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Andy Campbell Mrs.

Nogarr AP English 3, Period 6 September 4th, 2013 Title: Speech to the Virginia Convention Author: Patrick Henry Discussed: September 4th, 2013

Pathos: “I repeat it, sir, we must fight! An appeal to arms and to the God of Hosts is all that is left us! … There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! Our chains are forged! Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston! The war is inevitable and let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come.” (Paragraph 3,4)

Rhetorical Questions: “Are fleets and armies necessary to a work of love and reconciliation? Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled, that force must be called in to win back our love? … But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week, or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house? Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction?” (Paragraph 3,4)

Patrick Henry played a very prominent role in the movement for independence in the American Revolution. In the spring of 1775, Patrick Henry met with members of the second Virginia Convention to discuss the need for a military mobilization against the British. Speaking with passion and fervor, he delivered a powerful, now-famous speech that persuaded opponents of the Revolution to unite and fight for freedom. Taking advantage of growing patriotic sentiment, Henry provided the last straw for remaining loyal to Britain and convinced

This illustrates Henry’s thesis and leaves the listener with something to ponder. these claims resonated in the hearts of the listeners. to strengthen his position. As colonists at the time were beginning to feel more like independent citizens. Henry implies that God is on the colonist’s side. and thus the colonists have a moral obligation to fight the war. In addition to emotional appeal. Henry asserts that Britain only sees America as an economic extension of their empire. An important element is the mention of God. let it come. To persuade his audience. For example. He also references Boston in this excerpt because Boston was the center of colonial resistance. Henry compares Britain’s authority to the chains of slavery. sir. This philosophy would become an important motivator for soldiers in the war. and highlights the urgency of the situation to stimulate an emotional reaction from the listeners. in which British soldiers fired into a protesting crowd.” His energetic and enthusiastic tone established in his excerpt serves to evoke passion in the hearts of the listeners. Perhaps Henry wants to remind the audience of the Boston Massacre. Also notewort hy is the repetition of “We must fight” and “Let it come”. Henry mainly relies on pathos or appeals to emotion.many that a war would be inevitable. that force must be called in to win back our . Later. This is demonstrated in : “I repeat it. Henry also utilizes rhetorical questions extensively. to demonstrate his claim that Britain is careless to the colonist’s cause. he asks “Are fleets and armies necessary to a work of love and reconciliation? Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled. and not British subjects. sir. This reinforces the view that Britain lacks empathy for colonists. we must fight! An appeal to arms and to the God of Hosts is all that is left us! … There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! Our chains are forged! Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston! The war is inevitable and let it come! I repeat it.

Henry’s use of rhetorical questions reinforces his view that the country must go to war. or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed. Sometimes he uses them to propose drastic situations. Henry brings this up to instill fear into the audience. This is an effective technique: he casts the British in a negative light to make the audience fear them. as to suggest what Britain will do if the colonists do nothing to stop them. and Henry as the hero. thus strengthening the portrayal of the British as oppressor. but to suppress the colonists. to engage the audience and stir up emotional reactions. This justifies Henry’s demands to go to war. and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house? Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction?” The mention of a British guard in every home alludes to the Quartering Act. and then offers a solution to make the audience more trusting of Henry.love?” He proposes these questions to the audience as to point out they British fleets and armies are not on American soil to maintain peace or to protect the citizens. to elicit strong patriotic and nationalistic emotions. He then quells their fears by building up the audience’s confidence in the next paragraphs. in which British soldiers could legally take shelter in anyone’s home. Hen ry uses rhetorical questions throughout the piece. He presents them in a way that implies they will be a threat to society. in the case of “But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week. .