You are on page 1of 64

Now You Can Payroll Deduct

Your Purchases!
For More Information,
please contact:
Arlene Herrero
(800) 464-0452 x 103
aherrero@cityemployeesclub.com
Enroll today at CityEmployeesClub.com
New Club Benef
PAYROLL DEDUCTED
No Interest & No Fees
The Club has joined forces with PayCheck Direct
to bring you affordable shopping through the
convenience of payroll deduction.
Buy brand name computers, appliances, TVs,
electronics, and thousands of products through
the ease of payroll deduction without any interest
payments or fees.
Member Eligibility:
1. You must be an active member of the Club in good standings with at least 6 months of payroll deduction.
2. You must be an active or retired City or DWP employee.
3. You must be 18 years of age.
4. You must not have any outstanding balances on previous purchase programs.
PayCheck Direct is currently not available to LA County, State of CA, or LAUSD Club members.
Now You Can Payroll Deduct
Your Purchases!
For More Information,
please contact:
Arlene Herrero
(800) 464-0452 x 103
aherrero@cityemployeesclub.com
Enroll today at CityEmployeesClub.com
New Club Benef
PAYROLL DEDUCTED
No Interest & No Fees
The Club has joined forces with PayCheck Direct
to bring you affordable shopping through the
convenience of payroll deduction.
Buy brand name computers, appliances, TVs,
electronics, and thousands of products through
the ease of payroll deduction without any interest
payments or fees.
Member Eligibility:
1. You must be an active member of the Club in good standings with at least 6 months of payroll deduction.
2. You must be an active or retired City or DWP employee.
3. You must be 18 years of age.
4. You must not have any outstanding balances on previous purchase programs.
PayCheck Direct is currently not available to LA County, State of CA, or LAUSD Club members.
2 January 2014
Paid Advertisement
January 2014 3
RELIEF ASSOCIATION OPENS ITS DOORS
It was a packed house for the annual LAFRA Open House Party as
hundreds of active and retired members and their families shared
some pre-holiday time together while honoring Lee Kebler for a
lifetime of service to the fre service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 08
2ND ANNUAL SALSA COMPETITION
Teams from fre houses all over the city met at the El Coyote Mexi-
can Caf once again to battle for the hottest of the hot trophy. The
tacos and chips, margaritas and beer, salsa and more salsa were all
a perfect match to help raise funds for the WODFF . . . . . . . . 12
ABOVE AND BEYOND
The second installment of stories of LAFD members who rose to the
challenge when faced with exceptional danger. This month we re-
count the actions of Firefghters Jesse Franco and Kendal Koneval
at the Chatsworth Metrolink train derailment . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Presidents Message ................................................................................05
Battalion News ..........................................................................................14
Retired Guys
REMEMBERING CAPTAIN JACK SPEROW .........................................................29
Department in Action ................................................................................30
Station Fridge ...........................................................................................35
Retirement Dinner Announcement ............................................................36
Hogs Breath BBQ
FIRE HOGS PICNIC AND FUNDRAISER ............................................................37
LAFD Merit Scholar Awards ......................................................................38
LAFD Handball
2013 TURKEY BURNER TOURNAMENT AND FUNDRAISER ...................................41
Affordable Care Act
ITS IMPACT ON THE LAFRA MEDICAL PLAN ...................................................42
Mailbox .....................................................................................................44
Memorials .................................................................................................47
Chaplains Corner
LIBERATING LAW ........................................................................................49
Dollars & Sense
INTEREST REFUND AND EXTRAORDINARY DIVIDEND BONUS ...............................51
LAFD History
THE S.S. MARKAY FIRE .............................................................................52
Minutes of the Board of Trustees ..............................................................55
Classifeds ................................................................................................58
Tailboard ...................................................................................................61
FEATURES
CONTENTS
COPYRIGHT 2014
Los Angeles Firemens Relief Association.
No material may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher.
Notice: Production of The Firemens Grapevine magazine is very expensive, and while your dues
serve to underwrite a portion of the magazines costs, the bulk of funding comes from advertisers.
Many businesses advertise in the Grapevine. This does not mean that LAFRA endorses these
advertisers. Use of a Grapevine advertiser is at the risk of the member. If you are interested in any
of the advertisements, we urge you to use any and all means at your disposal to investigate them.
30
On the cover:
Structure Fire - Encino
Photo by:
Steve Gentry
VOL. XC JANUARY 2014 NO. 06
4 January 2014
FIREMENS GRAPEVINE
owned and published by the
Los Angeles Firemens Relief Association
815 COLORADO BLVD, 4TH FLOOR, LOS ANGELES CA 90041
EDITORIAL STAFF
Dave Wagner Editor..........................................................editor@lafra.org
Juan-Carlos Snchez Project Coordinator................jcsanchez@lafra.org
Eric Santiago Creative Editor.....................................esantiago@lafra.org
David Vienna Web/Social Media Editor...........................dvienna@lafra.org
Display Advertising....................................(323) 259-5200 ext. 231, 232, 260
PSOs
KATHERINE MAIN, BRIAN HUMPHREY, ERIK SCOTT
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
MIKE MASTRO, FRANK BORDEN, DAVID VIENNA,
JODY HOUSER, MICHAEL STEFANO, MONTE EGHERMAN, STEVE RUDA
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Ryan BaBRoff, DaviD BlaiRe, Doc DeMulle, GReG Doyle, HaRRy GaRvin,
STEVE GENTRY, JUAN GUERRA, BRIAN HAIMER, GAVIN KAUFMAN, RYAN LING, RICK MCCLURE,
MIKE MEADOWS, LLOYD PAYNE, JEFF ZIMMERMAN, YVONNE GRIFFIN, LAURA LICHTER.
LOS ANGELES FIREMENS RELIEF ASSOCIATION
JUAN ALBARRAN........................................................PRESIDENT
ROBERT STEINBACHER .......................................VICE-PRESIDENT
ANDREW KULJIS ........................................................SECRETARY
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
BARRY HEDBERG
CHRIS HART
CHRIS STINE
CRAIG WHITE
DAVID LOWE
DAVID ORTIZ
DAVID PETERS
DOAK SMITH
FRANK HERNANDEZ
GENE BEDNARCHIK
JAMES E. COBURN
JEFF CAWDREY
MARK AKAHOSHI
RICK GODINEZ
STEVE BERKERY
STEVE RUDA
STEVE TUFTS
STEVEN DOMANSKI
TIM LARSON
CHAPLAINS
GREG W. GIBSON...............SR. CHAPLAIN
DANNY LEON...........................CHAPLAIN
GEORGE A. NEGRETE...............CHAPLAIN
AQUIL F. BASHEER...................CHAPLAIN
TIM WERLE.............................CHAPLAIN
ROGER FOWBLE......................CHAPLAIN
HERSHY Z. TEN........................CHAPLAIN
RICK A. GODINEZ.....................CHAPLAIN
MARK R. WOOLF......................CHAPLAIN
JESUS PASOS..........................CHAPLAIN
CRAIG POULSON......................CHAPLAIN
TELEPHONES
FIRE-RELIEF ................................................................(323) 259-5200
RELIEF ASSOCIATION TOLL FREE NUMBER ...........................(800) 244-3439
RELIEF MEDICAL PLAN ..........................(866) 99LAFRA - (866) 995-2372
FAX NUMBER ................................................................(323) 259-5290
TODD LAYFER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR...............................(323) 259-5243
MARLENE CASILLAS DEVELOPMENT & MARKETING DIRECTOR(323) 259-5217
BECKY VALVERDE HUMAN RESOURCES ADMINISTRATOR.......(323) 259-5247
TODD LAYFER CONTROLLER/TREASURER.........................(323) 259-5243
BOB DILLON OPERATIONS MANAGER................................(323) 259-5233
ANA SALAZAR MEMBER SERVICES COORDINATOR...............(323) 259-5223
LAFRA MANAGEMENT
HealthSCOPE Benefts
WAYNE SHERMAN MEDICAL CLAIMS MANAGER...................(323) 259-5211
THE FIREMENS GRAPEVINE (USPS 191-060) is published monthly by the Los Angeles Firemens
Relief Association, 815 Colorado Blvd. 4th Floor, Los Angeles, Cal i for nia 90041. Annual $24 Subscription
included with Association mem ber ship; Non-members: $36. Single issues $3 postpaid. Back issues $6
postpaid. Pe ri od i cals post age paid at Los Angeles, CA and at additional mailing offce. POST MAS TER: Send
ad dress changes to: THE FIREMENS GRAPE VINE Magazine, P.O. BOX 41903, Los An ge les, CA 90041.
Printed by Collective Color, Los Angeles CA. For Clas si fed and Display Ad ver tis ing rates please call (323)
259-5200, ext. 231, 232 or 260. All editorial matter must be received by the Editor eight weeks prior to the
month of pub li ca tion. The opin ions ex pressed here in are those of the writ ers and do not nec es sar i ly refect
the offcial views of the Los An ge les City Fire De part ment or the Los An ge les Firemens Relief Association.
Paid Advertisements:
January 2014 5
Hello everybody-
First and foremost, I would like to thank the board for their
support and vote of confdence in the election of Robert Steinbacher and
myself to our current positions. I would also like to acknowledge the
dedication and commitment of John Jacobsen to this organization. His
quiet leadership has been steadfast and assisted this organization to meet
the ever changing demands.
By way of introduction, I am a member of the (in)famous class
of 80, February 1980 to be exact. I was last assigned at FS 26 on the C
platoon. I will miss the great team we had there but I look forward to my
new assignment here at LAFRA, helping members on a day-to-day basis.
My wife Penni and I have three grown children and one grandson, who
all are aware of the commitment required of the LAFRA president and
give me their full support at least for now! My family has a total of fve
members that belong to the LAFD and the LAFRA.
The Association is facing some dynamic changes that include
a future move of the LAFRA offces to a new location at 7470 North
Figueroa Ave, not far from where we are today. We are preparing foor
layouts of the building we purchased to best serve our membership. The
building has approximately 10, 000 square feet more than our current
location. We are working with a design frm to maximize space and eff-
ciency. The building consists of three foors: Two of the foors are above
grade, one is below grade.
Through the month of November LAFRA conducted a search
and interviewed candidates for our Executive Directors position. On
December 4, 2013, the Board of Trustees approved the recommendation
of the selection committee and chose Todd Layfer as our new Executive
Director. Congratulations to Todd, who has been the LAFRA Controller/
Treasurer for the past six years. The Board is looking forward to working
with Todd in his new capacity.
The Affordable Care Act continues to be a challenge. We are
trying to stay ahead of changes and minimize the impact on our medi-
cal plan. In this issue we have included a brief summary regarding the
A.C.A. and its impact on our LAFRA Medical Plan. Stay tuned for fur-
ther updates in our Grapevine or on the LAFRA website. If you require
more detailed information refer to the Department of Labor (www.dol.
gov) or www.healthcare.gov websites. If all else fails, you can call John
Jacobsen on his personal cell phone during business hours at F.S. 15 on
the A platoon.
Thanks for your support.
Juan Albarran
(323) 259-5200
president@lafra.org
Secretary Andy Kuljis, retiring Exec. Director
Dave Smith, former President John Jacobsen,
Exec. Director Todd Layfer, Vice President Bob
Steinbacher and President Juan Albarran
Trustees Rick Godinez, Doak Smith, Dave
Peters and Craig White after being sworn in
for a new term by Secretary Andy Kuljis (not
shown: Dave Lowe and Mark Akahoshi)
6 January 2014
Ofce of Brad M. Barrett
Deferred Compensation &
Pension Planning
Your Deferred Compensation Plan is the Gateway to Retirement
We assist both active and retired personnel in achieving their retirement objectives
through their Deferred Compensation Plan, Pension Plan, and DROP Plan.
bbarrett@onecapital.com
One Capital Management builds customized
globally balanced portIolios beginning with a
belief that portfolio structure is the single most
important element to creating a successful
investment portfolio.
Did you know?
We have found that
85% oI retirees who
eventually made a
nancial plan regret
not making one early
enough in their
working liIe."
BlackRock Annual
Retirement Survey 2012
www.onecapital.com/LAFD
P
a
i
d

A
d
v
e
r
t
i
s
e
m
e
n
t
:
January 2014 7
Dear Members,
I am writing to introduce myself
as the new Executive Director
of Los Angeles Firemens Relief
Association. I am not new to the
job of understanding the needs
of frefghters and their families
and the important role of the Re-
lief Association. For the past six
years, I have served as the Con-
troller/Treasurer of the Relief Association, working with our
Trustees to maintain our organizations strong fnancial stand-
ing. In that role, I have had the privilege of working with and
getting to know many of you.
I received my degree in accounting from Northern Il-
linois University and have a certifcate in Non-Proft Manage-
ment from Duke University. I have served as a board member
for the City of Burbanks Parks and Recreation Department and
also for Ohio State University.
From an early age I had an interest in fre service. As
a child growing up in Chicago, I lived close to a fre station and
would frequently drop by and chat with the fremen at Engine
Company 71. Sometimes they would even let me join them on
a ride- along! When I moved to California and purchased my
home in Burbank, as luck would have it, my neighbor was a
member of the LAFD, Gene Gallagher, who would share stories
about the department. After hearing all these great tales, I was
enthusiastic when I frst heard about the opening at the Relief
Association for Controller.
The work we do at the Relief Association is important
and my goal is to continue our 100-plus year tradition of pro-
viding excellent service to our dedicated frefghters and their
families. You and your fellow frefghters are there when called
upon by the citizens of Los Angeles and, simply stated, my team
and I are here to serve you and your families when you need us.
I look forward to working with the new president,
Juan Albarran, and the Board of Trustees in continuing to make
the Relief Association even stronger in the future.
Respectfully,
Todd Layfer
Executive Director
tlayfer@lafra.org
According to a variety of sources, the top New Years resolu-
tions include:
Losing weight
Getting more exercise
Saving more money
Spending more time with family
Learning or trying something new
While just 45% of Americans tend to make resolu-
tions each year, only 8% are successful in achieving their
objectives. The good news is that people who actually make
resolutions are 10 times more likely to attain their goals than
people who dont make resolutions at all.^
Another popular, unselfsh resolution people often
make is to help others. Firefghters have no problem consis-
tently achieving this goal many times over on a daily basis. It
doesnt matter how many non-emergency transports it takes to
equal one heroic save at a structure fre a virtuous act only
requires that we do the right thing willingly, that we act in
character, and that we do the act for its own sake.*
A virtue is a habit - but not one that is mechanical or
automatic; rather, it is voluntary and purposeful. Many of your
fellow LAFD members have made a habit of volunteering to
serve your needs in an assortment of ways. Your LAFRA Board
of Trustees are all volunteers that strive to help fre families
in need. Your UFLAC stewards volunteer to ensure that your
working conditions are safe and fair. Other volunteers work
with organizations like your Historical Society and Retired Fire
& Police Association.
Contributing by payroll deduction to the Widows,
Orphans and Disabled Firemens Fund is another way of
being habitually virtuous. Have you made a virtuous habit of
dropping your loose change into the WODFF extinguisher at the
frehouse? Registering your Ralphs Club Card (see page 46 of
this issue) is an easy way to instantly achieve your resolution of
helping others.
But why not take the next step and become a volun-
teer yourself? Some virtually painless virtuous deeds would be
to organize or join a frehouse team at Hope For Firefghters,
Lane Kemper Softball or the El Coyote Salsa competition. The
guys at Toy Central are always in need of extra hands why not
bring the family down for a day of collecting or sorting toys next
season?
The photos in your Grapevine magazine are the result
of the virtuous photographers who take to the streets knowing
their only reward will be to capture the heroic actions of our
members. Without their work the magazine wouldnt be much
to look at. You too can help to improve the quality of the Grape-
vine we need new Battalion News writers from every battal-
ion except 13. Send me an e-mail for details and well get you
started on achieving the frst of your New Years resolutions
right away.
Have a virtuous 2014!
editor@lafra.org
^ www.statisticbrain.com
*Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle
8 January 2014
O
n December 7th,
the doors of the Los
Angeles Firemens
Relief Association offices
were thrown open in order to
host the annual Open House
event. The beautiful holiday
decorations added to the fes-
tive atmosphere as Relief
members and their families
gathered to enjoy food and
fun. One of the most cheerful
areas was registration, where
conversation and laughter rang
out as old friends were reunit-
ed before they even signed in
and got their nametag.
This years Open House
honored Lee Kebler, a retired LAFD
Captain and director of the Los Angeles
Retired Fire and Police Association. Kebler
was clearly moved when presented with his
plaque, calling LAFRA a frst-class organiza-
tion thats helped thousands and thousands of
people. There was a second presentation later
in the day as the LAFD Fire Hogs arrived with
a $5000 donation for the Widows, Orphans &
Disabled Firemens Fund.
The food is always a big hit at Open
House, and this years spread was no excep-
tion. With items including New York strip
steak,
gour met
mac & cheese,
and crab cakes
(just to name a few),
executive chef Jason Sperber made
sure there was something for every-
one. The displays of delectable des-
serts were enough to make everyone
fnd a little more room for a strudel,
January 2014 9
tiramisu and a
tart or three.
LAFRA events
coordinator Juliet Brandolino was excited to
add some new elements to this years Open
House. This was a year of frsts. We had a
photo booth owned and operated by frefght-
er Jerrod Webster and his wife Robin, a new
strolling magician, the Kid Zone movie the-
ater and the largest number of cadet volunteers
ever.
The magician, two-time Magic
Castle award winner Joe Skilton, was quite
popular with attendees, and delighted and mys-
tifed small groups with pencils through bills,
moving coins and card tricks. The Kid Zone
entertained children and adults alike with holi-
day fare such as Elf and Rise of the Guardians.
The photo booth in the lobby was a bit hit, as
friends gathered fun props and took photos to-
gether to commemorate the day.
This years Open House was truly
a success. LAFRA president John Jacobsen
stated We are thankful that so many of our
members were able to join us for some ca-
maraderie and holiday spirit. The attendees
seemed to agree. As volunteer and widow Val-
erie Lawrence stated, Like always, its a class
act. Warm and friendly. Its just good to see old
friends.
10 January 2014
L
ee served in the Coast Guard during World War II from
1942 until 1945. He trained as a fight engineer and few pa-
trols along the Pacifc coast.
He came on the job on March 18, 1947. He was a rookie
on Truck 29, served four years in the Mountain Patrol, was an
Auto Fireman at 2s, a Captain at 33s and 26s, and as one of
the frst-ever Captain IIs was assigned to 94s. Throughout his
career he devoted himself to projects that were important to both
fre and police personnel. He served as a delegate to the Fire and
Police Protective League and as a director of the Los Angeles
Firefghters Association (CSFA). Lee retired as a Captain II from
Fire Boat 2 in 1978, with 31 years of service.
Since 1998, Lee has served as a director of the LA Retired
Fire and Police Association. He served as their president in 2002-
2003. He is well versed on pension issues, having attended most
every pension commission meeting for the past 15 years. Lee was
instrumental in restoring pensions for widows married prior to
1997, advocated for retired members representation on the board
under the new City Charter, and initiated and lobbied heavily for a ballot initiative for the Survivor Beneft Purchase Program. For his years
of dedication, the Los Angeles Fire and Police Pension department awarded Lee with their Distinguished Service Medal.
Lee is also active with the LAFD Historical Society. He helped to build the Fallen Firefghters Memorial, helped to initiate the
Memorial Paver Program and works to restore his old apparatus Fireboat 2, the Ralph J. Scott. With his wife, Mary, they work in the
museum gift shop, cook for the volunteers and provide docent tours. Mary and Lee were recently honored as the Historical Societys Vol-
unteers of the Year.
January 2014 11
F
irefighters Jesse Franco and Kendal
Koneval were working at Fire Station 87
on September 12, 2008, when a freight
train crashed head-on with a Metrolink train,
causing derailment, fire, deaths and injuries.
When Task Force 87 arrived at the
accident site, there were more than 1,000 gal-
lons of fuel and oil on the ground and burning.
While others handled extrication of passengers,
Firefghters Koneval and Franco were assigned
to fre attack.
Firefghters Koneval and Franco
advanced a hose line to the freight locomo-
tive which was engulfed in fre. While fghting
the fre, they heard pounding from inside the
locomotive. Firefghter Koneval saw that there
were people in the locomotive and attempted
to remove them. He used his axe, attempting
to remove the windshield from the overturned
locomotive. He was able to open a softball-
sized hole in the windshield. This hole showed
acrid pressurized smoke. Firefghter Koneval
obtained a rotary saw to cut away further at the
windshield. Firefghter Franco stepped in to
continue the work of removing the windshield.
Both frefghters opened the window and
told the train engineer to kick like your life
depends on it.
With this effort, the engineer was
able to kick open the window and get out.
He reported that his associate was still in the
locomotive and needed to be rescued. Without
hesitation, Firefghters Koneval and Franco
entered the locomotive through the hole they
had just cut. It was too small to get through with
breathing bottles on, so they both removed the
protection of their air bottles, and entered the
burning locomotive. The smoke was acrid and
banked down inside the train. They traveled
ffteen feet in search of the other engineer, found
him, and pulled him to safety. If not for the
actions of these frefghters, the engineers sure-
ly would have perished.
Firefghter Jesse Franco and Fire-
fghter Kendal Koneval, for their actions on
the MetroLink Train Derailment Incident, were
each awarded the Medal of Valor. The Medal
of Valor is awarded to a sworn member of the
Department who has demonstrated bravery
at great personal risk to his or her own life,
beyond a doubt and clearly above the call of
duty, whether on or off duty.
Firefghter Jesse Franco
Firefghter Kendal Koneval
12 January 2014
T
eams from fire houses all over the city
met at the El Coyote Mexican Caf once
again to battle for the hottest of the hot
trophy. The El Coyote chefs grilled the carne
asada and chicken, while the firefighters pre-
pared their spicy masterpieces. Event guests
tasted and scrutinized the different salsas and
then used their favorites to top their chips and
tacos. There was also plenty of margaritas and
beer to help wash it all down.
The variety of ingredients used in the
salsas was overwhelming. Besides the usual
chipotles, jalapenos and serranos, some of the
stations got very creative by adding fxings
like shrimp and pineapple. The crew from Fire
Station 17 warned guests to make their booth
the last tasting stop because their salsa was
criminally insane. 17s salsa was so spicy
that I couldnt taste anything else for an hour,
agreed one guest.
While each guest had their favorite, the
panel of judges was supposed to have the last
word on deciding which salsa was best. Event
judges Wendy Burch and Chris Schauble from
the KTLA news and Adriana Davalos, Miss
Los Angeles Latina 2013, gave it their best
shot but the competition still ended up in a tie
between FS 87 and FS 21. El Coyotes grand
lady Marjorie Cristoffersen was called in to
break the tie and after sampling both recipes,
awarded the 1st place trophy to 87s.
The winners from 87s were nonchalant
about their victory. We dont need strategy,
said Kenny Breskin. We just bring it, fnished
Jeff Harvey.
While not a prize winner, Martin Gutier-
rez from the FPB still enjoyed the event. Its a
good competition, he said, but it all depends
on the judges preferences. Our recipe is some-
thing that I picked up in my moms kitchen.
The many event sponsors made sure there
was enough food, drink and salsa for everyone,
and in the end, ensured that the Widows, Or-
phans and Disabled Firemens Fund was amply
endowed. Our thanks to Wells Fargo, Derek
Vehling, Collective Color, Heipler & Heipler,
Tom LaBonge, Mitchell Englander, Zev Yaro-
slavsky, Wells Capital Mangement, New York
Life Insurance and Pacifc Development Solu-
tions Group.
January 2014 13
P
a
i
d

A
d
v
e
r
t
i
s
e
m
e
n
t
:
14 January 2014
Engine 9 works an auto fre on Olympic
Blvd in the garment district on 11/3/13.
Photo by Rick McClure, EPN
Hundreds of public safety responders participated in crisis simulation training in a 41 story offce building in the Financial District on
November 9-10, 2013. The training simulated a fre and active shooting scenario. LAFD photos by Erik Scott
January 2014 15
Companies handled a small fre in a commercial building on Hill Street in Chinatown.
Photos by Adam VanGerpen, The Los Angeles Firefghter
Fire Station 27 apparatus, members
and their families all participated in this
years Hollywood Christmas Parade.
Photos by Laura Lichter,
preciouspixphoto.com
16 January 2014
LF 35 and Engine 6 pumped out a sub-
terrarium garage under an apartment
building on Vermont Ave near Melrose.
Photo Jeff Zimmerman, EPN
A fre fueled by an acetylene
tank beneath the control
cabin of a dockside crane
required companies to re-
spond by ground and sea on
November 9, 2013.
LAFD Photo by David Ortiz
January 2014 17
Engine 99 checks out a cement truck that
rolled over on Benedict Canyon Road.
Photo by Mike Meadows
The driver of an SUV was injured after he
was ejected from the vehicle near 6025
Sepulveda Bl. on 11/24/13.
Photo by Rick McClure
Task Force and Rescue 90 handled
a rollover on November 27, 2013 in
the 9300 blk of Woodley Ave.
Photo by Greg Doyle
18 January 2014
CALL TODAY
For a FREE Consultation!
800.573.4829
Its not just about the return on investments,
its about the return on life...
AL Hewitt, CFP, ChFC, EA
Certifed Financial Planner
Our Mission Statement:
To construct a comprehensive financial plan that will
make a significant difference in our clients lives.
To help our clients achieve a better return on life.
To form a long-term relationship with our clients.
To receive NO commissions and eliminate conflicts
of interest in the financial planning process.

Offices in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties


Download a Copy of The DROP Book at
www.DROPBOOK.com
1120 West Avenue M-4, Palmdale
400 Camarillo Ranch Rd, Camarillo
www.ALHEWITT.com
Paid Advertisement:
January 2014 19
Companies battled a structure fre
in Sunland on November 3, 2013.
Photos by Doc DeMulle,
The Foothills Paper
Task Force 75 rescued two from the
Pacoima Wash on October 25, 2013.
Photos by Doc DeMulle,
The Foothills Paper
20 January 2014
On 10/25/13, companies worked a fre in one room of
a single family in the 8700 block of Cantaloupe Ave.
A dog was carried out and revived by frefghters.
Photos by Mike Meadows
Light Force 75 working a very tall row
of Italian Cypress trees at 10455 Danube
Ave. in Granada Hills on 11/14/13.
Photo by Greg Doyle
January 2014 21
Greetings from the Battalion that
never sleeps!
Wow! I cant believe that were
already into 2014. Where does the time go?!?
In a few short weeks, and for the 1st time in
about fve years, we will have a drill tower
with actual boots . . . err . . . rookies . . . errr .
. . Probationary Members. Hopefully they
know that theyre in for a bit of a bumpy ride,
but once they get there, its the best job in the
whole world!!
Also, Id like to congratulate all of
the newest recipients of the Medal of Valor
and Medal of Merit. Among those honored
were two of our own from the Battalion, FF
Dave Mack and FF Casey Glynn - both from
66s. Theirs is a great story and if you didnt
get a chance to read it, check it out in last
months issue. Nice work gents, and way to
put it on the line for our citizens!
Moving on to our frst story - Over
at 64s, one of the captains has concerned
himself with every shifts SK, FI, VC and TS.
Having previously been an SA . . . errr EIT,
Captain Hill remembers how it was to try and
fll the empty spots, back when a few pages of
teletype vacancies would print up every morn-
ing. Being new to the position and the Bat-
talion, he makes sure that every i is dotted
and t is crossed - a real enforcer. In fact, he
kept a guy on the phone who had a guaran-
tor and wanted to TS until he actually ran the
hire and it was complete. Im sure that was a
great conversation . . . dead air . . . dead air
. . . man this computer is slow . . . dead air . .
. ok youre off, have a good night.
Hes been heard around the station
badmouthing guys who call in SK
at 9:00 pm or 6:30 am. I understand
that you want as much time as pos-
sible to fll a vacancy but as everyone
knows, sometimes things come up.
Anyway, turns out that after they
werent able to hire a Captain II for
the PM on Thanksgiving, Captain
Hill decided that he would further his
cause and bang in sick for the day
after. Like I said, I know sometimes
things happen, but when youve been
heard around the station saying that
you might not be at work on the day
after Thanksgiving, hmmmm, you
might want to hold yourself a bit
more accountable and think about
the example you are setting. Believe
me, guys notice, especially the ones
youve been heard badmouthing. Just
the story I got . . .
Our next story is out of
66s. Since the last set of captains
interviews is over, future offcers
can be seen all over the place. Almost every
shift I see a new face under an orange helmet
that was previously seen wearing a yellow
helmet. Engine 66 was recently dispatched
to an Engine call and when they arrived
on-scene, the family was complaining about
light-headedness and headaches. Common fu
right? After asking a few more questions and
getting sets of vitals, they realized that this
was textbook carbon monoxide poisoning.
Finally a chance to use it . . . yes, it was time
to deploy the 5 gas meter! Power turned on
check . . . two minute warm-up time and self
calibration check . . . someone who knows
how to use it - check? . . . just kidding, were
all experts on it right?!? Moving on . . . im-
mediately the meter picked up an outrageous
CO reading, but only in certain parts of the
house. The FFs were starting to feel some of
the same symptoms as the residents and they
quickly donned appropriate PPEs to investi-
gate further. As they were suiting up, Captain
McIndoe asked for The Denizens of Danger,
The Unequaled of the Unknown, The Heroes
of Haz-Mat, The Only Rig That Turns a Wheel
In The Station Besides The Rescue For An Oc-
casional Rescue Run . . . THE SQUAD (add
triumphant horns!!!) to be added. Squad 21 ar-
rived and without haste broke out their version
of the 5 Gas Meter, the 347 gas meter.
Upon entering the structure the meter went
absolutely off the charts. They searched and
searched and fnally located a leak in the attic.
Fortunately through their diligence, they were
most likely able to save the lives of this family
who probably wouldve perished during their
sleep from the CO. To add insult to injury, the
family had actually taken the battery out of
the CO detector in the house because it was
activating and making too much noise. Nice
work both Engine 66 and Squad 21!
Unfortunately usually after the
heroic story comes . . . well, the not so heroic
one. At a recent structure fre dispatch in 33s
frst-in, Task Force 21 was making their way
across the district, when TF 33 gave a size-up
of a one story commercial with heavy smoke
showing. Now prior to the size-up, TF 21 had
spotted the loom-up and it was on! Racing
to the scene, and not quite sure how far away
the next hydrant was, they came across a
close hydrant and decided to do a modifed
two-piece lay. In this lay that they quickly
Paid Advertisement:
22 January 2014
www.ai-mgmt.com | Tel. 562.433.1400 | kurt@ai-mgmt.com
5941 Naples Plaza, Long Beach, CA 90803 Fax 562.683.2683
FINANCIAL REPRESSION. WHAT IS IT?
Financial Repression could not be more relevant
when discussing the Feds policies of quantitative
easing (QE) which is intended to artifcially reduce
long-term interest rates. From the Feds website,
reducing the supply of longer-term Treasury securi-
tiesshould put downward pressure on longer-term
interest rates which will contribute to a broad easing
in fnancial market conditions (go to this link for
more information: http://www.federalreserve.gov/
faqs/money_15070.htm). Te Feds intention to bring
down borrowing costs has clearly been successful.
But, the reduction in interest rates has implications
across the entire yield curve and multiple asset classes.
Everything from bank saving deposits virtually at zero
and long dated CDs at a paltry 1%-2% (you have to
lock up your money for many years to earn this rate)
means savers are being punished or repressed by
artifcially low interest rates. To briefy summarize,
currently borrowers are rewarded with artifcially low
rates, (home mortgage rates are still extremely low)
while savers are socked with investment returns from
banks, credit unions and government bonds that are
below infation rates.
Another large factor in the fnancial repression debate
is governments perceived desire to pay a lower inter-
est rate on its debt than infation. Tis will allow the
government to monetize the mountain of debt that
has been accumulated post-fnancial crisis. Tis be-
comes quite complicated, but research in the area of
macro prudential policies (Te Liquidation of Gov-
ernment Debt by Rienhart & Sbrancia, March 2011)
indicates that the high level of US Government debt
can only be paid down through two likely scenarios.
Te likely and most palatable method is infate your
way out of it, meaning create infation through loose
monetary policy where the borrowed dollars become
less valuable over time. Or the second atom bomb
option is default (hopefully a very unlikely tool) and
this would cause a sharp contraction in GDP. Te
frst and likely scenario that will play out involves a
higher but manageable rate of infation with a small
growth component thrown in if all works out well.
Now, no Treasury or Fed ofcial in their right mind
would explicitly admit to a policy of infating away
government debt but this is likely the only viable
solution as tax increases and/or a massive growth
surge are very unlikely to happen in the coming
years.
So, what is the most likely outcome? Tere is
currently no clear consensus among economists
and other experts. But, interest rates will likely be
suppressed for many years to keep government debt
levels manageable, as this is one of a very few viable
options to help address years of profigate defcit
spending.
WHAT WE DO
We are investment counselors and
wealth managers. As a Registered
Investment Advisor, we utilize
Charles Schwabs Self Directed
Brokerage Option through the citys
Deferred Compensation Plan. Tis
allows our clients to keep their funds
within the citys Deferred Compen-
sation Plan while having an inde-
pendent advisor oversee their assets.
KURT STABEL, FOUNDER,
ACTIVE LAFD MEMBER
Kurt is the past elected police &
fre representative for the citys
Deferred Comp plan and has
unique experience to help you
utilize the plan. He has previ-
ously managed over $600 mil-
lion in client assets for another
investment advisor, and is a USC
business/fnance graduate.
OUR GOAL
To be your Deferred Comp and
DROP fnancial advisor. We
strive to grow our clients assets
by efectively reducing over-
all risk through strategic asset
allocation and a disciplined
investment process that is always
tailored to each clients risk pro-
fle and investment objectives.
P
a
i
d

A
d
v
e
r
t
i
s
e
m
e
n
t
:
January 2014 23
crafted in their minds, the pump would lay
from a hydrant, and if they needed to lay
further, the engine would continue the lay
until they arrived at the fre; whence the pump
would back-track to the hydrant and four-
way and perform the duties of the pump. So
as they came across a hydrant in the vicinity
of the loom-up, both Engine 21 and Engine
221 started painting their masterpiece. Engine
221 stopped at the hydrant and brilliantly laid
the frst strokes across the canvas until he
ran out of paint. Then Engine 21 jumped
right in and gracefully continued laying their
paint down until he also ran out . . . uh oh . .
. unfortunately they were a bit short of their
objective and had brushed past three closer
hydrants on the way to their objective. For-
tunately for them Engine 14 was able to lend
them 150 of extra paint so they could help
out and be effective artists at this fre. Too
bad we dont have any maps that tell us where
a hydrant is located in relation to an address?
Thats actually a whole other story. Just what
I heard. (For those of you who mightve been
confused: Paint=hose, Artists=frefghters,
graceful and brilliant= not so much . . . any
other questions, call FS21)
Along with the addition of the two
new Rescues (at 46s and 66s) comes an
infux of some new faces to the Battalion.
Some came with an eager attitude to learn
their job and serve the citizens of Los Angeles,
and some came because they were sent here.
Either way, make sure to introduce yourselves.
With that, Jonathan
Valenzuela now at FS
66 and assigned to
RA 266 added a new
addition to the family.
Jonathan Jr. weighed
in at 6 lbs 13 oz and
has two older sisters to
show him the ropes!
Good luck with the
sleep and dare I say
that Sr. might get more
rest at the station than
at home?!? Also con-
grats to Garrett (and
Jackie) Steffen over at
64s on the arrival of
son Logan Garrett born
on October 3, 2013.
Finally, Id like to congratulate all
the participants in the recent captains process.
I know its been a long bunch of months, but
when that day comes that you receive your
bugles and a new command, remember what
you went through to get there and it will make
it all worthwhile. You really have an opportu-
nity to make a difference, so do it! Remember
all the things that you said you would do
in your interview and do them! And most
importantly, remember to Serve with Courage,
INTEGRITY, and Pride!
Hope you had a Merry Christmas
and Happy Holidays! Please be safe, both on
and off duty, and PLEASE make good deci-
sions!! There are plenty of options, use one!
OK, thats all Ive got! Keep taking
care of one another. Stay safe and remember
that 2+2 makes sense, play nice, know your
audience, get a cool nickname, fgure out
which formula to use before the media gets a
hold of it, you get out what you put in, FI-1,
read the label, if youre tired sleep in, when
in need of a driver call an already overworked
800 to do your job, watch out for irony, dont
fumble Tradition, take 1st relief so you can go
back to sleep, and never Stand By!
Keep sending your stories and pho-
tos to wattsfre@gmail.com
Engine 89 handles an auto
fre on November 22, 2013.
Photo by Ryan Ling
24 January 2014
Cheerleaders ride atop
T-89s aerial at the Grant
High School Homecoming.
Photo by Jeffrey Geller
Engine 86 extinguished this
auto into the sound wall on the
101 Fwy at Tujunga on 11/24/13.
Photo by Rick McClure, EPN
January 2014 25
E103 and RA73 handled a T/A late
in the morning on Thanksgiving
Day at Lindley and Roscoe.
Photo by Greg Doyle
Four people were injured in a head-on
collision on the Tampa Ave. off-ramp
to the 118 Fwy on 10/27/13.
Photo by Rick McClure, EPN
26 January 2014
Battalion 17 companies handled a MCI with seven victims at
the intersection of Topanga Cyn and Clarendon St on 11/22/13.
Photos by Steve Gentry
Companies quickly knocked down a fre in a restaurant
on Ventura Bl on 11/5/13.
Photo by Juan Guerra, juanguerra.smugmug.com
January 2014 27
Paid Advertisements:

Hero Buyers: When your real estate transaction closes, you
will receive a DISCOUNT CHECK (equivalent to 25% of the agents gross
commission).

Hero Sellers: When you sell your home using a Homes for
Heroes affiliated Realtor, you will receive a DISCOUNT CHECK
(equivalent to 25% of the agents gross commission).
Additional Savings:
Save $795.00 off Lender fees for Refinance or Purchases
Benefits apply to all Fire Department Employees
www.HomesForHeroes.com
To Learn How You Can SAVE Call or Visit:
Real HERO Savings for
LAFD Members & Retirees
when you use
Homesfor Heroes
for Buying, Selling or
Refinancing your Home!
Eric Gausepohl
Summit Lending
(800)774-7650
Jenn Ochoa
Wife of active LAFD Engineer
Dwell Properties
(562)277-3115


Send your stories and photos directly to you Battalion News writer
or to the editor at editor@lafra.org
Direct diamond importer manufacturer of fine jewelry. Since 1983
Below retail price.
Save 30% to 70%
Showroom open to the public
Bridal Rings Co. 550 South Hill St. Suite 620. International Jewelry Center
Los Angeles, CA 90013. 213-627-7620. (Outside L.A. area 1-800-5-BRIDAL)
Member of the Jewelers Board of Trade, Better Business Bureau, GIA & Calif.
Jewelers Association. Present this ad and recieve a free gift.
Members of the community members joined frefghters in a family themed
event on November 16, 2013 for the public dedication of LAFD Station 94.
Photos by Yvonne Griffn
28 January 2014
January 2014 29
CAPTAIN JACK SPEROW
This November 12th marked the
frst anniversary of the passing of Captain
Jack Sperow. He died at the age of 94 after a
very busy life. For thirty years Jack was both
a Captain on the Los Angeles Fire Department
as well as Group Commander in the Active Air
Force Reserve Unit at March Air Force Base in
Riverside. The U.S. Air Force even made a flm
about him which was entitled Two Hats.
Jack served in three wars. In 1945,
his B-29 unit was waiting to be deployed to the
South Pacifc Theater when the war with Japan
ended. In 1950, his B-26 reserve unit was the
frst to be recalled for the Korean Confict. In
the late 1960s, during the Vietnam War, he
again resumed his active military career as a
C-124 Globe Master of Military Air Lift Trans-
port. His duty required transporting oversized
equipment and bringing troops back to the U.S.
Jack eventually retired from the military with
the rank of full colonel.
Upon his retirement from both of his
careers in Southern California, Jack accepted
the position of Senior Captain and Training Of-
fcer of the newly formed, professional Aptos
Fire Department. He and his family relocated
to Aptos in 1972.
Jack loved his time at the Aptos Fire
Department with Chief Chinn (also LAFD re-
tired) and the Red Hots. He enjoyed living
in the beauty of the Central Coast. Jack played
handball for ffty years before and after his re-
tirement, playing in tournaments throughout
the United States. He participated in the Boy
Scout program with his sons. Camping in the
High Sierras with his family was a real favorite
with Jack.
Jacks life was well lived and will not
be forgotten by the people who knew him, the
men that worked alongside him or the family
that loved him. He and his wife Genova Ge-
nie had a love affair that lasted over 70 years.
Jack and Genie had fve children, and their
family continues to grow with grandchildren,
great grandchildren, great-great grandchildren,
and now, four great-great-great grandchildren.
Retired LAFD members residing in Kern County (L to R)
Bob Klopfenstein, Jim Walters, Pat Engel, Roger Fiala,
Dan Arnett and Jerry Horwedel at their monthly breakfast
meeting. Call Kolp for info (661) 204-1374
Genie and Captain Jack Sperow
30 January 2014
STRUCTURE FIRE
ENCINO
Photos by Mike Meadows
January 2014 31
More than 100 frefghters battled a huge blaze rag-
ing at an Encino home that injured four members
on October 30, 2013. Companies arrived to fnd a
large three-story above ground Tudor style home at
the end of a long steep private driveway with heavy
fre on the third story. Some frefghters had to hike
equipment a 1/4 mile uphill to the structure. It took
two hours and 20 minutes to fully extinguish the
fames. The cause of the afternoon blaze is under ac-
tive investigation and the estimated dollar loss is still
being tabulated.
32 January 2014
HAZ MAT
SAN FERNANDO
Photos by Doc DeMulle, The Foothills Paper and
Adam VanGerpen, The Los Angeles Firefghter
Fire companies and a Haz-Mat team handled an incident on October 30, 2013 in a one-story commercial building in the City of San Fernando.
Employees at Envision Life CALIFA accidentally spilled a 55-gallon drum of 50% percent hydrogen peroxide solution, a strong oxidizer (a 3%
solution is common for medical use). It slowly began reacting with the petroleum products in the carpet and approximately one hour into the
incident it spontaneously combusted. A total of three city blocks were evacuated as a precaution.
January 2014 33
34 January 2014
One person was killed and six others injured
when a vehicle stopped in the HOV lane of
the 170 Fwy was struck, causing a chain re-
action in which fve other vehicles collided
on November 15, 2013. Two of the patients
had to be extricated from one vehicle. Three
were transported to area hospitals.
PHYSICAL RESCUE
NORTH HOLLYWOOD
Photos by Rick McClure EPN, and Mike Meadows
January 2014 35
36 January 2014
Paid Advertisements:
JOE FOLEY, Battalion Chief, Batt. 17-C
FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014
Marriott Warner Center
21850 Oxnard Street, Woodland Hills CA
Social Hour: 6:00 PM Dinner: 7:00 PM
Menu: Chicken or Tri-Tip - $55 includes dinner and gift
Call FS 84 - (818) 756-8684 or Chung Ho - (805) 907-9262
PLEASE NOTE: This is the rescheduled date.
JOHN DURSO, Captain II, FS 61-B
SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014
Odyssey Restaurant
15600 Odyssey Drive, Granada Hills CA
Social Hour: 6:00 PM Dinner: 7:00 PM
Menu: Buffet Style Dinner - $50 includes tax, tip & gift
Call FS 61 - (213) 485-6261
JOHN HOLTBY, Captain, FS 93-B
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 05, 2014
Braemar Country Club
4001 Reseda Blvd, Tarzana CA
Social Hour: 6:00 PM Dinner: 7:00 PM
Menu: Chicken or Pot Roast - $55 includes tax, tip & gift
Call FS 93 - (818) 756-8693
RSVP by February 24, 2014
GREG GIBSON, Battalion Chief, Batt. 17-C
TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 2014
Odyssey Restaurant
15600 Odyssey Drive, Granada Hills CA
Social Hour: 6:00 PM Dinner: 7:00 PM
Menu: Buffet Style Dinner - $60 includes tax, tip & gift
Call FS 4 - (213) 485-6204 or Battalion 1 Offce - (213) 485-6271
RSVP by March 4, 2014
January 2014 37
T
he LAFD Fire Hogs held
their annual Hogs Breath
BBQ on Saturday, Octo-
ber 5, 2013. Despite the extreme
weather and a recall of several
members, the event was well at-
tended by 75 Fire Hogs members,
friends and family.
A special thanks goes out to Fire
Hogs South End Vice President Taylor Gas-
kins for organizing the entire BBQ event. Tay-
lor was able to acquire the Long Beach Police
Offcer Association Park in Long Beach. The
parked proved to be an ideal location for the
Hogs Breath BBQ. The park had a kitchen to
prepare the food, plenty of picnic benches and
tables, a stage for the band and ample room on
a grass yard for the Biker Games.
The BBQ was prepared by a long-
time friend/supporter of the Fire Hogs, Darrell
Smith. Darrell started cooking the meat at 5:30
in the morning and the BBQ feast consisted of
beef brisket, pulled pork sandwiches, chicken,
sausage, beans and coleslaw. The food was
AWESOME.
The beer was donated by Firemans
Brew and Nin Kasi Brewery of Eugene, Or-
egon.
Fire Hogs Prospect Don Jesolva
recommended the band, Roadwork, who has
played at Cooks Corner as well as numerous
other venues in Orange County. Roadwork
rocked the afternoon away and even provided
some commentary during the games.
What would a biker BBQ be without
Biker Games? Thanks to FIREHOGS Sergeant-
at-Arms Pete Goff and his crew for setting up
the always popular and hilarious Biker Games.
Congratulations to the following people for
their wins: Fire Hogs Prospect Angel Meza for
the Slow Drag Race, Fire Hogs President Jack
Wise for the Keg Push, Jack Wise and Wen-
dy for the Potato Harvest, and Founding Fire
Hogs member John OConnor and girlfriend
Michelle for the Weenie Bite.
The 2013 FIREHOGS Hogs Breath
BBQ was certainly an entertaining event. The
warm weather, the fabulous park and a lot of
camaraderie made for a great day. All proceeds
from the BBQ were donated to the Los Ange-
les Firemens Widows, Orphans and Disabled
Firemens Fund. We look forward to seeing you
all in 2014.
38 January 2014
T
his year the Los An-
geles Fire Depart-
ment Scholarship
Fund awarded four
$5000 scholarship
grants. The Merit
Scholar Awards are
cash grants, made pos-
sible through the Jean Per-
kins Foundation, of up to
$20,000 ($5,000 per year
while the student continues
to be enrolled and making
normal progress toward a col-
lege degree). To be eligible, a
student must be the child or step-
child of an active or fallen LAFD
sworn employee. The eligible
student must be a high school
senior or college freshman, who
will be enrolled in the fall as a
full-time student in an accredited
college or university. The schol-
arships are awarded on the basis
of merit. The single most impor-
tant factor is academic achieve-
ment, but the all-civilian Selec-
tion Committee considered other
relevant criteria, including personal character
and extracurricular accomplishments.
This years awardees were students
who demonstrated excellence in academic
studies, good character, high moral standards,
leadership, distinction in extra-curricular activ-
ities, personal accomplishments and a potential
for future success. The selection committee
reviewed each application which consisted of;
two essays, their school transcripts and two let-
ters of recommendation.
Of the 57 eligible applicants, 10 f-
nalists were selected to interview and continue
the process. The combination of excellent ap-
plicants and a determined board, resulted in the
selection of four 2012 Merit Scholar winners. A
ceremony to recognize this years winners was
conducted by B/C Armando Hogan at FHMTC
on June 11, 2013.
This years six Runner-Up Award
winners are to be congratulated for their out-
standing merits. Each received a one time grant
of $2,500. They are Michael Amano, Andrew
Apodaca, Ryan Flynn, Katherine Martinez, and
Max Shapiro.
This years Best Essay award
of $2,500 was generously sponsored by the
LAFD Foundation. Randy Hess of the LAFDF,
presented the award to this years winner, Ciera
Chang.
The four 2013 award recipients and
their bios are as follows:
Kenna Arana is a graduating senior
from St. Lucys Priory High School and the
daughter of fallen Fire Captain Robert Arana.
Kenna will be attending Columbia University.
Kenna has studied classical piano and received
a Level 10 Certifcate of Merit. Kenna com-
petes in varsity cross country and is the recipi-
ent of the Sierra League All League Academic
Athlete Award in 2012, for outstanding ath-
letic and academic performance. In addition,
Kenna has received the Christian Service
Award for outstanding participation in service
activities. As the Regent Ambassador for St.
Lucys Jackie Bristow Memorial Foundation,
she was student liaison, responsible for recruit-
ing registrants and volunteers. She also served
as the Executive Board President of St. Lucys
Chapter of the National Honors Society. Kenna
also received the National Merit Commended
Student Award and National Hispanic Recogni-
tion Program Scholars Honors, graduating with
a 4.1 GPA

THE 2013 WINNERS:
Elizabeth Togneri, Fire Chief Brian Cummings, Emily Mayeda,
John Anglin, Kaycee Ching, Robert Nicholas, Kenna Arana,
Dick Barrett
January 2014 39
Kaycee Ching is a graduating senior
from Mira Costa High School, and the daugh-
ter of Fire Inspector Specialist Lloyd Fukuda,
Legal Liaison Unit (38 years LAFD). She will
be attending UC Berkeley majoring in Psychol-
ogy. Kaycee is a futist receiving Superior
Ratings in 2011 and 2012. She has received
the highest rating possible from the Southern
California School Band and Orchestra Associa-
tion. Kaycee is a Mira Costa Scholar Athlete
award winner in basketball. She is profcient
in Japanese, receiving Profciency Certifca-
tion in 2011 from the Japan Foundation and
Japan Education Exchanges and Services.
She is a volunteer for the Red Cross and the
Santa Monica Free Methodist Church. She
also coaches youth summer basketball league.
Kaycee is a Japanese Traditional Dancer and
has performed at the Nisei Week Parade and
Monterey Cherry Blossom Festival. She has
earned the Silver Award with the Girl Scouts of
America. Kaycee is a National Honors Society
Member, National Latin Exam Silver Medal
Winner Maxima Cum Laude and a National
Merit Commended Scholar and graduates with
a 4.0 GPA.
Emily Mayeda is a graduating senior
at El Segundo High School and the daughter
of Engineer Theodore H. Mayeda, assigned to
F.S. 80 (24 years LAFD). Emily will be attend-
ing UCLA and majoring in Physiological Sci-
ence. She is a member of the El Segundo High
School Chorale. Last year the ELHSC partici-
pated in London during the Olympic Games.
She earned her Black Belt in Shotakan Karate,
in 2009. She is also involved in YMCAs Youth
and Government, LAX Food Pantry, and has
been a volunteer for the Loyola Marymount
University Special Games. Since 2009, Em-
ily has devoted over 250 hrs. helping with the
childcare, feeding, safety of a child with Opitz
G Syndrome a genetic disorder that affects
bodily structure and intellectual disability. Em-
ily is a Link Crew Leader providing academic
advice to ELHS freshmen. Emily has received
awards for Principals Honor Roll, Certifcate
of Merit, has been a California Scholarship
Federal Member and District 53 Hero Award
recipient from California Legislature Assem-
bly. Emily graduates with a 4.5 GPA.
Elizabeth Togneri is a graduating
senior from Flintridge Sacred Heart Academy
and is the daughter of Engineer Timothy Tog-
neri, F.S. 60 (27 years LAFD). Elizabeth will
be attending UCLA and majoring in Pre-Med.
Elizabeth has been a Principal Harpist at Sa-
cred Heart since 2009. Her recent achievement
is reaching Grade 7 of the Associated Board of
the Royal Schools of Music. Elizabeth served
as a Campus Minister from 2010 - 2013. She
has volunteered as an instructor to kindergarten
students, decorated foats for the Tournament
of Roses Parade, and packed Blue Star Care
Packages for military personnel. As a member
of the Pasadena Independent Schools Founda-
tion, she reviews applications from charities
requesting scholarship donations. Elizabeths
academic achievements include AP Scholar
with Honor Award, National Honor Society
Member, California Scholarship Federation,
First Honors Award, and the 2013 Academic
Decathlon: Gold Medal in Art, Bronze Medal
in Speech. Elizabeth graduates with a 4.3 GPA.

Chief Cummings paid a special trib-
ute to Ron Fujikawa, April 6-1948 October
12, 2012, a member of the LAFD Scholar
funds board. Ron was an invaluable friend and
colleague. His fellow colleagues on the board,
as well as everyone at the LAFD who came to
know him, admired his spirit, energy and ever-
present good humor. He will be sorely missed,
but he will forever be a reminder to us of the
joy to be found in meeting and selecting these
accomplished Merit Scholars.
We would like to thank Mr. James
Carroll III and Mr. Joe Connolly, Executive
Board Members of the Jean Perkins Founda-
tion and, the LAFD Merit Scholarship Funds
Board of Directors, John Anglin, Dick Barrett,
Barbara Bagley, G. Louis Graziadio III, Tom
Mizo and Robert Nicholas for their dedication
and support of our members and their children.
We are also grateful to the Los Angeles Fire
Department Foundation for their sponsorship
of the Best Essay award and to the LAFD
Sertoma Club, the United Firefghters of Los
Angeles City, LAFD Historical Society and the
Los Angeles Firefghters Association, Los An-
geles Firemens Credit Union, who sponsored
the awards reception.
The announcement for the 2014 com-
petition should be posted early January 2014, at
www.lafd.org/scholarship. Thank you again,
and we look forward to the eighth LAFD Merit
Scholarship competition.
BEST ESSAY WINNER:
Fire Chief Brian Cummings, John Anglin,
Ciera Chang, Robert Nicholas, Dick Barrett
40 January 2014
Paid Advertisements:
LIVING TRUSTS
January 2014 41
O
n Saturday, November 30, 2013, LAFD
Handball and the USHA combined to
host the annual Turkey Burner doubles
handball tournament and fundraiser at Los
Caballeros, in Fountain Valley. Owen Gloves
sponsored gloves for the champions and final-
ists in each of the four divisions. All players
were provided dri-fit shirts, and winners re-
ceived a hoodie with the tournament logo.
32 teams participated in the tourna-
ment, which was divided into four divisions:
Caliente, Hot, Warm and Mild.
Top Southern California talent par-
ticipated, including seven professional hand-
ball players. Each division featured a round
robin format, with the top two teams in each
division playing in a one game fnal.
The hot division fnal featured an
all Fire Station 92 line-up and settled an in-
house rivalry. Ryan Carlos and Joe Steiner are
the current LAFD A doubles champions,
and Chris Yokoyama and Roy Harvey are the
current Simple Green U.S. Open A doubles
champions. There has been a continuing ar-
gument regarding which team is better when
playing for a title. The Turkey Burner was des-
ignated as the venue for the showdown, one
game for bragging rights and the title.
Steiner and Carlos jumped out to an
early lead of 9-1 then 12-2, before Yokoyama
and Harvey ran off 12 points in a row to take
a 14-12 lead. After a couple of side outs, Yo-
koyama and Harvey won the match 21-12.
Chad Rolish, also from Fire Station
92, partnered with Tracy Davis from Tucson,
Arizona, the top ranked U.S. female profes-
sional player, in the Warm Division. They
went through their round robin undefeated, and
were expecting a win in the fnal vs. Salvador
Castillon from Fire Station 26 and 15 year old
Brandon Ramirez. This was a great match and
an opportunity to see the future of handball.
Brandon soon took control of the game with
power serves and kill shots from the most un-
usual angles.
The 4-Wall Junior National Handball
Tournament is being held at Los Caballeros in
December, and the funds raised in the Turkey
Burner are designated to pay entry fees for lo-
cal youths who need fnancial assistance.
Roy Harvey and Chris Yokoyama defeated Ryan
Carlos and Joe Steiner in the Hot Division
Branden Ramirez and Salvador Castillon defeated
Tracy Davis and Chad Rolish in the Warm Division
Paid Advertisement:
visit:
www.LAFRA.org
mail:
P.O. Box 41903
Los Angeles CA
90041
phone:
(800) 244-3439
42 January 2014

LAFRA will continue to see an impact to the health
coverage we offer our members, as a result of the
upcoming changes under the Affordable Care Act
(ACA). Recognizing that there is much information
(and confusion!) surrounding ACA, we want to
provide you with a brief summary that covers several
of the important provisions and health plan changes.

Overview of Fees
The ACA contains a number of fees and
taxes that will affect the cost of health
care during the next several years. The
two fees that may impact the cost of our
plans in the near future are the Patient Centered
Outcomes Research Institute Fee and the Transitional
Reinsurance Fee.

Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Fee
(PCORI) - Beginning with plan years that ended after
Sept. 30, 2012, the ACA imposed a new fee of $1 per
member for the first year, $2 per member for the
second year and indexed to medical inflation
thereafter. This federally-mandated fee will be used to
establish an independent non-profit corporation
dedicated to studying patient outcomes. The
purported rationale is that with better data outcomes,
doctors, patients, purchasers and policymakers can
make evidence-based decisions about the best ways
to diagnose, prevent and treat health conditions. The
PCORI fee began in October 2012 and ends in 2019.

Transitional Reinsurance Fee For years 2014 to
2016, the LAFRA plans will be required to pay the
Transitional Reinsurance Fee. The stated purpose of
this program is to stabilize individual-market
premiums by supporting payments to individual-
market issuers that cover high-cost individuals. The
fee for 2014 is $63.00 per covered individual per
year.

Both the PCORI and TRP fees will impact the cost
of our Plan in 2014 and, consequently, Member
premiums. There is some discussion that self-
funded plans may be exempt from the TRP fee in
2015 and 2016 but, this has not been confirmed to
date.


Individual Mandate
One of the most significant changes
ACA enacts is the requirement that all
individuals must have health insurance
or pay an annual penalty (the
individual mandate). As of now, the individual
mandate will apply in 2014.

Health Insurance Exchanges - The Health Insurance
Exchanges are mandated to take effect in 2014, with
Enrollment beginning in October 2013. The
Exchanges will create an online marketplace through
which individuals and small businesses can purchase
coverage. Each State can decide whether to
implement its own exchange, run an exchange in
partnership with the federal government, or use a
federally sponsored exchange.

Three types of assistance are available to help certain
lower-income individuals:

1. Medicaid expansion states may choose to
expand Medicaid to people with incomes of up to
138% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL). Some
states are choosing to forgo this federal funding.

2. Tax credits (Premium Subsidies) People with
incomes between 100% and 400% of the FPL
(approximately $94,200 for a family of four) may
be eligible for tax credits to help pay insurance
premiums for coverage purchased through an
Exchange.

3. Reduced cost sharing people with incomes up
to 250% of the FPL will have access to coverage
with lower deductibles and co-payments.

Written Notice of Exchanges The City of Los
Angeles provided written notice to current active
employees by Oct. 1, 2013 to inform them of their
coverage options available through the new
Exchanges (also called Health Insurance
Marketplaces).

Please refer to the Written Notice of Exchange,
provided by the City of Los Angeles.

Understanding
How HealthCare Reform
Impacts You

January 2014 43
If you elect into the Exchange, the City is not
required to provide you with a contribution
toward the cost of coverage you obtain
through the Exchange.

Employer Mandate (Pay or Play) for Active
Employees Beginning in 2015, the City could be
subject to a penalty if it does not offer medical
coverage to full-time employees (working 30 or more
hours per week) that is affordable and meets
minimum value requirements, as defined in the
ACA. If the City offered health plans do not meet
these requirements, full-time employees may obtain
health insurance through an Exchange and depending
upon income level, possibly qualify for a premium
credit or subsidy. To satisfy the Mandate
requirements, an employer-sponsored health plan
must:

Be affordable to the employee, whose premium
should not exceed 9.5% of household income. The
household income qualification is met if the
employees contribution for individual coverage does
not exceed 9.5% of the employees W-2 wages.

Provide minimum value, which means the plan must
cover at least 60%, on average across the plan, of an
employees health care costs in a given year. For
example, if an employee incurs $1,000 in health care
expenses, the plan must cover at least $600, with the
employee responsible for the balance through a
combination of deductibles, co-pays and co-
insurance.

LAFRAs benefit plans meet the mandate
requirements of minimum essential coverage,
affordability and minimum value. Therefore,
individuals eligible for the LAFRA benefits plans
will not be eligible for premium subsidies through
the Exchanges.






Other ACA Changes
W-2 Reporting ACA requires that the
total premium of group health coverage
appear on your W-2 form, providing you
with information on the cost of your
health benefit plans. The requirement is informational
only and coverage is not subject to income tax.

The City will continue to report the total value on
employee W-2s.






Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC) On or
after Sept. 23, 2012, group health plans offering
health insurance coverage were required to use
standards in compiling and providing a Summary of
Benefits and Coverage (SBC) that accurately describes
the benefits and coverage under our plan. SBCs for
group health plans, beginning on or after Jan. 1,
2014, will include a statement on whether the plan
meets minimum essential coverage and minimum
value.

A Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC),
including the 2014 requirements, is available on
the LAFRA website (www.LAFRA.org).

Out-of-Pocket Maximum Changes Starting with
the Plan Year beginning in 2014, all cost sharing,
including flat-dollar copayments, toward services that
are defined as Essential Health Benefits must
accumulate to a plans out-of-pocket maximum
($6,350 self-only/$12,700 family).

LAFRAs current Out-of-Pocket maximums meet the
federal required guidelines.

Prohibition of Pre-existing Condition Exclusions -
Beginning in July of 2014, pre-existing condition
exclusions must be removed for all members, not just
those under age 19.

LAFRAs plans do not contain pre-existing
conditions exclusions.

This is a summary of the regulations under ACA.
Please refer to the Department of Labor
(www.dol.gov) or www.healthcare.gov for more
detailed information.

44 January 2014
I remember in the olden days a chaplains
column was in every month of the Grapevine.
Today there are 11 chaplains, so each one
would have to write an article only once a year
and Fowble (since he did such a great job in
this months October Grapevine . . . and he
is the most recently appointed chaplain) could
write two articles a year!! Is it a deal?
Please accept this gift to the Widows,
Orphans and Disabled Firemens Fund to
honor our chaplains, and my husband Gene
Fairrington (LAFD 1959 -89).
Sincerely,
Ruth Fairrington
Los Angeles, CA
Los Angeles Firemens Relief Association
We would like to thank all of you at the
Los Angeles Firemens Relief Association
for the memorial fag and beautiful fower
arrangement. Michael had a wonderful career
with the Los Angeles City Fire Department
and had an enduring affection for his Fire
Department family.
The Ambarian Family
Ojai, CA
Dear Mr. Jacobsen,
We wanted to let you know how appreciative
we are in regards to the efforts of Andy Kuljis
in honoring the life of Joseph O. Michell.
Andy was amazing from the moment Patrick,
Joes oldest son, called him on the day of Joes
passing. He was so helpful and supportive,
especially in securing Boat 2 for Joes fnal
voyage and our goodbyes. This meant so much
to Marie, Joes wife, as well as his children and
grandchildren. Andy is a true Keeper of the
Flame for LAs frefghters and their families.
Sincerely,
The Michell Family Marie, Patrick, Monica,
Dean, Tim and spouses and grandchildren
Los Angeles, CA
LA Firemens Relief Assn,
We wish to extend our sincerest gratitude for
all the help you have given to our family during
Dear Editor:
In going through my October Auto Club
magazine I came across a photo (A Big Bang
the 1947 explosion at the OConnor Electro-
Plating Co. plant on Pico Blvd) that was so
special to me.
My husband went on the fre dept in June
of 1947. They hired a lot of men after the war.
When I met him in 1950 he was working at
Station 15 on Bunker Hill, which is long gone
of course. They had a lot of fres because the
houses were ancient. They still had the old fre
trucks, even the brackets that held the horses
reins were still up there. They did not build cars
during WWII or fre trucks either I guess. They
did have a nice handball court though, and they
were in great shape.
Dont know how many guys left would
remember that explosion, but I wanted to send
the picture because it brought back interesting
memories.
Sincerely,
Clarice Tuck, widow of Capt Joseph Tuck
Vista, CA
Dear Editor:
About a year ago, at the LAFRA Open
House, I spoke with John Jacobsen. I told
him how happy I was to read the Chaplains
Column in the recent Grapevine.
Widows, Orphans and Disabled Firemens
Fund,
Please accept my donation in honor of my
dad who passed away on March 31, 2012. I
wanted to say Thank You to the LAFD for all
the help you have given us since Dad died. You
have been there for us so many times this past
year and a half. You were at Dads funeral to
give us a fag; and Ill never forget the bagpipe
solo at his graveside service.
In no time at all you sent us new insurance
cards, which proved to be a God-send. When
I was diagnosed with Hodgkin Lymphoma in
January 2013, you were there for us again.
Because of your medical insurance I feel I
got the best cancer treatment and care. After
chemotherapy and radiation treatments, I was
declared cancer free this past July. I recently
volunteered to work at a blood drive to raise
money for cancer patients who dont have
enough to afford good cancer care. It made me
realize what a wonderful gift you gave me with
your insurance.
And in June 2013 I turned 18 years old.
Once again you were there for me. I received a
pension check for my dads service time. Mom
and I immediately put the entire amount in a
CD at your credit union to help pay my college
expenses.
This is a special Thank You for all that you
have done for us this past year and a half. You
are our heroes.
Sincerely,
Kalyn D. Boukather
Irvine, CA
Kalyn and Philip Boukather
Kalyn (left) with
mom and sister
January 2014 45
If I handwrite a will,
isnt that good enough?
Learn about creating an estate plan that protects you and your family.
Ask for a Getting Started Kit and information about free estate planning seminars,
email MCasillas@lafra.org or call (323) 259-5217
Marlene Casillas, Relief Association Development & Marketing Director
Anyone can write out a will, but
it will still go through probate, usually a lengthy process
it may be contested, anyone can put in a suit against it
if assets are more than $100,000 your benefactors face
greater fnancial fees and penalties
it does not include your medical directive or your
fnancial directive
Send your letters
& comments
to the editor at:
editor@lafra.org
this very diffcult time losing my husband,
Hans R. Wolf. The Relief Assn was so kind and
helpful whenever our family called. They sent
us all the medical equipment we needed within
a days notice.
Andy Kuljis, a big thank you for all your
help attending the memorial service and
presenting the beautiful foral bouquet. Also for
the nice speech when presenting the fag case
containing the fag which had been fown over
his old fre station 45s. It will be displayed with
honor in our home. We have always been so
proud being part of the Los Angeles fre family.
Please accept this donation to the Widows,
Orphans and Disabled Firemens Fund in the
memory of Captain Hans R. Wolf.
Anne Wolf and the Wolf family
Canyon Country, CA
WODFF,
Please accept this donation in honor and
memory of the wonderful lady that shared 70 of
her 90 years with me Carol (Christmas baby
1922) Van Valkenburg Van Eaton. Thank you
for your help during her down time.
Sincerely,
Jack Van Eaton, LAFD retired (in 1975)
Bothell, WA
LA Firemens Relief Assn,
Thank you so much for the fag you sent
me in honor of my husband Gerald Lehmanns
memory. I will always treasure it. He was such
a great guy and I miss him so much.
Grethe Lehmann
Las Vegas, NV
46 January 2014
1. Register online at www.ralphs.com. (A) Sign in or follow the steps to create for a free account
(Youll need a Ralphs Rewards card if you dont have one, you can also register for a card once logged in)
2. Click My Account
3. Click Edit Community Contribution Program Information (B)
4. In the Find Your Organization feld, enter 84853 and select
Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemens Fund from the list (C)

5. Click Save
6. Buy groceries and use your Ralphs Rewards card at checkout
7. Ralphs Donates
8. We Thank You!
Important Information About Your Sign-Ups!!
If you have trouble signing up, you can either download a form
or call Angelica Patino at (323) 259-5235 for a copy of the form
that you can take to the store.
Remember to re-register
every September.
January 2014 47
MEMBERS
WAYNE E. SANQUIST, ENGINEER. APPOINTED JULY 02, 1951.
RETIRED ON A SERVICE PENSION MAY 17, 1982 FROM FS 24.
PASSED AWAY OCTOBER 28, 2013.
IVAR L. MIHLD, FIREMAN. APPOINTED APRIL 17, 1938.
RETIRED ON A SERVICE PENSION JULY 01, 1968 FROM FS 1.
PASSED AWAY OCTOBER 13, 2013.
FRANK H. NICKEL, CAPTAIN II. APPOINTED JULY 03, 1951.
RETIRED ON A SERVICE PENSION MARCH 01, 1973 FROM FS 42-B.
PASSED AWAY NOVEMBER 07, 2013.
JOHN S. KOUYOUMJIAN, FIREMAN. APPOINTED JULY 03, 1951.
RETIRED ON A SERVICE PENSION JULY 27, 1971 FROM FS 24.
PASSED AWAY NOVEMBER 12, 2013.
JAMES E. ANDERSON, ENGINEER. APPOINTED APRIL 17, 1971.
RETIRED ON A SERVICE PENSION JULY 02, 2001 FROM FS 12.
PASSED AWAY NOVEMBER 20, 2013.
FAMILY
PEGGY JOHNSTON, SPOUSE OF ALTON W. JOHNSTON, PASSED AWAY OCTOBER 24, 2013.
ARDATH L. GARST, JR., SURVIVING SPOUSE OF FRANK GARST JR., PASSED AWAY NOVEMBER 06, 2013.
ANNE V. BULLARD, SPOUSE OF ROBERT C. BULLARD, PASSED AWAY NOVEMBER 09, 2013.
DOTTY J. GIORDANO, SPOUSE OF ANTHONY E. GIORDANO, PASSED AWAY NOVEMBER 22, 2013.
A portion of fre-related
jewelry profts donated to
the Widows, Or phans and
Disabled Firemens Fund.
Paid Advertisement:
48 January 2014
January 2014 49
I
thought Id like to begin by telling you
about a very strict monastery and a new
recruit, Brother Alpheus. When Brother
Alpheus joined the monastery he was told that
the monastery was so strict that the monks were
only allowed to say two words every five years.
They were to spend their five years consider-
ing what they would say. Well, after five years
in the monastery, the Reverend Abbot called
Brother Alpheus in and asked him what his two
words were.
Brother Alpheus said, Food Cold.
OK, Brother Alpheus, the Abbot
said, You may no longer speak until fve more
years when you will be allowed to say your
next two words.
After fve years the Abbot called
Brother Alpheus in and asked him what his two
words were.
Brother Alpheus said, Bed, hard.
OK, Brother Alpheus, the Abbot
said, rather dismayed, you may say your next
two words fve years from now.
Five years later the Abbot called
Brother Alpheus in and again told him he could
now say two words.
I quit, said Brother Alpheus.
Well, no wonder, the Abbot said,
Youve been complaining since you got here.
Now lets join Ezra as he reads from
the Law of God. The occasion is some time
after the Dedication of the rebuilt Temple, af-
ter the exile. Lets just place it about 510 BC.
Ezra presents the Law of God on a major feast
day, perhaps the New Year, perhaps what later
generations would call Yom Kippur. One thing
caught my eye in that frst reading from the his-
tory book, Nehemiah. Ezra continually tells the
people not to be sad, but instead be full of joy.
The Law of God results in joy, not sadness.
In the Gospel, Jesus begins his public
preaching in the equivalent of a synagogue in
his own town: The Spirit of the Lord is upon
me. Therefore he has anointed me. He has sent
me to bring glad tidings to the poor, to pro-
claim liberty to captives, recovery of sight to
the blind and release to prisoners. To announce
a year of favor from the Lord.
These two readings assert that the
Law of God, The Word of God should be
received in joy not in gloom. The Law of God
is seen as liberating, not something that is
restrictive.
Let us be honest now. This is not how
most of us view commandments, church teach-
ings, etc. But if we really think about it, we can
understand the joy and the freedom we have re-
ceived when we have adhered to the principles
of our faith life, our morality.
Many people in our times have de-
manded a freedom from all codes of moral
conduct. How happy are these people? Can a
person be a member of a family he or she loves
and receive love from that family if that person
faunts the basic code for living in the family?
A person cannot be happily married and at the
same time unfaithful. A person cannot grow in
love and be basically selfsh. If a lack of rules
brought happiness, than why do so many he-
donists commit suicide? If a code of moral-
ity is supposed to be somber and oppressive,
than why are the happiest people in the world
those whose lives revolve around a very strict
following of the Lord? Some of the happiest
people I have ever met are the Trappist monks
I made retreats with in Conyers, Georgia and
in Gethsemani, Kentucky. They have to get up
in the middle of the night. They have set hours
for work and prayer. Their diets are restricted.
They take vows of silence. Yet, they are happy.
These are not people who do not know any
better. They are some of the brightest people
of our generation. Nor are they social misfts,
people who could have no place in society. The
monastery will only accept people who have
been successful members of society. They are
people whose lives point us to the true source
of happiness. Honestly, I have never met Broth-
er Alpheus in a Trappist monastery. The monks
are happy. The Law of God has brought joy.
This material is used with permission of its author, Rev. Joseph A. Pellegrino, Diocese of St. Petersburg, FL
50 January 2014
Deal direct with authorized Factory Dealers
Offering members of the Los Angeles Fire Department
Courteous, Ethical, and Special Consideration in the purchase of your new car.
GALPIN FORD
#1 Volume Ford Dealer in the world for 20 consecutive years!
Lincoln / Mercury / Honda / Mazda / Volvo / Ford
Jaguar / Lotus / Aston Martin / Spyker / Galpin Auto Sports
For special pricing contact
Terry MillerFleet Sales & Leasing
15505 Roscoe Blvd, North Hills CA 91343
818-797-3800 l www.galpin.com
1.800.GO.GALPIN
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
GOUDY HONDA
Auto Leasing & Fleet Sales Since 1989
Fastest Growing Dealer in the Nation
1400 W Main St, Alhambra CA 91801
Eddie WangFleet & Lease Manager
626-300-4222 l 800-423-1114
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
HAMER TOYOTA, INC.
Camry / Celica / Corolla / Tundra
Tacoma / Sienna / Supra / Solara
11041 Sepulveda Blvd, Mission Hills CA
Ask for Steve DensonFleet Manager
steve@hamertoyota.com
818-365-9621
Specializing in hassle-free car buying
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
HONDA OF HOLLYWOOD
Honda - Sales and Leasing
Large Selection of Used Vehicles
6511 Santa Monica Blvd, Hollywood CA
Ask for Dave Erickson
323-466-3251 l Fax: 323-462-0187
DaveE@hondaofhollywood.com
MARK CHRISTOPHER AUTO CENTER
Chevrolet / GMC / Commercial Trucks / Cadillac / Buick
#1 Chevrolet Truck Dealer
No Hassle Environment
2131 Convention Center W ay, Ontario CA 91764
Christina StrangioFleet & Lease Manager
Please Call for Appointment l 909-975-3976
cstrangio@markchristopher.com
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
WEST COVINA TOYOTA SCION
There is simply no limits to satisfying our customers
1800 E. Garvey Ave, West Covina, Ca 91791
www.westcovinatoyota.com
Huge used car selection
Please Call Our Fleet Department for Appointment
Charlie TunaFleet Director
(626) 859-7400 x151 l charlietuna88@gmail.com
Israel WinkelmannFleet Sales & Leasing Manager
(909) 282-9566 l iwink@wctoyota.com
January 2014 51
by Mike Mastro, President/CEO
Los Angeles Firemens Credit Union
Y
our Board of Directors has continued
with our proud tradition of returning
a portion of the Credit Unions net in-
come to LAFCU member/owners in the form
of an Interest Refund and Extraordinary Divi-
dend Bonus. For accounts held at LAFCU dur-
ing 2013, we are excited to have returned our
largest payout in history.
Member payouts on December 31,
2013, were a result of the very healthy net in-
come that the Credit Union generated in 2013.
The remainder of our net income was allocated
to our reserves in order to continue to protect
the safety and soundness of this organization.
At Los Angeles Firemens Credit
Union, we look to 2014 with a renewed com-
mitment a commitment to provide our Fire
Family with a member experience second to
none, as well as an intent to continue to treat
our members as member/owners who share f-
nancially in the success of their Credit Union.
Its a commitment we take seriously. Its some-
thing were as passionate about today as we
were in 1935.
I invite you to visit Los Angeles Fire-
mens Credit Union. Stop in, call, or visit us
online and see how we can bring you good for-
tune with your fnances in 2014 and beyond.
PROFESSIONAL FINANCIAL ADVICE TO HELP
YOU SET SPECIFIC, ACHIEVABLE GOALS
Rewarding members with a year-end
payout is only possible through strong member
participation. Managing fnances at LAFCU for
everyday savings and loan accounts, however,
is just one component to fnancial stability. Set-
ting specifc, achievable long-term fnancial
goals is another component.
As an LAFCU member, you can get
a complete picture of your fnances when you
meet with a Financial Advisor at FIREHOUSE
Financial available through CFS*.
And with the start of the New Year,
its a good time to take stock of your fnances
and revisit last years resolutions. Do you re-
member your New Years Resolutions from last
year? Were they too ambitious? Not ambitious
enough? You may even consider keeping a
resolution that you didnt follow through with.
FIREHOUSE Financial can help.
FIREHOUSE Financial can provide
you with assistance with a no-cost, no-obliga-
tion, professionally prepared fnancial plan, ad-
vice and with organizing your investment port-
folio by setting some specifc achievable goals,
gathering the necessary fnancial information,
analyzing your unique situation, and recom-
mending a personalized strategy. The CFS Fi-
nancial Advisors at FIREHOUSE Financial are
your resource to help you allocate your assets
to better serve your fnancial and investment
objectives.
For personal assistance with your f-
nancial goals, I encourage you to contact a CFS
Financial Advisor at (800) 231.1626 today.
I hope this article reminds you to
make your fnances a priority. Dont put your
fnances and fnancial security on the back
burner. Set a goal. Make a plan. And - follow
through. Ensuring your fnancial future is the
priority of YOUR Credit Union. Stop in, call,
or visit us online at www.lafrecu.org. We are
here to help.
The more business we do together
as a Fire Family, the greater the fnancial
reward will be for all members!
Best wishes for the New Year!
Mike Mastro
*Non-deposit investment products and services are offered
through CUSO Financial Services, L.P. (CFS), a registered
broker-dealer (Member FINRA/SIPC) and SEC Registered
Investment Advisor. Products offered through CFS: are
not insured by American Share Insurance (ASI) or other-
wise federally insured, are not guarantees or obligations of
the Credit Union, and may involve investment risk includ-
ing possible loss of principal. Investment Representatives
are registered through CFS. Los Angeles Firemens Credit
Union has contracted with CFS to make non-deposit invest-
ment products and services available to its members.
52 January 2014
LAFD HISTORY - THE S.S. MARKAY FIRE
Submitted by Frank Borden Director of Operations, LAFDHS
A
t 2:09 a.m., June 22, 1947, horrendous
explosions unexplainably erupted from
the midship butane compartments.
Great gobs of flame and ugly black smoke
boiled hundreds of feet into the sky and cast a
shimmering glow over the channel waters. Like
hacks from a gigantic meat cleaver, the blast
split the Markay down to her keel and released
hundreds of thousands of gallons of petroleum
products, which spread out across the slip to-
ward the row of American President Lines one-
store warehouses, each of them 600-feet-long
and standing on a wooden wharf. The thunder-
clap explosions and concussions shattered win-
dows and triggered burglar alarms throughout
Wilmington, San Pedro, and Terminal Island.
Hot chunks of the Markays deckwork plopped
down in the backyard of a San Pedro house.
Telephone calls and box alarms were coming
in faster than the San Pedro signal office could
handle them. First to hit was Box 15 at Berth
90. A mile of open water separated the box
from the Markay. (Box 15 was the name ad-
opted by the Los Angeles area fire buffs when
they organized their club.)
Fireboat 2s barn-like house and the
fre station adjoining it rocked on its piling as
if an earthquake had struck. The dormitory lit
up with an orangish-glow. Acting Captain Jack
Gordon grabbed the frephone and told the sig-
nal offce that Boats 2 and 3 were casting off
and heading toward Mormon Island. Brainard
Choppy Gray started Fireboat 2s gasoline-
powered engines and the crew cast off while
First Mate John Planagan followed in the
smaller Fireboat 3. As the frefghters left the
boathouse, they saw for the frst time that they
were in for the fght of their careers. Except for
its bow, the Markay was engulfed in clouds of
fame and smoke. Turning north for the short
run up the channel to the Markay, they felt the
intense heat while they were still hundreds of
yards distant. Blazing petroleum products from
the slashed Markay spread a blanket of fames
completely across the 600-foot-wide Slip No.
1. The foating sea of fre fanned out under
wood pilings and warehouses. The explosions
had snapped the warehouses sprinkler piping.
As the freboat frefghters plowed closer, they
saw wisps of smoke turn black and they knew
that at least two of the warehouses were beyond
saving as was the Markay.
With the fames completely blocking
the channel and the Markay blazing furiously
on their starboard side and the warehouses
burning on their port side, the frefghters re-
alized a worse threat. The offshore breeze and
tide were pushing the fames upstream toward
a congested area of oil storage tank farms,
warehouses, a chemical plant, an oil refnery,
and the huge complex of the 20 Mule Team
United States Borax & Chemical Corporation.
Beyond those industries lay tens of thousands
of Wilmington homes.
The San Pedro Signal Offce dis-
patchers, meanwhile, sent Engines 36 and 53,
Truck 48, Salvage 36, Rescue 36, and Boat Ten-
der 36, a hose carrier. Acting Battalion Chief
Russell Biegel quickly radioed, Dispatch ev-
ery piece of apparatus in the battalion. Biegel
also requested more companies from elsewhere
in the city to the north. It was a long run for all
of these companies and the small force of bat-
talion 6 frefghters would have more than they
could handle, even after help arrived. Alderson
was notifed and immediately left for Wilm-
ington. Acting Division 1 Chief Floyd Adams,
responding from his Fire Station 66 quarters,
later recalled, I was a good 18 miles away
from the harbor. The panoramic glow of that
fre reminded me of color photos I had seen of
the London Blitz during World War II.
While land companies on both sides
of the channel were mounting a direct, heavy
stream attack on the
warehouses and pro-
tecting nearby petro-
leum storage tanks,
Fireboat 2 was the key
to stopping this fre
from extending up-
stream and touching
off a confagration in
Wilmington. Some-
how, the freboat fre-
fghters had to battle
their way through that
smoke shrouded sea
of fame, get to the
other side of it, turn
the boat around and
batter the fre head-
on with all guns and
rail-mounted nozzles
attacking the heavily-involved underwharf fre.
Boat 2 churned to within 500 feet of the Markay
and the warehouses. The roaring fames all but
overwhelmed the deafening rumbling of the
freboats engines. The intensity of the heat and
the likelihood of more explosions made further
going an almost certain suicide run. Gray sig-
naled the engine room to slow all engines. Boat
2 glided forward as frefghters opened valves
which sent cooling jets of water spraying the
wheelhouse. The heat nevertheless shattered
three windows and the starboard lights. Gray
held the wheel steady as Boat 2 edged closer.
Huge heat blisters puffed up along the boats
gray hull. Sensing the peril, Gray rang for full
speed astern, while the frefghters looked for
another way to plow into the fre. Alone aboard
Fireboat 3, Planagan spotted four Markay crew-
men dive off the stern. Throttling to full speed,
Planagan swooped his launch into the inferno
and pick up two of the crewmen, as heat melted
the boats windshield. The other crewmen dis-
appeared and Planagan sped to shore with the
badly-burned men who would survive.
Boat 2 frefghters tried another tactic
to penetrate the impenetrable. Nosing in close
to the burning warehouses and staying as far
distant as possible from the Markay, Boat 2
opened up with all its guns. Inch-by-inch, yard-
by-yard, Boat 2 slowly moved closer to the
Old Fireboat 2 had made it through the fre
on the water to atack the fre on the wharf.
The Markay burns in the background.
January 2014 53
600,000 square-foot expanse of fames burning
on top of the water. Dead ahead was a 1200
foot-long patch of foating fames completely
blocking the channel. Much of it was shroud-
ed in thick, choking, biting, stinging smoke.
With visibility nearly zero, there were other
risks to consider before entering that furnace.
Stray vapors from the boats gasoline engines
could ignite and blow the boat and all aboard
to bits. Gray had the added problem of avoid-
ing foating debris or becoming disoriented in
the smoke, smashing into the wharf itself. As
all these possibilities fashed through the fre-
boat frefghters thoughts, they knew there was
no time to debate them. Fireboat 2 had to bull
its way through that blazing, smoking hell, if
a worse disaster and more loss of life than the
crewmen of the Markay was to be averted.
The roaring fames and the churning
engines made radio orders from shore all but
impossible to understand. Gray turned the ra-
dio to full volume and heard Aldersons order
to plow in through and make a frontal attack,
which was exactly what Boat 2 frefghters
were planning to do. That order was the most
diffcult one I had to give in all my years as
chief, Alderson later recalled. I knew that I
could be sending those men to their deaths.
Gray rang for propulsion and Boat
2 churned into the maelstrom. No go. Smoke
swallowed the boat and swept into the wheel-
house. Gray could not see the compass. He
ordered all engines reversed. The frst attempt
had failed. Then the smoke momentarily lifted.
Boat 2 frefghters seized their opportunity to
attack. Gray rang for full speed ahead and the
boat stabbed into that wilderness of smoke and
fame.
Boat 2 frefghters none of them
wearing breathing apparatus, because they had
none- took a vicious smoke and heat beating
as they pointed their guns downward while
sweeping aside the foating fames. They shot
into the swirling smoke and fre, which closed
in behind them and shrouded the boat. It seemed
like an eternity as they held their breaths while
gritting their way through that 1200-foot-long
caldron. Boat 2 suddenly burst into clear wa-
ter. The smoke and fre was behind them. Gray
quickly brought the boat around. With all guns,
rail nozzles and the Big Bertha pounding away,
the freboat frefghters attacked the advancing
fames head-on and fought them to a standstill.
The fre would extend no further. The land and
water battle continued for days as the Markay
and the wharves continued to smoke. Ten bod-
ies were found. Two more never were. Losses
came to $5,037,500. Boat 2 and 3 frefghters
earned everlasting fame that night for an act of
courage and frefghting unparalleled in the 100
year-history of the LAFD. But not one medal
for bravery was ever awarded to any of them.
Author: A great story written by the late Paul
Ditzel
Assistant Chief Douglas Cully, LAFD (ret.)
WW II US Navy Submarine Service
Veteran - USS Seahorse (SS-304)

As you look at the curved end of the
LAFD Hayward, you will see two lugs. Any
rookie thats given a profciency drill on this
tool in last 45 years will call them the Cully
Lugs. But where did this name come from?
Doug Cully is a retired LAFD A/C.
In the early 70s, Chief Cully and his aide,
Dave Ford, came up with idea of putting two
lugs on the curved end of the Hayward for the
purpose of opening tight or frozen valves on
fre protection systems. Using Fords mechani-
cal background, they put the lugs on the Hay-
ward, and it was adopted by the LAFD.
What few people know is some of the
fascinating life history of the one of the origi-
nators of this modifcation. Doug Cully was
born in Los Angeles and graduated from Man-
ual Arts High School. At 18 he enlisted in the
Navy and was sent to Coeur D Alene for basic
training. Hard to imagine, but during the war
there were several Navy boot camps around the
U.S. The word foating around the camp was
that those who volunteered for submarine duty
would be sent to San Diego. It was thought the
torpedomans school was there also. Being that
was the school he desired and wanting to get
closer to home, when the time came he volun-
teered and was put on a train, which didnt stop
until it got to Chicago, home of the Great Lakes
Naval Training Center! So much for the accu-
racy of the rumor mill.
Eventually Cully made it to Torpedo-
mans A School in Norfolk, Va. and gradu-
ated from US Naval Submarine School in New
London, CT. From submarine school he re-
ceived orders to a submarine tender and was
later transferred to the USS Seahorse (SS-304),
a Baloa class submarine, operating out of Bris-
bane, Australia.
While on board the Seahorse, Doug
went on seven of the ten war patrols conducted
by his boat in enemy waters. On his ffth patrol
the boat was severely depth charged and was
kept below the surface for a prolonged period
of time. The boat sustained severe damage and
despite many leaks, they were able to surface,
under the cover of a rain squall and slip past
the enemy. With the deck guns inoperable, a
30 degree list to port, the boat was able slowly
limp back to Guam on one engine and then to
Pearl Harbor for repairs. While in Pearl Harbor
the submarine sailors were put up at the Royal
Hawaiian Hotel in Waikiki, for a well deserved
R & R.
The crew of the Seahorse was led by
Commander Slade Cutter, who would end the
war as the third highest scorer on the tonnage
sunk list. Besides the many successful patrols,
the Seahorse picked up and captured a downed
Japanese airman, who was very grateful for his
The Hayward with the Cully lugs.
Doug Cullys submarine, the USS Seahorse in 1943.
The USS Seahorse crew photo. Doug Cully is sitng
on the far lef end of the photo third row up.
54 January 2014
Calendar for January 2014
deliverance from Davey Jones Locker. While
on the way to their tenth war patrol, Japan sur-
rendered and the boat was recalled to Pearl
Harbor.
Cully was discharged from the Navy
as a 3rd Class Torpedoman (TM3), qualifed in
Submarines (SS) from the Terminal Island Dis-
charge Center.
Cully joined the LAFD in August,
1946, in the second class to be hired after the
end of the war. Some of the noteworthy inci-
dents he experienced are as a rookie on the
Ralph J Scott he was on the water tower on
the Markay Ship fre in, a captain on duty at the
Signal Offce during the Bel Air Brush fre in
1962 and as an engine captain at 66s during
the 1965 Watts Riots.
Chief Cully retired from the LAFD
as an Assistant Chief in 1977. He currently re-
sides in Playa Del Rey.
So the next time you hear the rookie
say these are the Cully Lugs you know how
they got the name and that a member of Amer-
icas Greatest Generation was instrumental in
their creation. THANK YOU for your service,
Chief Cully.
Submitted by Ed Banda, LAFD (captain re-
tired), USS Wahoo (SS-565) 67-70
Old Fireboat 2
Work continues under the tent on the
Scott every Friday morning. We have two
new volunteers who joined the work party.
Kevin Corcoran (Retired Fireboat Pilot Mike
Corcorans son) and his friend Lea Safer are
both hard workers and multi-talented and both
off on Fridays. We really appreciate their help
on the restoration project. We are constructing
a scaffolding to work on the boat tower. Mark
Howell engineered a moveable wood platform
to work from so that we can remove the rust
and paint the tower from top to bottom - one of
our most challenging jobs on the project.
Whats New at the LAFDHS
Volunteer Tim McHenry at the Hol-
lywood Museum has taken on an enormous
restoration task. He has started to restore the
Seagrave-Anderson City Service ladder truck
that has been in the Museum since we opened.
It was horse drawn in 1910 and later motorized
with a Seagrave tractor with a chain drive. The
New Fireboat volunteers Kevin Corcoran
and Lea Safer take a second for a break from
work for a photo at the bow monitor.
The tower scafolding under constructon. Gor-
don Briggs on the top platorm, Glenn Wilkinson
on the tower, Kevin Corcoran on the wood plat-
form, Mark Howell and Tom Moran below.
Tim McHenry at the wheel of
the 1905 Gorter Water Tower.
Members of Fire Staton 27-A
taking the 50 foot Banger ladder
of the Seagrave-Anderson.
The tow truck bringing the old truck
around DeLongpre and into the mu-
seum backyard. No power steering
and hard rubber tres.
Just a note to add from the Marine
Corps Birthday last November. It was again
a great event thanks to Bill Staples and Dave
Navarro. We served SOS on metal trays and of
course they all needed to be washed. Deputy
Chief Mark Stormes took off his uniform coat
and got it the sink with help from retired Cap-
tain Bill Finn and did all the dishes. Wish I had
a photo of that. Thanks Mark and Bill. See you
Nov. 2014.
rig was moved out of the museum and into the
backyard thanks to Tim and a lot of help from
the members of FS 27-A who unloaded all the
ladders from the rig. First we moved the kiosk
in front, then Tim got the Gorter Water Tower
started and drove it out of the museum onto the
Memorial Plaza. Next, a tow truck hooked up
the Saegrave-Anderson with Don Dodd tiller-
ing and towed it around to the backyard. Now
the work begins with an unknown completion
date. Updates as we go along with the project
or come to the museum on Saturday and see it
for yourself.
January 2014 55
CALL TO ORDER
President John Jacobsen called the meeting
of the Board of Trustees of the Los Angeles
Firemens Relief Association to order at 10:30
a.m.
ROLL CALL
MEMBERS PRESENT:
John Jacobsen, President
Juan Albarran, Vice President
Andrew Kuljis, Secretary
Trustee James Coburn
Trustee Robert Steinbacher
Trustee Doak Smith
Trustee Steven Domanski
Trustee Jeff Cawdrey
Trustee David Ortiz
Trustee David Peters
Trustee Gene Bednarchik
Trustee Rick Godinez
Trustee Chris Stine
Trustee Craig White
Trustee Chris Hart
Trustee Steve Ruda
Trustee Francisco Hernandez
Trustee Mark Akahoshi
Trustee Steve Berkery
Trustee Tim Larson Pension
Trustee David Lowe Pension
David Ned Smith - Executive Director
Controller Todd Layfer
MEMBERS ABSENT:
Trustee Michael Overholser (Excused)
Trustee Barry Hedberg Pension
Trustee Steve Tufts (Excused)
GUESTS:
David Wagner, Grapevine Editor
Dennis Mendenhall, Retired
Lee Kebler, L.A. Retired Fire & Police
Bob Olsen, L.A. Retired Fired & Police
Tom Stires, Retired
INVOCATION & Flag Salute
Rick Godinez led the invocation. David Lowe
led the fag salute.
RATIFICATION OF MINUTES
John Jacobsen entertained a motion to ratify
and dispense with the reading of the minutes
of the Board of Trustees meeting held October
2, 2013. David Lowe so moved. Jeff Cawdrey
seconded. There was no further discussion or
objections.
Motion carried to ratify and dispense with
the reading of the minutes of the Board of
Trustees held October 2, 2013.
INVESTMENT REPORT

Mike Breller from Beacon Pointe Advisors
provided the investment report for the
3rd quarter 2013. He reviewed the market
returns and performance for both U.S. and
International markets. He stated that the
portfolio is performing very well. He referred
to the portfolio allocation and indicated that
in August, the Board confrmed new targets
within the ranges. He stated that they have
increased the total Alternatives section by 2%
and decreased from International Equity. He
indicated that the Titan Masters Fund will be
closing to new investments because they do
not want too many assets that may affect their
investment strategies. He indicated with this
anticipation, they suggest that LAFRA pre-
fund Titan before they close with an additional
$1 million.
Robert Steinbacher made the following motion.
The committee recommends and I so move to
transfer an additional $1 million to the Titan
Masters Fund before December 1st from the
Artisan International fund. There was no
discussion or objections.
Motion carried to transfer an additional $1
million from the Artisan International fund to
the Titan Masters Fund.
PRESIDENT REPORT
1) Jacobsen indicated that he sent the Express
Scripts formulary change to the LAFRA staff
and Trustees for their review and to help them
answer questions from members. He mentioned
that he has received a few calls but has not seen
much disruption to the membership. He also
indicated that there have been issues concerning
workers comp. medications and members
trying to get them flled with multiple Express
Script cards. The City is now providing Express
Scripts card for workers comp medications
which creates member confusion with our PPO
Medical Plan Express Scripts card.
2) Jacobsen stated that per the By-laws, there
will be a dues increase effective January 1,
2014. He stated that this increase is tied to the
wage increase that active fremen are receiving
from the City. The amount includes the July
2013 one percent increase and the November
one percent increase.
3) Jacobsen mentioned that the Marketing
Department has produced an instructional
video for fag raising ceremonies. He indicated
that the video is easy to follow and stated that
they have done a good job. He also mentioned
that the video will be available by link on the
LAFRA website and he will provide Trustees
with a DVD copy.
VICE PRESIDENT REPORT
1) Juan Albarran reported on the IFEBP
Conference that several Trustees attended in
Las Vegas and mentioned that they spent time
listening to different speakers on investment
strategies and rebalancing portfolios as well as
other issues related to LAFRA.
BUILDING COMMITTEE REPORT
Steve Domanski reported that the Building
Committee met with the architect companies
selected for the interview process. He stated that
they have chosen Ware Malcomb Architects for
their capabilities for the building project. He
indicated that the Project Manager negotiated
a contract price of approximately $86K. He
presented the following motion.
The committee recommends and I so move to
contract with Ware Malcomb Architects as the
LAFRA design frm. There was no discussion
or objections.
Motion carried to contract with Ware
Malcomb Architects as LAFRAs design frm.
Jacobsen indicated that they tentatively
scheduled a frst phase meeting with the
architects on Tuesday, November 12th to begin
evaluating our needs and wants.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS REPORT
1) David Smith referred to the new building
operations and indicated that they have had a
couple of minor issues with tenants and their
leases. He indicated that they are working
through them and are negotiating.
2) David Smith reported that the new LAFRA.
org site should be up and running by Friday
evening. He stated that all content has been
migrated over to the new site.
LOS ANGELES FIREMENS RELIEF ASSOCIATION MINUTES OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES
November 06, 2013
56 January 2014
ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE
REPORT
Robert Steinbacher presented the following
motions.
The committee recommends and I so move to
pay the usual and customary bills in the amount
of $1,700,357.32. There was no discussion or
objections.
Motion carried to pay the usual and customary
bills in the amount of $1,700,357.32.
The committee recommends and I so move
to pay the professional fees in the amount
of $112,795.89. There was no discussion or
objections.
Motion carried to pay the professional fees in
the amount of $112,795.89.
The committee recommends and I so move
to enter into contract with Ware Malcomb
Architects for $86K plus reimbursable
expenses. There was no discussion or
objections.
Motion carried to contract with Ware Malcomb
Architects at $86K plus reimbursable
expenses.
MEDICAL COMMITTEE REPORT
Jeff Cawdrey presented the following motion.
The committee recommends and I so move to
accept the applications to the Medical Plan.
There was no discussion and no objections.
Motion carried to accept all applications to
the Medical Plan.
The committee recommends and I so move
to set the federally mandated member out-
of-pocket expense for medical PPO claims at
$6,350 beginning January 1, 2014. There was
no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to set the federally mandated
member out-of-pocket expense for medical
PPO claims at $6,350 beginning January 1,
2014.
RELIEF COMMITTEE REPORT
James Coburn presented the following motion.
The committee recommends and I so move to
pay:
The Sick & Injury benefts in the amount of
$16,553.20,
The Estate Planning beneft in the amount of
$6,225,
The Life & Accident Death Benefts of $48,000,
The Relief Death Benefts in the amount of
$67,500.
There was no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to pay the above Relief
benefts.
James Coburn read the names of members who
recently passed and asked for a moment of
silence from the Board.
MEMORIALS
Howard L. Gellinck
Edward L. Castle
Frank R. Lunn
Mathew G. McKnight
Mario Martinez
Ronald J. MacKinnon
David E. Heryford
Hans R. Wolf
Robert C. Orman
Monte M. Vance
James L. Choner
Paul A. Parish, Jr.
Harry G. Stanton
Charles F. Breazeal
Laurence C. Romer
ASSISTANCE COMMITTEE
James Coburn presented the following motions.
The committee recommends and I so move to
accept the donations in the amount of $4,145.15
to the Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemens
Fund. There was no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to accept the donations in the
amount of $4,293.26 to the Widows, Orphans
& Disabled Firemens Fund.
The committee recommends and I so move to
approve the fnancial assistance applications for
surviving spouses, active and retired members.
There was no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to approve the fnancial
assistance applications for surviving spouses,
active and retired members.
EMERGENCY ADVANCEMENTS
James Coburn presented the following motion.
The committee recommends and I so move
to approve the emergency advancement
applications for active and retired members.
There was no discussion or objections.
Motion carried to approve the emergency
advancement applications for active and
retired members.
GRAPEVINE/WEB REPORT
Chris Hart reported that the new Mac
computers for the Grapevine department are up
and running. He mentioned that they will sell
the other old Mac computers on Craigs List
and one will be used by Jody Houser.
SECRETARYS REPORT
Andy Kuljis reported that the elections were
running on schedule and indicated that they
received a few undeliverable ballots back due
to address changes. He indicated that they will
schedule a date for processing the ballots and
asked for volunteers to help.
SETTING OF DATES
1) El Coyote Salsa event November 19th
2) LAFRA Open House December 7th
3) Hook & Ladder Enduro March 22nd.
RETIREMENT DINNERS

1) Dale Farnes November 19th
Rancho Vista Golf Club
2) Joe Foley November 30th
Warner Center Marriott
3) John Durso January 18th
The Odyssey
EXECUTIVE SESSION
The Board entered into Executive Session at
11:55am.
The Board adjourned from Executive Session
at 12:11pm.
David Lowe motioned to approve the actions
discussed in Executive Session. Craig
White seconded. There was no discussion or
objections.
Motion carried to approve the actions
discussed in Executive Session.
ADJOURNMENT
John Jacobsen entertained a motion to adjourn.
Tim Larson moved. Craig White seconded.
There was no discussion and no objections.
Motion carried to adjourn. The Board of
Trustees meeting adjourned at 12:12 pm.

John Jacobsen, President
January 2014 57
Donations to Widows, Orphans & Disabled Firemens Fund
November 2013
ALVINA C. BAKULA in memory of my husband, CAPT. EDWARD C. BAKULA
ROGER W. SCHMITZ in memory of JOHN LEWANDOWSKI
ROGER W. SCHMITZ
ROY KLINE
JOHN KURY/SHERRY ROOK in memory of RALPH C. ROOK
ANNE L. WOLF & FAMILY in memory of CAPTAIN HANS R. WOLF
CATHERINE M. DEVINE in memory of my beloved husband BILL ANDY DEVINE
DANIEL LEON
DANIEL LEON in memory of MARIO A. MARTINEZ, JEFFREY K. JOHNSON &
MATTHEW G. MCKNIGHT
MARIE G. MICHELL in memory of my husband JOE MICHELL
JASON C. HANEY/FIRE STATION 43 in gratitude to FS 43
ANNE M. MATHEUS in memory of my husband THOMAS V. MATHEUS
MARVIN & LINDA D. EDER
VICTOR L. PATRON in gratitude to FIRE STATION 6
HELEN L. SCHULZ
SCOTT A. LENZ in memory of CHARLES BREAZEAL
JOHN J. ADAMS in memory of CHARLES BREAZEAL
RUTH E. FAIRRINGTON in memory of my husband GENE FAIRRINGTON
AND OUR CHAPLAINS
JOHN & AUDREY VERDONE in memory of our beloved grandson PRIMO JOHN VERDONE
MARCIA H. BREWER in memory of CAPTAIN RUSSELL MCMENAMIN
KALYN D. BOUKATHER in honor of my father PHILIP K. BOUKATHER
MARIE G. MICHELL in memory of my husband JOE MICHELL
KENNETH L. DAMERON in memory of CHARLEY BREAZEAL
JACK F. VAN EATON in memory of my wonderful wife CAROL VAN EATON
FIRE STATION NO. 75 from the FIRE EXTINGUISHER FUND
MARILYN CULLEY & FAMILY in memory of ROBERT ORMAN
FRED E. IHDE in memory of ROBERT ORMAN
LAVERNE M. MC LEOD in memory of MILAGROS MILA CASPER
JULIE R. WILLIAMS in memory of LILLIAN GOODWINE
JAMES G. MILLS in memory of ED TAPERT
MARILYN OSTBY in memory of GORDON OSTBY
JOE & BOBBY HERING in memory of HANS R. WOLF
MARK E. RYAVEC in memory of JOE MICHELL
JOHN D. HOLLAND in memory of JOE MICHELL
PATRICIA DUNAVANT in memory of ROY MIHLD
ANN NIX in memory of JOE MICHELL
NANCY URUBURU in memory of JOSEPH MICHELL
ROBERTA & MOIRA FITCH in honor of our neighbor HOWARD DUNFORDS BIRTHDAY
CAROLINE MEDAN in memory of JOSEPH O. MICHELL
BRIAN HITCHINGS / SIMI BREAKFAST CLUB from the SIMI VALLEY
BREAKFAST CLUB
LAVONNE ABNEY in memory of JOE MICHELL
ANGELINA A. KIRKPATRICK in memory of JOE MICHELL
RICHARD M. LITT / CARLA J. LITT in memory of JOSEPH MICHELL
MARLENE R. OBRIETAN in memory of HANS R. WOLF
CATHY RICHARDSON
HOLLY HAMNER in memory of JOSEPH O. MICHELL JR.
NORA RAMOS in memory of WALLACE DUGAN
DON & FAMILY SMITH in memory of WALLY DUGAN
THERESA STACK in memory of WALLY DUGAN
PHYLLIS FORNERET in memory of CAPT. JEFFREY JOHNSON
JERRY M. SCHNITKER in memory of ROBERT ORMAN
DEBRA & ERIC LEWIS in memory of CHARLES BREAZEAL
EILEEN WELCH in memory of WALLY DUGAN
LARRY & FAMILY WELCH in memory of WALLY DUGAN
DIANE CHESTER in memory of EDWARD CASTLE
RONALD DUGAN in memory of UNCLE WALLY DUGAN
HEIDI MOSS in memory of FRANK ARGUELLO
ROBERT CLIFFORD in memory of DOMINGO ALBARRAN
HARRY & SUSIE MACGREGOR in memory of HANS R. WOLF
JOHN M. SCHERREI in memory of DAVID HEREFORD
BRIAN HITCHINGS
AMANDA STRICKLAND C/O CLARENCE STAPEL
TODD SANDS
SHERRIE MARTIN in honor of CAPT. FRED MARTIN - Happy birthday Dad!
DIANNE KREFT in memory of ANNE V. BULLARD
JEFFREY SILVA in memory of MICHAEL SYLVIA
JOHN BESIGNANO in memory of ANNE BULLARD
MICHAEL BESIGNANO in memory of ANNE BULLARD
CHARLES LAKIN in memory of RAY HARO
RAYMOND BESIGNANO in memory of ANNE BULLARD
RAYMOND BESIGNANO in memory of ANNE BULLARD
LON & ROSEANNE DUNN in memory of JOSEPH MICHELL
PATRICK MICHELL in memory of JOSEPH O. MICHELL
MICHELE ROMAS ABDULAZIZ
KEVIN ROSSI in memory of RICHARD ANTHNOY MUNOZ from Fire Station 87
IZUMI TANAKA in memory of JOE MICHELL
58 January 2014
MERCHANDISE
FOR SALE
PROJECT CARS. 1954
Mercury. 1957 Ford. 1939
Ford 2-door sedan. 1940 fords
- 2 and 4 door sedans. 1940
sedan delivery. 1961 T-Bird
convertible. 1941 Railway
Express van. Miscellaneous
parts. Contact Jim McPherson
LAFD retired. (805) 501-8102
or email jimmymac567@
charter.net
REAL ESTATE
FOR RENT
HORSE PROPERTY, LAKE
VIEW TERRACE - Near FS24.
3 bedroom, 2 bath, newly
remodeled kitchen with granite
countertops and stainless
steel appliances. Formal liv-
ing room, plus family room. 3
pipe corrals, arena, 2 barns,
trail access. Motor home and
horse trailer parking. Gardener
included. Available October.
$2800/month. Eng. Ames
(818) 257-4549.
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
EXCEPTIONALLY UNIQUE
PROPERTY!! Two homes,
one featuring 3000 sq.ft. 2
story with basement, 1 car ga-
rage, 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths,
large living room, den, wood
foors, newer carpet, all new
dual pane windows and sliding
doors, ceramic tile counters in
kitchen. Ceramic foors, coun-
ters & showers in bathrooms.
Koehler tubs, sinks and toilets
though out home. Two 90%
effcient forced air heaters.
The guest house, 1024 sq. ft.,
has 2 bedrooms, a loft, laundry
room, dining room, living
room, newer carpet, tile foors
in kitchen and laundry room.
Wall heater. All this and much
more, must see to appreciate
how well these homes and
yard have been maintained.
A rare fnd for sure!! Gary A.
Wilson, Broker/Owner/Realtor
(01139925), (888) 856-0001
garywilson@garywilson.com
SERVICES
ALTERNATIVE & TRA-
DITIONAL Termite & Pest
Control - ECOLA Ecological
Solutions. Smart choices,
simple solutions. Problem
solved. Call for FREE ter-
mite estimate or pest quotes
over the phone - escrow and
inspections excluded. Fireman
wife Sue Fries - Termite Lady.
(818) 652-7171.
termitelady@ecolatermite.com
COUNSELING SERVICES.
Licensed Clinical Psychologist
Dr. Susan Purrington special-
izes in anxiety, depression,
relational diffculties, eating
disorders, spiritual or per-
sonal growth, marital confict,
family of origin issues. Find
a supportive and confdential
place for healing and growth.
Located in Old Towne Orange.
Questions or consultation:
(949)648-7875
susanpurrington@gmail.com
CRAIG SANFORD HEAT-
ING & AIR - Free estimates,
residential, commercial. Great
rates for LAFD and LAPD.
Toll free (877) 891-1414,
(661) 298-3070, FAX (661)
298-3069. State License No.
527114
GARAGE DOOR INSTALLA-
TION & SERVICE. Garage
doors and openers. Need to
replace your broken springs?
or does your door need repair,
even replaced? We do it all
from new product to repair-
ing old. Call (661) 860-4563
Grassroots Garage Doors, Inc.
Lic# 950020. Son of 35 year
veteran freman.
ITS TAX TIME AGAIN!
Specializing in Firefghter and
Paramedic Returns, Electronic
Filing available, year round
bookkeeping and accounting,
business and partnership re-
turns, payroll. All computerized
processing with over 30 years
experience. Call early for
an appointment around your
schedule. Robert Sanchez
LAFD-OCD retired (818) 367-
7017, cell (818) 216-1040.
MARRIAGE, FAMILY, IN-
DIVIDUAL COUNSELING.
Licensed therapist Cathy
Chambliss helps couples and
individuals work through con-
ficts in relationships, stress,
anxiety, affairs, communica-
tion issues, and divorce. All
counseling is confdential.
Insurance taken. Call Cathy at
(310) 303-9132. Offce located
in Hermosa Beach.
www.cathychamblissmft.
com
REAL ESTATE - TEMECULA,
ANZA. Looking for a home
or investment property? Free
personalized home search
delivered to your email and
updated daily...Temecula-late
model affordable homes. Anza
- Southern California Country
Living at its best. Mike Oldar -
Century 21 Award - Temecula
(951) 587-1930. email:
m_oldar@hotmail.com
RE# 01895536 (Father - Re-
tired LAFD)
REBECCA MARTIN LAND-
SCAPE. Architectural land-
scape design and installation.
A full service design/build land-
scape frm that creates unique
custom exterior environments
that will increase the value
of your home and bring you
years of outdoor enjoyment.
Rebecca Martin, LAFD wife.
(818) 216-3637. Lic# 936577.
rebeccamartinlandscape@
gmail.com
TAX ALERT FOR FIREFIGHT-
ERS. Dont lose thousands of
dollars during your profession-
al career to taxes! Let HEWITT
FINANCIAL GROUP prepare
your tax return. We specialize
in tax preparation and fnancial
planning for frefghters. We
offer a FREE REVIEW of your
last three years of tax returns.
Call us today at (800) 573-
4829 or visit us at
www.hewittfnancial.com
WINDOWS & PATIO DOORS
- vinyl replacement windows
& Patio doors. I also carry
aluminum, wood and entry
door systems. Rick Brandelli,
Capt. LACoFD, FS 8-C (800)
667-6676. www.GeeWin-
dows.com
VACATION
RENTALS
BIG BEAR CABIN - All sea-
son, restful views from decks.
Two story, sleeps 6, half mile
to lake, two plus miles to
slopes. Fireplace/Wood, cable
TV/DVD/VCR. Full kitchen,
completely furnished except
linens. Pets ok. $95/$105 (two
day minimum). $550/$600 a
week, Beep or Donna Schaffer
1+(760) 723-1475.
www.schaffercabin.com
BIG BEAR CABIN. 2 bed-
room, 2 bath, 2 story. Sleeps
8. Near ski slopes & lake.
Fireplace/wood, cable TV,
DVD,VCR, full kitchen. Com-
pletely furnished. $85/$95
per night. Minimum 2 nights.
Holidays extra. Weekly avail-
able. All Season. Sheri (909)
851-1094 cell or (760) 948-
2844 home.
BIG BEAR CABIN IN SUG-
ARLOAF - Cozy upgraded 2
bedroom cabin. Sleeps 8. Fire-
place, deck, Wif - internet and
cable TV. On a large lot with
sled hill. Fully furnished except
linens. $125 Winter $100 sum-
mer. Details and availability,
call/text/email Jessica (949)
874-5294
sugarloafcabin@cox.net
sugarloafcabin.com
BIG BEAR LAKES FINEST-
Deluxe lakeside townhouse,
2 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2 cable
TVs, HBO, DVD, WiFi, 2 wood
burning freplaces, laundry
room, tennis court, indoor
pool, sauna, spa, boat dock.
Fully equipped, including all
linens. Sleeps 6. 310-541-
8311 or email nmbigbear@
gmail.com
CATALINA BEACH COT-
TAGE - 3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
one block to beach, view, fully
equipped housekeeping unit.
Marci (818) 347-6783 or Clar-
ence (310) 510-2721.
CLASSIFIEDS
January 2014 59
FABULOUS CAYUCOS
BEACH CONDO. 180-degree
ocean front view, 1 bedroom, 1
1/4 bath, living room, sofa bed,
outdoor patio ocean front view.
Morro Bay/ Hearst Castle,
Central California Area. Steps
to beach and fshing pier.
Nearby public golf & tennis.
Weekly or monthly. Contact
Sondra (818) 985-9066.
JUNE LAKE CABIN -
2BR/2BA cabin with Carson
Peak view. Close to fshing &
skiing. Furnished, wood deck,
equipped kitchen, wood burn-
ing stove, tree swing, cable /
DVD/phone. Garage/ample
parking. $95/night plus clean-
ing fee. Email for pictures. Jeff
Easton 93-A (805) 217-5602.
junebound@gmail.com
LAKE ARROWHEAD BLUE
JAY CABIN. Charming 2-story
with creek, large deck, two
baths, complete kitchen, TV/
VCR/DVD, freplace, washer
& dryer. Walk to Blue Jay Vil-
lage. Sleeps 8. $90/night. NO
PETS! Bruce or Sue Froude,
(805) 498-8542.
LAKE HAVASU LANDING-
Waterfront, steps to the water.
Boat mooring out front, off-
road desert behind house. 3
bed/3 bath, fully furnished w/
linens. Direct TV/DVR, BBQ,
Casino, Grocery/Meat Market,
Launch Ramp, Marina with
Boat House, Gated Commu-
nity. No pets/smoking. $350
Dan Cook 310 418 1577.
LAKE HAVASU BEAUTY
FOR RENT - 3 bdrm, 2 bath,
1600 sq.ft. Fully furnished
with all amenities- Laundry &
BBQ. 13,000 sq.ft. lot. 3 car
boat-deep garage. 3 miles
from launch ramp. Close to
downtown shops & restau-
rants. View of the lake. Quiet
street in good neighborhood.
No pets. No smoking. Snow-
bird rates. Call Mike (661)
510-6246
MAMMOTH - 1 bedroom Sum-
mit condo, sleeps 6. Conve-
nient underground garage
parking. Jacuzzis, gym (pool/
tennis in summertime), shuttle
right outside! Across from
Eagle Lodge, Winter $110 per
night, Summer $80 per night
plus $65 cleaning fee and 13%
tax. All linens included. Drew
or Nancy Oliphant (661) 513-
2000 or email
mammoth241@aol.com
MAMMOTH CONDO. 1 Bed/
1.25 Bath sierra manors con-
do. In town, on shuttle route.
Sleeps 4 easily. Pets OK. Fully
furnished with new furniture/
HDTV/WIFI Woodburning
freplace. Hot Tub, sauna, W/D
in complex. Reduced rates for
FFs starting @100/nt
oldtownmammothcondo.
ownernetworks.com
mammothmtncondo@ya-
hoo.com
Ryan (310) 717 8483 for more
info/ rates
MAMMOTH CONDO. 2
bedroom, 2 bath, sleeps 6.
Near Canyon Lodge. Newly
remodeled recreation room
with pool and spa. Laundy
facilities, condo has been
beautifully remodeled. Photos
available on website. Winter
- $300 per night, Summer -
$150 per night. $150 cleaning
fee. Call for holiday terms and
pricing. Joseph Angiuli (626)
497-5083.
MAMMOTH CONDO-CHAM-
ONIX. 2 bedroom & large loft,
3 full baths, sleeps 8. 5 minute
walk to Canyon Lodge. Fully
furnished, TVs, VCR/DVD,
pool, spa, rec room, sauna,
linens included. Winter $175
weekdays, $195-weekends/
holidays; summer $125, plus
cleaning. No smoking; no pets.
Craig Yoder (909) 948-3659.
MAMMOTH CONDO Cozy
2 bedrooms, 2 bath. Fully
furnished, WIFI, 3 TVs, pool,
spa, walk to shuttle, Old
Mammoth area. Winter $115,
Summer $90, plus maid $126.
Includes linens. No pets, no
smoking. Call (310) 540-4648.
MAMMOTH CONDO NEXT
TO THE GONDOLA VIL-
LAGE Fully furnished, three
bedroom, two bath with towels
and linens, newly remodeled
kitchen, internet and cable
TV, pool and Jacuzzi. Walk to
the gondola, shops, restau-
rants and ski in on the new
comeback trail. Parking at the
front door. Winter: $250/night.
Summer $150/night. Holidays
$300/night. Cleaning is in-
cluded. Call Mike Whitehouse,
Retired, 805-987-6122, email:
btkwhitey@yahoo.com or
Bruce Galien, Retired, 661-
645-7448, email: luvbaja2@
aol.com
MAMMOTH CONDO AT
MAMMOTH ESTATES,
4BR/3BA, sleeps 10, fully
furnished, 2 TVs, DVDs, WiFi,
towels/linens, freplace. Full
kitchen. Walk to Gondola
Village and shuttle. Complex
has pool, spa, sauna, laundry.
Winter $335/night, Summer
$215/night, plus cleaning.
Includes city bed tax. No pets,
no smoking. Dory Jones (310)
918-0631 or Kelly Corcoran
(310) 619-5355
MAMMOTH CONDO - 2 bdrm,
2 bath, 2 TVs, phone, garage,
pool, jacuzzi, fully furnished
- exept linens. Near shuttle/
chair 15. Winter $125/night.
Weekends and Holidays $110
midweek. Summer $95/night.
$495/week. No smoking. No
pets. Jim Johnson (818) 992-
7564, FS 80C.
MAMMOTH CONDO rental.
Large 2bed/2bath winterset
condo. Fully furnished, across
from Vons, on shuttle route,
easily sleeps 8. Hot tub,
heated pool, sauna, full size in
unit W/D HDTV/WiFi through-
out, woodburning freplace,
pets OK FIREFIGHTER
DISCOUNTS, rates from $150/
night
facebook.com/mammoth-
mtncondo@yahoo.com
Ryan @ (310) 717-8483
MAMMOTH CONDO - Sierra
Manors Sleeps 7. 3 bedroom
2 1/2 bath. Fully furnished ex-
cept linens. 2 TVs/VCR/DVD,
stereo/CD. Dishwasher, mi-
crowave, sauna, jacuzzi, pool.
No smoking/No Pets. Shuttle
at door. Winter $155/night,
Summer $100/night, Plus $80
cleaning fee and City Bed Tax.
Brian & Karen Salvage LAFD
Retired (805) 499-7752.
MAMMOTH LAKES - One
bedroom, extremely charming
wildfower condo. Full ameni-
ties, close to shuttle. Antiques,
art, satellite TV, freplace.
Sleeps 4. Winter $110, Sum-
mer $85 plus cleaning fees.
Call Bill Clark (818) 371-6722
Email: shakesong@aol.com
MAMMOTH SKI & RACQUET:
Studio/loft, 2 bath, king bed,
sleeps 4. Full kitchen, TV,
VCR, DVD. Garage parking.
Walk to Canyon Lodge. Ski
back wall. 2 night minimum.
Winter $100/nite, $126 Fri, Sat
& Holidays. Summer $50/nite.
Plus $95 cleaning & linens.
Jeff & Lisa Moir. LAFD Air Ops
(661) 254-5788.
MAMMOTH SKI & RACQUET:
Walk to Canyon Lodge. Studio
loft sleeps 4. Queen beds, full
kitchen, 2 baths, garage park-
ing, TV, VCR, DVD. Winter
Sun-Thurs $100.nite; Fri & Sat
$115/nite plus cleaning fee
$100. Non smoking complex.
Joel Parker, LAFD retired.
email: cat25sailor@juno.com
or (213) 399-6534.
MARIPOSA/GOLD COUN-
TRY. North entrance to
Yosemite. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
sleeps 6. Newly built. Com-
plete kitchen, washer & dryer,
wi-f, satellite TV. Seasonal
rates. www.thecottageonev-
ergreenlane.com
Call 888-977-1006
MAUI BEACH FRONT
CONDO ON NAPILI BAY -
50 from water. Studios and
1 bdrm. Luxury furnishings +
full kitchen. All the amenities!
Mauis best snorkeling/beach.
All island activities & Ka-
palua within 4 minutes. 5-day
minimum, from $150 per night
(regularly $310 night). Call
Sherrie or Bill for info/reserva-
tions (805) 530-0007 or email:
pmimaui@aol.com
or visit: www.napilibaymaui.
com
60 January 2014
MAUI CONDO 1 AND 2
BEDROOMS. Centrally lo-
cated on beautiful Maalaea
Bay. Excellent swimming
and snorkeling; white sandy
beach. Minutes from golf,
tennis, fshing, shop-
ping, airport and resort
areas. Marsha Smith or
Jeanne McJannet. Toll
free (800) 367-6084.
www.maalaeabay.
com
MAUIS MOST BEAU-
TIFUL BEACH - Napili
Bay. Beautiful furnished
condo that sleeps 4.
Lanai/balcony, full
kitchen, king bed, fat
screen TVs/DVD,
ACs free WiFi (inter-
net), complimentary
maid service, compli-
mentary coffee every
morning and breakfast
on Fridays. Special
frefghters discount
- Best value in West
Maui! Nice pool & BBQ
area - Close to beach!
(800) 336-2185 www.
napilivillage.com
Don Sprenger - retired
LAFD (949) 548-5659
PALM DESERT-3
bed/2bath, one level.
New re-model, fully fur-
nished w/linens. Cable
TV/DVR, Private Patio,
BBQ, Laundry, Garage,
Gated Community,
2(Pools, Jacuzzis,
Tennis Courts). Near
College of the Desert.
$175 Dan Cook 310
418 1577.
SOUTH LAKE TAHOE
Romantic Chalet Fam-
ily getaway. 3 bed/2
bath plus loft. Sleeps
810. Cable TV, wash-
er/dryer, microwave,
woodburning stove. 7
minutes to casinos and
Heavenly. Located in
Tahoe Paradise. $105
per night plus clean-
ing. Call Shawn or
Rose Agnew at (661)
250-9907 or (661) 476-
6288.
VACATION
VEHICLES
LUXURY RV FOR RENT.
New class A 40 motorhome.
Sleeps 8, bunk beds, 4
slides, 4 TVs, fully loaded.
$270/day (with active/retired
frefghter/police discount),
includes cleaning fee and
unlimited miles. 3-day mini-
mum, tow dolly available.
Get more, pay less. Call
Shawn, LAFD. (888) 540-
4835. www.ocdreamrv.
com
CALL OR EMAIL US FOR MORE INFORMATION
Eric Santiago - eric@lafra.org - (323) 259-5231
Dave Wagner - editor@lafra.org - (323) 259-5232
January 2014 61
Engine Company 38 occupied this quarters at 124 East I Street in Wilmington from 1917 until 1948.
Photo courtesy of the Fire Station 38 collection via LAfre.com
January Grapevine_2014.pdf 1 12/4/13 9:21 PM
Los Angeles Firemens Relief Association
815 Colorado Blvd FL 4
Los Angeles CA 90041-1745