Paul Stein and Janice Thompson. Anyone having knowledge of their whereabouts is asked to call Anna May at 508-764-3531, Nancy at 508-764-7074, Laurie at 508-347-9402, Paul at 508-764- 3861 or email Mamie at

domenica_m3c@yahoo.com.

MARIANHILL GRADS TO REUNITE SEPT. 19

of

1974, 35th Class Reunion will be help Saturday, Sept. 19, at 6:30 p.m. For tickets or more infor- mation email Diane at jewel- ryfree@yahoo.com or call 508-

943-9345.

HEY

YOU DON’T HAVE TO

CARRYTHISNEWSPAPERAROUND

EVERYWHERE, YA KNOW.

GETYOURTHEWHOLE

NEWSPAPERONLINE.

All local. All the time. TheHeartOfMassachusetts.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 12,

2010

• Registration in the

morning in the lobby of

the Southbridge Hotel & Conference Center.

• Box Lunch in the

Courtyard of the Southbridge Hotel & Conference Center at noon.

Having trouble affording your mortgage? Are you on the verge of foreclosure?

Do you know someone who is forced with: Foreclosure; Past- due mortgage payments; poor luck selling their home; losing their job; Do you owe more on your home than what you can sell it for? The prospect of foreclosure is far too familiar for many aver- age Americans today. If you or

someone you know is in that position, a short sale might be the best answer for your family. Call me today and I can help you sort through the options. There are NO realtor fees or attorney fees paid by you! So what are you waiting for? Call Kim D’Elia today. (508)331- 6699 broker of Allworth Realty

Page

jharrald@mac.com or Imelda Curboy Lundstrom at (508) 764-

7702.

For more information, con- tact Al Labelle at 715-486-9220 or al.labelle.dav@hotmail.com.

MARY E. WELLS CLASS OF 1959 TO REUNITE

Marianhill

C.C.H.S.

Class

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Circulation Department • P.O. Box 90 • Southbridge, MA 01550

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Southbridge Evening News B1

Tuesday, September 1, 2009 • Southbridge Evening News B1 T T o o w w n
Tuesday, September 1, 2009 • Southbridge Evening News B1 T T o o w w n

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CLASSIFIEDS

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TTOO PPLLAACCEE YYOOUURR AADD CCAALLLL TTOOLLLL FFRREEEE

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VVIISSIITT UUSS OONNLLIINNEE

wwwwww ttoowwnnttoottoowwnnccllaassssiiffiieeddss ccoomm

n n c c l l a a s s s s i i f f

010 FOR SALE

(2) Circular Clothing Racks (1) Circular Belt Rack Pricing Gun & Tags (2) Crates Coat Hangers Assorted Pictures

Only Used 7 Months Will Sell For $400 Or Separately

(860)974-9946

(2) Mercedes-Benz Alloy Wheels

Fit 190-124 Body Style, 1985-1992. Wheel Size Is 6.5” x 15” 1 Wheel Includes Michelin XM+S Alpin Radial (195-65-15) In Near-New Condition. $165 For All

774-230-8816

(2)Sofas

$150 & $200

Or Best Offer

508-278-2729

508-282-9997

(3) Oak 24” Captain’s Back Stools

$50 Each

Tempered Glass

Cocktail Table

40” x 40” $75

(3) Brass Hanging/Ceiling Lights

With 3 Lamps With 4 Lamps $15 Each

508-987-1104

1

2

(4) Suzuki King Quad Stock Tires

Brand New $150

Yamaha V-Star 1100

Studded Seat & Pillion Pad

$200

FitnessQuest Edge

Crosstrainer

Used Only A Few Times Asking $250 Sears Craftsman Gas-Powered Edger

$75

508-892-1550

(6) HEPA Filters

1/3HP, 120V