You are on page 1of 37

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1
UNIT 1: Cells and Biomolecules (Biology) (1 credit 1 !ours)

S"N#$SIS Size can be used to determine the various levels of organization, three of which molecular, cellular and tissue organization. This information is the fundamental to a proper understanding of Biology as the ideas and concepts covered are the basic building blocks from which the rest of the subject is constructed. This unit discusses the structure of cells and organelles and the basic chemistry of a cell. t covers the structure of a generalized eukaryotic cells of plants and animal cells as well as the structure and function of specialized cells of both animal and plant cells. t also discussed physical and chemical properties and physiological role of bimolecular substances and movement of substances through membrane. %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME !t the end of this unit the students should be able to" . . describe the structure of a prokaryotic cell and its inclusions# describe the structure of eukaryotic cell and understand the roles of the nucleus, nucleolus, rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, $olgi apparatus, lysosomes, chloroplasts, mitochondria, ribosomes, centrioles and microtubules, the cellulose cell wall# describe the properties of some important biological molecules# recall, recognise and identify the general formulae and structure of these molecules# understand their roles# and e&plain how molecules and ions move into and out of cells.

%.

T#$ICS &N( TIME &%%#C&TI#N '. ). Structure of cells and organelles Basic chemistry of a cell Total ( hours * hours 1 !ours

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1
)N#*%E('E 1./ Structure o0 cells and organelles '.' +rokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells '.) $eneralised eukaryotic plant and animal cells '.. ,ellular components '...'. /embrane, cell wall, and cytoplasm '...) 0rganelles 1ucleus" nucleolus, chromosomes, nucleoplasm, and nuclear membrane# 2ough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum# /itochondria, $olgi apparatus, 3ysosomes# 2ibosomes, ,hloroplasts, ,entrioles# /icrotubules# /icrofilaments# %acuoles '.7 Specialised plants and specialised animal cells ,ompare and contrast between prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells. ,ompare and contrast between eukaryotic plant and animal cells. 4raw the structure of cell wall and organelles. 4escribe the structure and functions and distribution of cell wall and organelles. http"55cellbio.utmb.edu5cellb io5membrane.html Strategy: 6&amine prepared slides under a light microscopes for each types of cells and observable organelles. Strategy: -sing a graphic organizer to compare and contrast the cells. S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE

4raw the structure of a specialised plant and animal cell.

1ote" Two e&amples of each specialized plants and animal cells would be sufficient.

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 )N#*%E('E 1./ Basic C!emistry o0 a Cell ).' +hysical and chemical properties and physiological role of water carbohydrate S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE Strategy: 3ecture followed by discussion.

State the importance of water properties as a constituents and medium for life. 4raw the basic structures of carbohydrates State the different types of carbohydrates. 4raw the basic structures of lipids. State the different types of lipids. ICT" dentify various types of amino acids from internet

3ipids

proteins and amino 4raw the basic structures of proteins and amino acids. acids State the different types of proteins and amino acids. nucleic acids 4raw the basic structures of nucleic acids. State the different types of nucleic acids.

).)

/ovement of substances through membrane +assive transport !ctive transport '.).. 9 6ndocytosis 6&ocytosis 4escribe the meanings and processes of passive transport, active transport, endocytosis and e&ocytosis.

Strategy: 3ecture followed by discussion.

':

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 UNIT 1 : Matter (C!emistry) S"N#$SIS This topic aims to enhance knowledge and understanding the basic of matter. The scope of study encompasses of atomic structure, state of matter and electronic structure of atoms. %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME !t the end of this unit the students should be able to" . recognise, recall of specific facts, terminology, principles, and practical techni;ues and show the understanding of the concepts of matter and atomic structure# describe, e&plain and interpret phenomena and effects in terms of principles and concepts, presenting arguments and ideas clearly and logically in the study of matter and atomic structure# interpret and translate data presented as continuous prose or in tables, diagrams and graphs and to carry out relevant calculations in the study of matter# and apply the principles and concepts to unfamiliar situations and to show understanding of the responsible use of chemistry in society.

%.

T#$ICS &N( TIME &%%#C&TI#N

'. ). ..

!tomic Structure States of /atter 6lectronic structure of atoms Total

< hours < hours < hours 1 !ours

''

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 )N#*%E('E '.: !tomic Structure '.' The fundamental particles of atoms 6&plain the properties of neutrons protons and electrons in terms of their relative charges and relative masses. 6&plain the contribution of protons and neutrons to atomic nuclei in terms of proton number and nucleon number. 6&plain the distribution of mass and charges within an atom. 6&plain proton number and nucleon number. 4efine the terms relative atomic, isotopic, molecular, and formula masses based on the '), scale. '.. /ass Spectrometry nterpret mass spectra in terms of relative abundance of isotopes and molecular fragments. ,alculate relative atomic mass of an element from the relative abundance of its isotopes or its mass spectrum. '.7 /ole and !vogadro ,onstant 4efine the term mole in terms of the !vogadro constant. ,alculate the number of moles of reactants, volumes of gases, volumes of solutions, and concentration of solutions leading to stoichiometric deduction. T , % Resources: ,4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook Strategy: 3ecture followed by tutorial sessions +ractical sessions to enhance the -nderstanding of theory as well as to apply the knowledge learnt ICT Integration nternet =ebsite S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE

'.) 2elative /ass

2alues: !ppreciate the ethical practices of scientists Thinking critically and analytically >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the recording of data

')

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 )N#*%E('E ).: States of /atter ).' Solid S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE

6&plain ;ualitatively the properties of solid in terms of the arrangement of particles in three dimensions and the repeated pattern of unit cells. 6&plain the terms lattice, allotrope, crystal system and unit cell. dentify the properties of the seven basic crystal structures" cube, he&agon, monoclinic, orthorhombic, rhombohedron, tetragon and triclinic with suitable e&amples. ,alculations relating to unit cells are not re;uired. 6&plain the changes in states of matter, phase diagrams of ?)0 and ,0). The processes of vaporisation, boiling, sublimation, freezing, melting and critical points.

Strategy: 3ecture followed by tutorial sessions +ractical sessions to enhance the understanding of theory as well as to apply the knowledge learnt ICT Integration: http"55www.chem.purdue.e du5gchelp5atoms.states.ht ml

).)

3i;uid

6&plain the kinetic concept of the li;uid state. 4efine the boiling point and freezing point of li;uids. 6&plain the kinetic concept of the li;uid state. 6&plain melting, vaporisation and vapour pressure using simple kinetic molecular theory.

ICT Integration nternet =ebsite

)..

$as

6&plain the pressure and behaviour of ideal gas using the kinetic theory. 4efine Boyle@s law, ,harles@s law and 4alton@s law. -se the pV=nRT e;uation in calculations# including the determination of the relative molecular mass.

T , % Resources: ,4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook

'.

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 )N#*%E('E ..: 6lectronic Structure of atoms S)I%%S 6&plain the formation of the spectrum of atomic hydrogen. ,alculate the ionization energy of an atom from the 3yman series converging limit. 2alues: !ppreciate the ethical practices of scientists Thinking critically and analytically >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the recording of data TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE

..' 3ine spectra of atomic hydrogen

4escribe the shape of the s and p orbitals. 4escribe the number and relative energies of the s, p, and d orbitals for the principal ;uantum numbers ', ), and . including the 7s orbitals. +redict the electronic configuration of atoms and ions given the proton number and charge.

..) The filling of orbitals

6&plain and use the ?undAs rule and the +auli 6&clusion +rinciple in the filling of orbitals.

'7

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 UNIT 3: S"N#$SIS This unit aims to enhance students@ knowledge and understanding of basic physical ;uantities, international units of measurement, error in measurements, vector and scalar ;uantities, the relation between displacement, speed, velocity and acceleration, 1ewton@s laws of motion, collision and conservation of momentum, e;uilibrium of forces and effects of frictional forces. %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME !t the end of this unit the students should be able to" . . show the understanding of the basic physical ;uantities, S units, kinematics Bincluding uniform circular motionC, dynamics and statics# describe, e&plain and interpret phenomena and effects in terms of principles and concepts, presenting arguments and ideas clearly and logically in the study of physical ;uantities, S units, kinematics, dynamics and statics# interpret and translate data presented as continuous prose or in tables, diagrams and graphs and to carry out relevant calculations in the study of kinematics, dynamics and statics# and apply the principles and concepts to unfamiliar situations and to show understanding of the responsible use of physics knowledge in society. Mec!anics ($!ysics) ( 1 credit 1 !ours)

%.

T#$ICS &N( TIME &%%#C&TI#N '. ). .. 7. +hysical ;uantities and units Dinematics 4ynamics Statics Total 7 hrs . hrs 7 hrs 7 hrs 1 !ours

'<

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 )N#*%E('E '. +hysical ;uantities and -nits '.' Basic ;uantities and S units S)I%%S 3ist the si& basic ;uantities and write their S units. 4educe units for derived ;uantities if the definitions are given. TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE Strategy: 3ecture followed by tutorial sessions +ractical sessions to enhance the understanding of theory as well as to apply the knowledge learnt ICT Integration nternet =ebsite 6g. www.bimp.fr '.) 4imension of physical ;uantities 3ist dimensions of basic ;uantities and determine dimensions of derived ;uantities. ,heck and construct e;uations by using dimension analysis '.. Scalars and vectors T , % Resources: ,4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook

Dnow the operations for the sum of vectors Be&amples on coplanar vectorsC. 2esolve a vector to two perpendicular components. State the differences between systematic errors and random errors. =rite derived data to an appropriate number of significant figures.

'.7 6rrors

'E

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 )N#*%E('E ). Dinematics ).' 2ectilinear motion ).) /otion with constant acceleration S)I%%S 4efine displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleration. 4erive and use e;uations of motion with constant acceleration. Sketch and use the graphs of displacement9time, velocity9 time, and acceleration9time for the motion of a body. 4escribe circular motion in terms of angular displacement, speed, angular velocity, and period. 6&plain uniform circular motion as an acceleration due to the change in direction of velocity. .. 4ynamics ..' 1ewtonAs laws of motion State 1ewtonAs law of motion and use its formula to solve problems on motion. -se the formula d (v ) d ( m) F=m or v . dt dt State the principle of conservation of momentum. Show the conservation of momentum by means of 1ewtonAs law of motion. 4istinguish between elastic collisions and non9elastic collisions. 4efine impulse as FFdt and deduce that impulse is e;uivalent to the change ofA momentum 6&plain what is meant by a body has inertia. Strategy: 3ecture followed by tutorial and practical sessions to enhance the understanding of theory as well as to apply the knowledge learnt. TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE 2alues: !ppreciate the ethical practices of scientists Thinking critically and analytically >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the recording of data

).. -niform circular motion and centripetal acceleration

..) ,onservation of /omentum

ICT Integration nternet =ebsite

'*

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 )N#*%E('E ... 6lastic and non9 elastic collisions S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE T , % Resources: ,4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook 2alues: !ppreciate the ethical practices of scientists Thinking critically and analytically >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the recording of data 7. Statics 7.' 6;uilibrium of particles 7.) ,losed polygon 6&plain a couple as a pair of forces tending to produce rotation only. To state the conditions for e;uilibrium of a rigid body. 6&plain how the action of frictional forces can maintains a body in e;uilibrium. Strategy: 3ecture followed by tutorial and practical sessions to enhance the understanding of theory as well as to apply the knowledge learnt.

Solve problems regarding linear collisions between particles.

7.. 6;uilibrium of rigid bodies

2alues: !ppreciate the ethical practices of scientists Thinking critically and analytically >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the recording of data

7.7 >rictional forces

2ealise that the frictional force is a force which has a ma&imum value of G2.

'(

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 UNIT 4: $ractical Science 1 (1 credits 53/ !ours)

S"N#$SIS This unit will develop students@ e&perimental skills and understanding of scientific methods. t is hoped that through practical works, skills such as handling of apparatus, planning of e&perimental works, making observations, interpretation of results and making inferences can facilitate the understanding of the dynamic and e&citing nature of science. n the process, an awareness of the ethical, technological and economic aspects of the subject can be created.
6ach practical work should be accomplished within a . hours period inclusive of the report write up by students under partial supervision of the teacher. The suggested e&periments for +ractical science ' are adopted from that of ST+/ +ractical Biology, ,hemistry and +hysics. There are . e&periments to be carried out in this semester comprising of one practical each from Biology, ,hemistry and +hysics respectively taking up a total of .: hours. %E&RNIN' #UTC#MES !t the end of this unit the students should be able to" . . . %. %. %. choose, assemble and use the apparatus correctly# follow instructions and safety procedures prescribed# observe, record and display readings or data collected# process, analyse and interpret data correctly and perform necessary calculation# draw reasonable conclusions consistent with the processed observations# and use precise language and terminology in preparing the report for the practical work. E76eriment 6&pt '" 6&pt )" 6&pt ." Titles ?istology of +lant and !nimal cells. ntroduction to +ractical ,hemistry /easurement and error estimation

$racticals Com6onents +ractical Science '

'8

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 UNIT : S"N#$SIS This unit discussed how raw materials are needed to release the energy, and other essential substances, are e&changed with the environment and transported within the organism. n particular, how animals obtain the o&ygen needed to release energy in mitochondria, and how it and other materials are transported by blood around the body using the pumping of the heart. >inally consideration will be given to how a favorable water balance is maintained in organisms and the methods by which unwanted wastes are removed. %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME !t the end of this unit the students should be able ble to" . . . %. %. %. recall the structure of the thora&# describe the mechanism of ventilation, including how breathing is controlled# recall the structure of alveoli and understand their role in gas e&change# describe the e&ternal and internal structure of a mesophyte leaf# e&plain the structure and roles of stomata and the mechanism of stomatal opening# state the functions of the circulatory system in the transport of respiratory gases, metabolites, metabolic wastes and hormones# describe the double circulatory system# describe the structure of the mammalian heart and coronary circulation and how the cardiac cycle is coordinated# describe the structure and roles of arteries, veins and capillaries# describe the structure of the vascular tissues# understand the role of vessels in relation to transport# e&plain the concept of homeostasis# describe the regulation of blood glucose level and relate it to diabetes mellitus# and describe morphological, anatomical and physiological adaptations of plants to different environments. 'aseous E7c!ange8 Trans6ort8 and +omeostasis (Biology) (1 credit 1 !ours)

% . % . H. H. H. H .

T#$ICS &N( TIME &%%#C&TI#N '. ). .. 7. $aseous e&change Transport ?omeostasis Total 7 hours < hours E hours 1 !ours

):

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1
)N#*%E('E '.: $aseous e&change '.' $aseous e&change in mammals Breathing cycle 3abel the structures involve in gaseous e&change. 6&plain the role of hemoglobin in transporting the gases. 4escribe the breathing cycle. 4raw labeled structure of stoma. 4escribe the mechanism based on starch9sugar hypothesis and DI accumulation hypothesis. Strategy: 3ecture followed by practical session . ).: Transport ).' !nimals ).'.' ,ardiac cycle ).'.) ,ontrol of heart beat ).'.. ,ardiovascular diseases State the definition of systole, diastole. 4escribe the cardiac cycle. 4escribe the control of heart beat. 2elate healthy life style to the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Strategy: -sing interactive multimedia software to illustrate the cycle. ,ollect information on the healthy life styles. Strategy" -sing interactive multimedia software to illustrate the breathing cycle. S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE

'.)

'..

Stomata in plants Structure and mechanism of opening and closing

)'

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 )N#*%E('E ).) +lants ).).' Hylem and ascent of sap S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE

4escribe &ylem and ascent of sap including transpiration, uptake of water and ions by roots, root pressure and cohesion9tension theory. 4escribe phloem and translocation based on mass flow hypothesis, and cytoplasmic streaming hypothesis

Strategy" 3ecture 4iscussion

).).) +hloem and translocation

..: ?omeostasis ..' ,oncept of homeostasis 6&plain the concept of homeostasis. 4escribe the regulation of blood glucose level and relate it to diabetes mellitus. ..) 0smoregulation in animals 3abeled the structure of kidney and nephron. 4escribe the process of urine formation. 4escribe the role and mechanism of action of antidiuretic hormone. ... 0smoregulation in plants 4escribe the role of stomata in the regulation of water loss. 4escribe morphological, anatomical and physiological adaptations of plants to different environments. Strategy: -sing an interactive model to illustrate the process Strategy" 3ecture

))

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 UNIT 9: S"N#$SIS This topic aims to enhance knowledge and understanding of basic chemical bonding. The scope of study encompasses ionic bonding, covalent bonding, metallic bonding and intermolecular forces between molecules. %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME !t the end of this unit the students should be able to" . recognise, recall of specific facts, terminology, principles, and practical techni;ues and show the understanding of the concepts of chemical bonding# describe, e&plain and interpret phenomena and effects in terms of principles and concepts, presenting arguments and ideas clearly and logically in the study of chemical bonding# interpret and translate data presented as continuous prose or in tables, diagrams and graphs and to carry out relevant calculations in the chemical bonding# and apply the principles and concepts to unfamiliar situations and to show understanding of the responsible use of chemistry in society. C!emical Bonding(C!emistry) (1 credit 1 !ours)

%.

T#$ICS &N( TIME &%%#C&TI#N '. ). .. onic BelectrovalentC Bonding and covalent bonding /etallic Bonding ntermolecular forces between molecules Total < hours < hours < hours 1 !ours

).

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 )N#*%E('E '.: onic B6lectrovalentC Bonding and ,ovalent Bonding S)I%%S 6&plain electrovalent and covalent bonding in terms of Jdot and crossA diagrams. 6&plain the 3ewis structure of S:7)9, ,:.)9, 1:.9, and ,19 ions. +redict and e&plain the shape of molecules and ions using the principle of electron pairs repulsion, eg. linear, trigonal planar, tetrahedral, trigonal bipyramid, octahedral, %9 shaped, and pyramid. 6&plain the concept of overlapping and hybridisation of the s and p orbitals for the ,, 1, and 0 atoms in the ,?7, ,,?7 , ,)?) , 1?., and ?)0 molecules. 6&plain the differences in the bond angles in the water, ammonia, and methane molecules. 6&plain the e&istence of polar and non9polar bonding in molecules which contain the ,9 ,l, ,91, ,90, ,93i, ,9Si bonds, and e&plain the 9covalent properties of ionic compounds such as !l):. and 3i . ,alculations on bond polarity are not re;uired. 6&plain the e&istence of co9 ordinate bonding as e&emplified by ? .:I, 1?7I, !l),lE, and K>eB,1CEL.9 . TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE Strategy: 3ecture followed by tutorial sessions +ractical sessions to enhance the understanding of theory as well as to apply the knowledge learnt ICT Integration nternet =ebsite !chievement oriented nitiative nnovative T , % Resources: ,4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook 2alues: !ppreciate the ethical practices of scientists Thinking critically and analytically >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the recording of data

ICT Integration: http"55en.wikipedia.org5 wiki5chemicalMbonding

)7

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 )N#*%E('E S)I%%S 6&plain typical properties associated with electrovalent and covalent bonding. 6&plain hydrogen bonding, %an der =aalsA forces, and metallic bonding. ).: /etallic Bonding 6&plain metallic bonding through overlapping of orbitals. 6&plain the formation of conduction and valency bands. Strategy: 3ecture followed by tutorial sessions +ractical sessions to enhance the understanding of theory as well as to apply the knowledge learnt ICT Integration nternet =ebsite !chievement oriented nitiative nnovative T , % Resources: ,4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE

4istinguish between conductors, insulators, and semiconductors BSi and $eC in terms of conduction band and valence band. ..: ntermolecular forces between molecules 4educe the effect of intermolecular forces between molecules on the physical properties of substances. 4educe the effect of hydrogen bonding on the physical properties of substances including organic substances. 4educe the types of bonding present in substances from the given information.

2alues: !ppreciate the ethical practices of scientists Thinking critically and analytically >le&ible and open minded

)<

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 UNIT :: S"N#$SIS This unit aims to enhance students@ knowledge and understanding of wave motion, types of waves, its propagation, electromagnetic waves and spectrum, geometrical and physical optics, refraction at curved surfaces, and application of these concepts. %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME !t the end of this unit the students should be able to" *a;es and #6tics ($!ysics) (1 credit 1 !ours)

show the understanding of waves and transfer of energy by waves, two different forms of waves, the propagation of sound waves and electromagnetic waves, reflection and refraction of light formation of images interference of light# describe, e&plain and interpret phenomena and effects in terms of principles and concepts, presenting arguments and ideas clearly and logically in the study of waves and optics# interpret and translate data presented as continuous prose or in tables, diagrams and graphs and to carry out relevant calculations in the study of waves and optics# and apply the principles and concepts to unfamiliar situations and to show understanding of the responsible use of physics knowledge in society.

%.

T#$ICS &N( TIME &%%#C&TI#N '. ). .. 7. =ave motion 6lectromagnetic waves $eometrical optics +hysical optics Total E hrs ) hrs . hrs 7 hrs 1 !ours

)E

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 )N#*%E('E '.: =ave motion '.' =aves and energy 6&plain how waves are formed and give e&amples of waves. 6&plain the relationship between waves and energy. 4efine displacement, amplitude, fre;uency, period, wave length, and wave front. 4erive and use the relationship v N fO. '.) 3ongitudin al and transverse waves '.. +rogressive waves 6&plain the properties of longitudinal waves and transverse waves and give e&amples of these waves. nterpret and use the progressive wave e;uation, y N a sin (wt - kx) or y = a cos (wt kx). 6&plain sound as a form of longitudinal wave. 4escribe the propagation of sound waves in terms of pressure variation and displacement. 6&plain that electromagnetic waves are made up of electrical vibrations and magnetic vibrations, 6&plain that 6, B, and the direction of propagation of electromagnetic waves are always perpendicular to each other. State the orders of magnitude of wavelengths and fre;uencies for each type of electromagnetic wave. Strategy: 3ecture followed by tutorial sessions +ractical sessions to enhance the understanding of theory as well as to apply the knowledge learnt ICT Integration nternet =ebsite 6g. www.bimp.fr T , % Resources: ,4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook 2alues: !ppreciate the ethical practices of scientists Thinking critically and analytically >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the recording of data S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE

'.7 +ropagati on of sound waves

).: 6lectromagnetic waves

).' 6lectromagnetic vibrations

)*

Foundation Course: Science 1

).) 6lectromagnetic wave spectrum

SEMESTER 1 )N#*%E('E ..: $eometrical optics ..' ,urved mirrors Dnow and use the relationship f = r/2 for curved mirrors. 4raw ray diagrams to show the formation of images by concave mirrors and mirrors. 4erive and use the formula '5f N'5u I '5v for curved mirrors. 4erive and use the formula n'5u + n)5u = Bn)9 n'C5r , for refraction at spherical surfaces. ..) 2efraction at curved surfaces -se the formula n '5u + n)5u = Bn)9 n'C5r to derive thin lens formula '5u I '5v N '5f ... Thin lenses and lens makerAs formula '5f NBn9'CB '5r ' I '5r ) C. -se the thin lens formula and lens makerAs formula. 7.: +hysical optics 7.' ?uygen@s principle -nderstand and use the ?ygensA principle to e&plain interference and diffraction phenomena. 6&plain the concept of coherence. 6&plain the concept of optical path difference. S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE Strategy: 3ecture followed by tutorial and practical sessions to enhance the understanding of theory as well as to apply the knowledge learnt. ICT Integration nternet =ebsite T , % Resources: ,4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook

2alues: !ppreciate the ethical practices of scientists Thinking critically and analytically >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the recording of data

)(

Foundation Course: Science 1

7.) nterference

Dnow the conditions for constructive interference and destructive interference.

SEMESTER 1 )N#*%E('E 7.. Two9slit interference pattern S)I%%S Dnow PoungAs two9slit interference pattern. 4erive and use the formula yN45a for Poung@s interference pattern. Dnow the diffraction pattern for a single slit. 4erive and use the formula sin = /a for the first minimum in the diffraction pattern for a single slit. TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE Strategy: 3ecture followed by tutorial and practical sessions to enhance the understanding of theory as well as to apply the knowledge learnt. ICT Integration nternet =ebsite T , % Resources: ,4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook 2alues: !ppreciate the ethical practices of scientists Thinking critically and analytically >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the recording of data

7.7 4iffraction at single slit

)8

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1 UNIT <: S"N#$SIS This topic aims to enhance knowledge and understanding of mathematical concepts that are fre;uently used in the sciences. Students will need to develop mathematical competencies in matrices, algebra and t r igonom et r y. %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME !t the end of this unit the students should be able to" . . . use matrices to solve simultaneous e;uations with up to three unknowns# carry out elementary operations on polynomials# and manipulate the trigonometric identities. Mat!ematics =or Science I (1credit 1 !ours)

T#$ICS &N( TIME &%%#C&TI#N '. ). .. /atrices !lgebra Trigonometry Total < hours < hours < hours 1 !ours

.:

Foundation Course: Science 1

Semester 1
)N#*%E('E '.: /atrices B< hoursC 2ecognize the different types of matrices. 4efine a matri&. +erform simple arithmetic operations on matrices. !djoin and nverse matri&es. $enerate an !djoin matri& of dimension . & .. Solving simultaneous e;uations with up to three unknowns using matrices. T , % Resources: 2eference" Quek Suan $oen, 3eng Da /an, Pong +ing Diang. B)::7C. Mat !mat"#s $. /alaysia" >ederal +ublication. (eli;ery Strategy: ,ooperative 3earning ,onte&tual Teaching S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE

).: !lgebra B< hoursC +olynomials -nderstand the meaning of the degrees and coefficients of polynomials. ,arry out elementary operations on polynomials. T , % Resources: 2eference" Quek Suan $oen, 3eng Da /an, Pong +ing Diang. B)::7C. Mat !mat"#s $. /alaysia" >ederal +ublication. (eli;ery Strategy: ,ooperative 3earning ,onte&tual Teaching

.'

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1
)N#*%E('E ..: Trigonometry B< hoursC The Trigonometric 2atios -se and manipulate e&pressions and e;uations involving the trigonometric ratios. Sketch the graphs of trigonometric ratios. T , % Resources: 2eference" Quek Suan $oen, 3eng Da /an, Pong +ing Diang. B)::7C. Mat !mat"#s $. /alaysia" >ederal +ublication. (eli;ery Strategy: ,ooperative 3earning ,onte&tual Teaching S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE

,ompound !ngles

6&pand trigonometry of compound angles using The sine of a sum or difference The cosine of a sum or difference The tangent of a sum or difference

.)

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 1
UNIT >: $ractical Science 1 (1 credits 53/ !ours)

S"N#$SIS This unit will develop students@ e&perimental skills and understanding of scientific methods. t is hoped that through practical works, skills such as handling of apparatus, planning of e&perimental works, making observations, interpretation of results and making inferences can facilitate the understanding of the dynamic and e&citing nature of science. n the process, an awareness of the ethical, technological and economic aspects of the subject can be created.
6ach practical work should be accomplished within a . hours period inclusive of the report write up by students under partial supervision of the teacher. The suggested e&periments for +ractical science ' are adopted from that of ST+/ +ractical Biology, ,hemistry and +hysics. There are . e&periments to be carried out in this semester comprising of one practical each from Biology, ,hemistry and +hysics respectively taking up a total of .: hours. %E&RNIN' #UTC#MES !t the end of this unit the students should be able to" . . . %. %. %. choose, assemble and use the apparatus correctly# follow instructions and safety procedures prescribed# observe, record and display readings or data collected# process, analyse and interpret data correctly and perform necessary calculation# draw reasonable conclusions consistent with the processed observations# and use precise language and terminology in preparing the report for the practical work. E76eriment 6&pt 7" 6&pt <" 6&pt E" Titles 4issection of mammalian circulatory system. %olumetric analysis" +urity and stoichiometry. Study the magnification of real image by a conve& lens.

$racticals Com6onents +ractical Science '

..

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 3
UNIT 1/: S"N#$SIS This unit discussed the strategies that different species have adopted to ensure their survival. These include various types of ase&ual reproduction, with its rapid production of numerous but usually identical offspring, and se&ual reproduction often a more protracted process yielding fewer offspring, but with the advantage of producing the variety so essential to a species@ evolution and survival in a changing world. ncluded in this unit are the many types of life cycle which have developed in order to ensure their survival. %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME !t the end of this unit the students should be able ble to" . . . %. %. %. % . % . H. H. H. H . describe the structure and functions of the principal parts of an insect9pollinated dicotyledonous flower and a grass# describe pollination and the events leading to fertilization# understand the adaptations related to insect and wind pollination# describe and appreciate the significance of the mechanisms for ensuring cross9 pollination# describe the structure and functions of the male and female reproductive systems# describe the production of gametes in oogenesis and spermatogenesis# recall the roles of luteinising hormone, follicle9stimulating hormone, oestrogen, and progesterone# describe the transfer of male gametes leading to fertilization# understand the functions of the placenta in relation to the development of the foetus# understand the roles of o&ytocin and prolactin# interpret human growth curves# and e&plain the meaning of ecdysis and metamorphosis. Re6roduction8 (e;elo6ment and 'ro?t!(Biology) ( 1 credit 1 !ours)

T#$ICS &N( TIME &%%#C&TI#N '. ). Se&ual and ase&ual reproduction 4evelopment and $rowth Total ': hours < hours 1 !ours

.7

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 3
)N#*%E('E 1./ Se7ual and ase7ual re6roduction '.' Se&ual reproduction in flowering plants S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE

4escribe the structure and functions of the principal parts of an insect9pollinated dicotyledonous flower and a grass. 4escribe pollination and the events leading to fertilization. -nderstand the adaptations related to insect and wind pollination. 4escribe and appreciate the significance of the mechanisms for ensuring cross9pollination.

Strategy@ 3ecture followed by practical session to study the cross9section of various types of flowers.

'.) Se&ual reproduction in human

4raw and describe the structure and functions of the male and female reproductive systems. 4escribe the production of gametes in oogenesis and spermatogenesis. 4escribe the transfer of male gametes leading to fertilization.

Strategy" ,ollecting information on structure and its function.

'.. !se&ual reproduction +arthenogenesis Sporulation Budding Binary fission 2egeneration %egetative 6&plain using specific e&amples the meaning of each type of ase&ual reproduction. Strategy: ,ollecting information on e&amples of each types of in ase&ual reproduction in animals and plants.

.<

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 3
)N#*%E('E ).: 4evelopment and $rowth ).' 6mbryology, human fetal development and parturition process 4escribe the formation of embryo from cleavage to organogenesis. 4escribe the functions of the placenta in relation to the development of the foetus. 4escribe the stages of birth and lactation, and the roles of relevant hormone. ).) Seed development and germination 4escribe the development of seeds and fruits after fertilization. ,ompare epigeal and hypogeal germination. ).. $rowth pattern nterpret growth curves. Strategy: 3ecture followed by discussion. Strategy" -sing video5interactive multimedia software to illustrate the birth process. S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE

).7

6cdysis and metamorphosis

6&plain the meaning of the two concepts. 4escribe an e&ample of life cycle .

.E

Foundation Course: Science 1

Semester 3
UNIT 11: S"N#$SIS This topic aims to enhance knowledge and understanding of the chemistry of carbon. The scope of study encompasses bonding of the carbon atoms, chemical formulae, isomerism and nomenclature and structural formulae for functional group. %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME !t the end of the course the students should be able to" . recognise, recall of specific facts, terminology, principles, and practical techni;ues and show the understanding of the chemistry of carbon# describe, e&plain and interpret phenomena and effects in terms of principles and concepts, presenting arguments and ideas clearly and logically in the study of chemistry of carbon# interpret and translate data presented as continuous prose or in tables, diagrams and graphs and to carry out relevant calculations in the chemistry of carbon# and apply the principles and concepts to unfamiliar situations and to show understanding of the responsible use of chemistry in society. T#$ICS &N( TIME &%%#C&TI#N '. ). .. 7. Bonding of the ,arbon !toms /olecular formula, 6mphirical >ormula and Structural >ormula somerism 1omenclature and Structural >ormulae for >unctional $roup Total < hours 7 hours ) hours 7 hours 1 !ours CarAon C!emistry I (C!emistry) (1 credit 1 !ours)

%.

.*

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 3
)N#*%E('E '.: Bonding of the ,arbon !toms S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE Strategy: 3ecture followed by tutorial sessions +ractical sessions to enhance the understanding of theory as well as to apply the knowledge learnt ICT Integration nternet =ebsite !chievement oriented nitiative nnovative T , % Resources: ,4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook 2alues: !ppreciate the ethical practices of scientists ).: /olecular formula, 6mphirical >ormula and Structural >ormula ..: somerism 6&plain the meaning of general, emphirical, molecular, and structural formulae for organic compounds. ,alculate emphirical formulae. nterpret structural isomerism with reference to the ability of carbon atoms to link together with each other in a straight line and5or in branches. Thinking critically and analytically >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the recording of data

6&plain the concept of hybridization in the bonding of carbon atoms with reference specially to carbon atoms which have a valency of four and the types of hybridization such as the following" sp linear, sp) triangular, sp. 9 tetrahedral. 4escribe the formation of R and S bonds as e&emplified by diagrams of the overlapping of orbitals in ,?7, ,)?7, ,)?), and ,E?E molecules. 6&plain the concept of delocalization of S electrons in benzene rings BaromaticallyC.

.(

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 3
)N#*%E('E S)I%%S 6&plain geometric5cis9trans isomerism in alkanes in terms of restricted rotation due to S bond5,N, bonds. 6&plain the meaning of a chiral center and how such a centre gives rise to optical isomerism. dentify chiral centres and5or cis9 trans isomerism in a molecule of given structural formula. TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE Strategy: 3ecture followed by tutorial sessions +ractical sessions to enhance the -nderstanding of theory as well as to apply the knowledge learnt

ICT Integration nternet =ebsite !chievement oriented 4etermine the possible isomers for nitiative nnovative an organic compound of known molecular formula. T , % Resources: ,4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook 7.: 1omenclature !nd Structural >ormulae for >unctional $roup 4escribe the classification of organic compounds by functional groups and the nomenclature of classes of organic compounds according to the -+!, system of the following classes of compounds" BaC alkanes, alkenes BbC haloalkanes BcC alcohols Bincluding primary, secondary and tertiaryC BdC aldehydes and ketones BeC carbo&ylic acids and esters 2alues: !ppreciate the ethical practices of scientists Thinking critically and analytically >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the recording of data

.8

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 3
UNIT 11: S"N#$SIS This unit aims to enhance students@ knowledge and understanding of magnetic fields, forces acting on moving charges and current carrying wire, electromagnetic induction, alternating current, transformers, relevant calculations involved in these concepts, and electronics. %E&RNIN' #UTC#ME !t the end of this unit the students should be able to" Electricity and Magnetism 1 ($!ysics) ( 1 credit 1 !ours)

show the understanding of magnetic field and flu&, force on current9carrying conductors, 3aws related to electromagnetic induction, alternating current and its rectification and operational amplifier through their abilities to recognize and recall specific facts, terminology, principles, and relevant practical techni;ues related to the four topics# describe, e&plain and interpret phenomena and effects in terms of principles and concepts, presenting arguments and ideas clearly and logically in the study of magnetism, electromagnetic induction, alternating current and electronics# interpret and translate data presented as continuous prose or in tables, diagrams and graphs and to carry out relevant calculations in the study of magnetism, electromagnetic induction, alternating current and electronics# and apply the principles and concepts to unfamiliar situations and to show understanding of the responsible use of physics knowledge in society.

%.

T#$ICS &N( TIME &%%#C&TI#N '. ). .. 7. /agnetic fields 6lectromagnetic induction !lternating current 6lectronics Total 7 hrs 7 hrs < hrs ) hrs 1 !ours

7:

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 3
)N#*%E('E '.: /agnetic fields '.' /agnetic field S)I%%S -nderstand the concept of magnetic field. 4efine magnetic field strength B. -se the formula for force on a moving charge, F = %& x B. -se the e;uation F = %&B sin . -nderstand the magnetic force that acts on a straight current9 carrying conductor in a uniform magnetic field. -se the e;uation F = I'B sin . -se the formulae for magnetic fields" circular loop, B = () I 2r solenoid, B N(nI straight wire, B N(I /2*d. 4efine magnetic flu& + N B! cos T. ).: 6lectromagnetic induction ).' /agnetic flu& ).) >araday@s law and 3enz@s law ).. Self9inductance State and use >aradayAs law and 3enzAs law. 4erive and use the e;uation for induced emf in linear conductors, discs, and plane coils. 6&plain the phenomenon of self9 inductance and define self9 inductance. -se the formulae , = -' d I 5 dt , ' I = )+. 4erive and use the e;uation ).7 Transformer %s5 %+ N 1s 5 1+ for a transformer. 4iscuss eddy currents in a transformer. 2alues: !ppreciate the ethical practices of scientists Thinking critically and analytically >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the recording of data TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE Strategy: 3ecture followed by tutorial sessions +ractical sessions to enhance the understanding of theory as well as to apply the knowledge learnt

'.) >orce on a moving charge '.. >orce on a current9carrying conductor

ICT Integration nternet =ebsites T , % Resources: ,4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook

'.7 /agnetic fields due to currents

7'

Foundation Course: Science 1

7)

Foundation Course: Science 1

SEMESTER 3
)N#*%E('E ..: !lternating currents ..' !lternating currents through resistors ..) +ower 4erive and use the formula for power in an alternating current circuit which consists of a pure resistor, a pure capacitor, and a pure inductor separately. Strategy: 3ecture followed by tutorial sessions +ractical sessions to enhance the understanding of theory as well as to apply the knowledge learnt ICT Integration nternet =ebsite T , % Resources: ,4 20/ ST+/ +hysics Te&tbook 2alues: !ppreciate the ethical practices of scientists Thinking critically and analytically >le&ible and open minded ?onest and accurate in the recording of data S)I%%S TE&C+IN' , %E&RNIN' E-$ERIENCE

... 2ectification of alternating currents

6&plain half9wave rectification and full9wave rectification with the use of diodes.

-nderstand the operational amplifier as a differential amplifier. 7.: 6lectronics 7.' 0perational amplifier 4escribe ideal properties of an operational amplifier.

-nderstand the principle of feedback in an amplifier especially negative feedback. 7.) 1egative feedback

SEMESTER 3

7.

Foundation Course: Science 1

Unit 13: $ractical Science 1 (1 credits 53/ !ours)

S"N#$SIS This unit will develop students@ e&perimental skills and understanding of scientific methods. t is hoped that through practical works, skills such as handling of apparatus, planning of e&perimental works, making observations, interpretation of results and making inferences can facilitate the understanding of the dynamic and e&citing nature of science. n the process, an awareness of the ethical, technological and economic aspects of the subject can be created.
6ach practical work should be accomplished within a . hours period inclusive of the report write up by students under partial supervision of the teacher. The suggested e&periments for +ractical science ' are adopted from that of ST+/ +ractical Biology, ,hemistry and +hysics. There are . e&periments to be carried out in this semester comprising of one practical each from Biology, ,hemistry and +hysics respectively taking up a total of .: hours. %E&RNIN' #UTC#MES !t the end of this unit the students should be able to" . . . %. %. %. choose, assemble and use the apparatus correctly# follow instructions and safety procedures prescribed# observe, record and display readings or data collected# process, analyse and interpret data correctly and perform necessary calculation# draw reasonable conclusions consistent with the processed observations# and use precise language and terminology in preparing the report for the practical work. E76eriment 6&pt *" 6&pt (" 6&pt 8" Titles nvestigating the structure of flowers, angiospermatophyta. !cid, base and salt9 ionic e;uilibrium. 4etermine Poung@s modulus by cantilever method.

$racticals Com6onents +ractical Science '

77