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Ewing Township Redevelopment Agency

Township of Ewing, New Jersey

OLDEN AVENUE
.....Redevelopment Plan.....

September 2009
T o w n s of
Township h i pEwing
of Ewing

A p r i me exa mp l e o f a b ra n d n e w “L i fe s t yl e” s h o p p i ng ce nte r b ui lt wi t h

t h e p e d e s t r i a n i n m i n d. Pro j e c t s l i k e t h i s a re s i m i l a r to t h o s e t h at t h i s

Pl a n s e e ks to i mp l e me nt. Wh i l e a rc h i te c t u ra l e le m e nt s c an d i f fe r, t he

p ro j e c t ’s p l a ce m e nt, o r i e nt at i o n and pedestrian c i rc u l at i o n s ys te m

a re t h e ke y co mp o n e nt s to re vi e w.

(“100 M ar ketplace”, Bask ing R idge, NJ )


CREDITS

Ewing Township Redevelopment Agency


Robert Kull, PP, AICP Chairperson
Daniel Brandt, Vice-Chairperson
David Rose, Secretary
Iman AQuddus
Hilary Hyser AS
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Suzanna McGee Mr ial
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Mr ane hank
Terrance Stokes P t Mc st
Mr hil Ve Lau o:
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Tyrone Garrett, JD, Executive Director Ew andra e in
ing Mc
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Michael O’Donnell, ESQ., Attorney ing owns d
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Ewing Township Mayor & Council ffic missi
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Mayor Jack Ball
Councilman Bert Steinmann, President
Councilman Joseph Murphy, Vice- President
Councilman Don Cox
Councilman Leslie Summiel
Councilwoman Kathy Wollert

Ewing Township Planning Board


Mayor Jack Ball
Councilman Bert Steinmann, Class II Member
Richard Owen, Chairman
Vincent Shea, Vice Chairman
David W. Thompson, Secretary
David Rose
Carl McCall
Hal Moeller
George Nickels, PE
Anthony Chiarello, 1st Alternative Heyer, Gruel & Associates
William Hill, 2nd Alternative Charles Latini Jr., PP, AICP
Imelda Wollert, Recording Secretary Kyra Quinn
Robert Hall, PP Township Planner Dilip Chitajallu, PP, AICP
Aditi Mandrawadi, PP, AICP
All correspondence and inquires to:
Ring Yu Lin
EWING TOWNSHIP REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY
Municipal Complex Photo and Simulation Credits
2 Jake Garzio Drive Charles Latini Jr., PP, AICP
Ewing, NJ 08628
Jennie Lossmann
609.883.2900 x7648 Fax: 609.538.0729
www.ewingtwp.net/bcc/etra Cathren Kull

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


TABLE OF CONTENTS
PREFACE ............................................................................................................................................ i

INTRODUCTION TO THE 2008 REDEVELOPMENT PLAN........................................................................ 1

A VISION FOR THE FUTURE................................................................................................................. 3

GENERAL GOALS OF THE REDEVELOPMENT PLAN................................................................................ 4

REDEVELOPMENT AREA AND SUBAREA DESIGNATIONS....................................................................... 7

STANDARDS FOR DEVELOPMENT......................................................................................................... 9


General Standards................................................................................................................................. 10
Subarea 1- Pennington Road Neighborhood Commercial......................................................................... 12
Subarea 2- Prospect Street Mixed-use Community.................................................................................. 15
Subarea 3- Spruce Street Small Business/Light Industrial........................................................................ 21
Subarea 4- Mercer Crossings................................................................................................................ 24
Subarea 5- Stout Avenue Neighborhood................................................................................................ 28
Subarea 6- Stokes/Calhoun Regional Commercial/Industrial.................................................................... 32
Subarea 7a & 7b - Prospect Park Neighborhood...................................................................................... 36
Subarea 8- Arctic Parkway Transitional Area ...................................................................................... 40

DESIGN STANDARDS........................................................................................................................... 43
Parking . .............................................................................................................................................. 43
Landscaping, Lighting & Signage Requirements..................................................................................... 46
Cellular Communications..................................................................................................................... 47

INFRASTRUCTURE STANDARDS........................................................................................................... 48
Public Improvements............................................................................................................................ 48
Off-Tract Improvements and Developer Contributions............................................................................ 48
Olden Avenue Streetscape and Road Profile........................................................................................... 50
The Supporting Road Network- Newly Constructed Roads ...................................................................... 49
Preliminary Traffic Calming Recommendations....................................................................................... 51
Public Transit...................................................................................................................................... 53
Parks & Open Space............................................................................................................................. 54

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PLAN (STATEMENT OF PURPOSES AND PUBLIC POLICIES).......................... 54


Relationship to Local Objectives and Municipal Land Development Regulations....................................... 54
Role of Township Boards...................................................................................................................... 54
Amending the Plan.............................................................................................................................. 58
Redeveloper Designation...................................................................................................................... 58
Redevelopment Agreements................................................................................................................. 59
PILOT (Payment in lieu of tax) Agreements............................................................................................ 60
Property Acquisition............................................................................................................................ 61
Specific Property Identified For Acquisition............................................................................................ 62

RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER PLANS........................................................................................................ 64

APPENDIX A- Parcel Maps.................................................................................................................... 68

APPENDIX B- List of Properties Located in the Redevelopment Area........................................................ 80

APPENDIX C- Floor Area Ratio Sliding Table.......................................................................................... 100

APPENDIX D- Accident Data & Analysis................................................................................................. 102

APPENDIX E- Master Plan Consistency Report........................................................................................ 107


TABLE OF MAPS

Map 1 - REDEVELOPMENT AREA Map ....................................................................................................... 2

Map 2 - OPPORTUNITIES MAP ................................................................................................................ 5

Map 3 - OARP Subareas Map.................................................................................................................. 6

Map 4 - EXISTING LAND USE ................................................................................................................... 8

Map 6 - CONCEPTUAL ROAD NETWORK MAP............................................................................................. 49

Map 7 - ENVIRONMENTAL & OPEN SPACE OPPORTUNITIES MAP.................................................................. 55

Map 8 - STATE PLAN MAP........................................................................................................................ 67

APPENDIX A - Block and Lot Area Maps..................................................................................................... 68-79


Preface
Area Description
The Olden Avenue Redevelopment Area includes nearly • The redevelopment of Parkside Plaza Shopping Center
600 acres along North Olden Avenue from Princeton by S&S Investments that includes the new Shop-Rite
Avenue to north of Pennington Road, and extends north (2002) in Sub-area 2;
to the Shabakunk Creek and the Lawrence Township
border and south to the City of Trenton border as shown
on the Olden Avenue Redevelopment Area Map (Map 1).
The area was designated by Township Council based on a
Redevelopment Investigation Report dated June 1997. The
study analyzed all parcels in the Area and determined that
the majority of property met the criteria required by the
Local Redevelopment & Housing Law (N.J.S.A. 40A:12A-1,
et seq.). A redevelopment plan was then drafted and
adopted by Ordinance of the Ewing Township Council on
August 24, 1999.
• The redevelopment of the former Certified Steel site
Efforts to Date with new construction of a Home Depot (2002) in
Since the adoption of the 1999 Olden Avenue Redevelopment Subarea 6;
Plan (OARP), the Ewing Township Redevelopment Agency
(ETRA) has worked closely with both public and private • The award in 2003, of a Livable Communities Grant
sectors to implement the Plan. Notwithstanding, a new, from the New Jersey Department of Transportation
highly coordinated approach is required to enable the that will help create utility easements on the 1800
marketplace improve and create new opportunities that block of North Olden Ave. Extension (Sub-area 1),
spur economic growth within the Township. relocate overhead utility lines (telephone, cable
and electric), relocate and remove utility poles, and
It is clear that the OARP has helped to facilitate new remove, relocate and replace sidewalks;
economic development and aesthetic improvements
that have increased the Township’s ratable base. Several • The redevelopment of the Kuhn-Jacobs industrial
specific projects have come to fruition over the past six facility into the Ewing Artist Loft Studios project was
years that have had positive impacts on the surrounding approved in Sub-area 6;
neighborhoods whereby additional investment in the
Township’s existing housing stock has occurred. Some • The successful implementation of flood control
of the projects that have influenced these improvements measures along the Shabakunk Creek through
include: a New Jersey Environmental Trust (NJEIT) grant
and low interest loan. Although more needs to be
• The demolition of the flood prone 1800 Block of North accomplished, this project greatly improved the
Olden Avenue and the creation of Shabakunk Creek detrimental conditions imposed upon the Public’s
Park on the site of a FEMA funded project (2002) in Health, Safety and Welfare;
Sub-area 1;

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

• Mercer Development Associates, also known as There are several reasons for updating the OARP at this
Mercer Group International (MGI) entered into a time:
“Redevelopment Agreement” to construct a 42,000
square foot, DEP approved, recycling facility; • There has been development activity and interest in the
Redevelopment Area that warrants a revisit of the Plan
to better capture market potential.
• The Redevelopment Area exhibits characteristics that
would allow continued short-term implementation while
working toward a more ambitious longer-term vision.
• Redevelopment projects have shown the need for
modification to the existing OARP and proposed
transportation routes.
• The Urban Land Institute’s “Mercer Crossings” report
recommended multi-jurisdictional cooperation between
Ewing, Trenton and Lawrence Township’s. The New
• Neighborhoods long plagued by vacant and dilapidated Jersey Local Redevelopment and Housing Law provides
structures continue to be improved through the efforts the legislative and planning tools to promote and
of the Agency. implement stated objectives and to “develop uniform
regulations” for the tri-municipal area. Ewing has the
ability to drive this effort through a broader vision of
regional stability incorporated in the redevelopment
plan.
• The Ewing Township Master Plan was updated in 2006
and its associated land development ordinances are
currently being updated by the Planning Board and
Township Council.
• The redevelopment plan has the opportunity to
take advantage of regional assets that can assist the
Township to grow and prosper.

Why Amend the Plan? The Challenges


It is appropriate that Redevelopment Plans be reviewed and Success stories aside, despite ETRA’s proactive effort, the
amended just as Master Plans are required to under the Area still struggles and travelers along North Olden Avenue
Municipal Land Use Law. This revised OARP was done so in Extension utilize the Area as more a travel corridor than a
conjunction with the recent revisions to the Ewing Township shopping district. Greater traffic has led to the continuance
Master Plan. As part of a NJDCA Smart Growth Planning of serious vehicular accidents at key intersections and turn
Grant, ETRA, in cooperation with the Township Planning lanes. The Plan’s goals of traffic calming and reestablishing
Board, has accepted the responsibility of updating the bus services along Olden Avenue remain high priorities and
Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan. Through this update, are envisioned to assist spur economic growth where it has
it has been found that the design recommendations of been slow to be realized by creating a better access and a
the 1999 OARP are unfeasible based upon the level of better place to do business.
reinvestment the Area has actually experienced and need The success of redevelopment will be influenced by
to be reconsidered. This Plan advances a new approach how to rectify the Area’s infrastructure, its impact on
that will tie together many economic development adjacent properties and neighborhoods, accessibility,
assumptions and design techniques in order to solidify traffic movement, and even aesthetic value. Lack of a
the Avenue as the “economic spine” of the Township. complete road network increases congestion by reducing
options for regional and local traffic. The Delaware Valley

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Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


Regional Planning Commission published a report that facilitate uniform development standards and allow
that highlights roadway issues that require further redevelopment within and across municipal boundaries for
analysis by the Township. http://www.dvrpc.org/asp/ the benefit of the region. By leveraging this cooperative
pubs/reports/08053.pdf Traffic calming, aesthetic spirit and unified vision, economies of scale are created
improvements, and reestablishing bus services along whereby every community benefits farther into the future
Olden Avenue are in-fact high priorities but have been slow than they would acting individually.
to occur because of the complexity of the road’s design
and the need for state and county public and private ETRA seeks to implement a vision that not only benefits
investment to assist pay for the necessary improvements. everyone in the region but more importantly strengthens
Through this plan ETRA seeks to: Ewing Township’s ratable tax base. Under State Law,
redevelopment plans and associated redevelopment
• Improve travel safety for pedestrians, bicyclists, cars agreements are among the few ways within a municipality
and trucks, by which strong design standards, that not only improve
• Improve access to businesses, and the aesthetic qualities of the Avenue but enhance the value
• Leverage public and private resources to create new of investment, can be established and enforced. The Plan
economic development opportunities for the entire contained herein allows the Township to implement its
area. vision for Olden Avenue with sufficient flexibility built into
the zoning standards that will enable private investment
The Opportunities the ability to propose projects that the market can support
While there are numerous opportunities to capitalize on, without compromising the Area’s future growth potential.
this new plan also builds on the Urban Land Institute’s Combined with a predictable development review process,
(ULI) “Mercer Crossings” project and subsequent Mercer this Plan will allow the Township the ability to effectively
County land use and transportation studies regarding market itself while streamlining efforts by Township staff
Spruce Street, Princeton Avenue and Farmers Market area. and Boards In affect, the Township will be in complete
Mercer Crossings was a ULI Panel Services Forum that control of its destiny while showing property owners and
studied the area where Ewing & Lawrence Townships and investors alike that it is serious in creating a business-
the City of Trenton converge at Olden Avenue and Spruce friendly atmosphere.
Streets. The report and information regarding subsequent
County studies in this area are available online at: http:// The Incentives
nj.gov/counties/mercer/departments/planning/mercer_ Additionally, this Plan utilizes its development standards
crossings.html. as an incentive for property owners to re-invest in their
properties while also encouraging outside developer
This new OARP is intended to complement current local interest in improving the Area. Following the Plan will
and regional planning efforts and lay the foundation provide added density and bulk standards above what is
for cooperative planning and development efforts currently allowed under Township Zoning. As can be found
in more detail in the PILOT section under “Using the Plan”
(page 59), the Township can also utilize PILOT’s or Payment
in Lieu of Taxes as a tool that not only accelerates economic
development within the Township thus adding to the tax
base projects that would otherwise not have happened, but
to direct public improvements to occur without additional
burden on the taxpayers of Ewing. The Agency is also able
to utilize its position to create programs for rehabilitation,
direct potential investors toward competitive loan programs
and reinvest PILOT money for infrastructure and streetscape
improvements.

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Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

Establishing a Business Climate


This plan is based on current land use development standards and practices. Through this plan, ETRA seeks to enhance
Olden Avenue’s position in the region by further capitalizing on the area’s strengths to encourage new private investment
to make Olden Avenue the premier place to do business. Through this Plan’s process, development applications will
have a clearer direction and will be streamlined and predictable. In effect, the Township’s implementation will be highly
coordinated.

To date, the Township and ETRA have made significant progress together in implementing the plan, however the area
remains at a disadvantage in competing with other destinations. A more ambitious vision is necessary to take the area’s
residents and businesses toward a future where public gathering places, family- and community-oriented goods and
services and new housing options for students, seniors and small households create a highly desirable place to invest
in. To accomplish this, the Plan’s design standards and other incentives will facilitate private investment and inherently
strengthen the ratable base into the foreseeable future. It will take hard time to accomplish, but “a journey of a thousand
miles begins with a single step.

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Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


C an t his ha p p en??? T he o p p o r t un i t y l i e s i n t hi s Pla n...
INTRODUCTION TO THE
2009 REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

The first Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan was prepared


more than a decade ago in cooperation with the Ewing
Township Planning Board. It was authorized by the Ewing
Township Mayor and Council pursuant to a Redevelopment STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS
Investigation Report approved by the Planning Board in
June of 1997, which resulted in the designation by Council According to New Jersey’s Local Redevelopment
of the Olden Avenue Redevelopment Area and the creation and Housing Law (N.J.S.A. 40A:12A-1, et seq.),
of the Ewing Township Redevelopment Agency in 1998. the Redevelopment Plan shall include an outline
for the planning, development, redevelopment
Redevelopment is a work in progress, but a solid Plan or rehabilitation of the project area sufficient to
provides a framework for land use and land development indicate:
within a redevelopment area, as well as an opportunity to
apply financial incentives and other implementation tools 1. Its relationship to definitive local objectives as to
to encourage the residents, business and property owners appropriate land uses, density of population and
to improve and renovate certain parcels individually or improved traffic and public transportation, public
through public-private partnership agreements among utilities, recreational and community facilities and
themselves, private sector redevelopers and other entities other public improvements;
as defined by State law. 2. Proposed land uses and building requirements in
the project area;
It is the intention of this Redevelopment Plan and the 3. Adequate provision for the temporary and
Ewing Township Redevelopment Agency to let market permanent relocation as necessary of residents in
forces guide the implementation of the vision created the project area including an estimate of the extent
through the Plan. This Plan provides incentives for to which decent, safe and sanitary dwelling units
design and development that enhance the market and affordable to displaced residents will be available to
promote negotiation with landowners without use of them in the existing local housing market;
eminent domain. The designation of a redevelopment 4. An identification of any property within the
area and adoption of a redevelopment plan also provides Redevelopment Area which is proposed to be
opportunities to provide property tax incentives, in acquired in accordance with the Redevelopment
conjunction with special loan programs and coordinated Plan;
public improvements to encourage and invigorate these 5. Any significant relationship of the Redevelopment
forces. Plan to:
• The Master Plans of contiguous municipalities;
• The Master Plan of the County in which the
municipality is located; and
• The State Development and Redevelopment Plan
adopted pursuant to the “State Planning Act” PL
1985, C398 (C52:18A-196 et al.).

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing
Map 1

FIGURE 1 Description:
The Redevelopment Area boundaries as designated by Ewing Township Council in 1997: Beginning along Olden Avenue Extension,
due west of Pennington Road, including certain blocks and lots fronting Olden Avenue Extension, including block 295 lots 8, 50, 55,
56, 7 and 25, fronting the westbound side of Olden Avenue Extension, and Block 234.01 Lot 41, and Block 296 Lots 48 and 24 fronting
the eastbound side of Olden Avenue Extension as well as Lots 16-23, and lots 44-47 in Block 296. The boundary generally extends
in an easterly direction including properties fronting along Olden Avenue Extension to its intersection with Pennington Road, where it
extends in a northerly direction up Pennington Road to the intersection of Pennington Road and Pennwood Drive and includes those
properties fronting on Pennington Road. The boundary then extends further east on Olden Avenue Extension to the intersection of
Parkside Avenue and Olden Avenue Extension. The boundary then extends in a southerly direction on Parkside Avenue and then
in an easterly direction towards Prospect Street, including certain properties north of Rosedale Avenue but not fronting Rosedale
Avenue, specifically block 118.04 lots 3-5, 11, 12, 14, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 24, 25, 30, 31, 38, 39, 40, 43, 50, 53, 63, 73, 74 and 174.
The boundary line then intersects with Prospect Street, continues south on Prospect Street to the City of Trenton border, including
all properties to the east of Prospect Street. The boundary line follows the City of Trenton border along Ingham Avenue to its
intersection with Calhoun Street, north on Calhoun Street and following the City of Trenton border to Princeton Avenue; extending
north on Princeton Avenue to the intersection of Princeton Avenue and Spruce Street. The boundary then turns left on Spruce Street
bordering Lawrence Township and continues in a westerly direction along Spruce Street to the intersection of Spruce Street and 4th
Street where it the extends north along 4th Street including property on both sides of 4th Street to the intersection of 4th Street and
Industry Court; the boundary then extends in a westerly direction, including property on both sides of Industry Court, and extending
in an westerly direction towards 5th Street. The boundary then turns in a southerly direction down 5th Street including properties on
the eastern side of 5th street, extending down 5th Street to Madison Avenue. At that point, the boundary turns west along. Madison
Avenue to its intersection with Prospect Street, including the following blocks and lots south of Madison Avenue but not fronting on
Madison Avenue specifically block 40, lots 248-250 and block 40.01 lots 1-3, 5-11, 14-23, 33, and 35. The boundary then intersects
with Prospect Street, and extends in a southerly direction where it the intersects with Olden Avenue Extension incorporating specific
lots in block 118.01 including lots 2, 3, 5-11, 14-19, 23 and 26 which front Olden Avenue Extension, the boundary extends north of
2 block 118.01 along 13th Street to include lots 533-538 in block 85 and lots 542- 551 in block 84. The boundary then extends west
along Olden Avenue Extension to the intersection of Olden Avenue Extension and Parkside Avenue.

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


A VISION OF THE FUTURE

The Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan envisions a The new buildings will be contained in a web of new streets
transformation of the area into an active place where connected into the exiting network that are comfortable, well
business can thrive from access by multiple modes of lit, green and shaded, colorful, lively, and friendly to both
transportation including walking. Creation of a climate pedestrians and automobiles. Each corner, intersection, or
where residents of Ewing Township and beyond come gateway along these streets will be treated with a unique
to enjoy amenities as they once did back in the days monumentality that captures the eye and attracts one and
of Brieler’s and the Parfait House is important toward all.
creating economic diversity where once again Olden
Avenue becomes the dynamic place it used to be but built Finally, the Olden Avenue Redevelopment Area will embrace
in accordance with today’s standards. the collegiate history of the Township by allowing and
attempting to facilitate the integrating the Area’s colleges
The Olden Avenue Area will eventually reconnect the (The College of New Jersey (TCNJ), Rider University, Mercer
Township’s stable, strong neighborhoods to that of the County Community College, and Thomas Edison College)
opportunities for diverse commercial goods and services into the fabric of everyday civic life. The Olden Avenue Area
with active public places designed into it. Taking full will be a place where job opportunities, community activities,
advantage of the Area’s strategic location along the major and open spaces create the type of place where students,
gateways into three unique communities, new investment young families, and existing residents will desire to live,
will help capture the opportunities for regional growth and where they can afford to do so. The Olden Avenue Area
and long-term sustainability. Every building will add true and its new neighborhoods will become another point of
value toward preserving the integrity of the surrounding pride for Ewing Township and a source of stability in the
communities with access by all reasonable modes of region.
transportation.

New park spaces integrated within the fabric of each


improved area will become gathering places. Environmental
restoration and regional flood protection will become
features that every resident can be proud of. Safe, clean
waterways will become integral to the design of healthy
neighborhoods and restoration of natural habitat.

New structures will provide exciting architectural


elements that complement a diverse history. Buildings
will, however, be built to the standards and requirements
of the modern era and will accommodate some of the best
places to live, work, sell, or be entertained in the area.

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

GENERAL GOALS OF THE REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

To make this vision real, the following Goals apply throughout the Olden Avenue Redevelopment Area:

A. Create a strong tax base that holistically combines proven planning and design techniques into a solid
business -friendly atmosphere.
B. Improve the functional and physical layout of the Area’s street pattern which will calm regional through
traffic, benefit businesses, and encourage walking, bicycling and public transportation.
C. Establish a network of open spaces that unites all development through the integration of the greater
Ewing Township and Mercer County open space network.
D. Create public spaces throughout the area that provide focal points within each Sub-area. Focus on
areas that may not be in Ewing but are community assets and should also be explored.
E. Employ an integrated approach where today’s projects do not inhibit the greater long-term vision for
growth and development
F. Improve pedestrian safety through a variety of techniques including traffic calming, intersection
improvements and street-oriented land use patterns, where appropriate
G. Control parking in the area by promoting shared parking as well as mixed private/public garage
facilities and shared access drives.
H. Create parking standards and regulation of parking placement within buildings to ensure that it is
screened from view at sidewalk level by effective architectural treatment.
I. Coordinate all development with new and existing land uses, circulation patterns, existing and
proposed mass transit facilities, and streetscape improvements.
J. Provide site improvement standards that seek to implement this comprehensive plan including height,
setbacks and massing.
K. Promote development that utilizes residential land uses as tool to spur economic development.
Housing should include provisions for senior citizen, student and affordable housing.
L. Create a destination where monumental gateways, unique and innovative architecture blend with
surrounding neighborhoods.
M. Create, where appropriate, mixed-use buildings that offer lively ground floor uses to enliven the
streetscape and works to attract a variety of business types.
N. Create new retail and office space for the area and the Township at large.
O. Allow for short-term implementation of this plan by also considering long-term possibilities of
alternatives to the existing traffic patterns in the Area.
P. Promote cooperative intergovernmental efforts between the Township of Ewing, City of Trenton,
Lawrence Township, Mercer County, NJDOT, NJDEP, and NJ Transit toward regional stormwater control,
regional traffic patterns, new and existing public transit facilities, and open space funding.
Q. Encourage investments in redevelopment and infrastructure that are responsive to the context and
that best promote the opportunities and assets identified in the Opportunity Map (Map 2).

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


Map 2
Township of Ewing

Map 3

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Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


THE REDEVELOPMENT AREA &
SUBAREA DESIGNATIONS

The Olden Avenue Redevelopment Area consists of a will serve as the basis that every project must strive to
total of over 800 separate lots comprising 584 acres of implement, regardless of whether any deviations to the
land and is organized into Sub-areas as depicted in the standards in the Plan are sought.
OARP Sub-area Map (Map 3). This Plan applies within the
Olden Avenue Redevelopment Area only and not to any Through Redevelopment Agreements, projects will move
area depicted outside of the boundaries designated by from concept to eventual Planning Board applications.
the Township Council as depicted in the Redevelopment Upon designation, all development sought within the Plan’s
Area Map (Map 1) and description. jurisdiction will begin at the Ewing Township Redevelopment
Agency (ETRA) level. Once conceptually reviewed and
The Existing Land Use Map (Map 4) and Existing Lot Sizes coordinated with the Township’s Site Review Committee,
Map (Map 5) depict the current status of all lots within the the Agency will then review and recommend the prospective
redevelopment area as of the drafting of this Plan. It is development application so that it may work its way through
through these characteristics, as well as the road patterns the Township’s Planning Board review and approval process
and surrounding neighborhoods, that the Plan was then in an efficient and expedient manner. In order to effectuate
able to reconstitute the Sub-areas and develop strong this Redevelopment Plan, the Local Redevelopment and
standards and incentives for development within each. Housing Law (N.J.S.A 40A: 12A, 8-9), permits ETRA to enter
into redevelopment agreements.
The Standards for Development provide a statement of
intent, objectives, and development standards for each
Sub-area. The applicable Sub-area intent and objectives

The Area can be described as having nine Zones with distinctive characteristics that have
been called “Sub-areas” for the purposes of this Redevelopment Plan. Each Area’s vision and
development standards are described fully in the Plan:

Sub-area 1 Pennington Road Neighborhood District


Sub-area 2 Prospect Street Mixed Use District
Sub-area 3 Spruce Street Small Business District
Sub-area 4 Mercer Crossings District
Sub-area 5 Stout Avenue Neighborhood District
Sub-area 6 Stokes/Calhoun Regional Commercial/Industrial District
Sub-area 7a Prospect Park Small Business District
Sub-area 7b Prospect Park District
Sub-area 8 Arctic Parkway Transitional District

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

Map 4

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Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


STANDARDS FOR DEVELOPMENT

Generally

The land uses and building requirements set forth in and design standards set forth in this Plan, such property
these Standards apply to the redevelopment of individual owners shall be under no obligation to conform to such
lots that conform, or are combined to conform to the uses and design standards, unless they seek to expand.
lot size requirements of this Plan. Properties can be All properties, of course, must continue to comply with
combined through a variety of binding legal instruments, the applicable provisions of Township health, safety and
including mutual easement agreements, Real Estate land development ordinances. Existing businesses seeking
Investment Trusts (REITs), cooperative partnerships amended site plan approvals or expansions of legal pre-
(limited partnerships, limited liability corporations, etc.), existing non-conforming uses are also eligible for property
or even cross access easements to connect parking lots tax incentives and other applicable incentives to create
and/or walkways. The Township shall also have the ability those site improvements and alterations constructed in
to support redevelopment projects with alternative, furtherance of this Plan.
non-conforming parcel configurations that substantially
meet the goals and requirements of the Plan and do not The goal of the Township and ETRA is to create a “spirit
negatively affect the development potential of adjoining of community” in the Olden Avenue Redevelopment Area
properties or vision of this Plan. whereby all existing and new property owners’ work in
concert toward improving of the entire area.
Legal uses in existence in the Olden Avenue Redevelopment
Area as of the date of the adoption of this Plan that are Affordable Housing
rendered non-conforming as a result of the Plan shall be In accordance with the LRHL, there are no designated
considered legal pre-existing non-conforming uses. Such affordable housing units in the OARP area, nor does the
uses shall continue to be regulated under development Plan identify the relocation of any residential land use
approvals existing as of the date of the adoption of this market or otherwise. Notwithstanding, the Plan will provide
Plan. The failure of any legal pre-existing non-conforming affordable housing opportunities in accordance with
use to conform to specific Sub-area land use and bulk the Council on Affordable Housing’s rules at the time an
standards shall not result in the prohibition of such use. application for development is made. All development of
Expansion of such legal pre-existing non-conforming affordable housing and contributions will be in accordance
uses shall be permitted as indicated and will be subject to with the Ewing Township Housing Element & Fair Share Plan
compliance with the applicable Sub-area Design Standards and other applicable requirements identified and enforced
and General Design Standards set forth by Sub-area. Upon by the Township Planning Board in its approval.
review of a development application submitted for a parcel
upon which exists a legal pre-existing non-conforming Off-Tract Improvements
use, the Planning Board shall have the authority to grant Define mandatory contributions to the Area’s infrastructure
waivers, in its discretion, from the Sub-area Design through Redevelopment Agreements.
Standards and General Design Standards set forth in this
Plan, subject to review and recommendation by ETRA Parks/Open Space
and, if applicable, the execution of a redevelopment Advance implementation of the Parks and Open Space
agreement. Furthermore, the use must be detailed in the objectives, particularly for those properties adjacent to
applicable Sub-area as a Permitted or Conditional Existing the Shabakunk Creek floodplain as well as those spaces
Use in order to obtain standing for such review. depicted on the Environmental & Open Space Opportunities
Map (Map 8) found in the Parks and Open Space Section of
While ETRA will encourage owners of properties containing this Plan.
pre-existing non-conforming uses to conform to the uses

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

Environmentally Friendly or “Sustainable” Design


Use of energy efficient site design including but not limited to LEED or Energy-Star Standards to reduce the ‘heat-island’
effect as well as to reduce stormwater runoff and improve water quality beyond reliance on traditional detention basin
techniques. Alternative energy technologies such as solar panels and geo-thermal heating installations will also be
encouraged.

Applying the Plan’s Development Standards


The Standards set forth in this Plan apply to all property in the redevelopment area. The regulations contained in this Plan
supersede Township zoning except where this plan is silent with regard to a particular development standard, in which
case the Ewing Township Land Development Ordinance will apply.

Development Standards are located within the Plan as follows;

-General Goals of the Plan .............................................................................................................. 4


-Specific Sub-area Intent, Objectives, Land Use & Bulk Standards..........................................................12-42
-General Design Standards ..............................................................................................................43-47
-Infrastructure Standards.................................................................................................................48-53

In application, the General Goals are what the Plan seeks to achieve holistically and comprehensively for the entire Plan
area. The specific Sub-area Intent, Objectives, Land Use & Bulk Standards are the standards by which each individual project
must adhere to in order to receive approval from the Planning Board and gain the financial benefits the Redevelopment
Agency and Township is prepared to offer. The General Design Standards apply to all projects and the Infrastructure
Standards may also, depending on the project’s specific location. Should any conflicts exist in applying the Sub-area
regulations and the General Design Standards, the Sub-area regulations will prevail.

ETRA may, at its discretion, review and recommend any deviation of a standard for a specific development project
through a substitute provision specified in a Redevelopment Agreement, or for a publicly funded infrastructure project,
where it documents that such standard would conflict with the ability to achieve a General Goal or Sub-area Intent or
Objective. Nevertheless, this Plan seeks to put the Township and its Boards on the same page so as to create a predictable
marketplace for both short and long-term investment.

10

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


11
Subarea
Subarea 1 - Pennington Road Neighborhood District

Intent Objectives
Sub-area 1 is the northwestern gateway into the • Encourage development patterns that facilitate retail
redevelopment area. Aesthetic and infrastructure sales of goods and services with easy access to adjacent
improvements will welcome shoppers into the Area and residential neighborhoods.
create better connections from adjacent neighborhoods • Connect adjacent neighborhoods to shopping
to goods and services along Olden and Pennington opportunities through streetscape and pedestrian
Avenues. To accomplish this, the Agency is committed amenities.
to working with all property owners in this Sub-area, • Work with Incarnation Church to create passive and
including those outside of the Plan’s jurisdiction. This active open space along Olden Avenue.
process has already begun with Shabakunk Creek Park, • Continue to improve stormwater flow along the Shabakunk
the Utilities Relocation Project at Olden and Parkside Creek to reduce flooding while also providing additional
Avenues, as well as the installation of sidewalks by open space opportunities.
Incarnation Church on its side of Olden Avenue.
However, much more can be achieved with minimal
effort such as initiating a public/private partnership
with Incarnation Church that makes better use of what
is essentially a lawn along Olden Avenue. Perhaps the
Township can develop park space with trees, gathering
spaces with recreational facilities. To promote the safety
of pedestrians and bicyclists by reducing risk of injury
from turning motor vehicles, future drive-thru services
are prohibited in this Sub-area.

A portion of this Sub-area has been characterized


by years of flooding from the Shabakunk Creek. To
alleviate the situation, the Township has developed
a flood mitigation strategy based on improving
capacity in the Shabakunk flood plain and providing
a system of detention facilities. While the Township’s
Proj ec t s such a s the ne w C HASE B ank have implemented s ome
flood control plan does not involve additional use or of the Plan’s ke y desig n ele me nt s ( Althoug h the address on the
sig n i s a simulation . )
acquisition of private property within the Olden Avenue
Redevelopment Area, a number of private commercial
properties have been severely affected by flooding in
the past and may become available for future flood
control. The Ewing Township Redevelopment Agency
will continue to assist flood impacted property owners
within the Redevelopment Area through proper site
design, intergovernmental partnership, and potential
regional stormwater mitigation measures.

a
T he Tow nship’s F E M A Proj ec t helped purcha s e f lood prone, di-
lapidated str uc tures in favor of a park that e nhance f lood pro-
tec tion e f for t s .

13

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

Land Use 2)  Additional coverage up to 10% may be granted if


Principal Uses - offset by contributions to other stream improvements
• Retail, and Business Services. (Such as: Bakeries; or innovative urban stormwater design features.
Fiduciary institutions; Book stores; Dry Cleaners; d. Floor Area Ratio
Clothing (new) and dry goods store; Dancing studio; 1) 0.50 maximum. 1.0 maximum for Residential
Delicatessen; Household appliance store; Library; Conditional Uses and/or Office Above retail.
Offices, business and professional; Artist Studios;
Tailor and dressmaker shop; Auto parts) Building Placement and Design
• Existing Auto Repair Facilities • Design ingress, egress and parking to be shared to
• Day Care (Family and Child) minimize curb-cuts.
• Ensure that sidewalks and streetscape amenities are
Conditional Uses installed or can be installed upon completion of the
• Residential. Conditioned Upon: applicable roadway design.
1) Such uses are located above commercial use. • Accommodate pedestrian access from the front in ways
2) All parking requirements for the site are met or that minimize conflicts with vehicular access.
subject to cross access agreement. • Drive-through services are prohibited
3) Separate and safe pedestrian access is provided • Separation of Parking from Public Streets. Along each
from curb-line to use. street line as defined bounding the district a ten (10’)
• Expansion of Existing Auto Repair Facilities. Conditioned foot strip shall be provided, suitably landscaped
Upon: except for necessary sidewalks and access-ways. The
1) Such uses are existing. landscaped strip shall be separated from the parking
2) Landscaping requirements and applicable buffers area by continuous concrete curbing except at access-
are satisfied to the Board’s satisfaction. ways and coordinated with Pedestrian access points.
3) Adherence to the applicable standards in the Design • Outdoor patio and seating areas are encouraged.
Standards Section. Waivers may be granted subject
to review and recommendation by ETRA.
4) Sign and lighting standards are met.
• Neighborhood Shopping Centers. Conditioned Upon:
1) Such uses are existing
2) Landscaping requirements and applicable buffers
are satisfied.
3) Sign and lighting Standards are met.

Bulk Standards
a. Principal Building.
1) Lot area: 17,500 sq. ft. - minimum
2) Build to Line: 20-25’ feet
3) Side yard: each 5 feet - minimum
4) Rear yard: 10 feet – minimum
5)   Height: 1-1/2 stories or 20’ (3-1/2 stories or 35’
feet upon Residential Conditional Use permit and/or
Office located Above)
b. Accessory Building.
1)   Distance to side lot line: 5 feet - minimum
2)   Distance to rear lot line: 5 feet - minimum
c.  Lot Coverage.
1)   Total impervious coverage: 70% maximum for all
property adjacent to Shabakunk Creek.

S
Promotion of a strong pedestr ian e nv ironme nt i s a long-ter m goal of
the Plan. Aesthetic improve me nts throug h strong streets cape stan -
dard s have bee n doc ume nted to calm traf f ic and enhance economic
de velopme nt initiatives.
14

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


Subarea
Township of Ewing

Subarea 2- Prospect Street Mixed-Use District

Intent
Located in the heart of the Redevelopment Area, this Sub-
area has tremendous opportunity to transform itself into a
walkable community center of commerce that focuses on
placemaking and includes housing opportunities (including
student ), parks, new dining, retail and entertainment
opportunities and public gathering spaces.

Although many automotive land uses are currently


located in this Sub-area, their presence does not preclude
or inhibit the ability to create a place that includes
the existing business community while presenting
opportunities for change through well-designed
development and improving the environmental quality of
the Shabakunk Creek through additional open space and T he pres e nt B oule vard-ty pe e ntrance into a site along the ea st side
of Prospec t Street beg ins to re veal a g limps e of thi s Subarea’s poten-
flood protection. High value new development will also tial for tran sfor mation into a mi x ed - u s e communit y. The simulation
work to solidify and increase the Township’s ratable base. below i s me rely one way it could look . A s atellite C ampu s to T CNJ
pe rhaps?
A pedestrian-oriented community is envisioned for this
Sub-area. While existing businesses will be grand-fathered
and encouraged to rehabilitate, in order to redevelop and
expand, those uses must do so within the framework set
forth by this Plan.

The integrated design approach discussed throughout


the Plan is underscored in this Sub-area, particularly in
the CORE area as indicated on Sub-area #2 Aerial Photo
Map where the standards are more tightly defined. Each
parcel’s design will work together to create a unique place
thus establishing a strong ratable base. This approach
will only be accomplished upon realization by property
and business owners that the increased development
opportunities of this Plan are worth the effort of additional
investment through the partnerships likely to be needed.

Objectives
• Establish and promote a CORE of mixed-use
development opportunities that work to create a center
of commercial and residential activity for the eastern
third of the Township.
• Create opportunities for property/business owners
and to reinvest in the Township thus strengthening the
ratable base.
• Reduce curb-cuts along North Olden Avenue through
shared access and parking arrangements.
• Enhance deeded open space with the creation
of additional public spaces, designed through
redevelopment projects for residential enjoyment.
T he Tow n ship’s Flood B a sin, once a g olf dr iv ing range, can be f ur-
the r conve r ted to become valuable public park space.
16

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


• Improve flood control along the Shabakunk Creek and Accessory Uses in Mixed-Use Buildings
reclaim floodplain land where existing uses degrade • Schools and Training Facilities (Such as public and private
environmental quality. universities; job training)
• Coordinate the development of existing auto-related • Business and Professional Office (Above Retail only)
land uses in a way that allows the efficient use of land • Retail, and Business Services (Such as: Bakeries; Fiduciary
while respecting environmental features and the intent institutions; Book stores; Dry Cleaners; Clothing (new)
of this Sub-area’s future growth potential. and dry goods store; Dancing studio; Delicatessen;
• Strengthen buffers between sensitive environmental Household appliance store; Library; Offices, business
features and deleterious land uses. and professional; Artist Studios; Engraving; Tailor and
dressmaker shop; Auto parts)
Land Use • Restaurant and Cafes (Outdoor seating is permitted as
Principal Uses are sandwich boards in mixed-use areas)
• Mixed-use buildings that include retail sales and • Health and fitness facilities
business services and residential and/or office space • Day Care (Family and Child)
on upper floors.
• Multi-family residential, including stacked townhomes, Conditional Uses-
flats and condominiums, 55 and older communities. 1) Stand alone Business and Professional Office
• Institutions of higher learning including student 2) Stand alone Retail, and Business Services
housing 3) Stand alone Health and fitness facilities
• Artist live/work studios ~Conditioned Upon( for all above Conditional Uses):
• Existing Auto Repair facilities • Property fronting North Olden Avenue
• Existing Automotive Sales (New and Used) • Location outside of the CORE area
• Recreational Facilities • Site Plan coordination with adjacent properties
• Sign and lighting Standards are met.

I LLU STR ATIVE ONLY: T he s ec tion of O lde n Ave nue w ithin Subarea # 2 i s plag ued by incompatible desig n approaches to the parcel s along it.
The Red dots are curbc ut s that could be eliminated in favor of shared dr ive way s in Gree n w / yellow outline whe n ne w de velopment i s propos ed.
In ess ence, the amount of curb- cut s can be cut in half thu s improv ing access and c irc ulation along the Ave nue .

Another impor tant point wor th con side r ing i s the “s ea” of a sphalt and lack of inte r- connec tive ness . T he “Subarea # 2 C onceptual Massing”
diag ram g raphically depic t s how concept s of thi s Plan can be utiliz ed to c reate sy ne rg i stic de velopme nt.

17

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

D elete r iou s land u s es , par tic ularly thos e along the Sha - L ack of a unifor m street s cape and desig n standard s has
bakunk Creek, have out standing e nv ironme ntally f r iend - led to a di s org ani z ed hodg epodg e of sig nage.
ly de velopme nt pote ntial. Photo by C athre n Kull

Pedestr ian u s e of the Ave nue i s ha z ardou s at best. A g oal of the plan i s to fac ilitate rede velopment of land
that has s at vacant for years such as the for mer DE P of -
f ices along Prospec t Street

18

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


Subarea #2 Conceptual Massing Plan

The Area #2 C onceptual Ma ssing Plan e nv i sion s ON E way the area could e ve ntually de velop unde r the prov i sion s of thi s Plan. The one
depic ted here utiliz es e x i sting building s and allow s for c ross - access ag ree me nt s and reduced c urbc ut s . Ne w street s and pr ivate dr ives, that
coordinate w ith the C onceptual Road Net work ide ntif ied in thi s doc ume nt, are e nv i sioned to a ssi st bu siness es w ith shipping and receiv ing
need s as well as create a walkable e nv ironme nt.

19

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

4) Expansion of existing Auto-related land uses. (No new c. Floor Area Ratio:
uses of these types permitted.) Conditioned Upon: 3.0 maximum for Mixed use in the CORE Area.
• A 50’ foot buffer that includes a minimum of 10’ Outside of CORE 0.5 single-use; 1.25 for mixed-use.
foot wide vegetative buffer (consisting of trees,
shrubs and other woody species), from the top Building Placement and Design
of the Shabakunk Creek bank as per FEMA maps. • Orient buildings to the street to create a strong pedestrian
Public access easements may also be required. environment through unified streetscape improvements,
• Agreements with adjacent land uses to share access giving top priority to pedestrian access both to and
and functional use of parking, loading and storage through the site.
where appropriate and feasible. • All multi-family residential and institutional land uses
must front on a public street (new or existing). “Eyes on the
• The interface with residential uses, current and
street” development techniques must be demonstrated.
envisioned, is addressed through design features
• Landscape all street connections to adjacent
that allow seamless integration and/or buffering.
neighborhoods.
• Ensure that sidewalks and streetscape amenities are • For all development adjacent to existing and proposed
installed or can be installed upon completion of the parks, open space, and public land uses either within
applicable roadway design. Ewing Township and the City of Trenton will incorporate
• When necessary, storage of disabled vehicles site design practices that locates the site’s required
shall be fully screened from public view and shall open space adjacent to the public parks network. Such
maintain a 75” buffer from the Shabakunk Creek. space may be dedicated to the Township subject to
Salvage yards are not permitted to expand. acceptance.
• Sign and lighting Standards are met. • All development on a street (not alley), both public and
private shall be treated architecturally as a front
• New development shall utilize the Conceptual Road
Bulk Standards
Network depicted in Map-6. Create all new streets as
a. Principal Building.
extensions of the existing street network in the area,
1) Lot area: 22,500 sq. ft. - minimum
constructed according to Township specifications and be
2) Build to Line: turned over to the Township upon build out.
i- 40’ feet minimum from the front property line • Drive-through services are prohibited
along Olden Avenue (except properties located in • Reopen culverts and tunneled streambanks in association
the CORE area) with redevelopment so long as it is long found to be of
ii- New buildings shall be placed 10’ feet minimum benefit to stormwater/water quality control. This shall
- 15’ feet maximum from the front property line not preclude construction of bridges or other crossings
in the CORE area and on Corner lots (where all subject to DEP approval.
property lines on streets are front property • For property adjacent to the Shabakunk Creek, use
lines), including Prospect Street and all new alternative paving materials such as “Grasspave TM” or
other types of porous paving material agreed to upon
roads identified on the Conceptual Road Network
negotiation of the Redevelopment Agreement or Planning
depicted in Map 6.
Board approval and in consultation with the Township
3) Side yard: 10 feet minimum (CORE is permitted 0 lot
Engineer (refer to Page 45 for an illustration of Grasspave
lines where appropriate.) TM).
4) Rear yard: 10 feet minimum • Orient all buildings to the street to create a strong
5) Height: 1 ½ stories or 20’ minimum. CORE Area: 2 pedestrian environment.
stories or 25’ minimum, 4 ½ or 45’stories maximum. • Require public access easements where appropriate for
6 ½ stories or 75’ maximum if parking is located restaurants and residential uses.
under principal structure. • Blank street-walls are prohibited for all façades along
b.  Lot Coverage. street frontages or adjacent to public open and other
1)   Total impervious coverage: 75% maximum for all public spaces.
property adjacent to Shabakunk Creek. • Capture and re-use greywater to the extent feasible.
• Connect and integrate with adjacent neighborhoods
2)  Additional coverage up to 10% may be granted if
through stream crossings and/or access to greenways
offset by contributions to other stream improvements
established and conceptualized by the Plan.

S
or innovative urban stormwater design features.
• Provide a Pedestrian Circulation Plan that meets goals of
this Plan where appropriate.

20

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


Subarea
Township of Ewing

Subarea 3 - Spruce Street Small Business District

Intent
Sub-area 3 is intended to remain predominantly light Tailor and dressmaker shop; Auto parts; Paint and
industrial in character, with a small area of retail businesses wallpaper store; Radio and television stores; Upholstery
located between Fourth and Fifth Streets along both sides shop and furniture refinishing )
of Spruce Street. The intent of this Sub-area is to: • Day Care (Family and Child)
• Encourage existing businesses to grow and expand,
• Provide additional economic development within the All Other Property except Spruce Street:
Sub-area, • Manufacturing, processing, producing, fabricating or
• Provide proper buffers to surrounding residential warehousing operations
neighborhoods. • Structures and uses devoted to research, experimentation
or engineering involving scientific investigation,
Economic development will require improved access. The engineering study, project development and similar
extension of Fifth Street alongside the former trolley right- activities.
of-way will eliminate dead end streets and provide access • Auto-related industries
to additional vacant land. More importantly, access to • Offices and warehouses.
Whitehead Road Extension will also be facilitated through • Public facilities.
the Fifth Street extension. The Fifth Street area will also
provide alternate routes of travel for bicycle, pedestrian Bulk Standards
and truck traffic properly separated throughout the entire Frontage on Spruce Street Only:
area. a. Principal Building.
1) Lot area: 17,500 sq. ft. - minimum
Objectives 2) Build to Line: 20-25’
• Facilitate the growth of commercial and light industrial 3) Side yard: each 5 feet - minimum
uses in this area while recognizing the need to protect 4) Rear yard: 10 feet – minimum
and enhance environmental quality. 5) Height: 1-1/2 stories or 20’ (3-1/2 or 35’ upon
• Improve circulation by extending Fifth Street alongside Residential Conditional Use permit and/or Office
the former trolley right of way to eliminate dead located Above)
end streets and provide access to remaining vacant b. Accessory Building.
land. Ensure that adequate buffers to surrounding 1)   Distance to side lot line: 5 feet - minimum
neighborhoods remain intact. 2)   Distance to rear lot line: 5 feet - minimum
• Ensure proper traffic controls and provide pedestrian c.  Lot Coverage.
and bicycle access to Olden Avenue along the new Fifth 1)   Total impervious coverage: 70% maximum for all
Street extension and/or along the Shabakunk Creek as property adjacent to Shabakunk Creek.
part of the Ewing/Lawrence Greenway initiative. 2)  Additional coverage up to 10% may be granted if
• Improve flood control along the Shabakunk Creek and offset by contributions to other stream improvements
reclaim floodplain land where existing uses degrade or innovative urban stormwater design features.
environmental quality d. Floor Area Ratio
1) 0.50 maximum. 1.0 maximum for Mixed-use Office
Land Use Above retail.
Principal Uses-
Frontage on Spruce Street Only: All Other Property except Spruce Street:
• Retail, and Business Services. (Such as: Bakeries; a.   Principal Building.
Fiduciary institutions; Book stores; Dry Cleaners; 1)  Lot area: corner lot 8,000 sq. ft. -minimum
Clothing (new) and dry goods store; Dancing studio; 2)   Lot width: 80’ feet -minimum
Delicatessen; Household appliance store; Library; 3)   Setback 10-15 feet (unless otherwise noted)
Offices, business and professional; Artist Studios; 4)   Side yard each- 5 feet -minimum

22

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


Building Placement and Design
5)   Rear yard 5 feet minimum • Provide street trees of types and in locations specified on
6)   Height: 1-1/2 stories or 20’ not to exceed 25 feet the street frontage by the Township Planning Board.
7) When abutting a residential district, side and rear • Establish and maintain vegetated buffers of landscaped
yard requirements shall conform to requirements of berms with deciduous and evergreen landscaping with a
applicable adjacent residential district. minimum 50’ feet width adjacent to residential uses and
b.   Accessory Building. zones.
1)   Distance to side lot line 5 feet minimum • For properties along 4th Street and Industry Court, design
2)   Distance to rear lot line 5 feet -minimum redevelopment reduce stormwater run-off, reclaim flood
3)   Height: 1 story not to exceed 15 feet -maximum plain land, improve flood control and environmental
c.   Lot Coverage. quality of the Shabakunk Creek.
1)   Total building coverage shall not exceed fifty (50%) • For property adjacent to the Shabakunk Creek, use
percent of total lot area. alternative paving materials such as “Grasspave TM” or
2.)   Total impervious coverage: 70% maximum for all other types of porous paving material agreed to upon
property adjacent to Shabakunk Creek. negotiation of the Redevelopment Agreement or Planning
3.   Additional coverage up to 10% may be granted if Board approval and in consultation with the Township
offset by contributions to other stream improvements Engineer.
or innovative urban stormwater design features.
d. Floor Area Ratio
1) 0.50 maximum.

T he Plan s eek s to improve bu siness conditions by improv ing f lood conditions and an
improved the qualit y of life throug hout... In Sub-area 3, t wo branches on the Shaba -
kunk meet and oppor tunities to improve reg ional f lood condition exi st... 23

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

Subarea
Subarea 4 - Mercer Crossings District

Intent entertainment centers, smaller retail stores well as some


Sub-area 4 consists of the entire block bounded by Arctic limited residential opportunities. Additionally, new uses
Parkway, Olden Avenue, Spruce Street and Princeton will be oriented to the street and projects will be design
Avenue. Redevelopment and rehabilitation opportunities to create a strong pedestrian environment, both within the
will be encouraged through the design of cohesive retail site and outside of it, thus providing safe and convenient
centers with controlled access from North Olden Avenue pedestrian access throughout.
or Arctic Parkway, redesigned parking, and landscaping
along all street frontages. Objectives
• Develop remaining segments of abandoned rail right-
The Sub-area is located adjacent to the Trenton of-way and logical adjacent parcels into new points of
Farmer’s Market, Halo Farms, and the North Trenton/ St access and economic development opportunities.
Hedwig’s Area; safe and efficient walking access from • Improve integration with the Trenton Farmers Market
the surrounding neighborhoods is a key component to area of Lawrence Township in order to provide better
economic development success. Coordinating with the access for the high percentage of walkers coming from
City of Trenton and with Lawrence Township will be key. North Trenton neighborhoods.
• Create strong retail environment through design that
Economic development opportunities will be increased by not only attracts additional retail and office space
using the remaining segments of abandoned rail right-of- opportunities but enhances the quality of life for the
way that effectively connects Olden Avenue, Spruce Street, surrounding area as well.
and Arctic Parkway. The potential to create additional road • Develop a stronger road network that provides options
frontage will foster additional economic development
opportunities. An environmental assessment may also be
undertaken to determine the extent and value of wetlands
and other lands for development that these new street
could unlock. Regional flood control and/or public park
space will also be considered.

Development of Sub-area 4 parcels should be coordinated


in design, particularly with respect to the objectives of
Mercer Crossings initiative. More efficient utilization of
land along both side of Spruce Street will facilitate a more
pedestrian friendly design approach that encourages the
traditional retail centers to be upgraded into “lifestyle”
centers. The area’s characteristics provides the opportunity
to include mix of uses such as major department stores,

T he U L I “Me rce r Crossing s” Repor t re vealed g reat potential for the


C apital Pla z a shopping ce nte r. In - fac t, redesig ned , the Plaz a can be

a
a linchpin that connec t s the far me r’s Market to the rede velopment
pote ntial of Area # 5

25

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

for motorists and pedestrians to utilize other routes structure.


of access with a focus on the reduction of vehicular b. Accessory Building.
congestion and pedestrian conflicts. New roads will 1.   Distance to side lot line: 5 feet - minimum
coincide with the potential extension of Whitehead 2.   Distance to rear lot line: 5 feet - minimum
Road and other circulation initiatives related to the ULI c.  Lot Coverage.
“Mercer Crossings” study objectives and coordinated 1.   Total impervious coverage: 70% maximum for all
with subsequent Mercer County studies. property adjacent to Shabakunk Creek.
2.  Additional coverage up to 10% may be granted if
Land Use offset by contributions to other stream improvements
Permitted Uses or innovative urban stormwater design features.
• Lifestyle Shopping Centers (Shopping centers that d. Floor Area Ratio: 2.0 maximum
promote pedestrianism and contain provisions such
as outdoor cafes, public gathering spaces, covered Building Placement & Design
walkways, etc.) • Orient buildings to the street to create a strong
• Office; executive, administrative, educational or pedestrian environment through unified streetscape
professional and medical services. improvements giving top priority to pedestrian access
• Mixed use buildings both to and through the site.
• Existing Lumber and Hardware supplies • Blank streetwalls are prohibited for all façades along
street frontages.
Accessory Uses • Connect and integrate with adjacent neighborhoods in
• Residential above commercial (Not permitted at ground accordance with a Pedestrian Circulation Plan consistent
level) with the Goals of this Redevelopment Plan.
• Retail and business services • Orient buildings to the street to create a strong
• Banks and Fiduciary Institutions pedestrian environment.
• Health and Fitness Facilities • Provide landscaped buffer of at least 30’ feet in width
• Restaurants and Cafes around all loading areas
• Public Uses (Community, recreation, human services) • All development will capture and re-use greywater to
• Day Care the extent feasible.
• Schools and Training Facilities • All development will provide stormwater controls
• New Drive-through services are prohibited. through the creative use of natural wetland areas as
deeded public open space and/or vegetative buffers
Bulk Standards where deemed appropriate. Design will be integrated
a.    Principal Building. into the overall development concept.
1. Lot area: 2 acres – minimum
2. Build to Line:
i) Along Olden Avenue, and Spruce Street, 30 feet
minimum - 35’ feet maximum from the front
property line.
ii) Along Intersections and all new streets. 10 feet
minimum - 15’ feet maximum
3. Side yard: each 5 feet - minimum
4. Rear yard: 10 feet – minimum
5.   Height: 3 ½ stories or 35’ maximum, 4 ½ stories
or 55’ where parking is located under principal

26

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


Area #4 Conceptual Massing Plan

E xtending C alhoun Street and the sur rounding street g r id w ill e nable thi s area to be a economically v iable and at trac tive place that w ill take
advantage of the sur rounding market place and c reate bet te r oppor tunities for all communities in the Me rce r Crossing s area . Even the Far mer’s
market, which under utiliz es it s pote ntial could not only be a mag net but be ne f it f rom a Ne w approach .

27

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

Subarea
Subarea 5 - Stout Avenue Neighborhood District

Intent Objectives
Subarea 5 consists of the area along Olden, Stout and • Rehabilitate the existing neighborhood through the
Heath Avenues south of North Olden Avenue and west Township’s Housing Rehabilitation program proposed in
of Princeton Avenue. This Subarea consists primarily of the Fair Share Housing Plan.
residential row houses with mixed use (commercial uses • Provide new in-fill housing development in keeping with
with upper floor residential units) fronting Princeton the neighborhood’s unique character.
Avenue and the Pierce Rubber Factory located at 1500 • Provide options for the reuse of commercial and industrial
Heath Avenue. property that improve the quality of life both within the
subarea and contribute to surrounding neighborhoods.
The rehabilitation of existing residential uses will be • Promote mixed-use development in a manner that
encouraged while providing a variety of additional housing strengthens existing neighborhoods and draws on
options, including the adaptive reuse of industrial sites. existing community assets.
The opportunity to expand this neighborhood by taking • Integrate additional park space and enhancement of
advantage of its strategic location in the Redevelopment existing spaces for passive and active uses. Improve
Area is tremendous. Given the neighborhood’s access community access to these areas.
to existing parks and open space, Brownfield sites and • Work with the City of Trenton to stabilize the entire
underutilized property make for prime redevelopment region.
opportunities.
Land Use
Redevelopment of this area will also require strong The mixed-use properties along Princeton Avenue are
buffers between residential land uses and the industrial particularly suited for the Sub-area. Uses incompatible
areas within subarea 6. with adjacent residential neighborhoods however, such as
auto repair garages, used car lots, auto salvaging or other
commercial or industrial uses that are better suited to light
industrial zones, would become legal non-conforming uses
and therefore encouraged to be rehabilitated/ redeveloped
into neighborhood oriented mixed-use structures.

Permitted Uses
• Multi-family residential
• Institutions of higher learning including but not limited
to student housing
• Private and Public schools and satellite learning centers
• Existing Light Industry and automotive related
businesses

Vacant Parcel s along the Ave nue hinde r the pro g ress of the Area Conditional Uses
1) One and Two family Residential and Townhomes.
Conditioned Upon:
• Property located adjacent to uses similar in
nature.
• Property located on Heath, Stout, Brian and/or
Olden Streets or within a one (1) block radius of
said streets.

a C aroline Stokes D ay C are C e nte r

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


29
Township of Ewing

2) Mixed-use (Residential, and/or Office Professional 2. Build to Line:


ABOVE retail). Conditioned Upon: i) Front setback: 30 feet minimum - 35’ feet maximum
• Property fronting North Olden Avenue or Princeton from the front property line along Olden Avenue.
Avenue or future extensions of Calhoun Street ii) Front setback: 10 feet minimum - 15’ feet maximum at
• All other standards and intent of Sub-area #5 are intersections and on all new streets.
met. iii) Mixed-use development: Front setback: 0 feet
3) Religious Institutions and Houses of Worship. minimum - 10’ feet maximum from the front property
Conditioned Upon: line along Olden and Princeton Avenues. Maintain a
• All ancillary uses require separate use permits minimum of 15’ within the right-of-way for streetscape
(office, classrooms, etc.) and sidewalk provisions and streetscape.
• Establishing a Pedestrian Circulation Plan and iv) Prevailing setbacks may be averaged for in-fill and
installation sidewalks on all street frontages development on the same or intersecting streets.
• Property shall front any existing or new street 3. Side yard: each 5 feet - minimum
• Parking is prohibited in the front yard area 4. Rear yard: 10 feet – minimum
4) Expansion of existing Auto-related land uses and 5. Height: 3 ½ stories or 35’ maximum, 4 ½ stories or 55’
Light Industry (No new uses of these types permitted.) where parking is located under principle structure.
Conditioned Upon: b. Accessory Building.
• Agreements with adjacent land uses to share 1. Distance to side lot line: 5 feet - minimum
access and functional use of parking, loading 2. Distance to rear lot line: 5 feet - minimum
and storage where appropriate and feasible. c.  Lot Coverage.
• The interface with residential uses, current 1. Total impervious coverage: 70% maximum for all property
and envisioned, is addressed through design adjacent to Shabakunk Creek.
features that allow seamless integration and/or 2. Additional coverage up to 10% may be granted if offset by
buffering. contributions to other stream improvements or innovative
• Ensure that sidewalks and streetscape amenities urban stormwater design features.
are installed or can be installed upon completion d. Floor Area Ratio
of the applicable roadway design. 1. Residential in-fill development. Single-Family and Two-
• When necessary, storage of disabled vehicles family subject to the FAR Sliding Table in Appendix C.
shall be fully screened from public view. Salvage 2. One point five (1.5) maximum, 1.0 maximum for multi-
yards are not permitted to expand. family.
• Sign and lighting Standards are met.
Building Placement and Site Design
Bulk Standards • Orient buildings to the street to create a strong pedestrian
a. Principal Buildings environment through unified streetscape improvements,
1. Lot Area giving top priority to pedestrian access both to and through
i) Single Family: the site.
Minimum: 40 feet width and 4,000 square feet in • All multi-family residential and institutional land uses must
lot area front on a public street (new or existing). “Eyes on the street”
Maximum: 50 feet in width and 5,000 square feet development techniques must be demonstrated.
in lot area. • Landscape all street connections to adjacent
ii) Two-Family: neighborhoods.
Minimum: 60 feet and 6,000 square feet in lot • For all development adjacent to existing and proposed
area. parks, open space, and public land uses either within Ewing
Maximum: 70 feet in width and 7,000 square feet Township and the City of Trenton will incorporate site design
in lot area. measures to include required open space as additional,
iii) Mixed-use: 22,500 publicly accessible park space that may be dedicated to the
iv) Multi-family Residential: 2 acres, Additionally, Township subject to acceptance. All open space (new and
existing) must be accessible to the public

30

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


• All development on a street, both public and private shall be treated architecturally as a front
• Create all new streets as extensions of the existing street network in the area, constructed according to Township
specifications and be turned over to the Township upon build out.
• Capture and re-use greywater to the extent feasible.

Area #5 Conceptual Massing Plan


T hi s subarea i s in a unique position whe reby unde r utiliz ed a ss et s such a s Fathe r Rocco Park , the C aroline Stokes D ay C are C enter and sur-
rounding thr iv ing ne ig hborhood s can be broug ht to g ethe r in a way that c reates a s olid livable communit y. Circ ulation improvement such as
C alhoun Street E xtension (Re v Howard Wood s on Jr Way ) can c reate walkable street s while improv ing traf f ic f low

31

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

Subarea
Subarea 6 - Stokes/Calhoun Regional Commercial/Industrial District

Intent Land Use


This Sub-area will create new redevelopment parcels for Because of the history of industrial uses, permitted land
a variety of commercial and industrial uses consistent uses in Sub-area 6 will include large site industrial uses such
with the current uses in the area. However, the future of as recycling, warehousing and distribution, light industrial
these uses remains in question as the industrial sector and related commercial uses so long as the property does
in the United States continues to weaken with exception not front Olden Avenue or Calhoun Street. In addition, the
of flex industrial space with high-capacity truck access. development of “flex-space” developments that combine
As has been witnessed in other areas of the State, heavy manufacturing, distribution, retail, office and hotel uses,
industrialized areas can change toward uses vastly including extended stay business hotels, are encouraged.
different from today’s. The Township possesses the ability
to utilize Brownfield remediation laws to create additional Additionally, property that directly fronts North Olden
development opportunities as new taxes generated from Avenue or Calhoun Street will be permitted to redevelop in
redevelopment are able to be applied toward cleanup costs. a manner that is more consistent with adjacent Sub-area 4.
As circumstances progress, ETRA, the Ewing Township
Planning Board and Ewing Township Council may seek Permitted Uses
to revisit this matter to determine the most appropriate 1) Lots that Front Olden Ave or Calhoun Street
reuse of the industry intensive portions of this Sub-area. • Lifestyle Shopping Centers (Shopping centers that
promote pedestrianism and contain provisions such
Notwithstanding the long-term future for this area, as outdoor cafes, public gathering spaces, covered
the Plan seeks to allow industrial uses within this Sub- walkways, etc.)
area to operate and improve their properties and • Mixed use buildings
expand in a manner that is respectful of surrounding • Existing Lumber and Hardware supplies
neighborhoods. Because of the history of industrial uses, • Retail sales and services
land filling and auto salvaging within this Sub-area, some • Restaurants
redevelopment parcels may require some remediation of
soil contamination. 2) Lots without frontage on Olden Ave or Calhoun Street
(conditioned upon proper buffering from all residential
Properties that front North Olden Avenue will also be uses and streets)
permitted to redevelop in a manner that works to unify • Manufacturing, processing, producing, fabricating~ or
both side of the Avenue and allowing access from adjacent warehousing
neighborhoods both existing and proposed. • Research. Experimentation or engineering involving
scientific investigation, engineering study, project
Objectives development and similar activities not involving
• Create new redevelopment parcels, which facilitate the manufacturing, sale, processing, warehousing,
short-term growth and buffers surrounding the existing distribution, or fabrication of material, products or goods
industrial areas from residential neighborhoods while except as incidental to the principal permitted uses.
recognizing the long term potential for change. • Office; executive, administrative, educational or
• Allow industry to thrive, while ensuring adequate professional and medical services.
buffers to residential neighborhoods are provided. • Hospital for small animals (dogs, cats, and the like)
• Create additional opportunities for Open Space including kennel, provided yards are enclosed.
by reclamation of land that also works to improve • Combinations of two (2) or more compatible uses
environmental quality and stormwater reduction for per¬mitted within one (I) unit.
the entire region. • Public safety facilities.
• Planned developments of 5 acres or more, subject to

a
Redevelopment Agreement.

33

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

Accessory Uses Bulk Standards


1) For properties that Front Olden Ave or Calhoun 1) For properties that Front Olden Ave or Calhoun Street
Street (or future Calhoun Street Extension): (or future Calhoun Street Extension),
• Residential above commercial (Not permitted at ground a.    Principal Building.
level) 1. Lot area: 2 acres – minimum
• Retail and business services 2. Build to Line:
• Banks and Fiduciary Institutions i) Front setback for buildings along Olden Avenue: 50
• Health and Fitness Facilities feet minimum from the property line of the prevail-
• Restaurants and Cafes ing setback
• Public Uses (Community, recreation, human services) ii) Front setback for buildings along all new streets
• Day Care or interior access drives: 10 feet minimum - 15 feet
• Any accessory use on the same lot which is customarily maximum from the front property line.
incidental to the principal permitted use. 3. Side yard: each 5 feet - minimum
• New Drive-through services are prohibited. 4. Rear yard: 10 feet – minimum
5. Height: 3 ½ stories or 40’ maximum, 4 ½ stories or 55’
2) For properties without Frontage on Olden Ave or where parking is located under principal structure.
Calhoun Street, conditioned upon proper buffering b. Accessory Building.
from all residential uses and streets. 1.   Distance to side lot line: 5 feet - minimum
• Cafeteria, lunchroom, first aid and/ or medical facilities 2.   Distance to rear lot line: 5 feet - minimum
operated by or for the employer for the exclusive use c.  Lot Coverage.
of employees or guests. 1.   Total impervious coverage: 70% maximum for all
• Recreational areas for employees, indoors and property adjacent to Shabakunk Creek.
outdoors. 2.  Additional coverage up to 10% may be granted if
• Garages and storage buildings. offset by contributions to other stream improvements
or innovative urban stormwater design features.
d. Floor Area Ratio:
0.5 maximum. 2.0 maximum for mixed-use

2) For properties without Frontage on Olden Ave or Cal-


houn Street,
a.   Principal Building.
1.   Lot area: 2 acres -minimum
2.   Lot Width: 250 feet -minimum
3.   Front yard: 75 feet -minimum
4.   Side yard: one 35 feet -minimum
5.   Side yard: total of two 100 feet -minimum
6.   Rear yard: 75 feet -minimum·
7.   Height: 3-1/2 stories or 35’ (4 ½ stories or 55’ with
parking under principal use)
b.   Accessory Building.
1.   Distance to side lot line: 25 feet ~ minimum
2.   Distance to rear lot line: 25 feet -minimum
3.   Height: 1 story -not to exceed 15 feet -maximum
c.    Lot Coverage.
1.   Total building coverage shall not exceed thirty five
(35%) percent of total lot area.
The Tow nship’s C ompost Fac ilit y

34

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


2.  Total impervious coverage: 70% maximum for all to negotiation within the redevelopment agreement and
property adjacent to Shabakunk Creek. NJDEP regulations.
3.   Additional coverage up to 10% may be granted if
offset by contributions to other stream improvements Furthermore, due to the Sub-area’s proximity to residential
or innovative urban stormwater design features. land uses in Ewing and Trenton, landscaped buffers of 50’
feet minimum in size must be developed and maintained
Building Placement & Design to shield residential land uses and zoning from deleterious
• Orient buildings to the street to create a safe and land uses. This includes landscaped berms with deciduous
convenient pedestrian environment through unified and evergreen landscaping, including sound walls if deemed
streetscape improvements giving top priority to appropriate. Compatible land uses will be integrated within
pedestrian access both to and through the site for these residential land uses. Specifically;
non-industrial uses. a.    All buildings and uses shall be served by public water
• Blank streetwalls are prohibited for all façades along and sewage and a lot may contain more than one (I)
street frontages. principal building.
• Drive-through services are not permitted. b.    Yard Requirements Adjoining Residential Districts. On
• Connect and integrate with adjacent neighborhoods lots adjoining residential districts, no building shall be
where appropriate through stream crossings and/or located closer fifty (50’) feet from such district boundary
access to greenways established and conceptualized and be buffered with a vegetative screen..
by the Plan. c.    Landscaping Along Streets, Roads or Highways. Each
• For any properties adjacent to the Shabakunk Creek property shall be appropriately landscaped particularly
or tributaries use alternative paving materials (100’) feet of any street intersection said distance to
such as “Grasspave TM” or other types of porous be measured from the intersection of the right-or-way
paving material agreed to upon negotiation of the lines at the corner affected and the closest point of such
Redevelopment Agreement or Planning Board approval proposed driveway. No entrance or exit, at the curb line
and in consultation with the Township Engineer (refer only shall be closer than twenty (20’) feet from a side lot
to Page 45 for an illustration of Grasspave TM). line. Entrance and exit sizes, locations and construc¬tion
• Provide landscaped buffer of at least 30 feet is shall also be in accordance with requirements of the
required around all loading areas governmental agency’ having jurisdiction over the facility
• Capture and re-use greywater to the extent feasible. upon which the permitted use has frontage.
d. Loading Docks and Service Areas. No loading dock or
Additional Building Requirements service area may be on any street frontage. Provision
The suggested redevelopment parcels in Sub-area 6 for handling all freight shall be on those sides of any
are adjacent to an area of low elevation that has been buildings which do not face any street or proposed
the most severely flooded area of Ewing Township. A streets.
continuing dialogue will be maintained between the e. Outdoor Storage Areas. No use or accessory use shall
Ewing Township Planning Board and the Mercer County be constructed to permit the keeping of articles,
Planning Director regarding the County’s concern over equipment, goods or materials in the open exposed to
new development within the Redevelopment Area having public view, adjacent residences or a residential district.
excessive lot coverage that will delay the improvement When necessary to store or keep such materials in the
of flooding conditions down stream in Trenton. As such, open, the area shall be enclosed with a screen or buffer
it is a requirement of this Redevelopment Plan that in planting strip and be situated not closer than fifty (50’)
order to gain the additional density permitted in this plan, feet from a residential district line, public right-of-way or
each redevelopment site shall provide excess capacity, Greenway.
or contribute to, regional stormwater detention design f. Conservation. Existing woodlands, windbreaks and
beyond what is required either in the Ewing Township Land watersheds shall be preserved as far as the standards of
Development Ordinance or the New Jersey Residential Site conservation practice require.
Improvement Standards. Such allowances will be subject

35
Township of Ewing

Subarea
Subarea 7a & 7b - Prospect Park Districts

Intent
Sub-area 7 is known as the Prospect Park section of Ewing properties in this area into a true residential neighborhood.
Township. It is currently heavily developed for residential Furthermore, the extension of the Sub-area boundary into
uses as it is for commercial uses, as the workforce for the neighborhood bounded by Ingham and Calhoun Streets
the local businesses traditionally lived in the same will work to improve the quality of life throughout the Sub-
neighborhood. An exception to this land use pattern area. Connecting these two areas through street extensions
occurs along Prospect Street, where the properties fronting and streetscape improvements is envisioned to complement
Prospect Street include Business Highway uses even industrial re-use efforts and make this area a better place to
though a majority of the properties are residential homes. live, work and play.
Sub-area 7 lies within the “area in need of rehabilitation”
designation. Objectives
Sub-area 7A- Prospect Park Small Business/Light Indus-
Sub-area 7A- Prospect Park Small Business/Light In- trial
• Facilitate the expansion of commercial uses along Dryden,
dustrial
Hazel and Robbins Avenues north of Weber Avenue.
North of Weber Avenue is intended to enhance the
• Mandate better site design through increasing landscape
environment for business and business services. to
provisions that work toward reducing the “heat island”
reduce the impacts of noise, odors and other land use
effect and decreasing stormwater run-off.
conflicts, residential landowners are encouraged to sell
• Improve access to and from industrial land uses while
their properties to adjacent businesses. The Agency
reducing the impact of truck traffic on surrounding
will be available to assist and encourage these property
neighborhoods.
owners relocate to new in-fill housing opportunities on
• Capture and re-use greywater to the extent feasible.
existing vacant lots within Prospect Park between Weber
and Homestead Avenue (Sub-area 7B- Prospect Park
Sub-area 7B - Prospect Park Neighborhood
Neighborhood.)
• Encourage the rehabilitation of existing industrial uses in
the area while promoting a neighborhood friendly design
Sub-area 7B - Prospect Park Neighborhood
approach.
The intent of Sub-area 7B is to provide a residential
• Provide for new infill housing opportunities on existing
context that can facilitate mortgage financing for existing
vacant lots within Prospect Park between Weber and
homeowners along Dryden, Hazel and Robbins Avenues
Homestead Avenue.
while still allowing for commercial uses and to use
• Work with the Township’s Housing Plan to promote
property tax incentives to encourage uses as permitted
homeownership and neighborhood stabilization from
in the Light Industrial zoning for the area along Dryden,
Weber Avenue south through to the Ingham and Calhoun
Hazel and Robbins Avenues north of Weber Avenue.
Street neighborhood.

The use of property tax incentives within Sub-area 7B to


facilitate rehabilitation and new construction of housing
within the area between Weber Avenue and Homestead
Land Use
Street will support the stabilization of the neighborhood
while allowing the private marketplace room to continue
transforming abandoned and underutilized industrial

a Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


37
Township of Ewing

Permitted Uses—7A -Area #7A


• Manufacturing, processing, producing, fabricating or a.    Principal Building.
warehousing operations 1. Lot area: 8,000 square feet minimum
• Research, experimentation or engineering involving 2. Lot Width: 80 feet -minimum
scientific investigation, engineering study, project 3. Build to Line: 10-15 feet
development and similar activities. 4. Side yard: each 5 feet - minimum
• Auto-related industries. 5. Rear yard: 10 feet – minimum
• Office; executive, administrative, educational or 6. Height: 2 ½ stories or 40’ maximum.
professional and medical services.
b. Accessory Building.
• Warehousing.
1.  Distance to side lot line: 5 feet - minimum
• Public facilities.
2. Distance to rear lot line: 5 feet - minimum

Permitted Uses—7B c.  Lot Coverage.


1. Total impervious coverage: 70% maximum for all
• One and Two- family dwellings
property adjacent to Shabakunk Creek.
• Residential Townhomes
2.  Additional coverage up to 10% may be granted if
• Multifamily residential (including 55 and older
offset by contributions to other stream improvements
residents)
or innovative urban stormwater design features.
• Artists lofts
d. Floor Area Ratio: 0.25 minimum; 0.5 maximum.
Conditional Uses in 7B
-Area #7B
1) Mixed Use (residential above retail and business
services). Conditioned Upon location along key Single-family, Two-family and Townhouse
roadways intersections of; a.   Principal Building.
- Calhoun Street & Ingham 1.   Lot area: 4,000 square feet minimum (6,000 square
- Parkway & Prospect Street feet for two-family)
2) Light Industrial- In accordance with area 7A Permitted 2.   Lot Width: 40 feet -minimum (60’ for two-family)
3.   Front yard: 0-25 feet *
Uses above. Conditioned Upon;
4.   Side yard: Five (5’). Twelve (12’) feet aggregate
- No front yard storage of any kind.
5.   Rear yard: 25 feet -minimum
- Side Yard storage shall be screen and
6.   Height: 4-1/2 stories or 45’ (5 ½ stories or 60’ with
landscaped.
parking under principal use)
- Vegetative Buffering from all residential land
uses. b.   Accessory Building.
- Street trees and 5’ minimum sidewalks. 1.   Distance to side lot line: 5’ feet ~ minimum
3) Religious Institutions and Houses of Worship. 2.   Distance to rear lot line: 5’ feet -minimum
Conditioned Upon: 3.   Height: 1 story -not to exceed 15 feet -maximum
• All ancillary uses require separate use permits c.    Lot Coverage.
(office, classrooms, etc.) 1.   Total building coverage shall not exceed thirty-five
• Meeting all off-street parking requirements (35%) percent of total lot area.
• Establishing a Pedestrian Circulation Plan and 2.  Total impervious coverage: 70% maximum for all
installing sidewalks on all street frontages property adjacent to Shabakunk Creek.
• Property shall front any existing or new street 3.   Additional coverage up to 10% may be granted if
• Parking is prohibited in the front yard area

Bulk Standards

38

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


offset by contributions to other stream improvements • Property in Sub-area #7a shall maintain 30% of lot area for
or innovative urban storm landscaping.
   water design features. • For industrial property, establish and maintain vegetated
d. FAR: See FAR Chart. buffers of 50’ feet minimum from adjacent residential
zones including landscaped berms with deciduous and
* Variation in Front yard is dependant on neighborhood evergreen landscaping.
character. • For property adjacent to the Shabakunk Creek use
alternative paving materials such as “Grasspave TM” or
Multi-family other types of porous paving material agreed to upon
a.   Principal Building. negotiation of the Redevelopment Agreement or Planning
1.   Lot area: 22,000 square feet minimum Board approval and in consultation with the Township
2.   Lot Width: 80 feet -minimum Engineer. (refer to Page 45 for an illustration of Grasspave
3.   Front yard: 0-15’ feet (stoops encouraged) TM)
4.   Side yard: 15’ adjacent to like structures. ½ the
height of the structure when adjacent to all other
residential types.
5.   Rear yard: 25 feet -minimum·
6.   Height: 4-1/2 stories or 45’ (5 ½ stories or 60’ with
parking under principal use)
b.   Accessory Building.
1.   Distance to side lot line: 5’ feet ~ minimum
2.   Distance to rear lot line: 5’ feet -minimum
3.   Height: 1 story -not to exceed 15 feet -maximum
c.    Lot Coverage.
1.   Total building coverage shall not exceed sixty (60%)
percent of total lot area.
2.  Total impervious coverage: 70% maximum for all
property adjacent to Shabakunk Creek.
3.   Additional coverage up to 10% may be granted if
offset by contributions to other stream improvements
or innovative urban storm
   water design features.
d. Maximum FAR 1.0

Building Placement & Design

39

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

Subarea
Subarea 8 Arctic Parkway Transitional Area

Intent Clothing (new) and dry goods store; Dancing studio;


The properties, and their semblance, in this Sub-area are Delicatessen; Household appliance store; Library;
unique. The Sub-area is bordered by Fifth Street, Spruce Offices, business and professional; Artist Studios; Tailor
Street, Arctic Parkway and Olden Avenue. Traversing and dressmaker shop; Auto parts; Paint and wallpaper
through the center of this Sub-area, which contains store; Radio and television stores; Upholstery shop and
residential, industrial, retail and professional office land furniture refinishing )
uses is the Shabakunk Creek. Given the nature of the areas • Mixed use
that surround this block, as well as the flooding potential • Existing light industrial uses
of the creek, this Sub-area will be treated differently than • Existing Residential Land Uses
the other areas.
Conditional Uses
The intent of this Sub-area is to facilitate smooth transitions 1) Expansion of Existing Light Industrial uses and
between the mixes of land uses that exist on all sides of automotive related business. Conditioned Upon
it, particularly the residential neighborhoods. In addition, • A 50’ foot buffer that includes a minimum of 10’
all development will provide additional shading of the foot wide vegetative buffer (consisting of trees,
Shabakunk Creek to complement the Township’s water shrubs and other woody species), from the top
quality project and where feasible, will provide additional of the Shabakunk Creek bank as per FEMA maps.
flood reduction measures. Public access easements will also be necessary.
• The interface with current residential uses is
Objectives adequately addressed through design features
• Improvement of flooding along the Shabakunk Creek that allow seem-less integration, buffering and
and reclamation of the floodplain where land uses landscaping.
degrade environmental quality • Street trees and 5’ minimum sidewalks.
• Encourage development patterns that facilitate retail • Sign and lighting Standards are met.
sales of goods and services along Arctic Parkway
and Fifth Street that recognize adjacent residential 2) Expansion of Residential Land uses. Conditioned
neighborhoods and commercial areas. Upon
• Reduce curb-cuts along North Olden Avenue through • The interface with current industrial uses is
shared access and parking arrangements. properly buffered and landscaped per the
• Create strong relationships to adjacent neighborhoods Planning Board’s recommendations.
through streetscape and pedestrian access to shopping
opportunities in both the Sub-area and adjacent Sub- Bulk Standards
areas. a. Principal Building.
1) Lot area: 12,000 sq. ft. - minimum
Land Use 2) Build to Line:
Principal Uses i- 20’ minimum - 25’ feet maximum from the front
• Office, professional office, and research property line along Olden Avenue, and Spruce
• Retail, and Business Services. (Such as; Bakeries; Street..
Fiduciary institutions; Book stores; Dry Cleaners;
ii- New Light Industrial uses. 10-15’.

a Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


41
Township of Ewing

3) Side yard: each 5 feet - minimum


4) Rear yard: 10 feet – minimum
5) Height: 3 ½ stories or 35’ mixed-use. 1 ½ stories or
25’ otherwise.
b. Accessory Building.
1) Distance to side lot line: 5 feet - minimum
2) Distance to rear lot line: 5 feet - minimum
c. Lot Coverage.
1) Total impervious coverage: 60% maximum for all
property adjacent to Shabakunk Creek.
2)  Additional coverage up to 10% may be granted if
offset by contributions to other stream improvements
or innovative urban stormwater design features.
d. Floor Area Ratio
1) 0.50 maximum. 1.25 mixed-use.

Building Placement and Design


• For property adjacent to the Shabakunk Creek, use
alternative paving materials such as “Grasspave TM”
or other types of porous paving material agreed to
upon negotiation of the Redevelopment Agreement or
Planning Board approval and in consultation with the
Township Engineer.
• Capture and re-use greywater to the extent feasible.
• Provide shading for the stream corridor with tree species
approved by the Township.
• Connections to adjacent neighborhoods where
appropriate through stream crossings and/or access to
park space or greenways established and conceptualized
by the Plan where appropriate.

S ome simple street s cape improve me nt s along Arc tic


Parkway can g o far toward the improve me nt of the pe-
destr ian e nv ironme nt throug hout the Area .

42
DESIGN STANDARDS

The Design Standards of this Plan apply to all projects in shall utilize the Urban Land Institute’s; Shared Parking
the Redevelopment Area. When combined with the Sub- Manual.
area regulations, the intent is create an environment in
which business thrives and people feel comfortable and (a) Residential Parking Standards
safe on foot, bicycle, automobile or bus, to come a spend (in mixed-use structures, accessible to Bus service, and with
money for the goods and services offered along the shared arrangements only. Otherwise NJ Residential Site
Avenue. All projects will be designed for people first, not Improvement Standards apply) : 1.3/unit average. Further
the automobile. Pedestrian circulation improvement will organized by unit type:
begin to take shape through the implementation of the (1) Studio apartments- 1.00 spaces per unit
Plan. While vehicular circulation will remain important, (2) 1 Bedroom- 1.20 spaces per unit
the emphasis will be on traffic calming and destination (3) 2 Bedroom- 1.50 spaces per unit
creation. (4) 3 Bedroom — 1.75 spaces per unit
(5) Senior Citizen - 1.0 space per unit
Parking
This plan seeks to reduce the impact parking requirements
(b) Non-Residential
have on the amount of impervious coverage within the
(where shared arrangements can be achieved and supported,
Olden Avenue floodplain. Ultimately, portions of the
otherwise the Township’s parking standards in the LDO
Redevelopment Area are envisioned as “park-once”, where
apply.)
multiple tasks can be accomplished with one “drive and
(1) Neighborhood Retail — Two (2) per 1,000 square
park.” Depending upon the quality of the historic fill any
feet
property adjacent to the Shabakunk Creek may employ
(2) Shopping Center Retail – Three (3) per 1,000 square
alternative paving materials such as “Grasspave TM” or
feet
other types of porous paving material agreed to upon
(3) Office space — One (1) per 1,000 square feet
negotiation of the Redevelopment Agreement or Planning
(4) Restaurant - One (1) per every 4 seats
Board approval and in consultation with the Township
(5) Warehouses - One (1) per employee on maximum
Engineer.
shift
(6) Houses of Worship - One (1) per every 3 seat
Minimum Parking Ratios
Parking is encouraged and permitted to be presented
Parking Location & Design
to the Board in a Shared calculation where appropriate.
(a) Multi-use or shared parking is encouraged among
Traditionally, parking standards are derived through
businesses wherever feasible to reduce overall parking
peak period demand, which many-times represent a “one-
requirements.
percent” solution. What occurs 99% of the other times is
(b) Provide fully or partially below grade structured parking
what this Plan seeks to address- quality of life, not quantity
for all development over 3 1/2 stories.
of parking spaces. Notwithstanding, this plan currently
(c) For parking at the first floor and above the first floor,
only allows mixed-use development to be the principle
the structure shall be fully clad from public view and
way that parking reductions and shared formulas can be
located behind active uses while minimizing conflicts
sustained; particularly along auto-dependant corridors
among pedestrians, bicycles and vehicle and providing a
like Olden Avenue. In all other cases RSIS will apply until
secure and visible environment for users of the parking
such time as the Township seeks to revisit the Plan based
facility where feasible.
on real data and experience. All shared parking models

43

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

at access-ways.
(d) Where parking is not screened by active uses, clad 4) Landscaping. Those portions of all yards not used
the structure to match the building above, including for parking, loading, unloading and service shall be
but not limited to, appropriate ground level window planted and maintained at all times.
treatments with translucent but not transparent glazing 5) Entrances and Exits. All entrances and exits upon a
no smaller than three feet by three feet starting no public street shall not be located within fifty (50’)
higher than three feet above ground. feet of any street intersection; the distance to be
(e) Locate access to all parking facilities along a street. measured from the intersection of the right-of-way
Additionally: lines at the corner affected and the closest point of
1) A maximum of one curb cut for every 100’ feet of such proposed driveway. Entrance and exit sizes,
street frontage is permitted. Should the size of a locations and construction shall also be in accordance
development parcel prohibit this spacing, provide with requirements of the governmental agency
shared entrance provisions in accordance with #2 having jurisdiction over the facility upon which the
(below) to ensure that ultimately the curb cut will be permitted use has frontage. Entrances and exits may
eliminated when feasible. be required to be shared with adjacent land uses.
2) Connect existing and future parking facilities on 6) Screening or Buffer Strip. Along each side and rear
adjacent parcels. property line which adjoins a single-family residential
3). Separation of Parking From Public Streets. Along district in the township or a similar district in an
each street line as defined bounding the district a ten adjoining municipality, a screen or buffer planting
(10’) foot strip shall be provided, suitably landscaped strip may be required consisting of massed
except for necessary sidewalks and access-ways. evergreens and shrubs of such species and size as
The landscaped strip shall be separated from the will produce an effective screen at time of planting.
parking area by continuous concrete curbing except The screen or buffer strip shall be landscaped in
accordance with a plan acceptable to the planning
board. The planted screen shall be the responsibility

44

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


of the applicant to carry out this program and to for handling all freight shall be on those sides of any
promote such maintenance and care as is required buildings which do not face any street or proposed
to obtain the effect intended by the original plan. streets.
Should a screen not be required, a seem-less and (d) Where permitted, outdoor Storage Areas. No use
integrated design approach will be employed with or accessory use shall be constructed to permit the
adjacent properties keeping of articles, equipment, goods or materials in the
(f) The Planning Board may require a portion of the parking open exposed to public view, adjacent residences or a
requirement in designated areas may remain unpaved, residential district. When necessary to store or keep such
maintained as lawn and reserved (“banked”) for temporary materials in the open, the area shall be fenced with a
or future use as warranted by demand. screen or buffer planting strip and be situated not closer
than fifty (50’) feet from any residential district line.
Loading and Outdoor Storage Requirements (e) Landscaping. Those portions of all yards not used for
(a) There are no requirements for loading for residential parking, loading, unloading and service shall be planted
uses. and maintained at all times.
(b) All loading areas for non-residential uses shall be (f) Only supermarkets and industrial facilities are required
enclosed and their doors kept closed except when to have off-street loading berths.
loading and unloading. Trash and recycling materials a. First 8,000 square feet — None
must be kept inside the loading area prior to pick-up b. Next 10,000- One (1)
when located adjacent to residential structures or in c. Each additional 200,000 or fraction thereof - One
mixed-use buildings. No loading areas may face or be (1)
visible from any street.
(c) Loading Docks and Service Areas. No loading dock or
service area may be on any street frontage. Provision

SHORT-TERM

LONG-TERM
NOW

By merely adding street trees begins to soften the


street and detracts from the utility poles.

Currently, signage and lack of streetscape


creates a harsh environment and one that
is not pedestrian friendly to the surrounding
neighborhoods

Eventually, public and private investment will work


together to create a solid place for pedestrians and
Nor th Olden Avenue prov ides an oppor tunit y to establi sh a v i sual the me for the businesses.
r ight-of-way areas betwee n the street - line and the curb, a s well a s ne w land-
s caping and sig nage cr ite r ia , that work s to coordinate ne w de velopme nt and
rede velopment.

45

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

Landscaping, Lighting & Signage Requirements center, retail center or other use and must include
1) Sign Standards- the street number used by the site for identification
The following additional signage standards will apply within and/or mail delivery.
the Redevelopment Area and no other signage will be
permitted other than as specified below: d. Where a single building entrance is shared by
a. Each business establishment with one or more two or more business establishments, a directory
independent entrances in a retail or office center will identification sign may be used to identify the name
be entitled to one building sign per entryway. The site and location of each business. Directories may also
plan submitted to the Planning Board must include be incorporated into the signage plan under (a)
building elevation drawings that incorporate locations above.
designed into the building facades for identification e. Storefront windows must be used for orderly
signage that is part of the architectural context of the display of merchandise and will not be permitted
building. The size and graphics of the signage plan to become cluttered with temporary signage, flyers,
will be subject to the approval of the Planning Board. leaflets and other material and enforceable by the
b. No freestanding signs will be permitted. Ground zoning Official.
signs at that curb level will be the only permitted new f. Temporary sandwich board style signs will only be
sign types. permitted for use in conjunction with a sidewalk café
c. Ground or Monument Signs must be incorporated into attached to a restaurant pursuant to an approved
the landscape design and meet the following criteria: site plan by the Planning Board. Such signs may be
i. Signs are limited to one monument sign per site of not up to six square feet, may only contain the name of
more than three feet in height within a required sight the restaurant and a menu, and must be removed
triangle and five feet in height outside of a required when the outdoor cafe is not open for business.
sight triangle. Such a sign will be limited to 30 square g. Each new business establishment will be permitted
feet in total size, excluding logo as well as any pedestal one temporary banner announcing a grand opening
or base under the monument. for a period of one calendar month from the first full
ii. The monument sign must be constructed from or partial day it is open to the public. The banner
finished masonry, metal, stone or etched glass in must not be larger than 5% of the facade area of the
neutral or earth tone colors, except that alternative building occupied by the new business and will not
materials designed and intended to have an equivalent be located anywhere else on the site other than the
appearance may be approved by the Planning Board front business facade.
during site plan review.
iii. Monument signs may be illuminated with spotlighting 2) Landscaping & Lighting Standards–
only. Incorporation of sign illumination into an overall The landscape and lighting standards contained in the
landscape lighting design is strongly encouraged. Ewing Township Land Development Ordinance shall
iv. Monument sign text is limited to the name of the office apply to all development in the Redevelopment Area with
the following supplemental standards:
a. Include a minimum of the equivalent of 15 shade
trees of 6-inch caliper per acre of parcel area in
the overall site landscape plan. Two 3 inch caliper
trees will equate to one 6 inch caliper tree and
three 1 inch caliper ornamental trees will equate
to one three inch caliper shade tree. The minimum
planting sizes shall conform to the requirements of
the Township’s Shade Tree Ordinance.
b. Plant parking areas will with a minimum of (1)
shade tree per (10) ten parking spaces
c. Use a mixture of evergreen trees and ornamental

An ex ample of “Gra sspave TM”.


S ource: w w w. stoneagepave rs . com

46

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


shrubs for buffers created pursuant to the building a) Antenna will be flush mounted and painted to match
requirements of this Plan, except where crossed by b) All supporting equipment and cabinetry shall be
pedestrian walkways. thoroughly landscaped and buffered.
d. Plant trees along the Right of Way of all streets at c) If reconstruction is necessary, at the Board’s discretion
a minimum of 30’ on-center and conforming to camouflage may required. Where appropriate, flag
the requirements of the Township’s Shade Tree poles, public art installations, and trees may sought.
Ordinance.
e. Screening or Buffer Strip. Along each side and rear 2) Collocated on a building structure or rooftop
property line which adjoins a single-family residential a) All antennas and associated equipment are screened
district in the township or a similar district in an from public view by parapets and/or other architectural
adjoining municipality, a screen or buffer planting treatments.
strip may be required consisting of massed b) Architecture of the structure remains in balance
evergreens and shrubs of such species and size as c) No wiring is visible
will produce an effective screen at time ·of planting.
The screen or buffer strip shall be landscaped in
accordance with a plan acceptable to the planning
board. The planted screen shall be the responsibility
of the applicant to carry out this program and to
promote such maintenance and care as is required
to obtain the effect intended by the original plan.
Should a screen not be required, a seem-less and
integrated design approach will be employed with
adjacent properties
f. For property adjacent to the Shabakunk Creek use
alternative paving materials such as “Grasspave TM”
or other types of porous paving material agreed to
upon negotiation of the Redevelopment Agreement
or Planning Board approval and in consultation with
the Township Engineer (refer to Page 45 for an
illustration of Grasspave TM).
g. For property adjacent to the Shabakunk Creek
provide shading for the stream corridor with tree
species approved by the Township.
Cur re nt side walk condition s are in despe rate need of im-
h. Provide connections to adjacent neighborhoods prove me nt
where appropriate through stream crossings and/or
access to park space or greenways established and
conceptualized by the Plan.
i. For locations within a flood plain area, an emergency
evacuation plan is required.

Cellular Communications
No new monopoles are permitted with the Redevelopment
Area. New facilities are permitted on existing monopoles
or towers. Reconstruction of existing poles is permitted
but subject to an aesthetic review by the Planning Board.
Notwithstanding, all cellular communication facilities
shall utilize the following standards.
1) Collocation on existing poles or towers.
Ne w, unifor m Sig n standard s w ill g reatly improve
the appearance of the Ave nue

47

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

INFRASTRUCTURE STANDARDS
Public Improvements
The unsightliness of overhead wires and poles was cited as not count against the municipal cap on indebtedness. The
one of the factors contributing to a poor visual image for the Mercer County Improvement Authority may also be able to
Olden Avenue Corridor. Therefore, the Planning Board and play a role in the financing strategy.
Redevelopment Agency continue to make the transfer of
utilities (including connections) underground, and/or the With regard to the responsibility of private property owners
relocation of utilities off of existing right-of-ways a policy for relocating utilities and associated costs, existing
of this Plan. However, the difficulties in achieving this are property owners who do not redevelop or substantially
great, particularly along Olden Avenue, and streetscape rehabilitate their properties will not be required to move
design along the corridor may be an alternative option their utilities or pay for the re-connection at the property
to soften the impact of these utilities. Notwithstanding, line when the overhead wires in the public right of way are
prior to the issuance of any permits which access North buried. All new development and redevelopment projects,
Olden Avenue Extension, Ewing Township shall request a as well as substantial rehabilitation of existing properties,
15-foot utility easement. The easement will be utilized will continue to be required to provide underground utilities
for new sidewalks, bike lanes, landscaping, signage and on-site, even if the service connections at the property line
other streetscape improvements. are still from overhead wires (see Section 15-59 of the Ewing
Township Land Development Ordinance).
The relocation of utilities is an express power of the
Redevelopment Agency under the Redevelopment and Off-Tract Improvements and Developer
Housing Law. However, the cost of removing poles and Contributions
wires, digging trenches, installing conduit and restoring All development in the Olden Avenue Redevelopment Area
the curbing, sidewalk and landscaping are not incurred by will be conditioned upon an appropriate contribution for off-
the utility company. Such improvements will need to be tract improvements necessary to carry out the vision of the
viewed as capital improvements by the Township, working Plan. Except as otherwise specified in this Plan, the extent
in cooperation with the utility companies, Mercer County of a developer’s contribution for off-site improvements
and individual redevelopers and property owners. The will be outlined in the redevelopment agreement with
State Board of Public Utilities adopted the Smart Growth the Ewing Township Redevelopment Agency (ETRA). If
Infrastructure investment program (SGIIP) under N.J.A.C such responsibility is not covered in the redevelopment
14:3-8.12 which serves Planning Area 1 under the State agreement, the redeveloper’s contribution for off-tract
Plan. (Olden Avenue is located in a Planning Area 1.) The improvements will be determined in the same manner as
basics of the BPU’s program is that rules allow for the other development projects throughout the Township’s
reimbursement to the entity (developer) who is relocating normal permit and/or site plan review process In addition
the service. The additional rate-payers (in Ewing’s case, to the standards outlined in this Plan, the Township may be
added PSE&G customers) in the system is the source of required to take additional action to implement this Plan.
revenue for this reimbursement. These may include:
• Negotiation for and Collection of Fees from Developers
While this approach will work for major redevelopment for park and infrastructure improvements.
projects, rehabilitations and small-scale redevelopment • Public investment in Parks improvements.
that do not add additional rate-payers do not benefit from • Environmental Remediation in conjunction with parks
such a program. In this case, either the Redevelopment improvements.
Agency or the Township can bond for such a improvement • Vacation or realignments of utility and roadway Right of
project, and either amortize the bonds through the Way and easements.
general tax levy or through service charges paid by • Negotiations with adjacent municipalities, Mercer
redevelopment projects that have executed long-term County, State of New Jersey and New Jersey Transit.
tax abatements with the Township. Any bonds amortized • Improvements outside of this Plan’s jurisdiction to
through service charges for redevelopment projects will facilitate connections between new and existing
neighborhoods, mass transit stations and schools

48

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


Map 6
Township of Ewing

Olden Avenue Streetscape & Road Profile the “livability” and viability of the business district, better
Both the ULI Mercer Crossings report and the Ewing designed office and retail centers with fewer driveway
Township Circulation Element of the Master Plan calls for cuts onto North Olden Avenue provides an opportunity to
traffic conditions to be treated a similar way, a Complete establish a visual theme for the right-of-way areas between
Streets-type approach that works toward improving the street and the curb. New landscaping and signage
safety along the corridor. This Plan works toward an criteria will work to coordinate new development and
integrated land use and transportation approach that redevelopment with public investment. The restoration of
seeks traffic calming measures while ensuring that the public environment (streets and sidewalks) is to:
all modes of transportation are accommodated and 1) Create a visual identity for the “Avenue” through the
businesses are easily accessible. All indications lead to use of coordinated design elements to associate it as a
the assertion that Olden Avenue does not lack capacity, commercial “district” within Ewing Township. Basic design
it lacks safe condition. As this Plan’s vision is realized elements are anticipated to include clearly delineated
and transportation options presented, the Avenue will sidewalks, pedestrian-oriented street furniture where
continue to transform over time into a road that functions appropriate, light fixtures and coordinated landscaping.
for all business but also people in cars, on buses, on 2) Plant street trees of medium size, in accordance with
bicycle, and on foot. Township’s Shade Tree Ordinance, 30’ on center with
landscape material native to the region. Trees will be
At this time, this Plan merely presents recommendations chosen based on their ability to grow amidst transmission
for the roadway design work to come. Upon adoption lines without drastic pruning needs.
of this Plan, the Redevelopment Agency will continue to 3) Maximize the ability for pedestrian movement to occur
work with the Township, its Planning Board, the County from site to site in order to reduce the number of vehicle
of Mercer, and business community to establish design trips coordinate with bus transportation.
standards specific to Olden Avenue that promote a safer • Provide safe pedestrian and bicycle access.
and more attractive streetscape for consumers. • Include sidewalks along property frontages inside the
curb-line, linking walkways to new development.
The North Olden Avenue corridor developed during a • Create logical pedestrian linkages between adjacent
time when transportation and land use were conceived properties as well as cross-access easements for
of in silos. Dominated by the automobile age, the Avenue vehicular connections between properties.
epitomizes the stark auto-oriented highway “strips” which 4) Provide streetscape improvements along Olden Avenue
depended on through-traffic to siphon customers off the in accordance with the final design agreed upon by
road. While attracting customers off the road is paramount the Mercer County Transportation Department and
to the success of small business, there has been little or Township.
no consideration given to the aesthetic appearance of the 5) Provide parking in the front yard, only if sufficient space
corridor, or its overall functionality. The result has been is not available in the rear or side yard area. If sufficient
a design that encourages travelers to avoid or bypass space exists for parking in the rear or side yards, reserve
businesses along Olden Avenue for other destinations. the area of each parcel that is closest to the road for
Historically, businesses have had to adapt to this landscaped buffers and pedestrian access consisting of
environment and compete with competing transportation pathways, beds of ground-cover and shrubs.
design interests and land use and transportation policies 6) Provide at least one shade tree or two ornamental trees
that work against community cohesion and economic per fifty linear feet of frontage measured at the building
promotion and branding, resulting in excessive signage line, where the trees may be grouped to provide clear
and squeezing every last parking space out of undersized sight-lines to building facades and facade identification
sites, even to the unforeseen detriment of a true shopping signage.
district. The district fails in creating a true destination
and the road’s design has everything to do with it. Because design standards are yet to be developed for North
Olden Avenue, this Plan does not change the design of North
With the new vision for the corridor embodied in this Olden Avenue, but does set the stage for discussion. North
Redevelopment Plan, the re-creation of the public spaces Olden Avenue is under the jurisdiction of Mercer County and
will be more important than the redevelopment of private currently consists of two travel lanes in each direction with
properties. As the public investment works to improve a wide striped center median to enable left turns along most

50

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


of its length through the Redevelopment Area. The County
is currently developing an access management plan and
code, which will function like the State Highway Access
Management Code. The ULI August 2004 report endorses
the conversion of North Olden Avenue as a landscaped
median boulevard. While a more detailed analysis must
be performed, the concept seems feasible. However, more
analysis must be performed before a project of this nature
goes into design:
i. An understanding of the logistical needs of the
business community.
ii. Understanding of the importance and buy-in from
the business community.
iii. An exploration of all design options including a
smaller “pavered” median and a smaller road profile
design to calm traffic.
iv. Identify areas for raised/pavered or textured
pedestrian crossings.

This Plan recommends that the potential for improving New Street Profile
the aesthetic quality of North Olden Avenue Extension be
- T he Ne w Street Prof ile cor respond s to the
explored with the County. The Infrastructure Standards C onceptual Road net work Map
section under Newly Constructed Roads provides
additional recommendations for discussion. Additionally,
even though North Olden Avenue was designed to handle
traffic volumes associated with GM and Naval Jet Propulsion
Laboratory, an analysis may also be necessary to review
the impact of increased truck traffic on a redesign. The
Township will work with Mercer County to ensure the
design of the roadway will handle the impacts of new
development and pedestrian safety.

The Supporting Road Network-


Newly Constructed Roads
Newly constructed roads within the Redevelopment
Area would include those identified in the Conceptual
Road Network map (Map 6). The Plan envisions that in
the future new roads and access drives will become an
integral part of the circulation network. These roads will
not only work to gain access to the region, but create
many more opportunities for economic development with
the additional road frontage created. Working in-concert All other Streets- Generally
with the standards set forth in this plan, these roads set
a future for the Township that future generations will be
proud of. To this end, ALL new streets shall be designed in
accordance with this Plan’s streetscape standards and will
ensure pedestrian and bicycle accessibility. Furthermore,
consideration shall also be given for mid-block bus stop
pull-offs on all County Roads.

51

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

Many of these roads and access drives


envisioned in the Plan will likely be part of a
longer-term initiative as they transect land that
is currently being utilized as heavy industrial
uses. However, in no way does setting this
vision impede on the ability of these industries
to function today and into the future. The Plan
merely seeks to set the stage for the future
consideration of such roads should these
industries dry up or relocate as they have in
many communities throughout New Jersey.

Notwithstanding longer-term initiatives, the plan


seeks the following short-term road extensions
that work toward facilitating redevelopment
today that also allow the possibility for future
more ambitious extensions.
The short-term circulation objectives include
the following:
New Calhoun Street Profile
• Calhoun Street Extension (Kirkbride to
Spruce Street) - T he Ne w C alhoun Street Prof ile cor respond s to
the C onceptual Road net work Map
• Extension of “neighborhood streets” (Olden,
Heath Street, and Stout Avenues) to connect
to new Calhoun Street Extension.
• Extension of Brian Street south to Princess
Diana Drive
• Improve Olden Avenue streetscape and
design function.
• Create new street parallel to Heath Street to

Olden Avenue Streets cape


Graphic Simulation

P o t e n t i a l O l d e n Av e n u e P r o f i l e
To be approved by MC -D OT

52

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


meet Brian Street Extension. hardscape improvements;
• Create new streets through the former golf driving range • Consideration of the use of pedestrian scale lighting
and across Prospect thus reestablishing connection to fixtures.
Olden Avenue. • Consider using building placement and design of signage
• Extension of pedestrian access from Fifth Street north s a means to change the character of the roadways;
of Irven Street through to Whitehead Road. • Review signal timing to ensure proper allotment of time
• Extension of Dickerson, Tasker and Industry Court to for pedestrian crossings;
meet the New Fifth Street Extension • Consideration of a Reduction of lane-widths.
Public Transit
Traffic Calming Recommendations Upon review of the Public Transportation Map, located in
All of the proposed roads in this are all essentially the Township’s Master Plan, it becomes apparent that Olden
extensions of existing streets and right-of-way. Cart-way Avenue corridor is under-served by public transportation;
widths of the new extensions would remain consistent with whether publicly or privately operated. As such, ETRA
the existing roadways. While some roads are not likely to will continue to work with the State and County on Public
be built for some time, the design of all projects must take Transit improvements. Should improvements to the system
future efforts into consideration. All improvements will be implemented, such as an additional bus route, bus stop
consider pedestrian and bicycle access especially the Fifth shelters and pull-offs should be considered to ensure a
Street Extension. The Fifth Street extension will work with properly functioning system.
the Ewing/Lawrence Greenway initiative (and surrounding
neighborhoods), the design of which will create a fully In addition, the Plan has reviewed longer-term initiatives and
separate and distinct 20’ twenty-foot pedestrian and recommends the continued exploration of jitney and trolley
bicycle right-of-way that is fully buffered from the new service. This Plan supports the concept of connecting the
Fifth Street. Bus Rapid Transit project for Route 1 with the Olden Avenue
Redevelopment Area. However, a more ambitious exploration
A longer-term road network plan should continue to be of light rail and other mass transit connections should never
developed whereby roads and/or future extensions of the be ruled out as a possibility in the future, especially when
roads begin connecting the entire circulation network. considering potential linkages between West Trenton and
Such an endeavor would conceivably connect Sub-area 7 Trenton Rail Stations.
to Sub-area 5 through Sub-area 6. Additionally, thought
should be given to enhancing connections along Olden The Township Circulation Element of the 2006 Master Plan
Avenue, Princeton Avenue, Spruce Street and Arctic does a good job summarizing the needs along the Avenue.
Parkway. Specific design criteria must be developed for As such, it should be referred to while assessing the
new proposed roads. Future planning efforts in this regard functionality of the Avenue.
should include traffic calming measures, including but not
limited to, the following;
• Consideration of the use of Chicanes, bump-outs, and
clear pedestrian markings at all crossings;
• Consideration of the use of pedestrian islands
appropriately signed and landscaped;
• Consideration of the use of Pedestrian sensor controls
at crossings;
• Consideration of the use of mid-block crossing at key
locations;
• Education and enforcement;
• Consideration of the use of temporary solutions such
as stripping to gauge the impact prior to marking

53

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

Parks & Open Space


Parks and Open Spaces are critical to the creation of
places where people can enjoy a active, healthy lifestyle.
To this end, this Plan has created a conceptual framework
whereby new development can contribute toward the
creation of additional public spaces. The Parks & Open
Space Opportunities Map (Map 7) serves as the foundation
for such an effort. The map details where opportunities
can become integral to strengthening the form of Fathe r Rocco Field in Tre nton

development while enhancing environmental quality and


flood protection. As stated in the Land Use Standards, in
order to receive consideration of the enhanced standards
contained in this Plan, implementation or pro-rata
contributions will be made to further the intent of this
section.

Some of the concepts in this Plan include;


• Reclaim and restore the floodplain along the Shabakunk
Creek
• Enhance and create superior pedestrian connections
to Moody Park.
• Initiate discussion with Incarnation Church to improve subarea 5 ; Stout Ave nue Play g round
their open space along North Olden Avenue as an
enhanced public amenity.
• Work with the Ewing Environmental Commission to
implement the Ewing Lawrence Greenway initiative.
Consult the Historic Commission on the restoration of
the railroad trestle that crosses the Shabakunk Creek
just south of Olden Avenue.
• Explore the potential of creating additional regional
flood control infrastructure. Such facilities should be
considered as an additional public park space where
appropriate.
• Work with potential developers on the expansion of
Stout Avenue Park
• Collaborate with the City of Trenton and Mercer County subarea 2 ; T he for me r Ew ing G olf Rang e
for the improvement and expansion of Trenton’s Father
Rocco Park into Ewing.
• Explore the intersection of Arctic Parkway & Spruce in
Sub-area 4 and the public works facility in Sub-area 3 as
potential regional flood-basins/public park facilities
• Transform the former Ewing Golf Range Flood Basin
into a multi-functioning basin/public park
• Enhance pedestrian connections to the Farmers
Market.

54 subarea 1 ; Shabakunk Creek Park

Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


Map 7

55

Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Township of Ewing

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PLAN


(STATEMENT OF PURPOSES AND POLICIES)
The Redevelopment Plan serves as the principal tool to provisions set forth in this Redevelopment Plan shall be
not merely guide the revitalization of the Olden Avenue submitted to the Planning Board through the normal site
Redevelopment Area but promote it as well. While ETRA plan and subdivision procedures as identified in N.J.S.A.
and the Township Council approve the Redevelopment 40:55D-1, et seq. The Planning Board (but not the Board
Plan, the residents, business and property owners of of Adjustment) may grant minor deviations from the
Ewing Township have the opportunity to recommend regulations contained within this Redevelopment Plan,
modifications and improvements to the plan as needed where, by reason of exceptional narrowness, shallowness
for the plan to remain current and relevant. Successful or shape of a specific piece of property, or by reason
implementation will require continuous outreach to of exceptional topographic conditions, pre-existing
the residents and commercial property owners in the structures or physical features uniquely affecting a specific
redevelopment area and judicious use of redevelopment piece of property, the strict application of any area, yard,
tools and financial incentives by the Ewing Township bulk or design objective or regulation adopted pursuant
Redevelopment Agency. to this Redevelopment Plan, would result in peculiar and
exceptional practical difficulties to, or exceptional and
Relationship to Local Objectives and Municipal undue hardship upon the developer of such property.
Land Development Regulations The Planning Board may also grant such relief in any
A review of the zoning prior to the adoption of this Plan application relating to a specific piece of property, where
indicates that the current zoning districts within the the purposes and intent of this Redevelopment Plan would
Redevelopment Area are predominantly B-H (Highway be advanced by such deviation and recommended by the
Business), IP-2 (Industrial Park B 2), IP-3 (Industrial Park Ewing Township Redevelopment Agency. The benefits of
B 3), with a small area of R-3 Residential zoning in the any deviation must outweigh any detriments. The Planning
Stout Avenue neighborhood and a small area of PRO Board may grant minor design waivers for signage,
(Professional, Research, Office Zone) at and around the streetscape improvements, provided that consistency
bank site on Pennington Road south of Olden Avenue. with adjacent properties and projects are found.
While some of these standards are consistent with
the intent of this Plan, many of the Land Development Again, no relief may be granted under the terms of this
Ordinance provisions are contrary to a unified vision. As section unless such deviation or relief can be granted
such, the underlying zoning facilitates many of the issues without substantial detriment to the public good and
that this Plan seeks to remedy. This Plan supersedes the will not substantially impair the intent and purpose of
“Underlying Zoning”. the Redevelopment Plan. An applicant for a deviation
from the requirements of this Redevelopment Plan shall
The Olden Avenue Redevelopment Area shall be provide public notice of such application in accordance
redeveloped in accordance with the standards detailed in with the public notice requirements set fort in N.J.S.A.
this Plan. As of the adoption of this Plan, the Township is 40:55D-12(a) and (b).
committing to creating a smooth and predictable process
whereby this Plan will supersede use, bulk, and design Notwithstanding the aforementioned, any deviation from
standard provisions of all remaining Ewing Township the permitted use, or height provisions of the 2009
Land Use Regulations continue to apply. Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan that exceeds the
Additionally, any provision or standard of development Planning Board’s ability to grant a 10% increase or 10’
that the Redevelopment Plan that is silent on the Ewing feet, whichever is less, can only be made through a formal
Township Land Development Ordinance shall apply. Plan amendment by the Township Council in accordance
with the process set forth in the Local Redevelopment and
Role of Township Boards Housing law, N.J.S.A. 40A:12A-1 et seq., and only upon
All development applications taking advantage of the finding that such deviation would be consistent with, and
in furtherance of, the goals and objectives of this Plan.

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Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


From Concept to Construction....

Procedure & Approval Process Synopsis

All projects within the Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan area will follow the
following procedure as is consistent with the Township’s current development
review process...

1. Upon an applicants contact with the Township the project may appear before
the Site Review Committee for conceptual review or be referred directly to
the Ewing Township Redevelopment Agency (ETRA), for all projects located
within the Redevelopment Area. A set of procedures, with all submission
requirements and contact information, will be available upon first contact
with the Township.

2. Upon referral to ETRA, the Executive Director may hold an initial meeting
with the prospective developer and/or property owner to determine:
a. Level of detail necessary for ETRA review and recommendation.
b. The most appropriate meeting date for project review. Or,
c. If the project should be referred directly to the Site Review Committee.

3. If seeking the benefits of the OARP, ETRA review would then allow for:
a. Professional review if necessary
b. The Designation of the Developer if necessary
c. Creation of a Redevelopment Agreement if necessary

4. ETRA’s review and recommendation of a project will then be formally sent


to the Planning Board by way of letter. ETRA’s review will include:
a. Agreed-upon key site plan considerations and negotiated public
improvements
b. Any deviations from standards necessary for the project that may or may
not ETRA supports

5. Any issues that the Site Review Committee or Planning Board finds in need
of addressing may require an additional meeting with ETRA to resolve any
such issues. In the event of the dissolution of the Site Review Committee,
ETRA will deal directly with the Planning Board.

6. Project seeks Planning Board approval.

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The Zoning Board of Adjustment retains no jurisdiction For Qualifications (RFQ) to include, at a minimum, the
within the Plan’s area. following information:
a) Description of the redevelopment entity, including
Amending the Plan type of company or partnership, disclosure of
The Township reserves the right to require an applicant ownership interest, list of references with name,
requesting deviation and Plan amendment to reimburse address and phone information, list of any general or
the Township for such costs of its professional engineers, limited partners, financial profile of the redeveloper
planners, attorneys and staff time in furtherance of such entity, and where applicable, a list of comparable
deviation, for which an escrow fund be established. The projects successfully completed.
escrow payment shall be $10,000. The Township further b) Description of proposed use for the redevelopment
reserves the right to require an applicant requesting an project, including analysis of the site and overall
amendment to the Plan to prepare a study of the impact approach to site development regulatory process,
of such amendment, which study must be prepared by a use of contractors and subcontractors, etc.
professional planner in the State of New Jersey. c) Anticipated construction schedule, including
estimated pre-construction time period to secure
permits and approvals once granted final site plan
Redeveloper Designation approval by the Township.
Following the adoption of the Redevelopment Plan, no 2. The Agency will designate a redeveloper entity as the
property seeking a Redevelopment Agreement and thus Conditional Redeveloper for a project subject to the
the financial benefits of this Plan within the redevelopment successful negotiation and execution of a redevelopment
area shall be developed until a Redeveloper has been agreement with the Ewing Redevelopment Agency
designated by ETRA. A Redevelopment Agreement is within 12 months of conditional designation. The
only necessary when seeking the financial benefits that Agency may grant an extension to the negotiation
a redevelopment area designation provides. This applies period of six months or terminate the conditional
to owners of the property at the time of adoption as redeveloper designation.
well as to contract-purchasers. The Township intends to 3. The Redevelopment Agency may, at any time,
allow all property owners the opportunity to redevelop entertain an unsolicited proposal from a prospective
their property except as may otherwise be required in redeveloper or property owner for redevelopment of a
any of the Standards for Development contained in any redevelopment project. The Agency will have the option
of the Sub-areas.. ETRA has application forms detailing of conferring conditional redeveloper designation
the application process, which includes meeting with to such a redeveloper or putting out an RFQ if the
appropriate Township officials, planning staff and the property is publicly owned to solicit interest in the
Site Plan Review Committee to review proposed plans, project from other potential redevelopers, subject in
followed by a presentation to the ETRA for designation. either case to the completion of Step 1 above prior
to the execution of a redevelopment agreement.
Under certain conditions ETRA may institute a process Existing property and business owners will be involved
of selecting or approving a redeveloper to undertake in this process as provided in this Plan. Preference
a redevelopment project through a Redevelopment on the selection of a redeveloper will be given to an
Agreement will require the following steps: entity that represents all of the property and business
owners within a suggested redevelopment parcel and
1. The Redevelopment Agency will prepare a Request otherwise meets the requirements of the Plan for the

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Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


selection of a redeveloper. Finally, no redeveloper Township of Ewing, more particularly describing which
designation will be made pursuant to an unsolicited real property is the subject matter of this Agreement,
proposal received by the Agency until the affected and that said property consists of meets and bounds,
owners of properties within the redevelopment parcel acreage, block and lot and other defining features of
are given the opportunity to present their own proposal the property. All agreements shall contain a covenant
within a reasonable time period as established by the running with the land.
Agency. • Intent of the Parties. The intent of the parties to be bound
by the terms of the agreement should be clearly stated.
Redevelopment Agreements The agreement shall specifically include a statement that
In order to effectuate this Redevelopment Plan, the Local the property owner represents that it has an equitable
Redevelopment & Housing Law (N.J.S.A. 40A:12A,8-9, or a legal interest in the real property and that all other
permits ETRA the ability to enter into redevelopment persons holding legal or equitable interests in the
agreements. Redevelopment Agreements allow ETRA real property are to be bound by the agreement. The
and a prospective redeveloper the ability to provide each development agreement wil provide for the rights and
other a degree of expectation during the development obligations of the property owner under the agreement
process. Whether it be timing of a public improvement and shall run with the land.
or monetary donations in-lieu of construction, the • Recitation of Benefits and Burdens. The agreement
Redevelopment Agreement is a useful tool for all parties shall recite the benefits each party expects to gain from
involved, public and private. A Redevelopment Agreement entering into the agreement, as well as the burdens
is only necessary when seeking the financial benefits that each party agrees to bear. Because the agreement will
a redevelopment area designation provides. be treated as a contract, the consideration each party
is to receive from the other should be stated clearly in
Although agreements are subject to negotiation, order to ensure enforceability. The benefits to the local
basics of an agreement should include the following government and community must be expressed in terms
considerations; that exhibit the agreement as consistent with the Plan.
• All parties to the agreement shall be named and their • Approval and Permit Requirements. The agreement shall
capacities to enter into the agreement clearly stated. In specify all discretionary approvals and permits that will
the case of developer/owners, their equitable or legal have to be obtained before the development can proceed
interests in the property must be stated. beyond its various stages. All conditions precedent to
• Relationship of the Parties. The relationship between the obtaining of the permits and approvals should be
the parties to the agreement shall be stated clearly. listed.
Typically, the statement will specify that the relationship • Dedications and Reservations. The agreement should
is contractual and that the owner/developer is an provide, where appropriate, a statement of any land or
independent contractor, and not an agent of the local improvements to be dedicated to the Township or land
government. reservations made by the developer for public purposes,
• Property. The property to be subject to the agreement and the specific time period for such dedications and
shall be clearly and thoroughly identified. An attachment, reservations as they relate to the date of entering into
preferably with a map, specifically describing the the agreement.
property shall be provided and incorporated into the • Utility Connections. All water and sewer service, either to
agreement by reference. Specifically, the agreement be provided by the developer or by the local government,
shall provide that the property is located in the shall be described in detail, together with schedules of

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construction completion, cost allocation (between is that the PILOT does not have to be apportioned to the
or among developers and government and later county, school district, fire districts, etc., the way it would
developers), hookup or connection schedules, and revenue from property taxes- although the Township may
parameters for permitting, including fees for utility wish to provide the schools with funding.
provision, service and/or relocation.
• Duration of the Agreement. The agreement shall There are two types of PILOT(s), the short-term (5-year)
state a termination date. It should also specify project and long-term (up to 30 year). The difference between
commencement and completion dates, either for the short-term and long-term abatements is as follows;
project on the whole, or for its various phases. The
agreement should specify that the termination date SHORT-TERM ABATEMENT: This program is intended for
can be extended by mutual agreement, and that development projects in which, after project completion,
commencement and completion dates may also be the increase in assessed value to the improved property
extended. does not exceed 30%. The added assessment is phased in
• Transference. The agreement is not transferable ithout over a five-year period.
written consent of the redevelopmet agency.
• Periodic Review. The agreement should provide for The short-term abatement is on the improvement portion
periodic reviews of the project in order to determine of the tax assessment. The assessed value of the land
compliance with the terms of the agreement. Unless on which the improvement is made remains at 100%.
otherwise negotiated, Ewing Township Construction The abatement agreement must be approved before the
Office shall be responsible for performing such project starts. The type of projects are typically used for
reviews. rehabilitation projects.
• Remedies and Enforcement. Remedies for breach
on the part of either party shall be provided, and LONG-TERM ABATEMENT: For certain redevelopment
the agreement shall provide for enforcement of its projects, ETRA may negotiate and submit for approval
provisions. to the Township Council a long-term payment-in-lieu-of-
• Relocation Assistance. If a developer acquires taxes (pilot) agreement with qualifying developers. Pilot
property, the developer may be required to offer agreements can be up to 30 years. The amount of the pilot
relocation assistance. is based on a percentage of project income, or a percent
of total project costs. Agreements are subject to approval
PILOT (Payment in lieu of tax) Agreements by the Township Council before the project begins. The
The Local Redevelopment and Housing Law permits ETRA short-term, five-year abatement cannot be coupled with
to enter into payment in lieu of tax agreement (PILOT) the long-term abatement program.
to effectuate the implementation of this Plan. Eligible
projects within the Redevelopment Area may request a In both the long-term and short-term scenarios, PILOTs
PILOT through a Redevelopment do not affect a municipality’s School-aid formula. Since
Agreement. A PILOT is not a tax exemption, it is an school-aid is based on a commercial ratable basis,
incentive to improve a property that effectively “freezes” PILOTs effectively take the ratable off-line and out of the
the property’s pre-development tax payment while calculation. Combined with a fiscal analysis that should
the improvements are deferred over a timeframe until be determined during the redevelopment agreement
eventually, and incrementally, 100% of the property’s process, PILOTs, when combined with a portion of this
improvements are assessed into the Township’s budget. revenue stream to the school system will not adversely
The Township will never receive less on the property than affect the school budgeting process.
it did prior to the redevelopment project. The difference

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Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


Property Acquisition The Township continues to carefully consider eminent
NJ State law requires that the principles of property domain and as such, will require a formal Plan amendment
acquisition be discussed within the Plan. The Local process to accomplish any publicly initiated taking. Using
Redevelopment and Housing Law authorizes the use of this approach does take more time but adds transparency
eminent domain for public acquisition of property for for public review.
the purpose of redevelopment when such properties are
specifically identified in the a redevelopment plan. The The Township may seek to negotiate contracts of sale of
Township has made it their policy to restrict the use of privately held parcels of land within the redevelopment
eminent domain within the redevelopment area, and this area to enable consolidation of redevelopment sites.
Plan does not propose any property for eminent domain. Notwithstanding, the Township’s ability to bring property
Since this Plan’s original adoption in 1999, no property owners to the table to discuss future development, any
has been condemned to consolidate property in order to consolidation of property through eminent domain will
further the intent of the Plan. The intent of this approach require a formal Township action through the Plan amendment
was to allow the private marketplace to negotiate their process outlined in the LRHL N.J.S.A. 40A:12A-7.
own deals and consolidate property without condemnation
proceedings. While this policy is favorable to private If a situation arises that further compels the Agency to
property owners within the area, it has been known on request a Plan amendment in order to pursue any potential
several occasions to hinder implementation of the Plan. eminent domain procedures; to protect the public interest,
In some cases, this hindrance delayed projects through there are clear, detailed steps that must be followed before
unreasonable demands during the negotiation process. In the Township undertakes the formal Plan amendment
the best cases, these demands lead to project amendments; process. They are at a minimum:
in the worst, broken deals and lost ratables. •   The Township and its Redevelopment Agency will
ensure that the present owners of property be given
While condemnation is rarely used in redevelopment every opportunity to participate in the redevelopment
projects, regardless of whether property is identified or program through the reinvestment and redevelopment
not, it is a useful tool in keeping negotiations fair and of their properties in accordance with the land uses,
reasonable. State law provides that in a redevelopment building and design requirements of this Plan.
area, should the power of eminent domain be exercised, •   Every conceivable effort will be made to reach a
the amount to be paid to the owner of property acquired negotiated agreement with an individual property owner
is the greater of fair market value at the time of the taking on a sales price and three reasonable offers for purchase
or at the time of the designation of the redevelopment would have to be rejected by that property owner
area, in this case, the date of the Council Resolution in before eminent domain (through a Township Council
1997. In addition, Section 7 of the Local Redevelopment approved Plan amendment) would be considered by the
and Housing Law (“LRHL”) requires that a redevelopment Redevelopment Agency.
plan identify “any property within the redevelopment area •    In the extreme circumstance that the Agency
which is proposed to be acquired in accordance with the determines to use eminent domain, the property owner
redevelopment plan”. In-fact, more than fair market value will be compensated based on “fair market value”, which
is usually paid to a property owner because the redeveloper is the higher of the value at the time of taking or at the
is gaining increased value through the additional property
gained.

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time of the redevelopment area designation.


•    The Township and the Redevelopment Agency will assure that any and all condemnation proceedings comply with
state and federal law.

Should a Plan amendment become necessary, the redevelopment agency, shall reserve the right to recommend to
Township Council that eminent domain proceedings be commenced with regard to any privately-held parcels within the
subject portion of the redevelopment area, on behalf of the selected redeveloper, pending the deposit of cash or a letter
of credit with the Agency by the redeveloper equal to the fair market value of such parcel as determined by appraisal.
Such money shall be used to purchase the property. The developer shall also be responsible for:
• The difference between that appraisal price (previously deposited with the Agency by the redeveloper) and a court-
determined final condemnation award;
• The relocation costs of any business or resident displaced as a result of the condemnation, to the extent required by
state or federal law, whichever is applicable (see Relocation Plan below).
• All costs that may arise from the requirements of the Industrial Site Recovery Act (ISRA) of the State of New Jersey,
N.J.S.A. 13:1K-6 et. seq.
• The costs of the Township’s professionals, planners, engineers, attorneys in furtherance of such condemnation, for
which an escrow fund shall be established.

Specific Property Identified for Acquisition


No property has been identified for eminent domain.

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Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


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Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


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RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER PLANS


Ewing Township Master Plan
The master plans which are relevant to this Redevelop- The industrial land uses within Subarea 6 have histori-
ment Plan are those of the City of Trenton, (which borders cally been in close proximity to the row-house neighbor-
the Redevelopment Area opposite Princeton Avenue, Cal- hoods on both sides of Princeton Avenue and Calhoun
houn Street, Ingham Avenue and Parkway Avenue); and Street. The eventual redevelopment of Subarea 6 into
the Township of Lawrence, (which borders the Redevelop- more productive and active industrial and commercial
ment Area opposite Princeton Avenue, Spruce Street and uses, and the improvement of access and circulation
portions of the Shabakunk Creek). The Plan must also be through the area, may increase the level of truck traffic
compared to the Mercer County Growth Management Plan on Princeton Avenue and Calhoun Street, although the
and the State Development and Redevelopment Plan. bulk of the truck access is expected to use North Old-
en Avenue as the most direct link to Route 1. It is im-
In 2006, Ewing Township amended and updated its Mas- portant to note, however, that these areas are already
ter Plan including its Conservation Element with Environ- zoned for industrial uses and that the City’s response
mental Resource Inventory. These documents are living the Mercer County Cross Acceptance Survey indicated
documents that will continue to mutually evolve. This Plan that no significant conflicts with the plans of adjacent
is substantially consistent with the intent of the Ewing municipalities were found.
Township Master Plan and actually refines the Master Plan
to create livable places where the intent of the plan can be To the extent that successful redevelopment leads to
effectively implemented. In-fact this Redevelopment Plan the incremental improvement of the flooding condi-
furthers virtually all the Master Plan’s goals for Vision, tions along the Shabakunk and new detention or other
Land Use, and Circulation. Other goals pertaining to Hous- stormwater management facilities are designed to re-
ing, Open Space, and Utilities are also furthered. duce off-site flooding down stream, the implementa-
tion of this Redevelopment Plan will have a positive im-
After a review of the Land Use and Circulation Elements, pact on historically flood prone areas in Trenton.
this Plan implements many of the recommendations con-
tained in the Future Land Use Plan. Furthermore, the im- Township of Lawrence Master Plan
plementation of this Plan as a stand-alone document also The Lawrence Township Master Plan was last updated
works toward these ends as a unified vision is needed to in 1995 and a new Land Use Ordinance (LUO) was ad-
realize the true potential of the Olden Avenue Area. opted in December of 1997. The Master Plan and LUO
both have objectives that urge redevelopment in the
City of Trenton Master Plan southwest section of the Township in the area of the
The portion of the City of Trenton bordering the Redevel- Brunswick Circle (junction of Alternate Route 1, Route
opment Area is mixed use and residential neighborhoods, 206 and Princeton Pike. This section of Lawrence is very
consisting predominantly of row-homes, with some gar- close to the Ewing and Trenton borders and Lawrence
den style apartment buildings. The row-home neighbor- may eventually lay out a redevelopment area adjacent
hoods are of the same approximate age and character as to this Redevelopment Area. Most of the zoning in the
those in Subarea 5 and the Hammitt Street neighborhood. adjoining sections of Lawrence is either Highway Com-
The rehabilitation of the neighborhoods in Ewing Town- mercial, or Neighborhood Commercial (NC-1 or NC-2).
ship can be expected to have only positive effects on the
Trenton side. The Trenton Master Plan includes policies City of Trenton Urban Enterprise Zone
to address compatible in-fill development and mixed use A portion of Trenton’s Urban Enterprise Zone extends
zoning which is consistent with the objectives of this Re- to its borders with Ewing and Lawrence. Depending on
development Plan for the areas along Princeton Avenue, the term of Trenton’s UEZ designation and the time pe-
Calhoun Street and Ingham Avenue. riod at which the City can petition the New Jersey UEZ

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Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


Authority for an expansion of the UEZ boundaries, there Incentives are to be established to encourage infill de-
may be an opportunity for all three municipalities to ben- velopment in existing developed areas that is compatible
efit from a regional UEZ. with the natural and cultural functions of Conservation
Areas and that will lessen demands for land development
Mercer County Growth Management Plan within Conservation Areas.
The Mercer County Growth Management Plan (1986) in-
cludes the Olden Avenue Redevelopment Area within the This Redevelopment Plan allows for an increase in open
“Urban Growth Area” in Mercer County. The Plan describes space requirements to reduce flooding and assumes a 50%
an Urban Growth Area as areas which; provide major con- open space set-aside for certain redevelopment parcels
centrations of mixed use activities that serve countywide adjacent to the Shabakunk or abutting wetlands. These
needs, including high density residential development, provisions are consistent with the relevant Management
single family housing on small lots, County and State gov- Policy for Conservation Areas stated above.
ernment facilities, professional offices and a wide range
of cultural facilities...are served by public sewer and wa- The Mercer County Planning Board has prepared a Pre-
ter, are fully accessible to major transportation facilities, liminary Master Plan Update that remains a draft docu-
and are the location of major commercial and industrial ment at the time this Redevelopment Plan was prepared.
employment centers. Information regarding this process, including the draft
plan and background documents, is available online at
The Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan is fully consistent http://nj.gov/counties/mercer/departments/planning/
with the type and intensity of development described in master_plan.html. It is expected that this Redevelopment
an Urban Growth Area. In addition, the Redevelopment Plan will be used by the County in finalizing updates to its
Plan is compatible with the following specific policies: 1986 Master Plan.
* Fifty percent of the demand for new land development
in Urban Growth Areas is to be accommodated in re- Based on this review, this Redevelopment Plan is consis-
development of existing developed land areas. tent with the policies of the Mercer County Growth Man-
agement Plan.
* In filling or redevelopment of urban areas will be en-
couraged through legal requirements and through State Development and Redevelopment Plan
financial incentives at intensities appropriate to the The Township has participated in Cross Acceptance and
character of the area and to the availability of facili- submitted a dissenting report to the State Planning Com-
ties and infrastructure. mission for the purpose of advancing consideration of
* ...nonresidential development is to be of four to six West Trenton as a designated Center during the second
stories in height, and is permitted to cover up to 80% round of Cross Acceptance. The County’s Cross Accep-
of the land area of the site. tance Report referred to Ewing as predominantly devel-
oped, with future growth likely to come from redevel-
The floodplain of the Shabakunk Creek, including the opment of existing areas rather than development of
portion of the stream corridor within the Redevelopment undeveloped areas.
Area, has been identified on the Conservation Areas Map
in the 1986 Growth Management Plan. The Management This Redevelopment Plan is the first undertaken exclu-
Policies for Conservation Areas includes the following sively by the Township and follows the redevelopment
provision: strategy outlined in the County Cross Acceptance Report.

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Township of Ewing

Notwithstanding Cross Acceptance, the State Development and Redevelopment Plan (State Plan) locates Olden Avenue in a
Planning Area 1 (Metropolitan). The State Plan Map (Map 8) indicates the State Plan’s designation and as such designates
the area as a Growth Area.

Mercer Crossings Report


The Township has participated in the Urban Land Institute’s Mercer Crossings Report and is an active member of the tri-
municipal County steered committee. Since much of the Redevelopment Area is impacted by the recommendations of the
Report, it is important to recognize. The Mercer Crossing Report details many initiatives that will be implemented and sup-
ported by this Redevelopment Plan.

The ULI panel of experts from across the country spent a week assessing an area that included the eastern portion of the
Olden Avenue Redevelopment Area, portions of Lawrence Township and the City of Trenton leading up to Route 1 and
made a number of recommendations worthy of consideration. The panel:
• Identified a portion of Capital Plaza and neighboring areas as “opportunity sites” within Ewing Township.
• Proposed changing the design for Olden Avenue including the creation of a “green median with limited left turn lane
to calm and control traffic access/conflict points” and “a wider, tree protected sidewalk to promote pedestrian traffic.”
While a “boulevard” approach may be appropriate, careful consideration of the businesses along the Avenue will be
considered and options will be explored with the County Transportation Department.
• Advocated the re-establishment of an Olden Avenue bus route. The former bus “Cross-town” route was discontinued
in the late 1980’s with the closure of the GM plant and Naval Warfare station.
• Sought to “create a road grid to promote access and ease bottlenecks” between the three municipalities.
• Encouraged the creation and maintenance of a “green infrastructure” that would work to improve aesthetics, create
atmosphere and protect the environment.
• Emphasized the need for intergovernmental cooperation and financial resources.
• Recognized that design criteria in both the OARP and the Brunswick Turnpike South Redevelopment Plan
(Lawrence Township) need to “provide consistent and solid urban design criteria” (ULI August 2004, p. 29).

ETRA continues to coordinate with Mercer County, Lawrence Township, the City of Trenton and other Ewing Township
agencies through County initiatives including land use and transportation studies addressing Spruce Street, Princeton
Avenue and the Farmers Market Area. See http://nj.gov/counties/mercer/departments/planning/mercer_crossings.html
for additional information and updates.

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Heyer, Gruel & Associates September 2009


Map 8

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Olden Avenue Redevelopment Plan


Eve ntually, public and pr ivate investment w ill
work to g ethe r w ith desig nated open spaces,
such a s the Ew ing G olf Rang e depic ted here,
to c reate a s olid e nv ironme nt to do live and do
bu siness.
a
appendix

.....Parcel Map.....