TROOP 115 HANDBOOK

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA Troop 115, Traverse City, Michigan
Bay Trails District, Scenic Trails Council

Handbook Developed August 2006

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Table of Contents
Page Number Handbook Cover Table of Contents Troop 115 Contact Numbers Glossary of Terms What Is Boy Scouts All About? Founders of Scouting and BSA Troop 115 History and Eagle Scouts Youth-Run Troop Troop Organization Junior Leadership Parent Participation Troop Meetings Troop Campouts / Outings Court of Honor / Awards Night Order of the Arrow Uniform and Insignia Boy Scout Handbook Scout Merchandise/Equipment Communication System Merit Badges Advancement Guidelines General Advancement Requirements Service Projects Discipline Financial Responsibility Adult & Youth Training 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 11 16 16 17 22 22 25 26 26 27 27 29 34 34 34 35 35

The Troop 115 Handbook was developed in 2006 as part of a Wood Badge Ticket (C-8-6) by Richard Peck, Scoutmaster. Acknowledgements: Troop 115 Committee Members and Scouts for their review and additions, and various scouting web sites used for informational purposes.

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Troop 115 Contact Numbers
Scenic Trails Council Boy Scouts of America 1499 Business Park Drive Traverse City, MI 49686-8741 Phone: (231) 947-7071 Fax: (231) 947-7072

POSITION
District Executive

NAME
Mark Ewing

PHONE AND/OR EMAIL
(231) 947-7071 ext. 106 office (231) 631-7490 cell maewing@bsamail.org (231) 929-3498 (231) 946-1582 boomerinarbonne@charter.net (231) 938-9010 home (231)590-1938 cell rpeck@ecswebsite.com (231) 938-0909 home (231)392-2356 cell tcoggins@airwayautomation.com (231) 946-9798 home (231) 620-3291 cell mfleahy1@charter.net (231) 947-2329 home (231) 620-4450 cell TCKOSCOENERGY@aol.com (231) 933-4071 home (231) 645-0480 cell (231) 938-9010 home (231)590-4077 cell tcmomkat@charter.net (231) 946-6349 home jleahy@charter.net (231) 938-0909 home (231) 946-3868 durecki@aol.com (231) 218-3803 cell

Unit Commissioner Committee Chair Scoutmaster

Harry Leibziet Pam Boomer Richard Peck (Rick) Bear (C-8-6) Tim Coggins

Assistant Scoutmaster

Assistant Scoutmaster

Mike Leahy

Assistant Scoutmaster

Alan Kostrzewa

Assistant Scoutmaster Assistant Scoutmaster Charter Representative

Daryl Collins

Kathy Peck

Advancement Chair Outdoor Chair Equipment Coordinator Secretary Treasurer Fundraising Chair

Alan Kostrzewa John Leahy Tim Coggins Nancy Durecki Mike Leahy Catherine Collins

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Glossary Of Terms
Term or Abbreviation APL ASM ASPL BOR Camporee CC Friends of Scouting (FOS) Jamboree JAS NYLT PL PLC OA Order of the Arrow Definition Assistant Patrol Leader Assistant Scoutmaster Assistant Senior Patrol Leader Board of Review Council or District camp on grand scale Committee Chair Annual fundraiser by Council (FOS) Scout meeting or camp on grand scale Junior Assistant Scoutmaster National Youth Leader Training Patrol Leader Patrol Leaders Council Order of the Arrow Boy Scouting’s National Honor Society that seeks to recognize Scouts and Scouters who, as campers, best exemplify the Scout Oath and Scout Law in their daily lives. Our local lodge is Indian Drum Lodge 152. Quartermaster Roundtable Across the country, nearly 4 million Scouts and adult leaders distribute and collect bags of food for their local community food banks. Scoutmaster Senior Patrol Leader The Boy Scout Leader Wood Badge course is the advanced training program for Boy Scout troop leaders. It is designed to train Scoutmasters, Assistant Scoutmasters, and other Scouters directly involved with Boy Scout troop operation. Its purpose is to aid Boy Scout troop leaders in providing a quality program that will enable each Scout to grow to his greatest potential.

QM RT Scouting for Food (SOF)

SM SPL Wood Badge

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What Is Boy Scouts All About?
Find out what Boy Scouts of America has to offer. There are three aims to scouting: Aim 1 - To Build Character Aim 2 - To Foster Citizenship Aim 3 - To Develop Fitness These three aims represent the long-term outcomes we want for every boy. It is the mission of the Boy Scouts of America to serve others by helping to instill values in young people, and in other ways to prepare them to make ethical choices over their lifetime in achieving their full potential. Mission Statement The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law. Scout Oath On my honor I will do my best To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; To help other people at all times; To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight. Scout Law A Scout is: Trustworthy Loyal Helpful Friendly Courteous Kind Obedient Cheerful Thrifty Brave Clean Reverent

Vision Statement The Boy Scouts of America is the nation's foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training. In the future Scouting will continue to: Offer young people responsible fun and adventure; Instill in young people lifetime values and develop in them ethical character as expressed in the Scout Oath and Law;  Train young people in citizenship, service, and leadership;  Serve America's communities and families with its quality, values-based program.
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Founders of Scouting and the BSA
Robert S. S. Baden-Powell As a youth, Robert Baden-Powell greatly enjoyed the outdoors, learning about nature and how to live in the wilderness. After returning as a military hero from service in Africa, Baden-Powell discovered that English boys were reading the manual on stalking and survival in the wilderness he had written for British soldiers. Gathering ideas from Ernest Thompson Seton, Daniel Carter Beard, and others, he rewrote the manual as a nonmilitary nature skill book and called it Scouting for Boys. To test his ideas, BadenPowell brought together 22 boys to camp at Brownsea Island, off the coast of England. This historic campout was a success and resulted in the advent of Scouting. Thus, the imagination and inspiration of Baden-Powell, later proclaimed Chief Scout of the World, brought Scouting to youth the world over. Ernest Thompson Seton Born in Scotland, Ernest Thompson Seton immigrated to America as a youth in the 1880s. His fascination with the wilderness led him to become a naturalist, an artist, and an author, and through his works he influenced both youth and adults. Seton established a youth organization called the Woodcraft Indians, and his background of outdoor skills and interest in youth made him a logical choice for the position of first Chief Scout of the BSA in 1910. His many volumes of Scout craft became an integral part of Scouting, and his intelligence and enthusiasm helped turn an idea into reality. Daniel Carter Beard Woodsman, illustrator, and naturalist, Daniel Carter Beard was a pioneering spirit of the Boy Scouts of America. Already 60 years old when the Boy Scouts of America was formed, he became a founder and merged it with his own boys' organization, the Sons of Daniel Boone. As the first national Scout commissioner, Beard helped design the original Scout uniform and introduced the elements of the First Class Scout badge. "Uncle Dan," as he was known to boys and leaders, will be remembered as a colorful figure dressed in buckskin that helped form Scouting in the United States. William D. Boyce In 1909, Chicago publisher William D. Boyce lost his way in a dense London fog. A boy came to his aid and, after guiding the man, refused a tip, explaining that as a Scout he would not take a tip for doing a Good Turn. This gesture by an unknown Scout inspired a meeting with Robert Baden-Powell, the British founder of the Boy Scouts. As a result, William Boyce incorporated the Boy Scouts of America on February 8, 1910. He also created the Lone Scouts, which merged with the Boy Scouts of America in 1924.

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James E. West James E. West was appointed the first Chief Scout Executive of the Boy Scouts of America in 1911. Although orphaned and physically handicapped, he had the perseverance to graduate from law school and become a successful attorney. This same determination provided the impetus to help build Scouting into the largest and most effective youth organization in the world. When he retired in 1943, Dr. West was recognized throughout the country as the true architect of the Boy Scouts of America.

Troop 115 History and Eagle Scouts
Troop 115 was originally chartered by the East Bay Elementary PTO in 1954. When East Bay Elementary was closed our charter was picked up by the PTO at Courtade Elementary where we now meet. Troop 115 is one of the oldest continually chartered Troops in Scenic Trails Council and has a rich and proud history of providing challenging adventures, opportunities for advancement and developing quality young men. The Troops leadership is committed to providing a program that will carry that history into a proud future. The Eagle Scout
(written Jan. 19, 1980 - Contributed by Wes Fish, Scoutmaster, Troop 102, Ventura, CA; copied from eaglescout.org)

A young man stands before us now, smiling broadly as his honor is bestowed. He stood before us once as Tenderfoot, but now he is an “Eagle Scout”. “On my honor, I will do my best” he promised from the start; He said that he would obey the Law that is known by every scout. The Oath and Law become his creed, his Motto “Be Prepared”; “Do a good turn daily” was the Slogan to which he agreed. With Slogan, Motto, the Oath and Law, he traveled the “Eagle” trail; a trail completed by just a few, but an asset to those who do. He learned to do whatever is right no matter what others might think. He learned to be proud, yet not aloof, to respect all other men. Who is this young man who before us stands accepting his “Eagle” with pride?

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He once was a Boy Scout with boyish ideals; but now he is nearly a man.

Scout Name
Michael Nickels John Gayao Harold (Skip) Brown Tom Zaremba Kevin Wilkes Gary Helms Mark Ewing William Ewing Kevin Elsenheimer Charles Valleau Jeffery Hengesbach Brad Clingan David Rose Michael Prevo Michael Kearney Scott Krauchunas Mike Obuchowski Philip Butkovich Mark Anderson Todd Nurnberger Phil Jeffrey Charlie Risk Greg Robinson Kedar Klix Jason Butzow Jon Nichols

Year
1963 1965 1967 1967 1973 1973 1978 1979 1980 1981 1981 1983 1986 1986 1986 1986 1986 1988 1988 1989 1990 1990 1990 1992 1993 1996

Scout Name
David Gaumer Dan Nickels David Hanson Michael Helms John Dewaha Kevin Whiting Duane Smith Todd McCall Andrew Schmidt Kurt Wilkes Craig McPherson Ronald Kendzierski, Jr. William Hubert Bill Howard Jeffery Rush Chris Klaver Charles Wriska Matt Kosnik Paul Ryan Justin Vanderlinde Randy Averill Eric Wriska Brian Salisbury Gregory Caskie, Jr. Robert Busch Eric Kornmiller

Year
1965 1966 1967 1972 1973 1973 1979 1980 1981 1981 1983 1984 1986 1986 1986 1986 1987 1988 1988 1990 1990 1990 1991 1993 1994 1996

Youth-Run Troop
Troop 115 is working toward being a youth-run organization. The Scouts conduct an annual planning meeting and during monthly Patrol Leaders Council (PLC) meetings plan the programs, activities and events of the troop. The adult leaders advise and guide the Scouts, providing support and encouragement, and act as positive role models. The decisions of youth leaders will only be vetoed by the adult leaders for matters of safety

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or for compliance with the policies and regulations of the Boy Scouts of America and Scenic Trails Council. The Troop or Committee typically plans Service Hour Projects and the Fundraising Chair typically plans the fundraisers for the troop. One of the Methods of Scouting is leadership development. The Scouts learn by doing, planning, organization, and decision-making; and as they learn these skills they acquire increasing responsibility. However, the learning is guided. The youth leaders receive training from the adult leaders and at National Youth Leader Training (NYLT) courses when available. Specific training and advice for the various youth leadership positions are also provided. Ample leadership opportunities exist within the troop, short-term and long-term, individual and shared. “In Scouting, boys learn to be effective leaders… and to be good followers.” (Scoutmaster Handbook, 9th edition, p. 9)

Troop Organization
The following descriptions highlight areas within the troop's organization. Troop 115 is part of Boy Scouts of America, Bay Trails District, Scenic Trails Council. The troop’s organization consists of the Chartering Organization, the Troop Committee, the Boy Scouts and their parents.

CHARTERING ORGANIZATION: The Courtade Elementary School
Parent/Teacher Organization (PTO) is the Chartering Organization for Troop 115. The charter allows the PTO to host a BSA troop for its community and youth objectives.

TROOP COMMITTEE: The Troop Committee is a group of adults, generally
parents of Scouts, who support the troop by insuring that the troop's adult leadership is adequate, by providing various support functions, by delivering a quality troop program, and by handling troop administration. The Troop Committee also helps to raise the funds needed for equipment and operating expenses. The adult leaders will act primarily as advisors giving maximum opportunity for the Scouts to show responsibility.

Troop Committee meetings are currently held the second Tuesday of each month at LaSenorita’s on Garfield beginning at 6:30 PM. Parents are encouraged to attend these meetings. Dates may vary so the most parents are able to attend. The Troop Committee is the troop's board of directors and supports the Troop program. But you ask, "What does the Troop Committee do?" The Troop Committee does the following:  Ensures that quality adult leadership is recruited and trained. In case the Scoutmaster is absent, a qualified Assistant Scoutmaster is assigned. If the Scoutmaster is unable to serve, a replacement is recruited.  Provides adequate meeting facilities.  Advises the Scoutmaster on policies relating to Boy Scouting and the Chartered Organization.

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 Carries out the policies and regulations of the Boy Scouts of America.  Supports leaders in carrying out the program.  Is responsible for finances, adequate funds, and disbursements in line with the approved budget plan.

Troop Organization (cont.)
 Obtains, maintains, and properly cares for Troop property.  Provides adequate camping and outdoor program (minimum 10 days and
     nights per year). Serves on Boards of Review and Courts of Honor. Supports the Scoutmaster in working with individual boys and problems that may affect the overall Troop program. Provides for the special needs and assistance some boys may require. Helps with the Friends of Scouting campaign. Assists the Scoutmaster with handling boy behavior problems.

The Troop Committee consists of a Committee Chair, Chartering Organization Representative, Scoutmaster, Assistant Scoutmaster(s), Advancement Chair, Fundraising Chair, Outdoor Chair, Equipment Coordinator, Secretary, Treasurer and interested parents. The following gives a brief overview of each representative.

Committee Chair: The Committee Chair serves as the "chairperson of the board,"
the board being the Troop Committee. Duties of the Chairperson  Organize the committee to see that all functions are delegated, coordinated, and completed.  Maintain a close relationship with the Chartered Organizations Representative and the Scoutmaster.  Interpret national and local policies to the Troop.  Prepare Troop Committee meeting agendas.  Call, preside over, and promote attendance at monthly Troop Committee meetings and any special meetings that may be called.  Ensure Troop representation at monthly roundtables.  Secure top-notch, trained individuals for camp leadership.  Arrange for charter review and re-charter annually.  Plan the charter presentation.

Chartering Organization Representative: The Chartering Organization
Representative’s primary responsibility is to help the unit to be successful and to provide coordination between the chartered organization and the Troop. Typical duties include:

 Is a member of the chartered organization.  Serves as head of "Scouting Department" in the organization.

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Maintains a close liaison with the Troop Committee Chairman. Helps recruit other adult leaders. Serves as a liaison between the Troop and the Chartered Organization. Assists with Unit rechartering [each January the Troop must go through a rechartering process].  Encourages service to the organization.  Is an active and involved member of the district committee.

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Scoutmaster: The Scoutmaster is responsible for overseeing the operations of the
troop. The Scoutmaster’s main responsibility is the Scouts of the troop. The Scoutmaster's duties include:  Train and guide boy leaders.  Work with other responsible adults to bring Scouting to boys.  Use the methods of Scouting to achieve the aims of Scouting. Meetings  Meet regularly with the patrol leaders' council (PLC) for training and coordination in planning troop activities.  Attend all Troop meetings or, when necessary, arrange for a qualified adult substitute.  Attend Troop Committee meetings.  Conduct periodic parents' sessions to share the program and encourage parent participation and cooperation.  Take part in annual membership inventory and uniform inspection, charter review meeting, and charter presentation. Guidance  Conduct Scoutmaster conferences for all rank advancements.  Provide a systematic recruiting plan for new members and see that they are properly registered.  Delegate responsibility to other adults and groups (Assistants, Troop Committee) so that they have a real part in Troop operations.  Supervise Troop elections for the Order of the Arrow. Activities  Make it possible for each Scout to experience at least 10 days and nights of camping each year.  Participate in Scenic Trails Council and Bay Trails District events.  Build a strong program by using proven methods presented in Scouting literature.  Conduct all activities under qualified leadership, safe conditions, and the policies of the chartered organization and the Boy Scouts of America.

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Assistant Scoutmaster(s): Aside from being responsible for particular functions,
each Assistant Scoutmaster acts as an advisor to the patrols. Assistant Scoutmasters help operate the troop. Each assistant Scoutmaster is assigned specific program duties and reports to the Scoutmaster. They also provide the required two-deep leadership standards set by the Boy Scouts of America. An Assistant Scoutmaster may be 18 years old, but at least one in the Troop should be 21 or older, so he can serve in the Scoutmaster's absence. Types of assistant Scoutmasters include:  Assistant Scoutmaster--New Scout patrol  Assistant Scoutmaster--Venture patrol

Advancement Chair: Responsible for the administration of the troop advancement
program, the Advancement Chair keeps records and prepares reports for submission to the Council. Duties of Advancement

 Encourage Scouts to advance in rank.
 Work with the Troop Scribe to maintain all Scout advancement records.  Arrange quarterly Troop Boards of Review and Courts of Honor.  Develop and maintain a merit badge counselor list.  Make a prompt report on the correct form to the council service center when a Troop Board of Review is held. Secure badges and certificates.  Work with the Troop Librarian to build and maintain a Troop library of merit badge pamphlets.  Report to the Troop Committee at each meeting.

Fundraising Chair: Researches and recommends fundraising projects to meet the
Troop's financial requirements. Organizes volunteers to assist in fundraising. Obtains approval from Troop Committee.

Outdoor Chair: Responsible for organization of outdoor activities, including
summer camps. Duties of Outdoor Chair Help in securing permission to use camping sites. Serve as transportation coordinator. Ensure a monthly outdoor program. Promote the National Camping Award.  Promote, through family meetings, attendance at Troop campouts, camporees, and summer camp to reach the goal of one outing per month.  Secure tour permits for all Troop activities.  Report to the Troop Committee at each meeting.    

Equipment Coordinator: Responsible for working with the Troop Quartermaster,
control and maintenance of troop equipment.

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Duties of the Equipment Coordinator

 Supervise and help the Troop procure camping equipment.  Work with the Quartermaster on inventory and proper storage and
maintenance of all Troop equipment.  Make periodic safety checks on all Troop camping gear, and encourage Troop in safe use of all outdoor equipment.  Report to the Troop Committee at each meeting.

Secretary: Attends all committee meetings and takes minutes.
Duties of the Secretary       Keep minutes of meetings and send out committee meeting notices. Handle publicity. Prepare a family newsletter of troop events and activities. Conduct the troop resource survey. Plan for family night programs and family activities. At each meeting, report the minutes of the previous meeting.

Treasurer: Attends all committee meetings providing a treasury report and maintains
the organization’s treasury. Duties of the Treasurer (Finance/Records)

 Handle all troop funds. Pay bills on the recommendation of the Scoutmaster 
 and authorization of the troop committee. Maintain checking and savings accounts. Train and supervise the troop scribe in record keeping. Keep adequate records in the Troop/Team Record Book. Supervise the camp savings plan. Lead in the preparation of the annual troop budget. Lead the Friends of Scouting campaign. Report to the troop at each meeting. Keep adequate records of expenses.


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Junior Leadership
Troop 115 operates under the Patrol Method of Scouting as developed by Lord Robert Baden-Powell of Great Britain in the early 1900’s. This is one of the best methods for developing leadership and responsibility. A patrol typically consists of 6-8 Scouts under the leadership of a Scout, elected by the patrol to be its Patrol Leader. Through
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their Patrol Leader and the Patrol Leaders Council, chaired by the Senior Patrol Leader, Scouts have input into the program of the troop and are able to get the latest information on upcoming events and activities. The patrol serves to ease communication within the Troop. A general election by the entire Troop will be conducted for Assistant Senior Patrol Leader in September and in March of each year. The current Assistant Senior Patrol Leader will automatically assume the position of Senior Patrol Leader. If for any reason the current Assistant Senior Patrol Leader is unable to fulfill the duties of Senior Patrol Leader, a new Senior Patrol Leader will be elected by the entire troop. The outgoing Senior Patrol Leader will preside over the election, accepting nominations and supervising the collection of ballots. Voting will be conducted by secret ballot. The Scoutmaster or an Assistant Scoutmaster and the outgoing Senior Patrol Leader will count and verify the vote. The candidate receiving a simple majority of the members present will be declared winner. If more than two boys are running for a position and no one receives the majority of the votes, a revote will be taken between the two candidates until one candidate receives a majority of the votes.

Junior Leadership (cont.)
JUNIOR LEADERSHIP POSITIONS
Elected positions: Senior Patrol Leader -- ASPL moves into position after serving 6 mo. as ASPL Assistant Senior Patrol Leader -- Elected by the troop Patrol Leader -- Elected by individual patrols members Appointed positions: Assistant Patrol Leader -- Appointed by the Patrol members Chaplain's Aide -- Appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader Historian -- Appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader Junior Assistant Scoutmaster -- Appointed by the Scoutmaster Librarian -- Appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader Quartermaster -- Appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader Scribe -- Appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader OA Troop Representative -- Appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader Troop Guide – Appointed by Scoutmaster Den Chief – Appointed by Scoutmaster Adult leaders with the help of the SPL will conduct Troop Leadership Training (TLT) on a yearly basis to help develop leadership skills and understanding of the duties each Troop leadership position. More information regarding TLT is available from the Scoutmaster.

JUNIOR LEADERSHIP DESCRIPTIONS AND QUALIFICATIONS: Senior Patrol Leader:
The Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) is the boy leader of the Troop. After having served as ASPL for a six-month period, the Scout moves into the SPL position for a six-month

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period. He sets the agenda and presides at all Patrol Leaders Council (PLC) meetings, runs the weekly Troop meetings appoints other boy leaders, and assigning specific responsibilities as needed. The SPL is under the direction of the Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmaster(s). The SPL is expected to attend TLT and assist the Scoutmaster with presenting the training material. As the boy leader of the Troop attendance at a majority of Troop activities is important. The SPL should set an example for the rest of the Troop by wearing the uniform correctly, living the Scout Oath and Law, showing Scout Spirit and being active in the Troop.

Junior Leadership (cont.)
Assistant Senior Patrol Leader:
The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL), also elected by the troop, assists the Senior Patrol Leader in conducting meetings. He acts as the Senior Patrol Leader in the Senior Patrol Leader's absence. The ASPL is usually a senior Scout, works with the SPL learning leadership qualities and stepping in when the SPL is unavailable. The ASPL also helps train and supervise the Troop Scribe, Quartermaster, Troop Guide, Librarian, Chaplin Aide and other junior leaders. The ASPL will advance to SPL after having served for six months in this position. Each Scout running for the office of Assistant Senior Patrol Leader must be a First Class Scout, must have served as a Patrol Leader, must be 13 years of age and is encouraged to attend National Youth Leader Training when available. The ASPL is expected to attend TLT even if the scout has attended previously. As a boy leader of the Troop attendance at a majority of Troop activities is important. The ASPL should set an example for the rest of the Troop by wearing the uniform correctly, living the Scout Oath and Law, showing Scout Spirit and being active in the Troop.

Patrol Leader:
Patrol Leaders are responsible for their individual patrols at all times. They preside at patrol meetings, as well as control their patrol during troop functions. They represent their patrol at Patrol Leaders Council meetings and report to the Senior Patrol Leader for all matters concerning their patrol. Patrol Leaders are elected by their patrols. The PL is expected to attend TLT even if the scout has attended previously. As a boy leader of the Troop attendance at a majority of Troop activities is important. The PL should set an example for the rest of the Troop by wearing the uniform correctly, living the Scout Oath and Law, showing Scout Spirit and being active in the Troop.

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Assistant Patrol Leader:
The Assistant Patrol leader leads the patrol in the Patrol Leader’s absence. The APL will advance to PL after having served for six months in this position. The APL is expected to attend TLT even if the scout has attended previously. As a boy leader of the Troop attendance at a majority of Troop activities is important. The APL should set an example for the rest of the Troop by wearing the uniform correctly, living the Scout Oath and Law, showing Scout Spirit and being active in the Troop.

Quartermaster:
The Troop Quartermaster keeps track of troop equipment and sees that it is in good working order. A Scout is assigned to this position by the SPL and reports to the ASPL. The Quartermaster is expected to attend TLT even if the scout has attended previously. As a boy leader of the Troop attendance at a majority of Troop activities is important. The Quartermaster should set an example for the rest of the Troop by wearing the uniform correctly, living the Scout Oath and Law, showing Scout Spirit and being active in the Troop.

Junior Leadership (cont.)
Scribe:
The Scribe keeps the troop records. He records the activities of the Patrol Leaders Council and keeps a record of dues, advancement, and Scout attendance at troop meetings. A Scout is assigned to this position by the SPL and reports to the ASPL. The Scribe is expected to attend TLT even if the scout has attended previously. As a boy leader of the Troop attendance at a majority of Troop activities is important. The Scribe should set an example for the rest of the Troop by wearing the uniform correctly, living the Scout Oath and Law, showing Scout Spirit and being active in the Troop.

Den Chief:
Den Chiefs are assigned by the Scoutmaster and Cubmaster for a Cub Scout Pack to assist Den Leaders with the Cub Scout program. The Den Chief should attend a majority of the Den meetings and Pack meetings. Den Chiefs expected to attend TLT even if the scout has attended previously. As a boy leader of the Troop attendance at a majority of Troop activities is important. Den Chiefs should set an example for the rest of the Troop and the Cub Scouts by wearing the uniform correctly, living the Scout Oath and Law, showing Scout Spirit and being active in the Troop and Den.

Chaplain’s Aide:
The Chaplain’s Aide works with the Troop Chaplain to meet the religious needs of Scouts in the troop. He also works to promote the religious emblems program. A Scout is assigned to this position by the SPL. The Chaplain’s Aide is expected to attend TLT even if the scout has attended previously. As a boy leader of the Troop attendance at a majority of Troop activities is important. The Historian should set an example for the rest of the Troop by wearing
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the uniform correctly, living the Scout Oath and Law, showing Scout Spirit and being active in the Troop.

Historian:
The Historian keeps a historical record or scrapbook of troop activities. A Scout is assigned to this position by the SPL and reports to the ASPL. The Historian is expected to attend TLT even if the scout has attended previously. As a boy leader of the Troop attendance at a majority of Troop activities is important. The Historian should set an example for the rest of the Troop by wearing the uniform correctly, living the Scout Oath and Law, showing Scout Spirit and being active in the Troop.

Librarian:
The Librarian takes care of troop literature such as merit badge books and other BSA manuals. A Scout is assigned to this position by the SPL and reports to the ASPL. The Librarian is expected to attend TLT even if the scout has attended previously. As a boy leader of the Troop attendance at a majority of Troop activities is important.

Junior Leadership (cont.)
The Librarian should set an example for the rest of the Troop by wearing the uniform correctly, living the Scout Oath and Law, showing Scout Spirit and being active in the Troop.

Troop Guide:
The Troop Guide works with new Scouts. He helps them feel comfortable and earn their First Class rank in their first year. The troop Guide is assigned by the Scoutmaster and SPL and reports to the Scoutmaster. The Troop Guide is expected to attend TLT even if the scout has attended previously. As a boy leader of the Troop attendance at a majority of Troop activities is important. The Troop Guide should set an example for the rest of the Troop by wearing the uniform correctly, living the Scout Oath and Law, showing Scout Spirit and being active in the Troop.

OA Troop Representative:
The OA Troop Representative must be a member of the OA and keeps the Troop informed about OA proceedings among other duties such as holding OA elections in the Troop. The OA Troop Representative is assigned by the SPL and reports to the Scoutmaster. The OA Troop Representative is expected to attend TLT even if the scout has attended previously. As a boy leader of the Troop attendance at a majority of Troop activities is important. The OA Troop Representative should set an example for the rest of the Troop by wearing the uniform correctly, living the Scout Oath and Law, showing Scout Spirit and being active in the Troop.

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster:
The Junior Assistant Scoutmaster (JAS) serves in the capacity of an Assistant Scoutmaster except where legal age and maturity are required. He must be at least 16

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years old and not yet 18. The Scoutmaster appoints him because of his leadership ability. He reports to the Scoutmaster. The JAS is expected to attend TLT even if the scout has attended previously. As a boy leader of the Troop attendance at a majority of Troop activities is important. The JAS should set an example for the rest of the Troop by wearing the uniform correctly, living the Scout Oath and Law, showing Scout Spirit and being active in the Troop.

Patrol Leaders Council:
The Senior Patrol Leader, the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, the Patrol Leaders and the Scribe form the Patrol Leaders Council (PLC). The PLC meets monthly to plan weekly meetings and monthly events, to discuss problems and to make recommendations on improving troop operations. The PLC meets under the supervision of the Scoutmaster and/or Assistant Scoutmaster(s). Troop 115’s PLC meets the first Monday of each month.

Junior Leadership (cont.)
National Youth Leader Training: Scenic Trails Council offers a National Youth
Leader Training (NYLT) course each year in June. This is an excellent leadership training program and all eligible Scouts are encouraged to attend during their scouting career. For more information please contact the Scoutmaster.

Parent Participation
The adults who provide supervision, support and time to make Troop 115 a success are volunteers. They will need your help. How you support your son's Troop depends on your talent and available time. Both mothers and fathers can give a few hours to provide transportation, help maintain Troop equipment, be a Merit Badge Counselor, serve on the Troop Committee or serve in other leadership positions. Whatever your volunteer role, the troop needs you to keep operating as a quality unit, which makes our Troop worthy of the fine Scouts it serves. Good parental support consists of all of the following:  Make sure your son attends as many activities as possible and is ready for them.  Encourage your son in his Scout advancement.  Take an active interest in all his Scouting activities.  Attend Court of Honor/Awards Night.  Become active in the Troop Committee.  Support fundraisers as set by the Troop.

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

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Merit Badge Counselors, special Committee Members and drivers are just a few of the ways for parents to assist the leaders and Troop Committee. PLEASE SHARE YOUR TALENTS AND GET INVOLVED. You should receive a Troop Resource Survey when your son joins the Troop. Please fill this out and return it to one of the leaders. Show your son that you support the program. He will appreciate your involvement. The program will be no better than you HELP make it!

Troop Meetings
Troop meetings are held three to four times a month on Monday evenings from 7:008:30 PM at Courtade Elementary School. Some meetings may be held at someone’s house instead of the School. The first Monday of each month we will also hold a Green Bar meeting from 8:30 to 9:00 so the PLC can plan for upcoming meetings and outings. During the summer months no weekly meetings are held. However, campouts are still scheduled monthly and there may be other events held as well (such as service hours, events or fundraisers).

Troop Meetings (cont.)
Meetings begin promptly at 7:00 PM with a pre-meeting game and an opening flag ceremony at 7:15, followed by the program, and announcements at 8:25 PM (which parents should attend) and a closing ritual. Please arrange for your son to be picked up no later than 8:30 PM so that adult leaders may leave immediately following the meeting. A brief discussion with the PLC will take place following each meeting to evaluate the just concluded meeting and make sure PLC members know what is needed to prepare for the next meeting.

Troop Campouts / Outings
Troop overnight or weekend campouts will be scheduled approximately twelve times a year. The Patrol Leaders Council (PLC), with the approval/supervision of the Scoutmaster and/or Assistant Scoutmaster(s), plans these. The troop usually attends Summer Camp each year. Summer Camp consists of 6 days and 6 nights of camping. Troop 115 traditionally attends the Scenic Trails Council Summer Camp, known as Camp Greilick which is located approximately 7 miles south of Traverse City off Hobbs Highway, but the Scouts may choose to attend an out-of-council camp. Other high adventure camps are planned for the older Boy Scouts (First Class rank and above). Some high adventure camps may have minimum age or school grade requirements. Scouts meet at a designated time at Courtade Elementary School for all campouts unless notified otherwise. An approximate time is given for return from a campout before leaving, so parents should be available by phone around the given time. A phone call is typically made to parents as the Scouts are nearing Traverse City if a designated return time was not specified. All Scouts who plan to attend a troop

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weekend campout should make a commitment no later than the troop meeting prior to the campout. A maximum charge of $3.00 per meal per scout will be collected prior to leaving for an overnight or weekend campout. If the Scouts have planned an activity for which there is a specific charge, the fee may be higher. There must be a minimum of two adults (one of which must have taken Boy Scout Leader Training) for each campout. A maximum charge of $3.00 per meal per adult will be collected prior to leaving for an overnight or weekend campout. The troop account pays the registration fee for two adult leaders for each outing which requires a registration fee. Due to troop insurance reasons, permission slips are required before a Scout attends a campout. Scouts should record all their activities in their Scout handbook. If enough boys attend, each patrol will camp as a patrol in the troop campsite and will be responsible for their area of the campsite; otherwise, they will camp as one patrol. All persons must be prepared for the prevailing weather and activities. Late arrivals and early departures for campouts will be allowed, but should be approved by the adult leader in charge. All Scouts are expected to stay until the Troop gear/equipment is properly stored. A leader will stay until the last Scout is picked up. Parents are expected to pick their Scout up in a timely manner. Recommended personal gear for campouts is as follows. Copy these pages as needed to use as a checklist when packing. All personal gear should be clearly marked with the Scout’s name to save confusion.

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Recommended Personal Gear for Spring/Fall Campouts
Clothing Class A uniform (belt, shirt, neckerchief, and hat) T-shirts (one for each day of the campout) Shorts (or swim trunks) Long pants Sweater, Long-sleeve shirt or Light weight jacket Underwear (one for each day of the campout) Socks (two for each day of the campout in case one gets wet) boots or Sturdy shoes Hiking Tennis shoes (to wear around camp) Hat with brim Rain Gear

Personal Gear Scout Handbook Water bottle First aid kit Pocketknife Flashlight (with spare batteries) Matches or Other fire starters Compass & Map Pack (Backpack or Duffel Bag) Sleeping bag Sleeping pad Eating kit (Spoon, Fork, Plate, Bowl, Cup) Cleaning kit (Soap, Toothbrush, Toothpaste, Dental floss, Washcloth, Hand towel) Sunblock Insect Repellent

Optional Watch Camera Notebook with Pen or Pencil Sunglasses Magnifying glass Binoculars Animal and Plant identification books

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Recommended Personal Gear for Winter Campouts
Clothing Class A uniform (Belt, Shirt, Neckerchief, and Hat) Long-sleeve shirts (one for each day of the campout)* Long pants (one for each day of the campout)* Sweaters (one or two)* Insulated parka or coat with hood* Insulated long pants (Snow pants)* Underwear (one for each day of the campout) Heavy Socks* Light Socks (to wear under the heavy socks)* Long underwear (depending on how cold it is)* Hiking boots or snow boots Thick Gloves/Mittens (2 pair)* Heavy Winter Cap (covers head and ears)* Rain Gear

Personal Gear Scout Handbook Water bottle First aid kit Pocketknife Flashlight (with spare batteries) Matches or Other fire starters Compass & Map Pack (Backpack or Duffel Bag) Sleeping bag Sleeping pad Eating kit (Spoon, Fork, Plate, Bowl, Cup) Cleaning kit (Soap, Toothbrush, Toothpaste, Dental floss, Washcloth, Hand towel) Sunblock Optional Watch Camera Notebook with Pen or Pencil Sunglasses Magnifying glass Binoculars Animal and Plant identification books
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Troop Campouts / Outings (cont.)
* Parents and Scouts Please Note: Cotton clothes are a poor choice for cold/wet weather camping as cotton is bulky, slow to dry and does not insulate well when wet. When possible pack synthetic materials or wool. Remember, several layers of light weight material with a water proof outer layer is the best way to stay dry and warm.

Other Campout Information
Transportation – The Troop car pools to all of our outings. If you can help with
driving please let us know and fill out a driver information form. One of the Troops adult leaders will provide you with information regarding travel routes, planned stops and other details.

Food – The Scouts plan and prepare meals as a Patrol and are expected to provide
prepared meals for the adult leaders in attendance. Each Patrol prepares a meal plan and designates one patrol member as grubmaster for the campout. The grubmaster will obtain a check from the Troop Committee Treasurer, purchase all of the food on the Patrol’s meal plan and bring the supplies to Courtade Elementary at the designated time. Each boy participating will bring money the week before the event to cover the cost of the food.

Assignments – Every Scout will have Troop and or Patrol responsibilities on a
campout. Each patrol prepares a duty roster where jobs are assigned on a rotating basis. Typical jobs include water duty, cook, cleanup, sanitation, and fireman. Other jobs may be assigned as needed.

Schedule – The schedule for a typical campout is as follows: Friday late afternoonmeet at Courtade Elementary and load personal gear and food, travel to campsite, set up camp followed by a cracker barrel (snack). Saturday- breakfast and cleanup, Flag Ceremony, morning activity, lunch and cleanup, afternoon activity, free time / advancement work, dinner and cleanup, Flag Ceremony, campfire. Sunday- breakfast and cleanup, prayer service, cleanup equipment, Quartermaster inspects and checks-in patrol equipment, break camp, inspect campsite for trash and return home.

Equipment – Troop 115 provides shared patrol gear such as tents, a Patrol Kit with
stove, lantern, and dining fly and each patrol has a Patrol Box with cooking and cleaning supplies, and spices among other essentials. All patrol equipment used on a campout is checked out by the Patrol Leader from the Troop Quartermaster. All equipment needs to be cleaned, dried and returned to the Quartermaster in good condition after each outing. Wet tents need to be taken home and setup to dry then packed and returned to the Quartermaster at the next troop meeting.

Medications – If a Scout is taking medications the parents must advise the
Scoutmaster. All medications need to be in clearly marked, original containers.

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Troop Campouts / Outings (cont.)
Prohibited Items- Scouts should not bring any of the following items to any
scouting activity unless specifically authorized by the Scoutmaster.          Fireworks or explosives of any kind Firearms or ammunition of any kind Slingshots, clubs, spears or any other type of weapon Hatchets or axes (the Troop provides these when needed) Sheath Knives Pocket knives with blades longer than 4 inches Tobacco, alcohol, or illegal drugs Electronic entertainment devices Aerosol cans of any kind

Campout Rules – The Scout Oath and Scout Law will govern every campers actions at all times. Uniform Requirements: Scouts and adult leaders will wear their Field Uniform
(Class A) to and from all Troop 115 outings and campouts. While camping, Activity Uniforms are encouraged except for flag ceremonies and other special events.

Campsites by Patrols: Each patrol will designate their own campsite and be
responsible for it. Scouts and adult leaders should ask for permission before entering another Patrols campsite. Do not touch or use another Scout’s personal equipment or Patrol equipment without prior permission.

Keep the Campsite Clean and Organized: All Scouts and adults are expected to
keep their tents and personal equipment clean and picked up at all times. Patrols are expected to keep their camping area clean and picked up at all times. The entire troop will conduct a clean sweep of the campsite at the end of each campout.

Fire Safety: Scouts may build and light fires only when and where authorized by the
Scoutmaster or Assistant Scoutmaster. Fire safety rules will be strictly enforced. Do not cut any live or standing wood without permission.

No Flames In Or Near Tents! Period. Buddy System: Troop 115 follows the Buddy System at all times. Never leave your
buddy or allow him to leave you. Adult leaders will call for buddy checks periodically. If you or your buddy are absent during a buddy check expect to have additional duties assigned during the campout.

Water Safety Rules: Scouts and adults will follow BSA Safe Swim Defense and
Safety Afloat procedures and policies at all times when water activities are involved.

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Troop Campouts / Outings (cont.)
Lights Out: The campsite will be secured and all Scouts in their tents by 11:00 p.m.
unless a later time is approved by the Scoutmaster. Lights will be turned off and talking will stop by 11:30 p.m. Scouts are expected to stay in their tents (except to go to the latrine or report an illness or other emergency) until reveille the next morning.

Discipline: If disciplinary action is warranted it will be handled by the Senior Patrol
Leader or Scoutmaster as needed. For severe issues the parents will be summoned and referral to the Troop Committee may be warranted.

Court of Honor/Awards Night
Troop 115 conducts a Court of Honor/Awards Night to recognize our Scouts' hard work. COH/Awards Night is a family affair and parents are encouraged to attend to honor the boys for their achievements. At this event, the Boy Scout receives his earned merit badges and rank advancements from the Senior Patrol Leader, as determined by the Advancement Chair. If the parent/guardian is unable to attend, then another adult can act as a stand-in for the parent. Parents are requested to attend all COH/Awards Nights whether or not their sons are receiving any awards. Presence at the Awards Night shows that you support involvement in Scouting. A family potluck has traditionally followed the COH/Awards Night. A COH/Awards Night is conducted as determined by the Troop Committee. If a Scout is unable to attend the COH/Awards Night, he will be presented his earned merit badges and rank advancements at the next troop meeting he attends. A Scout may only receive merit badges and rank advancements if he is in complete Field Uniform.

Order of the Arrow
As Boy Scouting’s National Honor Society, the Order of the Arrow (OA) seeks to recognize Scouts and Scouters who, as campers, best exemplify the Scout Oath and Scout Law in their daily lives. The three principles of the Order are brotherhood, cheerfulness, and service. Foremost, the Order of the Arrow is a service organization which assists Scouting at all levels; nevertheless, an Arrowman’s first duty is always to his own troop. Through the Order, the Scout’s unselfish desire to help others is crystallized into a life purpose of leadership in cheerful service to all. The Arrowman must always conduct himself in such manner as to cause others to emulate his actions in the high ideals of Scouting. Besides a dedication to service, the Order promotes, develops, and maintains the Scout camping tradition and spirit, keeping the outing in Scouting. Like Boy Scouting, it is a

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youth-run organization with adults acting as advisers. All members of the Order of the Arrow are equal.

Order of the Arrow (cont.)
Purpose The purpose of the Order of the Arrow is fourfold:  To recognize those Scout campers who best exemplify the Scout Oath and Law in their daily lives  To develop and maintain camping traditions and spirit  To promote Scout camping  To crystallize the Scout habit of helpfulness into a life purpose of leadership in cheerful service to others History
The Order of the Arrow (OA) was founded by Dr. E. Urner Goodman and Carroll A. Edson in 1915 at the Treasure Island Camp of the Philadelphia Council, Boy Scouts of America. It became an official program experiment in 1922 and was approved as part of the Scouting program in 1934. In 1948, the OA was recognized as the BSA's national brotherhood of honor campers and became an official part of the national camping program of the Boy Scouts of America.

Eligibility
To become a member, a youth must be a registered member of a Boy Scout troop or Varsity Scout team and hold First Class rank. The youth must have experienced 15 days and nights of camping during the two years before his election. The 15 days and nights must include one, but no more than one, long-term camp consisting of six consecutive days and five nights of resident camping, approved and under the auspices and standards of the Boy Scouts of America. The balance of the camping must be overnight, weekend, or other short-term camps. Scouts are elected to the Order by their fellow troop or Varsity team members, following approval by the Scoutmaster or Varsity Scout Coach. Adult selection is based on their ability to perform the necessary functions to help the Order fulfill its purpose, and is not for recognition. Selected adult Scouters must be an asset to the Order because of demonstrated abilities, and provide a positive role model for the youth members of the lodge.

Induction The Ordeal induction ceremony is often conducted at Scout camp and is the first step toward full membership. During the experience, candidates maintain complete silence, receive small amounts of food, work on camp improvement projects, and are required to sleep alone, apart from other campers, which teaches significant values.

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Brotherhood Membership
After 10 months of service and fulfilling certain requirements, a member may take part in the Brotherhood ceremony, which places further emphasis on the ideals of Scouting and the Order. Completion of this ceremony signifies full membership in the OA.

Order of the Arrow (cont.)
Vigil Honor
After two years of service as a Brotherhood member and with the approval of the national Order of the Arrow Committee, a Scout or Scouter may be recognized with the Vigil Honor for outstanding service to Scouting, his lodge, and the community. This honor is bestowed by special selection and is limited to one person for every 50 members registered with the lodge each year.

Lodges
Each Order of the Arrow lodge is granted a charter from the National Council, BSA, upon annual application by the local council. The OA lodge helps the local council provide a quality Scouting program through recognition of Scouting spirit and performance, development of youth leadership and service, promotion of Scout camping and outdoor programs, and enhancement of membership tenure.

Sections
An Order of the Arrow section consists of lodges within a geographic area of the region. Once every year, representatives of lodges in the section come together for a conclave to share in fellowship and training. All of the elected section chiefs form the conference committee for the annual Order of the Arrow program of emphasis, which is held under the guidance of the national OA Committee. The committee meets each year at the national OA planning meeting in December.

Regions
The region chief is the youth leader of the region and elected by the section chiefs in his region for a term of office specified by the national Order of the Arrow Committee, which coincides with the terms of the national chief and vice chief. This election is held in conjunction with the national OA planning meeting where the annual OA program of emphasis is planned. The region chiefs serve as voting members of the national Order of the Arrow Committee, representing youth on national OA policy and programs. The Order of the Arrow region chairman is an adult appointed by the regional director. The professional adviser for the region is a staff member assigned to the position by the region director.

National Chief and Vice Chief
The national chief and vice chief are Arrowmen selected by the section chiefs at the national OA planning meeting each December. They serve as voting members of the national Order of the Arrow Committee, representing the youth on national OA policy and program.

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They also serve as the presiding officers for the annual OA program of emphasis. The national committee specifies their term of office. The national committee chairman and director of the Order of the Arrow advise them of their responsibilities.

Uniform and Insignia
It is not the purpose of the Scout uniform to hide the differences between boys or make them feel they are all the same. Scouts in Troop 115 may come from many racial and ethnic backgrounds, with their own religious beliefs and family traditions. Scouting wants boys to take pride in these differences rather than to hide them or be ashamed of them. There is one way all Scouts and Scouters are alike. Whenever a Scout(er) sees another Scout(er) in uniform he knows he is like that person because both have committed to the principles of the Scout Oath and Scout Law. This is important in a time when there are too many things dividing people. The Scout Oath and Law bind all Scouts and Scouters, the world over, in a common purpose. The Scout uniform identifies Scouts openly with someone of the same beliefs and values. By wearing the uniform, Scouts and Scouters are taking an open stand for their convictions.

Field Uniform
Scout shirt (long or short sleeve) Scout trousers, long or short. If short pants are worn, Scout stockings or Scout socks shall be worn. Troop 115 or BSA neckerchief Scout hat Any closed-toe shoe or boot (as a safety precaution Troop 115 precludes the wearing of sandals at Scouting events) Scout belt Scout socks Note: Order of the Arrow (OA) sashes are only worn at OA functions, not at regular troop meetings. The merit badge sash is a uniform item for special occasions.

Activity Uniform (may be worn at specified times)
Troop 115 Scout T-shirt (or other Scout T-shirt) *Scout trousers (long or short). If short pants are worn, Scout stockings or Scout socks shall be worn *Scout hat Any closed-toe shoe or boot (as a safety precaution Troop 115 precludes the wearing of sandals at Scouting events) *Scout belt *Scout socks

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Uniform and Insignia (cont.)
Scouts and Scouters should wear their complete Field Uniform for all Scouting activities. Encourage your Scout to comply. A complete Field Uniform will be required for most district, council and out-of-council events. The merit badge and OA sash is a uniform item for special occasions. The official Field Uniform of the Boy Scouts of America can be found described in the Boy Scouts of America Handbook. Troop 115 does have a neckerchief which is given to each new scout when he joins the Troop. The Scout(er) is expected to wear the Field Uniform at most Boy Scout functions and all troop meetings. A Troop 115 t-shirt or other Scouting t-shirt is considered an Activity shirt and is allowed during campouts, or when otherwise designated. A Field Uniform is expected for all travel to and from campouts. Proper insignia is to be worn on the uniform in accordance with the guides found on the inside covers of the Boy Scouts of America Handbook. Merit badges should be sewn on the merit badge sash. Temporary badges may be worn one at a time. Patches indicating rank, patrol and leadership position must be kept current. No hats other than scout hats are to be worn with the Field Uniform. Our Council web site has a Uniform Insignia Placement Guide.

Boy Scout Handbook
It is the policy of Troop 115 that all Scout members own the Boy Scouts of America Handbook. A Handbook is presented to each new scout when he joins the Troop. Information in this book is very useful to both Scouts and their parents. The handbook should be brought to all meetings and outings. This handbook is necessary for advancement work and skills that will be worked on at outings and troop meetings. It is the Scout’s responsibility to approach the Scoutmaster or an Assistant Scoutmaster when an area needs to be signed as completed in the handbook during an outing or at any other time.

Scout Merchandise/Equipment
Various scouting equipment and supplies are available through the troop for a Scout’s use during a campout. The troop has limited extra sleeping bags and backpacks available. The troop provides tents for sleeping and cooking utensils. All items are to be checked out before a campout and checked back in following the campout. For Scouts wishing to purchase merchandise/equipment, scout items are available from the Council Office or Boy Scouts of America mail order catalogs. Second-hand Class A shirts may sometimes be found at Goodwill stores. Each boy should bring a personal backpack, sleeping bag, and mess kit with utensils for his personal use, or check items
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out available in Patrol Boxes. Patrol cooking equipment and tents are provided. All gear may also be available to a Scout’s family for non-scouting activities.

Communication System
In preparing the annual calendar, the Senior Patrol Leader will canvas the troop for desired events. This is normally done in December or January of each year at a special designated meeting of the troop. The Senior Patrol Leader will then hold a meeting of the Patrol Leaders Council with the troop's Scout and adult leadership and prepare a proposed calendar for approval by the Troop Committee. The Troop Committee will consider the boys' desires for an annual program with respect for the ability to support the program. Once the Troop Committee approves the calendar of events, the calendar will be printed and distributed. It should be noted however, that this annual calendar is subject to change throughout the year, and Scouts should also rely upon their Monthly News Updates. A Monthly News Update (newsletter) will be sent out following the PLC and Troop Committee meetings. The Monthly News Update is what your son should refer to for the most up-to-date schedule of events. From time-to-time, the Senior Patrol Leader will make phone calls to each Patrol Leader with reminders or updates of the troop events, (sometimes upon very short notice). The Patrol Leaders in turn are responsible for contacting each member of their Patrol with the update/reminder. This Boy Scout method of communication teaches responsibility to the boys. Occasionally, Scouts will be notified by an announcement at school of a change in the troop’s plans. The most important and reliable method of staying informed is for your son to attend the Troop meetings. Each week announcements are made regarding upcoming events, changes, permission slips, etc. If in doubt, the first person your son should call is his Patrol Leader and if he is unavailable, the Senior Patrol Leader. As always, if there is ever a question, feel free to contact the Scoutmaster, the Assistant Scoutmaster(s) or the Committee Chair. The troop tries to keep you informed, but ultimately the responsibility is your son’s. If he wants to participate in the program, he should never “not know”. All he has to do is attend meetings or ask.

Merit Badges
Earning merit badges allows you to explore many fields, helps you round out your skills, and introduces you to subjects that will perhaps become lifelong interests or a rewarding career. There are more than 120 merit badges for you to choose from. You may earn any merit badge at any time, with Scoutmaster approval. Don’t wait for someone to tell you when and which merit badge to work on. You don’t need to reach a certain rank in

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order to be eligible. However, you should concentrate on achieving the rank of First Class before devoting a lot time to working on merit badges.

Merit Badges (cont.)
Don’t overwhelm yourself by trying to complete too many badges at one time. Troop 115 recommends that you actively work on no more than two at one time until you reach the rank of First Class, and no more than five at one time thereafter. You can find information about merit badge requirements in the appropriate merit badge pamphlets and in the current year’s Boy Scout Requirements book. Some of these are available in our troop library. All of them are available from our Council Boy Scout office in Traverse City. If you are finished using merit badge booklets that you own, Troop 115 encourages you to donate them to the troop library. Another excellent source of merit badge information is www.meritbadge.com.

Here are the steps to earning a merit badge: 1. Get a blue merit badge card from the Scoutmaster, fill in your
name, address, and the name of the badge, and ask the Scoutmaster to sign it. Then get the name and phone number of a qualified counselor from the Advancement Chairman or Scoutmaster.

2. Call the counselor and set up an appointment. This can be at any place that is suitable to both of you. Along with a buddy (another Scout, a family member, or a friend), meet with the counselor. The counselor will explain the requirements for the merit badge and help you get started. 3. Work on the badge requirements until you complete them, meeting with the counselor (along with your buddy) whenever necessary. You must complete the stated requirements and satisfy the standards of each merit badge. The merit badge counselor may encourage you to do more than the requirements state but he or she may not require it. YOU (not the counselor, Scoutmaster, or Advancement Chairman) keep the merit badge card until you have completed the requirements and the counselor has signed the card. If you lose this card, you will have to start the badge over unless the counselor is willing and able to vouch for what you already completed. If you change counselors for any reason, it is up to the new counselor whether or not he or she will accept the work you did with the previous counselor. Normally the new counselor will ask you a few questions, and if the counselor is satisfied that you actually did the work that was signed off, he or she will accept it.

4. After you complete the merit badge and the counselor signs your

merit badge card, he or she will keep the Counselor's section and
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return the rest of the card to you. Bring the rest of the card to the Scoutmaster, who will keep the troop section and return the Scout section to you. You will receive your merit badge shortly after you turn in the blue card (usually the next troop meeting). Your wallet-sized certificate card will be presented to you at the next Court of Honor.

Scout Buddy System: You must have another person with you at each meeting with
the merit badge counselor. This person can be another Scout, your parents or guardian, a brother or sister, a relative, or a friend.

Advancement Guidelines

Scout

Tenderfoot

Second Class

First Class

Star

Life

Eagle

Advancement will be at each Scout’s own pace
Troop 115 believes that a Scout should receive recognition for his achievements. The Boy Scout advancement program provides a ladder of skills that a Scout climbs at his own pace. As he acquires these skills he moves up through a series of ranks, for which he is awarded badges; Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle. The higher he climbs the more challenging his tasks -- and the more rewarding. In Scouting, recognition is gained through leadership in the unit; attending and participating in the activities; living the ideals of the Scout Oath and Law; and developing a proficiency in outdoor life, useful skills, and career exploration. Achievements include:  Learning skills that qualify for Scouting's more rugged and exciting outdoor challenges.  Developing body and mind, growing self-confidence, and helping younger Scouts climb the advancement ladder.  Discovering how it feels to go further -- in so many ways -- than you ever thought you could. Education and fun are functions of the Scouting movement, and they should be the basis of the advancement program.

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Advancement develops a pattern of setting positive goals and reaching them throughout life. Even though it’s not one of the primary aims of Scouting, advancement is a natural byproduct when your Scouting experience grows with the BSA ideals, the patrol method, the outdoors, association with adults, personal growth, leadership development, and the Scout uniform. It’s easy to advance by following these four basic steps: There are four steps of advancement:     The Boy Scout learns The Boy Scout is tested The Boy Scout is reviewed The Boy Scout is recognized

Advancement Guidelines (cont.)
RANK ADVANCEMENT
The requirements for the ranks of Tenderfoot through First Class prepare you to take full advantage of all that Scouting has to offer. Star, Life, and Eagle requirements focus on service to others and developing leadership skills. Requirements for each rank are outlined in the Boy Scout Handbook. You can work on advancement requirements with your parents or other family members, with other Scouts and with adult Scout leaders. This can be done on your own, in patrol and troop meetings, and during other troop functions such as campouts. A good rule of thumb is to try to complete one or two rank requirements at each troop meeting. Scout skills cannot be mastered by performing them just once. You will have many opportunities to practice each skill, and you will be thoroughly tested on each requirement before it is "signed off". In addition, expect to practice each skill repeatedly, even after it has been signed off. As you progress, you will also have opportunities to teach these skills to less experienced Scouts, which will further reinforce your knowledge and skill. As you complete each requirement, you will be tested and signed off in the BACK section of your handbook (pp. 438 - 449) by the Scoutmaster or by someone he designates. This person may be an Assistant Scoutmaster, a Troop Committee Member, or another, more experienced, Scout. (In Boy Scouts, troop leaders rather than parents, sign off advancement requirements. In order to avoid the appearance of impropriety, in most troops, troop leaders will not normally sign off rank requirements for their own sons. Infrequent exceptions may be made in the case of a leader who is teaching skills to several Scouts at once at a patrol or troop meeting or other Scouting function, but every effort should be made to have another leader sign off the instructing leader’s son(s) if possible.) It’s up to you to take advantage of the advancement opportunities available to you, and to take initiative to ask for someone to test you when you are ready. You are responsible for keeping your own personal advancement record in your handbook. You

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should also record your service hours, campouts, troop activities, and leadership positions in your handbook. You must earn the ranks in order, but you may complete any requirement for Tenderfoot through First Class at any time. (For example, you may complete a First Class requirement before finishing your Tenderfoot requirements, but you must earn Tenderfoot rank before you are awarded Second Class and First Class ranks.)

Advancement Guidelines (cont.)
SCOUTMASTER CONFERENCE
You will be meeting regularly with the Scoutmaster to discuss your activity in the troop and your understanding and practice of the ideals of Scouting. These meetings are typically in the form of a Scoutmaster Conference. A Scoutmaster Conference is a chance for the Scout to have a one-on-one discussion with the Scoutmaster. The purpose is to develop, over a period of time, an increasing level of understanding and trust between them. For the Scoutmaster, it is an opportunity to get to know each individual Scout in the troop and help each one to chart his course in Scouting and in life. Although mainly associated with the advancement program, the Scoutmaster Conference is a general counseling tool that can be employed at anytime for a variety of reasons. For the Scout, the Scoutmaster Conference presents a valuable opportunity. It offers him a chance to discuss with the Scoutmaster his involvement with the troop. He can express what he likes/dislikes about the troop’s program and activities and what he would like to change. A review of what he did to earn advancement allows him to evaluate his accomplishments. The Scoutmaster aids the Scout to recognize and overcome his weaknesses while encouraging the use of his strengths. The setting of new goals is the most important outcome of their conversation. The Scoutmaster, in reviewing the requirements for the next rank and outlining what is involved in completing them, encourages further advancement by showing the Scout that the requirements are not as difficult as they appear. As the Scout advances higher in rank, the Scoutmaster will increasingly emphasize what the Scout can do to enhance the troop through leadership opportunities. Scoutmaster Conferences will be conducted during the troop meetings or at some other time agreed upon by the participants. A Scoutmaster Conference must be completed in advance of a Board of Review. You do not have to wait until you have completed the requirements for a rank in order to ask for a Scoutmaster conference. You may talk with the Scoutmaster at any time that is convenient to both of you. However, for a Scoutmaster conference to count toward rank advancement it must take place after all
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other requirements are complete and before the Board of Review. At this required conference the Scoutmaster will also help you determine whether or not you are ready to go before the Board of Review. The length of a Scoutmaster Conference is long enough for the Scoutmaster to know three or four more things about the Scout that wasn’t known before; and short enough for the Scout to understand the significance of this step toward Eagle. Your Scoutmaster Conference will generally run no longer than 20-30 minutes. It is the Scout’s responsibility to request a Scoutmaster Conference with their Scoutmaster when he is ready for it. The Scout is expected to be in a complete uniform and bring his Boy Scouts of America handbook with him for his conference.

Advancement Guidelines (cont.)
BOARD OF REVIEW
After the Scoutmaster conference, you should arrange for your Board of Review by asking the Scoutmaster to schedule the review with the Troop Committee. The last requirement a Scout must meet in order to advance in rank is to appear before a Board of Review (BOR). Board of Reviews will be on scheduled Troop meeting nights or following Troop Committee meetings. The Scout is expected to be in complete uniform and bring his Boy Scouts of America Handbook with him for his Board of Review. Boards of Review for all ranks except Eagle Scout, are held as needed, and are composed of three to six registered members of the Troop Committee. (Eagle Scout Boards of Review are arranged through your Council or District Advancement Committee and can have other members.) The Board of Review may not include the Scoutmaster, Assistant Scoutmasters, or your family members. The purpose of the Board of Review is not to retest you but rather to ensure that you have completed all of the requirements, to determine the quality of your troop experience, and to encourage you to advance toward the next rank. (Sometimes you may meet with a Board of Review even when you are not ready for the next rank, in order to check your progress and to see how things are going for you in the troop and in your patrol. The Scoutmaster or Advancement Chairman may schedule you for such a Board of Review when (s)he feels that an extended period has passed since your last Board of Review.) You need to have your Boy Scout Handbook and should be in your complete field uniform when you appear before a Board of Review. At the beginning of the review, the president of the board will bring you into the room, introduce you to the board, and invite you to be seated. During the review the board will discuss your development along your trail to Eagle, ask you questions about skills that were required for your particular rank, and evaluate you in terms of troop activities and readiness for the next rank. It is also a time for you to ask any questions you might have and to give feedback to the troop committee about activities and your Scouting experience in your troop and in your patrol. At the end of the review you will be asked to leave the room

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while the board discusses your qualifications. The board will then call you back into the room and inform you either that you have been approved for the next rank or what additional actions you must take to qualify. After passing the Board of Review, you will be recognized in front of the troop as soon as possible. You will receive your new rank patch shortly after, usually at the next troop meeting. You will be formally recognized for your rank advancements and merit badges in front of family and friends during a ceremony at a Court of Honor. At this time you will be presented with your wallet-sized certificate card and, if your troop presents them, a rank pin ("mother’s pin"). Troop 115 currently holds 2 to 3 Courts of Honor each year but will hold them more frequently as needed. Your parents, other family members, and friends are invited and encouraged to attend all Courts of Honor.

Advancement Guidelines (cont.)
After reaching the rank of Life Scout, you will meet with the Scoutmaster. At this meeting you will receive your Life to Eagle packet and discuss ideas and suggestions for your Eagle Service Project. This project must conform to special guidelines that have been outlined by the Boy Scouts of America. Your Scoutmaster, Troop Advancement Chairman, and a representative of your District Advancement Committee, as well as the benefiting organization, must approve your project before you begin carrying it out.

RECORD-KEEPING
Your advancement records are kept in three places — your Council office, the Troop Advancement Chairman, and yourself. The Council office keeps records supplied to them by the Scoutmaster or Troop Advancement Chairman, who also keeps copies of these records for the Troop. You will receive three kinds of documents that you need to KEEP IN A SAFE PLACE UNTIL AFTER YOU TURN 18 (or receive your Eagle Scout Award, whichever is later)! These documents are: your Scout Handbook with requirements signed off, your portion of completed blue merit badge cards, and the wallet-sized certificate cards for rank advancement and merit badge completion. Make sure all of them are signed or initialed by the appropriate Scout leader. All of the cards are the same size and can be safely kept in plastic protector pages (available at WalMart, etc.) which are designed for baseball and other sports cards. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT YOU KEEP THESE DOCUMENTS IN A SAFE PLACE AND DO NOT LOSE THEM!!! If it should happen that there is a discrepancy or missing records, your personal records are your most important ally in proving what you completed and when.

RECOMMENDED READING
 Boy Scout Handbook (No. 33105)  Current year’s Boy Scout Requirements (No. 33215)  Merit badge pamphlets

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
 The Scoutmaster Handbook, (No.33009)  Advancement Committee Policies and Procedures, (No. 33088B)
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The original version of the above Advancement Guidelines was supplied to the US Scouting Service Project by Sarah G. Nunez, Troop 205, Longhorn Council, Ft. Worth, Texas. It has been edited to make it specific to Troop 115 of Scenic Trails Council.

General Advancement Requirements
Age Requirement Eligibility: Merit badges, badges of rank, and Eagle Palms are for boys who are registered Boy Scouts. Any registered Boy Scout may earn these awards until his 18th birthday. SERVICE PROJECTS Star and Life: Work on service projects for credit toward advancement to Star and Life ranks shall be approved by the Scoutmaster or Troop Committee in advance of starting the project. Only adult leaders are authorized to sign-off service project requirements. If there is any doubt as to the validity of the project the matter will be referred to the Troop Committee for resolution. Eagle: Eagle service projects shall be of lasting value to the community rather than completion of routine upkeep and preventive maintenance. It is suggested the project be a minimum of 100 man-hours of labor and planning. The Troop Committee in advance of beginning any work shall approve the project. Troop 115’s committee requires that the Eagle candidate brief the Troop Committee on his project at a regularly scheduled committee meeting. The briefing shall outline the scope, scale and requirements of the proposed project. The Committee will review the candidate's plan for completeness in planning and ability of the troop to support the project to completion. The schedule of work should be examined in detail to ensure there are no major conflicts with other planned troop activities. Upon completion of the service project, The Eagle candidate shall provide the Advancement Chair with a written description of the project and a schedule of participants and hours worked.

Discipline
General: Discipline policy in Scouting is simple. The doors of Scouting are always open to those who strive to follow its law. Adherence to the Scout Oath and Law will, primarily, be handled by the boy leaders with adult intervention only to maintain safety, preclude property damage, avoid disrupting other organizations' activities and/or restore order in extreme cases of unruliness Obedience: Obedience in Troop 115 is to the Scout Oath and Law. The Oath and Law make being a good citizen of the troop, camp or community possible. Obedience to the
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Scout Law includes respect for Scout leadership and adult leadership and all members and guests of the troop. Respect for adult and Scout leadership is expected. Under no circumstances will adult or boy leaders administer punishment for any reason. Hazing, of any type, will not be tolerated. Boys or adults observing such activity will take immediate measures to stop such activity and report incident(s) to the Scoutmaster or Committee Chair. Enforcing discipline: The Patrol Leaders will handle most discipline in the patrols. When the Patrol Leader cannot handle the problem, he should obtain help from the Senior Patrol Leader. The Senior Patrol Leader has the authority to ask any Scout to leave the meeting area and report to the Scoutmaster or Assistant Scoutmaster. When the Senior Patrol Leader cannot handle the problem, he must obtain the help of the Scoutmaster or Assistant Scoutmaster.

Financial Responsibility
Dues: Dues are payable annually (in November) as our charter is renewed every
January. The dues pay for National registration fees, Boys’ Life, Troop accident insurance, charter renewal fee, awards earned by the Boy Scout, and Troop operating expenses. Currently troop dues are $150.00. For Scouts that join mid-year the dues are pro-rated. Food, uniforms, books, and miscellaneous expenses incurred by each boy are the responsibility of the boy. Specific event registration fees, Camporee, Summer Camp and High Adventure trip fees are the responsibility of each boy. Boys transferring to Troop 115 are expected to pay prorated dues. Please contact the Treasurer with questions regarding dues.

Money earning projects: Fund raising events are available each year with the
Troop Committee determining which fund raisers the troop will participate in for that year. All scouts and their parents are expected to participate. Some fundraisers, such as the annual Gladhander cleanup, go directly into the troop account. But for most fundraisers portions of the money earned go into the participating Scouts personal accounts (kept by Troop 115’s Treasurer) for their personal scouting expenses. The remaining proceeds from these fundraisers are then earmarked for special projects such as tents, cooking equipment, and maintenance of the troop trailer. The annual popcorn sale is by far the best way to earn money, with the potential to cover all personal expenses for the coming year. The popcorn sales entire profit is credited to the boy’s individual account.

Financial assistance: If for any reason a Scout is unable to afford Class A shirt or
other Scout-related necessities, the troop will help arrange for financial assistance. A note, signed by the Scout's parents or guardian, stating financial circumstances shall be presented to the Troop Committee Chair. Personal details will remain confidential. If you are in need of financial assistance for your son to be involved in Boy Scouting, please approach one of the leaders or the Committee Chair. The Council offers various forms of financial assistance to help Scouts. No boy will be turned away from a Scouting experience due to financial difficulties.

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Adult & Youth Training (copied from BSA website
September 2006)

Every Boy Deserves a Trained Leader
The journey from Fast Start to Wood Badge is a seamless progression for adults and an unending benefit for BSA youth. Fast Start Orientation and New Leader Essentials— the first two steps in new-leader training—introduce new leaders to the Boy Scouting program. Leader Specific Training, as the name implies, focuses on specific leader roles and will require several days to complete, depending on an individual's previous outdoor skills experience. Wood Badge has evolved into the premier leadership course of the BSA, strengthening a leader's ability to effectively work with groups of youth and adults.

Adult & Youth Training (cont.)
Fast Start Orientation
Welcome to Scouting! As a new Scout leader, you are joining our Scouting family, and we want you to understand how the program works. The Fast Start Orientation video and guide will help explain it. These materials present a quick introduction to get new leaders ready for your first Boy Scout meeting. You will learn in Fast Start Orientation that Scouting employs eight fundamental methods to deliver its three aims of character development, citizenship training, and personal fitness. The eight methods are the ideals, the patrol method, the outdoors, advancement, association with adults, personal growth, leadership development, and the uniform. A troop functions best when all eight methods are employed. As a leader progresses through the levels of training, the eight methods are continually emphasized.

Part One—Introduction
The first thing new leaders should know is that many resources are available to help them. The video's introduction lays out the basics to help new volunteers get started as Scouting leaders. Part Two—The Troop Meeting Part Two of the video explains how troop meetings are important in preparing the troop for its monthly outdoor adventure. Each 90-minute meeting should be fun and meaningful for the Scouts. A troop meeting has seven essential parts, each of which is explained in the video. Part Three—The Outdoor Program This section of the video explains the importance of the outdoor program to Scouting. Boys are attracted to Scouting by its offer of outdoor fun and adventure. Through

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exciting outdoor activities like camping and hiking, studying nature, and watching wildlife, Scouts learn to care for the environment and master outdoor skills. At the same time, the outdoor program helps them develop leadership and teamwork. Part Four—The Troop Committee This segment of the video illustrates the role of the troop committee, a group of adult volunteers that work behind the scenes to support the Scoutmaster. Troop committee members do a wide variety of tasks, from repairing tents to maintaining troop records. The troop committee's most important responsibility is to make sure that the very best adult leaders are selected, recruited, and trained to work with their boys.

New Leader Essentials
As the first section of Basic Leader Training, New Leader Essentials is a 90-minute introductory session that highlights the values, aims, history, funding, and methods of Scouting and provides new leaders with a look at the resources available to them. New Leader Essentials often is offered as the first part of Leader Specific Training.

Adult & Youth Training (cont.)
Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmaster Leader Specific A new troop leader is considered trained Training
upon completion of Fast Start Orientation,

New Leader Essentials, and all four parts of Leader Specific Training is divided into Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmaster four parts. The first three parts are Leader Specific Training. Troop committee designed to teach troop operations and can members and Webelos leaders who plan to move into a leadership position in a troop be completed in one full day or three are encouraged to complete this training evenings. The fourth part is completing as well. "Introduction to Outdoor Leadership Skills," which are the skills required for the Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks. Because emphasis is placed on a leader's previous knowledge of the skill rather than course attendance, a new leader can complete this course at an accelerated pace.

Varsity Coach Leader Specific Training
Varsity Coaches and assistant Coaches have similar training requirements to Scoutmasters and assistant Scoutmasters. Requirements for trained Varsity leaders are Varsity Fast Start Orientation, New Leader Essentials, Varsity Coach Leader Specific Training, and introduction to Outdoor Leadership Skills.

Troop Committee Training
For troop committee members, Leader Specific Training includes Troop Committee Challenge. Upon completion of the three-hour challenge, a troop committee member is considered trained.

Wood Badge for the 21st Century
Upon completion of Leader Specific Training, an adult is eligible to attend Wood Badge for the 21st Century. As the core leadership skills
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This emblem is available to all adult leaders who have completed Fast Start Orientation, New Leader Essentials, and Leader Specific Training for their position. It is worn on the left sleeve, below and touching the emblem of leadership for which it was earned.

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training course for the BSA, Wood Badge focuses on strengthening every volunteer's ability to work with groups of youth and adults and is less focused on outdoor skills, which are more effectively addressed in other training courses. The task force that developed Wood Badge for the 21st Century was charged with developing an adult training course that was on the cutting edge of training for the 21st century. They created a highly user-friendly course that would encourage BSA local councils to offer more courses and, ultimately, train more Scouters. The Wood Badge course has made significant accomplishments in both areas.

Adult & Youth Training (cont.)
Incorporating leadership concepts that are used in corporate America, the course teaches participants the basics of listening, communicating, valuing people, team development, situational leadership, problem solving, and managing conflict. Once the skill is learned, each member is given the opportunity to use the skill as a member of a successful working team. At the conclusion of the course, each participant develops a set of personal goals related to his or her Scouting role. Working toward these goals allows each participant to practice and demonstrate new skills. Nationwide over the past two years, Wood Badge courses have increased more than 30 percent. The course is for all Scouters—Boy Scout leaders, Cub Scout leaders, Venturing leaders, and district and council leaders. This has increased communication to allow for a more seamless connection among all BSA programs.

Supplemental Training
There is always something new to learn and experience in BSA training. A number of supplemental training modules are available on the BSA Web site. They are designed to be downloaded for one-hour course outlines or viewed as self-study courses. Most BSA local councils offer additional training for Scout leaders, focusing on outdoor skills, Youth Protection, and youth leadership development. At the national level, a number of training courses are conducted each summer at the Philmont Training Center in northern New Mexico. Courses focus on everything from teaching outdoor skills to working with the troop committee. Another supplemental training opportunity is the monthly district roundtable— meetings that bring together Scout leaders from a number of troops to share ideas and teach skills. Each meeting is an opportunity for enjoying fellowship and fun with others who are committed to Scouting's aims and ideals.

National Youth Leadership Training
National Youth Leadership Training is an exciting, action-packed program designed for councils to provide youth members with leadership skills and experience they can

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use in their home troops and in other situations demanding leadership of self and others. For many years, junior leader training (JLT) was an important part of the leadership training continuum of BSA local councils throughout America. In 2003 and 2004, a task force of leadership experts and hundreds of Scouts in pilot courses across the nation reviewed and tested every aspect of the new NYLT syllabus, which incorporates the latest leadership ideas and presents fresh, vital and meaningful training for today's Scouts. T

Adult & Youth Training (cont.)
The NYLT course centers around the concepts of what a leader must BE, what he must KNOW, and what he must DO. The key elements are then taught with a clear focus on HOW TO. The skills come alive during the week as the patrol goes on a Quest for the Meaning of Leadership. NYLT is a six-day course. Content is delivered in a troop and patrol outdoor setting with an emphasis on immediate application of learning in a fun environment. Interconnecting concepts and work processes are introduced early, built upon, and aided by the use of memory aids, which allows participants to understand and employ the leadership skills much faster. Built on the legacy of past JLT successes, the new NYLT integrates the best of modern leadership theory with the traditional strengths of the Scouting experience. Through activities, presentations, challenges, discussions, and audio-visual support, NYLT participants will be engaged in a unified approach to leadership that will give them the skill and confidence to lead well. Through a wide range of activities, games, and adventures, participants will work and play together as they put into action the best Scouting has to offer.

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