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ACP Functional Description

May 1998

Universal Network Access

ACP 10

ACP 50

ACP 70

May 1998 Order Number 2000-900 Document Number 950404-01 Rev E

Copyright
E TELEMATICS INTERNATIONAL, INC., a member of the ECI Telecom Group, 1998. All rights reserved. Telematics International, Inc. reserves the right to use or distribute freely any information supplied by readers without incurring obligations. Any unauthorized use, duplication, or distribution of this document or any part thereof without the prior written consent of Telematics International, Inc. is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States of America.

Disclaimer
Telematics International, Inc. reserves the right to improve this document, its contents, and any products described herein at any time without prior notification. The information in this document has been reviewed for accuracy, clarity, and completeness. Telematics International, Inc. is not responsible for any errors or omissions in this document. If you find any errors or have any comments, please forward them to: Telematics International, Inc. Information Management & Development Dept. 26630 Agoura Road Calabasas, California 91302–1988 U.S.A.

Contents

Contents
Introduction
ACP 10 Platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACP 50 Platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACP 70 Platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 5 7

Architecture Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACP System Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9
9 9

I/O Connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ACP 50 Communication Expansion Modules (CEMs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACP 50 Communication Adapter Modules (CAMs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACP 70 Optional Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . External Interface Converters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . lnternal Interface Converters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13
13 13 14 14 14

Level 1 Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

17

Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Clocking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Software Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . System Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

19 21

Extensive Diagnostic Capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Additional Network Management Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Automatic Node Protection Switching (ANPS) Support . . . . . . . . . . . .

25

Connecting the Nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Configuring the Nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Failure Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

X.25 Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Level 2 Frame Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Level 3 Packet Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General X.25 Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X.25 Multipoint Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

27
27 27 28 31

DSP Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Why Bisync? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DSP within the X.25 Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connection Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trace Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33
33 33 33 34 34

Frame Relay Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DTE and DCE Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Outbound Congestion Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inbound Congestion Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

35
35 35 36 36

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

iii

Frame Relay Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Monitoring Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Trace Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Asynchronous Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Device Connectivity Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Host Connectivity Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X.3 Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X.28 Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X.29 Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X.121 Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

38
38 38 38 39 40 42 42

SNA Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Why Combine X.25 and SNA? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACP TPAD and HPAD Value-added Emulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automatic Error Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PU and LU Switching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3270 SNA Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3770 SNA Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5250/5294/5394 SNA Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connections to a Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enhanced Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

43
43 43 43 43 44 44 44 44 45

IP Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Routing Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ELX Transceivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LAN/WAN Interface Connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Point-to-Point (PPP) Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IP Transporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PPP/SLIP/X.25 Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PAP/CHAP and RADIUS Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Proxy ARP for IP Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

46
46 48 48 48 48 49 49 49 50 50 50 53 54

TPP Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Why TPP? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FOP and BOP Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TPP Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connection Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trace Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

56
56 56 56 57 57 57

POS Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terminals and Hosts Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connection Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Programmable Message-Based Switching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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58 58 58 59 61

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ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Contents

ISDN BRI Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How ISDN Basic Rate Interface (BRI) Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISDN Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . National ISDN Variations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACP ISDN Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

63
63 63 64 64

Internal Modem Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modem Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACP 50 Internal Modems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advantages of Internal Modems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Synchronous Dial-out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Asynchronous Dial-out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dial-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACP Internal Modem Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

66
66 66 66 68 68 68 68

Functional Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

70

Personality Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Nature of Performance Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Guidelines to Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Memory, Software, and Hardware Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . User Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

75 77

User Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Charges, Terms, and Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Comments, Questions, Corrections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

Index

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ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Statement of Corporate Policy & Direction Year 2000 Millennium Change
POSITION: Telematics International will ensure that all its products conform to the upcoming millennium change. Telematics’ products employ a suite of standard product software and, in some cases, software products either custom developed or maintained by Telematics. PROCESS: We have raised internal awareness by conducting a set of quality checks against the products. We have also specified the nature of the necessary tests and have disseminated this information to the responsible individuals in all geographic locations that participate in verification activities. As products pass through their development and maintenance cycles, these specific verification tests will be conducted to ensure year 1999-to-2000 transition and year 2000 resilience. Required software changes and/or hardware dependencies will be identified and implemented. Similarly, custom software will be verified and modified, if necessary, according to the terms of specific customer contracts. A synopsis of the product tests planned is as follows:

H H H H H H

Output will be year 2000 compliant. Products that possess the ability to set clocks will be 2000 compliant. Products that need to compute differences between time stamps will be 2000 compliant. In products containing a clock, the clock will be able to successfully perform a roll-over from December 31, 1999 to January 1, 2000. The year 2000 will be treated as a valid leap year. Products will function correctly in situations where network components physically reside in time zones that span millenniums.

Where Telematics offers third party suppliers’ products as part of our product solution, we will work with those suppliers to ensure that the time-keeping requirements for the next millennium are met. Where any other non-Telematics supplied third-party products or customer-generated non-Telematics software may be interfacing with Telematics products, the customer is responsible for the year 2000 compliance. AVAILABILITY: Upon delivery of all newly developed products in 1998, the millennium requirement will be already addressed. Upon delivery of revisions (function or maintenance) to existing products, the millennium issue will be addressed. The goal for all products to be millennium-compliant is by July 1, 1998. Customers with products that are either under warranty or are covered under a software maintenance and update contract will receive the millennium-compliant software updates as part of the normal update process. For others, an upgrade program will be announced.

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Revision History
This Revision History begins with Revision D. Revision D: Revised certification information; updated ACP data sheet and environmental/operational specifications. Updated IP information, including PAP/CHAP and RADIUS server features, plus proxy ARP. Updated POS applications; added asynchronous dial-out modem application; and added two Voice/Fax Module option information. Added new system management options and updated Functional Characteristics tables. Added BEST BUY (best price) items to ordering forms. Added ACP 50 hex V.28 card and octal modem V.34 card ordering information. Moved obsolete product numbers to separate Obsolete section. Revision E: The following changes were made to the manual:

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

Added a Statement of Corporate Policy & Direction for Year 2000 Millennium Change issues (see page vii). Updated ACP 50 product data to include the support of T1/E1 CSU/DSU hardware and dual 48VDC power supplies (see pages 5–6). Eliminated all ACP 70 Voice/Fax Option (VFO) information from the manual. (The VFO has been discontinued.) Added information regarding the new T1/E1 CSU/DSU management module that is supported on the ACP 50 by version 4.0 ACP software. (See pages 2 and 20.) Added information about Automatic Node Protection Switching (ANPS) — the protective switching feature available to ACP 50 units with 4.0 software. (See page 25.) Added descriptions of the available CEMs, CAMs, and optional modules that are available for use on the ACP 50 and ACP 70 (see pages 13– 14). Updated CEM/CAM table (Table 5) to include V.32 and V.34 modem CEM/CAM model numbers and information on the octal DMA III/PS CEM, octal DMA/PS CAM, and T1/E1 CSU/DSU CAM (see page 15). Added information on new system management options: SNMP Agent, FTP, and TELNET Server (see page 23). Updated information regarding supported X.25 packet size (see page 27). Added new descriptions/figures of SNMP, FTP, and TELNET to the IP protocol section (see page 46). Added information regarding the new OSPF routing capability supported by version 4.0 software (see page 48). Updated Point of Sale figures and feature descriptions (see pages 58– 61). Updated ACP 50 Functional Characteristics Version 1.13 table (Table 15 on page 72) to indicate the correct PU-LU type for SW/AS/SNA/TP/BR software (model number 5Bx9). Updated ACP 50 Functional Characteristics Version 2.xx table (Table 16 on page 73) to reflect correct modem async port allowance and to include software p-kit 5P09. Added new ACP 70 2.xx table (Table 18 on page 74). Added new ACP Functional Characteristics Version 4.xx tables (Tables 17 and 19 on pages 73– 74) to show the capabilities of new software versions. Updated ACP 50 and 70 Software and Hardware Matrixes (Tables 21 and 22 on page 76) to include Version 4.xx software support information. Removed ordering section from this manual. The standard ordering section is now available as a separate document (ACP Order Form – Standard) under model number 2002-900 (part number 950493-01).

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ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Introduction
Telematics ACP (Access Communication Processor) networking products offer a variety of cost-effective ways for users to access a range of network services. Telematics ACPs can be deployed as customer premises equipment (CPE), central office/concentration equipment within public networks, or as user access and switching equipment within private data networks. Telematics International is also a pioneer in offering highly reliable, fast products for Point of Sale (POS) transactions as well as for frame relay, Internet/Intranet, and X.25-based systems (see Figure 1). The ACP platforms available are: ACP10 ACP 50 ACP 70 ACP models are available with a variety of protocol and interface modules to support various access and networking functions.

Universal Network Access

X.25

POS

INTERNET

FRAME RELAY

Figure 1.

Telematics Product Coverage of Key Network Systems

Designing for the future: Universal Network Access TM
Universal Network Access is designed to offer single-source access to all user connectivity needs. Universal Network Access offers choice: the ability to choose from a host of different access protocols and network service options. The Universal Network Access platforms include the ACP 10, ACP 50, and ACP 70. With Universal Network Access, Telematics customers will be able to connect their remote worksites using any variety of access protocols and network connections. For access to networks, the ACPs transport a wide range of protocols including async, frame relay, X.25, TCP/IP, POS, SNA, BSC, SLIP, and PPP, or, in a “transparent” mode, any bit or byte synchronous protocol. On the network side, users select the service they require, whether it is basic rate ISDN, frame relay, X.25, IP, PPP, or even a leased line into a private network. As user needs change, they are able to change access protocols, network services or both without having to buy another access device. All network service and access protocol changes are available from the network manager software. The flexibility of Universal Network Access allows users to send LAN data across an IP connection at the same time that they are sending async or SNA across X.25. Universal Network Access products combine the functionality of a PAD, FRAD, switch, router concentrator, multiplexer and ISDN terminal adapter, within a single device.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

1

I The Automatic Node Protection Switching (ANPS) mod-

ule provides automatic backup of an entire node. This is done automatically and the network manager is informed of a failure through an SNMP trap. Async connections are accomplished by using “Y” cables.
I The Asynchronous module allows the attachment of async

packets or frames for routing over the network. The IP implementation also supports asynchronous SLIP (serial line IP) and synchronous/asynchronous PPP (point-to-point protocol) users over directly connected asynchronous lines or via the PSTN through the internal modem card. The IP implementation may also include the PPP/SLIP/ X.25 gateway for specific personality kits. PPP users have security available through PAP/CHAP and RADIUS servers. Proxy ARP for IP addressing may be used with IP, SLIP, and PPP serial ports. I The TPP module transports synchronous byte- and frameoriented protocol data within an X.25 packet. The TPP implementation provides a pass-through function for other synchronous traffic alongside the SNA, async, X.25, and 3270 DSP traffic supported by the specific ACP communication modules.
I The ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) BRI

start-stop terminals, host computers, and PCs. In support of an asynchronous PAD function, it provides data traffic concentration from a number of async devices to the X.25 networking module. It implements all the packet assembly/disassembly functions and end-to-end controls and procedures specified in CCITT recommendations X.3, X.28, X.29, and X.121.
I The X.25 module provides interconnection and call routing

between X.25-compliant equipment, such as PADs, X.25 host computers, gateways, routers, or other switches within the network. Standard functions include packet data switching, concentration, routing, error recovery, and network flow control. It supports the CCITT X.25 recommendation allowing the connection of different types of X.25 equipment and networks.
I The Frame Relay module provides the interconnection

(Basic Rate Interface) module provides the 2B+D ”S/T” interface with 2B (bearer) channels and one D (data) channel. The ISDN implementation supports X.25 packet switching over the B channels (and D channel in the future), and supports both incoming and outgoing circuits.
I The Modem module supports the internal software-driven

and routing between all frame relay-compliant equipment within the network, such as FRADs, frame relay host computers, routers, and gateways. This module supports the LMI ANSI, ITU, and GO4 (Group of 4) recommendation, allowing connection to different types of frame relay networks and equipment.
I The SNA module allows the attachment of SNA/SDLC

modems. It offers support for a range of modem standards, including V.32bis as well as V.42bis data compression. The internal modems support a range of dial-up services including async, X.25, SLIP, and PPP.
I The POS module allows the attachment of POS terminals

cluster controllers and host computers to either private or public data networks. It provides conversion from SNA to X.25, and vice versa, and can operate in either standard IBMr QLLC protocol mode, compatible with NCP/NPSI software, or in VLU (Virtual Logical Unit) mode. VLU mode allows 3270/5250 devices to operate in a multi-host environment. Host support includes the IBM system 370, S/3x, and AS/400.
I The DSP module allows the attachment of 3270 BSC

and host computers to either private or public data networks. POS supports ISO 8583, VISAI, VISAII, APACS, SPDH, and TINET protocols. POS features include “fast connect” modems and local protocol spoofing which both help reduce overall transaction response time.
I The internal T1/E1 CSU/DSU module provides direct con-

EBCDIC controllers. It provides protocol conversion from 3270 BSC to X.25 using the de facto DSP packet level protocol. DSP implementation allows 3270 displays and printer devices to operate in a multi-host environment.
I The IP module allows the interconnection of Ethernet

nection to T1 or E1 services. This eliminates the need to purchase an external CSU/DSU (Channel Service Unit/ Data Service Unit). The CSU/DSU is a dual-port device and is fully manageable by using the ACP System Manager (SYM) software module. The interface for T1 is a 100 ohm RJ45 connector. The interface for E1 is a 120 ohm RJ45 connector. There are three LED indications per port to indicate “on line,” “yellow alarm,” and “red/blue” alarm or loss of frame. ACP products can run certain combinations of the above modules concurrently enabling maximum access and networking functionality.

LANs over X.25, frame relay, or IP networks for remote access to LAN services such as E-mail, file transfers, and TELNET sessions. The IP module accomplishes this by fragmenting the Ethernet TCP/IP datagrams into smaller

2

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

ACP 10 Platform

Highlights
I Based on Intel 80C188 10 MHz CPU. I 6 multi-protocol ports. I 1 DMA-driven port at 64 kbps. I EPROM- or Flash memory-based operating code
ACP 10 Front Panel

cartridges (“personality modules”).
I 128 KB RAM expandable to 256 KB. I Supports X.25, async, SNA, DSP, TPP, and frame

relay.
I Local and remote diagnostics. I Centralized management via INF, SmartView, and
Back Panel with AC Power Supply

OMS.
I Optional V.11 or V.35 external adapters. I 110/220V switch-selectable power supply. I 75,000 hours – Calculated MTBF (basic unit).
Back Panel with DC Power Supply

The ACP 10 is a low-end, self-contained Access Communication Processor that offers the same access and networking features as the other ACP platforms described in the pages that follow. The base unit houses a personality module, six universal communication ports, and non-volatile memory for configuration parameters. The ACP 10 is an ideal choice for sites with only a few devices requiring access to the core network. The ACP 10 personality module is available in two versions: a low-cost EPROM module, which contains the ACP 10 operating code, or a more flexible, flash-based module that is

also able to receive operating code non-intrusively over the network. Combinations of access protocols are available for either personality module in code sets (Type 2, Type 3, etc.). A protocol enable key on the personality module determines the availability of access protocols, and an optional memory enable key expands the memory by 128 Kbytes. The ACP 10 has six V.24 ports, three of which provide a regulated power feed for a specially designed, optional V.11 and V.35 external converter. It is also available with a choice of power supplies: 110/220 VAC or 48 VDC.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

3

110V/220V Voltage Selector DDB15–S Cable Connectors EPROM-based Module (Extended)

Personality Module V.11 or V.35 Converter Kit

Base Unit 110/220 VAC IEC Power Line Connector or 48 VDC Terminal Block

Flash-based Module

ACP 10 Base Unit, Personality Module, and V.11/V.35 Converter Kit.

Operational
Processor Type Code Storage in bytes RAM in bytes Options Protocols Supported 80C188 10 MHz CPU 512K PROM or Flash 128K to 256K V.11 /V.35 external adapters 48VDC power supply X.25, async, SNA, DSP, TPP, and frame relay

Safety
UL 478/4 and CSA 22.2 No. 220, or UL 1950 and CSA 22.2 No. 950, respectively, where applicable. IEC 950: 1991 EN 60950: 1992 EN 41003: 1993

Emissions
EN 55022: 1994, Class A FCC Part 15, Class A

Electrical
AC Power Frequency Power Dissipation DC Power Current Frequency Power Dissipation 100V to 130V 1.4 Amp max. 50/60 Hz ± 2% < 40 BTU/hr –40 to –58 VDC 0.3 Amp DC N\A < 40 BTU/hr 198V to 264V 1.3 Amp max. 50/60 Hz ± 2% < 40 BTU/hr

Export Classification
All Telematics products are classified by the U.S. Department of Commerce Export Administration under Export Commodity Control Number (ECCN) 1567A. Any export of these products outside the United States requires prior approval from the U.S. Department of Commerce or another applicable agency of the U.S. Government.

Headquarters
Corporate Headquarters ECI Telecom-Telematics 1201 W. Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 (954) 772-3070 (800) 833-4580 FAX (954) 351-4405 Asian Headquarters ECI Telecom (HK), Ltd. 2806 China Resources Bldg. 26 Harbour Road Wanchai, Hong Kong 011-852-2824-4128 FAX 011-852-2802-4411 Central European Headquarters ECI Telecom GMBH Buropark Oberursel In der Au 27 61440 Oberursel, Germany 011-49-6171-6209-0 FAX 011-49-6171-5405-7 Western European Headquarters ECI Telecom, Ltd. Isis House Reading Road, Chineham Basingstoke, Hampshire RG24 8TW, United Kingdom 011-44-1–256-388-000 FAX 011-44-1-256-388-143

Environmental
Operating Temp. Storage Temp. Shipping Temp. ă0_ĂtoĂ45_ C (41_ĂtoĂ113_ F), 20%ĂtoĂ80% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ51__ C (-4_ĂtoĂ125_ F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ60_ C (-4_ĂtoĂ140_ F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity

Physical
Height Width Depth Weight (fully configured) 72 mm (2.9”) 295 mm (11.5”) 235 mm (9.1”) 4.5 kg (9.5 lbs)

4

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

ACP 50 Platform

Highlights
I Based on Intel 80486 50 MHz CPU. I Supports up to 24 internal V.32bis or V.34 modems. I Configurable with up to 48 async ports. I Configurable with up to 26 sync ports which may include 2 sync ports

at 2Mbps.
I Configurable with up to 1 Ethernet port. I Disk- or PCMCIA-based software upgrades via a network connection. I Scaleable using communication expansion modules (CEMs). I Modular, easy field upgrades & serviceability. I Supports X.25, async, SNA, DSP, POS, TPP, frame relay, IP routing,

ACP 50 Front Panel

ISDN, TELNET Client, TELNET Server, FTP server, SNMP, and OSPF.
I Local and remote diagnostics. I Centralized management via INF, SmartView, OMS, or other SNMP

32-port, 10-link Back Panel with ELX Port

managers.
I 92,000 hours – Calculated MTBF (basic unit and components). I 100V–264V auto ranging power supply. I 27, 48, or dual 48 VDC power supplies. I Optional internal T1/E1 CSU/DSU. I Redundancy option available when using the ANPS feature of Version
Stretch Chassis Back Panel with Three Modem Cards

4.0 software (together with required hardware).

The ACP 50 provides an open platform with the highest price/performance ratio of all the ACP products. Its demonstrated success in the market is a result of expanding the character/packet processing power and the number of high speed links that can be supported in a single ACP node. The ACP 50 uses the same field-proven software modules as the other ACP platforms. The ACP 50 base unit includes the following Field Replaceable Units (FRUs) housed in a forced-air cooled metal chassis with an expansion backplane for CEM/CAM FRUs (see figure on next page): I AC Power and Disk Module.
I Optional 27, 48, or dual 48 VDC Power and Disk Modules. I 3.5-inch disk drive (high density). I “Personality module” printed circuit board without enable

The 486 CPU disk controller allows the ACP 50 to support up to 1.44 MB formatted address space on the 3.5-inch disk drive, allowing concurrent execution of an extended set of access and networking protocols. The ACP 50 uses an integrated 50 MHz 486 CPU (25 MHz double clock), supporting the following types of high-performance CEMs: I Octal DMA CEM with 8 DMA-assisted universal ports.
I Octal modem CEM with 8 DMA-assisted universal ports. I Hex CEM with 16 async ports. I ELX CEM with 2 VHSL links and one 10Base5 Ethernet

port, with optional PCMCIA card. (The ELX CEM can connect to either an ELX or T1/E1 CSU/DSU CAM.)
I ISDN Basic Rate Interface CEM with 1 VHSL link and 2

keys.
I 486/50 MHz CPU with up to 32 MB of memory and a

ISDN S0 RJ45-type 8-way plug interfaces (for Version 1.xx software only). A fully-populated chassis can support two VHSL links plus up to 24 high-speed universal ports or 48 async ports.

high-performance, 32-bit microprocessor.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

5

Communication Expansion Module (CEM)

Power and Disk Module Rear Panel Backplane ELX/VHSL or BRI/VHSL CEM ELX/VHSL, BRI/VHSL, or T1/E1 CSU/DSU CAM

Chassis DB-25 Cable Connectors ELX/Communication Adapter Module (CAM)

ACP 50/486 Motherboard

ACP 50 FRUs

Operational
Processor Type Code Storage in bytes RAM in bytes Options 80486 at 50 MHz 1.44 MB (disk) 4 MB Hex , Octal DMA, ELX, Octal Modem, & ISDN Basic Rate Interface cards; internal T1/E1 CSU/DSU V.11 /V.35 external adapters; 27, 48, or dual 48 VDC power supplies X.25, async, SNA, DSP, TPP, frame relay, IP, ISDN Basic Rate Interface, PPP, POS, and IP

Safety
UL 478/4 and CSA 22.2 No. 220, or UL 1950 and CSA 22.2 No. 950, respectively, where applicable. IEC 950: 1991 EN 60950: 1992 EN 41003: 1993

Emissions
EN 55022: 1994, Class A FCC Part 15, Class A FCC Part 68 (approved for all components requiring certification).

Protocols Supported

Export Classification
All Telematics products are classified by the U.S. Department of Commerce Export Administration under Export Commodity Control Number (ECCN) 1567A. Any export of these products outside the United States requires prior approval from the U.S. Department of Commerce or another applicable agency of the U.S. Government.

Electrical
AC Power Frequency Power Dissipation 100V to 130V, 2.5 Amp maximum 198V to 264V, 1.6 Amp maximum 50 Hz/60 Hz ± 2% < 300 BTU/hr

Headquarters Environmental
Operating Temp. Storage Temp. Shipping Temp. ă5_ĂtoĂ45_ C (41_ĂtoĂ113_ F), 20%ĂtoĂ80% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ51_ C (-4_ĂtoĂ125_ F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ60_ C (-4_ĂtoĂ140_ F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity Corporate Headquarters ECI Telecom-Telematics 1201 W. Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 (954) 772-3070 (800) 833-4580 FAX (954) 351-4405 Asian Headquarters ECI Telecom (HK), Ltd. 2806 China Resources Bldg. 26 Harbour Road Wanchai, Hong Kong 011-852-2824-4128 FAX 011-852-2802-4411 Central European Headquarters ECI Telecom GMBH Buropark Oberursel In der Au 27 61440 Oberursel, Germany 011-49-6171-6209-0 FAX 011-49-6171-5405-7 Western European Headquarters ECI Telecom, Ltd. Isis House Reading Road, Chineham Basingstoke, Hampshire RG24 8TW, United Kingdom 011-44-1–256-388-000 FAX 011-44-1-256-388-143

Physical
Height Width Depth Weight (fully configured) 215.9 mm (8.5”) 431.8 mm (17”) 355.5mm (14”) 15.4 kg (34 lbs)

6

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

ACP 70 Platform

Highlights
I Based on Intel 80486 25 MHz CPU. I Integrated Ethernet AUI port. I Up to 14 universal sync/async ports at 64kbps and

up to 2 ports at 2 Mbps.
I PCMCIA-based for software configuration upgrades

ACP 70 Front Panel

via network.
I Scaleable by using optional modules (Quad CCM or

ISDN BRI port modules).
I Supports up to 4 ISDN S0 interfaces. I Supports X.25, async, SNA, DSP, POS, TPP, frame
Back Panel with two Quad CCMs

relay, IP routing, ISDN, TELNET client, TELNET server, FTP server, SNMP, and OSPF.
I Local and remote diagnostics. I Centralized management via INF, SmartView, OMS,

or other SNMP managers.
I 77,000 hours – Calculated MTBF (basic unit). I 100V–250V auto ranging power supply.
Back Panel with four ISDN BRI Port Modules

The ACP 70 provides the greatest flexibility to support a range of access protocols and network services. The ACP 70 comes with integral Ethernet and high speed synchronous capabilities and supports expansion for additional universal ports. The ACP 70 uses the same field-proven software as the other ACP platforms. The base unit of each ACP 70 includes the following Field Replaceable Units (FRUs) housed in a forced-air cooled metal chassis: I AC Power Module, 110/220V: provides regulated power for all logic, and can sustain power interruption of at least two AC cycles.
I Optional 48VDC Power Module. I Quad Combined Communication Module (CCM) support-

I CPU motherboard with 4 MB memory, a high-performance

32-bit microprocessor, ROM and RAM memory, a 2-bus I/O interface, and the following items: j Four universal (sync/async) V.24 ports with speeds up to 64 kbps, which provide a regulated power feed for specially designed, optional V.11 and V.35 external converters. j One embedded Ethernet Access Unit Interface (AUI). j Two VHSL ports supporting a pair of V.series (V.11, V.24, or V.35) interface modules, with a maximum speed of two ports at 512 kbps, for X.25 or frame relay connections.
I “Personality keys” on the motherboard. I 2 MB PCMCIA enables additional software storage.

ing 4 V.24 universal (synchronous/asynchronous) ports at speeds up to 64 kbps which provide a regulated power feed for specially designed, optional V.11 and V.35 external converters.
I Single ISDN BRI port module supporting 2B+D channels. I Memory modules (SIMMs).

The optional Quad CCMs and ISDN BRI port modules plug directly into the ACP 70 motherboard (see figure on next page). A screwdriver is all that is required to install these modules as upgrades.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

7

Enable Keys Power Module Quad CCMs

Memory Modules (SIMMs) PCMCIA (optional memory for software storage)

ACP 70 FRUs

Operational
Processor Type Code Storage in bytes RAM in bytes Options 80486 at 25MHz 2.0 MB Flash (plus optional 2 MB PCMCIA) 4 MB Quad V.24, ISDN, and Voice/Fax modules V.11 /V.35 external adapters 48VDC power supply X.25, async, SNA, DSP, TPP, frame relay, IP, ISDN Basic Rate Interface, PPP, and IP

Safety
UL 478/4 and CSA 22.2 No. 220, or UL 1950 and CSA 22.2 No. 950, respectively, where applicable. IEC 950: 1991 EN 60950: 1992 EN 41003: 1993

Emissions
EN 55022: 1994, Class A FCC Part 15, Class A

Protocols Supported

NOTE:

Most equipment configurations meet the limits of EN 55022 and FCC for Class B digital devices.

Electrical
AC Power Frequency Power Dissipation 100V to 250V 0.60 Amp to 0.25 Amp 50/60 Hz ± 2% < 222 BTU/hr

Export Classification
All Telematics products are classified by the U.S. Department of Commerce Export Administration under Export Commodity Control Number (ECCN) 1567A. Any export of these products outside the United States requires prior approval from the U.S. Department of Commerce or another applicable agency of the U.S. Government.

Environmental
Operating Temp. Storage Temp. Shipping Temp. 5_ to 45_ C (41_ to 113_ F), 20% to 80% Relative Humidity –20_ to 51_ C (–4_ to 125_ F), 10% to 95% Relative Humidity –20_ to 60_ C (–4_ to 140_ F), 10% to 95% Relative Humidity

Headquarters
Corporate Headquarters ECI Telecom-Telematics 1201 W. Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 (954) 772-3070 (800) 833-4580 FAX (954) 351-4405 Asian Headquarters ECI Telecom (HK), Ltd. 2806 China Resources Bldg. 26 Harbour Road Wanchai, Hong Kong 011-852-2824-4128 FAX 011-852-2802-4411 Central European Headquarters ECI Telecom GMBH Buropark Oberursel In der Au 27 61440 Oberursel, Germany 011-49-6171-6209-0 FAX 011-49-6171-5405-7 Western European Headquarters ECI Telecom, Ltd. Isis House Reading Road, Chineham Basingstoke, Hampshire RG24 8TW, United Kingdom 011-44-1–256-388-000 FAX 011-44-1-256-388-143

Physical
Height Width Depth Weight (fully configured) 86.8 mm(3.4”) 415 mm(16.3”) 325 mm(12.8”) 6 kg (13 lbs)

8

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Architecture Highlights
Hardware Characteristics
The three Access Communication Processor platforms offer a wide range of hardware features. The ACP platforms are based on the 188 and 486 microprocessor series. The ACP platforms support up to: I Two 2 Mbps DMA-assisted ports (ACP 70).
I 24 64 kbps DMA-assisted ports, plus one at 2 MB and one

ACP System Features
System operation for the ACP platforms is protected by a watchdog timer. This timer protects against lock-ups (caused by program or memory failure) that generate a general system reset, resulting in an unconditional system restart. These and other restart-causing events, e.g., power failures, are reported to the Network Management System. The ACP 10 uses ROM or flash for both start-up and operating software. It uses RAM for dynamic memory functions, i.e., stack, data buffers, variable storage, and interrupt vectors. Configuration parameters are stored in battery-backed RAM. The ACP 70 uses ROM for start-up, and flash for operating software. In the ACP 50, the boot ROM contains initial hardware start-up diagnostics for all CPU-board logic circuitry. It also contains an IPL program for loading I/O CEM-related diagnostics from the system diskette to RAM. Once all diagnostic tests have been performed successfully, the operating code and configuration on the system diskette are executed. The ACP 50 and ACP 70 use byte-parity protected RAM for dynamic memory functions, i.e., stack, data buffers, variable storage, and interrupt vectors. Refer to Table 1 for a summary of system characteristics, Table 2 for certification status, Table 3 for MTBF reliability figures, and Table 4 for physical and environmental specifications.

at 384 kbps (ACP 50).
I 48 19.2 kbps async ports (ACP 50). I 24 115.2 kbps async ports (ACP 50). I One 10 Mbps 10BASE5 Ethernet LAN port (ACP 50/ACP

70).
I 4 ISDN BRI S0 ports (ACP 70). I 24 V.32bis integral modem ports (ACP 50). I 24 V.34 integral modem ports (ACP 50). I Non-volatile storage for the operating code and configura-

tion database: the 3.5-inch diskette, flash personality module, or PCMCIA module allow the distribution of operating code via the network.
I Electrical interfaces: RJ11 (ISDN), RJ45 (async), DDB15

(sync/async), DB25 (sync/async), and AUI (Ethernet).
I Physical interfaces: RS530, V.24, V.35, V.11. I Field Replaceable Unit-based construction for easy field

upgrades, wiring, and maintenance.
I Extensive diagnostic tests to isolate faulty Field Replace-

able Units or interconnection problems.
I Choice of AC or DC power supplies.

Table 1. Systems Characteristics
ACP 10 Processor Type Processor Speed Non-volatile Storage — in bytes RAM — in bytes (basic-extended) Number of chassis I/O Slots First Field Deployment
80C188 10 MHz 16K NVRAM 512K ROM/ 512K Flash 128-256 K Ċ January '90

ACP 50
80486 50 MHz 1.44M (disk)

ACP 70
80486 25 MHz 2.0M Flash

8-32 M 3 July '94

4-16 M 2 November '94

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

9

Table 2. Safety and Emissions Certifications
Certifications 1 Safety: UL 2 CSA 2 IEC 950: 1991 EN 60950: 1992 EN 41003: 1993 Emissions: EN 55022: 1994 3 FCC Part 15 3 FCC Part 68 4 Network Certification: Pan-European (”CE”mark) approved Other international approvals held 5 Immunity: EN50082–1: 1992 EN50082–1: 1997 Internal Modems (PSTN, leased line): 6 USA United Kingdom (BABT SITS 8201D) NOTES: ACP 10 ACP 10 48VDC n – n n n n n n/a n ACP 50 ACP 50 27VDC
– – 7 7 7

ACP 50 48VDC – – n n n n n n n

ACP 70

ACP 70 48VDC n n n n n n n n/a n

n n n n n n n n/a n

n n n n n n n n n

n n n n n n n n/a n

n n n n

n

n

n n n n

n n n n

n

n

n

n/a n/a

n/a n/a

n n

n/a n/a

n/a n/a

1. The ACP products are marked in conformity with the following European Commission Directives: The Low Voltage Directive (LVD), 73/23/EEC The Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive (EMC), 89/336/EEC The Telecommunications Terminal Equipment Directive (TTE), 91/263/EEC The Conformité Européene Marking Directive (CE Marking), 93/68/EEC 2. UL 478/4 and CSA 22.2 No. 220, or UL 1950 and CSA 22.2 No. 950, respectively, where applicable. 3. Class A for ACP 10, ACP 50, and ACP 70 models. (Note that for the ACP 70, most equipment configurations meet the limits of EN55022 and FCC for Class B digital devices.) 4. Approved for all components requiring certification. 5. For specific country approvals, consult your Telematics sales representative or the Telematics International Approvals Group. 6. Internal octal modems are certified as complete assemblies only. 7. Certification performed on Request for Price Quotation basis, if required.

10

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Table 3. Estimated Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) Figures (in thousands of hours)

ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ
Component
MTBF for Basic Unit / Basic Unit 48 VDC MTBF for Power Module (AC / DC) MTBF for Personality Module / Extended MTBF for CPU MTBF for Octal DMA CAM / DMA II CEM MTBF for Hex CAM / CEM MTBF for ELX CAM / CEM MTBF for T1/E1 CSU/DSU CAM MTBF for BRI CAM / CEM MTBF for Octal Modem CEM MTBF for Quad I/O Module MTBF for Fan Assembly Mean Time to Repair

ACP 10
75.2 / 106.4

1208.2 / 2437.8

20 min.

NOTE: MTBF figures for CAMs and CEMs are for CAMs and CEMs individually. Do not attempt to combine these figures in any form to calculate combined CAM/CEM figures. Such combination figures are highly dependent on system configuration and should be obtained through your Telematics representative.

ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ
ACP 50 ACP 70
76.8 7474.2 / 165.0 115.3 / 115.9 1805.1 161.7 1632.7 / 244.8 135.0 1756.5 / 214.5 2162.2 / 302.0 568.9 / 239.0 454.5 502.6 / 256.0 179.1 457.0 200.0 15 min. 45 min.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

11

Table 4. Physical and Environmental Specifications
Description
Physical Height Width Depth Weight (fully config.) Electrical AC Rating
Frequency Power Dissipation

12 ACP Functional Description, May 1998

ACP 10 w/48VDC
72 mm (2.9”) 295 mm (11.5”) 235 mm (9.1”) 4.5 kg (9.5 lbs) 100V to 130V, 1.4 Amp maximum 198V to 264V, 1.3 Amp maximum 50 Hz/60 Hz ± 2% < 40 BTU/hr ă0_ĂtoĂ45_C (0_ĂtoĂ122_F), 20%ĂtoĂ80% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ51_C (-4_ĂtoĂ125_F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ60_C (-4_ĂtoĂ140_F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity

ACP 10 w/48VDC
72 mm (2.9”) 295 mm (11.5”) 235 mm (9.1”) 4.5 kg (9.5 lbs) DC Power: -40 to -58 VDC Current: 0.3 Amp DC N/A < 40 BTU/hr ă0_ĂtoĂ45_C (0_ĂtoĂ122_F), 20%ĂtoĂ80% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ51_C (-4_ĂtoĂ125_F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ60_C (-4_ĂtoĂ140_F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity

ACP 50 Stretch
215.9 mm (8.5”) 431.8 mm (17”) 355.5 mm (14”) 15.4 kg (34 lbs) 100V to 130V, 2.5 Amp maximum 198V to 264V, 1.6 Amp maximum 50 Hz/60 Hz ± 2% < 300 BTU/hr 5_ĂtoĂ45_C (41_ĂtoĂ113_F), 20%ĂtoĂ80% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ51_C (-4_ĂtoĂ125_F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ60_C (-4_ĂtoĂ140_F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity

Environmental * Operating Temp. ***
Storage Temp. Shipping Temp.

Table 4. Physical and Environmental Specifications (continued)
Description
Physical Height Width Depth Weight (fully config.) Electrical AC Rating
Frequency Power Dissipation

ACP 50 w/27VDC
215.9 mm (8.5”) 431.8 mm (17”) 355.5 mm (14”) 15.4 kg (34 lbs) DC Power: 19 to 30 VDC Current: 6 Amp DC N/A < 300 BTU/hr ă5_ĂtoĂ45_C (41_ĂtoĂ113_F), 20%ĂtoĂ80% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ51_C (-4_ĂtoĂ125_F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ60_C (-4_ĂtoĂ140_F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity

ACP 50 w/48VDC
215.9 mm (8.5”) 431.8 mm (17”) 355.5 mm (14”) 15.4 kg (34 lbs) DC Power: -42 to -57 VDC Current: 3 Amp DC N/A < 300 BTU/hr ă5_ĂtoĂ45_C (41_ĂtoĂ113_F), 20%ĂtoĂ80% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ51_C (-4_ĂtoĂ125_F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ60_C (-4_ĂtoĂ140_F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity

ACP 70
86.8 mm (3.4”) 415 mm (16.3”) 325 mm (12.8”) 6 kg (13 lbs) AC Power: 100V to 250V Current: 0.60 Amp to 0.25 Amp 50/60 Hz ± 2% < 222 BTU/hr ă5_ĂtoĂ45_C (41_ĂtoĂ113_F), 20%ĂtoĂ80% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ51_C (-4_ĂtoĂ125_F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ60_C (-4_ĂtoĂ140_F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity

ACP 70 w/48VDC
86.8 mm (3.4”) 415 mm (16.3”) 325 mm (12.8”) 6 kg (13 lbs) DC Power: -40 to -70 VDC Current: 1.4 Amp maximum N/A < 222 BTU/hr ă5_ĂtoĂ45_C (41_ĂtoĂ113_F), 20%ĂtoĂ80% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ51_C (-4_ĂtoĂ125_F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity -20_ĂtoĂ60_C (-4_ĂtoĂ140_F), 10%ĂtoĂ95% Relative Humidity

Environmental* Operating Temp. ***
Storage Temp. Shipping Temp.

* Temperature ranges may be further limited by the type of diskette media used.

*** Humidity must be noncondensing.

I/O Connectivity
The ACP 10 I/O logic is fully-integrated in the base unit, while the ACP 50 allows greater port expansion with a variety of Communication Expansion Modules (CEMs) and Communication Adapter Modules (CAMs). The ACP 70 contains both fully-integrated I/O logic and expansion capabilities. Several different optional modules provide the ACP 70 with various interface options. determined by the installation of interface modules installed on the BRI CAM. (ISDN BRI operation is supported only by Version 1.xx software.) Refer to Table 5 on page 15 for additional information regarding ACP 50 CEMs.

ACP 50 Communication Expansion Modules (CEMs)
Communication Expansion Modules (CEMs) are printed circuit boards that contain the logic circuitry required for I/O operation in the ACP 50. The ACP 50 CEMs, work in conjunction with separate CAMs to allow additional interface flexibility to the outside world. The following types of CEMs are supported by the ACP 50: H Hex CEM. Provides 16 asynchronous ports that run up to 19.2 kbps. The hex CEM connects to either a V.24 or V.28 hex CAM. The ACP 50 can contain up to three hex CEMs. H Octal DMA I/II/III CEM. Provides eight DMA-assisted universal ports, supporting synchronous speeds up to 64 kbps and asynchronous speeds up to 115.2 kbps. A special version of octal DMA—the octal DMA III/PS CEM—also supports the Automatic Node Protection Switching (ANPS) feature of ACP Version 4.0 software. The ACP 50 can contain up to three octal DMA CEMs. H Octal Modem CEM. Two different version of this CEM are available: V.32 or V.34. Both CEMs contain modem module SIMMs to support analog transmission, and eight DMA-assisted synchronous/asynchronous ports. The ACP 50 (stretch chassis) can contain up to three octal modem CEMs, supporting up to 24 internal modems. H ELX/ELX II CEM. The ELX CEM is a daughterboard that installs directly on the ACP’s main CPU (since it installs in the same location as the BRI CEM, only one of these CEMs may be used in an ACP). The ELX provides one Ethernet port that is compatible with the IEEE 802.3 interface specification for 10Base5 Ethernet LANs. The ELX CEM also provides two VHSL ports that may run at speeds up to 2 Mbps. The ELX II version of the CEM also holds the ACP’s PCMCIA card. H BRI CEM. The ISDN BRI CEM is a daughterboard that installs directly on the ACP’s main CPU (since it installs in the same location as the ELX CEM, only one of these CEMs may be used in an ACP.) The BRI CEM provides two S0 interface ports for BRI bearer services, and one VHSL ports, supporting speeds up to 384 kbps. The VHSL port may have either an RS-530, V.24, or V.35 interface,

ACP 50 Communication Adapter Modules (CAMs)
The ACP 50 platform uses Communication Adapter Modules (CAMs) to connect external communication cables. This approach allows the ACP to meet different physical/electrical interface requirements, i.e., DTE or DCE, V.11, V.24, V.35, etc. The CAMs are located behind the backplane and connect directly to their corresponding CEMs (see Figure 2).

ACP 50 Backplane Communication Expansion Module Communication Adapter Module

Figure 2. ACP 50 CEM-Backplane-CAM Assembly The CAMs contain the connectors seen on the rear of the ACPs, and depending upon the CAM installed, house different types of connectors with either a DCE or DTE physical appearance to the attaching device. Regardless of the DCE or DTE appearance, the actual connectors are standard RJ11/RS-530, RJ45, and DB25-S “female” connectors. The appearance is selected via the CAM or cable, depending on the connector type. (Refer to Table 5 for further information on CAMs and CEMs.) CAM Physical Interfaces. CAMs are for connecting ACPs to terminals, host computer ports, modems, etc. For interfaces, cables should only use the wire pin-outs defined for that specific interface (V.11, V.11/RS530, V.24, V.35, RJ11, RJ45 types). Cables must be shielded to comply with emission standards and must be manufactured using UL and CSA approved materials. NOTE: Special DB25-to-Winchester adapter cables are available for interfacing to V.35 modems. The Winchester connector uses 6-32 jack screws. All ACP DB25/DDB15 connectors and cables use 4-40 jack screws.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

13

The following types of CAMs are supported by the ACP 50: H Hex CAM. The hex CAM is available in both V.24 and V.28 models, each providing 16 asynchronous ports. The hex CAM is used with the hex CEM. The ACP 50 can contain up to three hex CAMs. H Octal DMA CAM. The octal DMA CAM is used with the octal DMA I, II, or III CEM to provide eight DMA-assisted universal ports. A special version of the octal DMA CAM—the octal DMA/PS CAM—supports the Automatic Node Protection Switching (ANPS) feature of ACP Version 4.0 software. The ACP 50 can contain up to three octal DMA CAMs. H Octal Modem CAM. This CAM is used with either the V.32 or V.34 octal modem CAM and contains eight RJ11 connectors for synchronous/asynchronous modem connections. H ELX CAM. The ELX CAM contains one AUI DB15 connector for an Ethernet connection, and two DB25 connectors for the CAMs two VHSL ports. The VHSL ports can be adapted to either RS-530, V.24, or V.35 by installing two V.series interface modules into a connector on the CAM. The ELX CAM is used with the ELX CEM. Only one ELX CAM may be used in the ACP 50. (Since the BRI CAM installs in the same location as the ELX CAM, only one of these CAMs may be installed in an ACP.) H BRI CAM. The ISDN BRI CAM contains two RJ48C-type (8-way) S0 ports to interface to the ISDN. Each interface can carry one or two B-channels at 64 kbps and one D-channel at 16 kbps. The BRI CAM also contains one DB25 VHSL port supporting speeds up to 384 kbps. The VHSL port can be adapted to either RS-530, V.24, or V.35 by installing a V.series interface modules into a connector on the CAM. The BRI CAM is used with the BRI CEM and is supported only by ACP Version 1.xx software. Only one BRI CAM may be used in the ACP 50. (Since the BRI CAM installs in the same location as the ELX CAM, only one of these CAMs may be installed in an ACP.) H T1/E1 CSU/DSU CAM. This CAM contains two RJ45 connectors to provide T1 and E1 connections, and contains a DB15 connector for an Ethernet connection. The CAM provides a mechanism to put a line into loopback mode for testing from a central office, and also provides warnings/alarms and collects/relays error statistics. The CSU/DSU CAM is supported only by an ACP 50 equipped with a 50/486 Type2 C/D CPU, an ELX II CEM, and Version 4.0 software. Refer to Table 5 on page 15 for additional information regarding ACP 50 CAMs.

ACP 70 Optional Modules
The ACP 70 uses various optional modules to provide it with different interfaces. These modules are described below: H V.11, V.24, and V.35 Interface Module. These modules are small accessory daughterboards that plug into two sockets on the ACP 70’s CPU board. The modules install just behind the DB25 connectors for the ACP 70’s two VHSL links, giving a V.11, V.24, or V.35 appearance to the related link. H Quad Combined Communication Module (CCM). The addition of one or two CCMs allows you to increase the number of ACP 70 universal V.series ports. Each CCM plugs into the ACP 70’s CPU board and has four female DDB15 interface connectors. A CCM can be installed in either or both of the ACP 70’s upper port areas. H ISDN BRI Port Module. Up to four of these modules may be installed in an ACP 70, with each module using one S/T port. The port supports two B-channels operating at 64 kbps and one D-channel operating at 16 kbps. Each module contains one RJ45 connector. Refer to Table 5 on page 15 for additional information regarding ACP 70 optional modules.

External Interface Converters
External interface converters are available to change the V.24 signaling of the ACP 10, 50, and 70 to V.11/RS-530 or V.35. These converters provide clocking to the V.11 or V.35 devices, thus eliminating costly clock boxes. The converters have a 25-pin connector at each end for attachment to the ACP and V.11/V.35 device sides. Connections to V.11 devices with DB15 connectors and V.35 devices with Winchester connectors can be achieved with the appropriate cables.

lnternal Interface Converters
Internal interface converters, known as interface modules, are available to define the electrical signaling for VHSL ports on the ACP 50 and ACP 70 (see preceding CEM, CAM, and module descriptions). The interface modules are selected at the point of purchase. For the ACP 50, the interface modules are available for the ELX and BRI CAMs. For the ACP 70, the interface modules are available for the main CPU board.

14

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Table 5. ACP Interface Hardware
CEMs Max Speed (kbps) Product ACP 10 ACP 50 Description (Integrated) Hex Hex Octal DMA III Octal DMA III/ PS ELX II 1 2 ELX II 1 2 ELX II 1 2 Octal modem V.32 Octal modem V.32 Octal modem V.32 Octal modem V.32 Octal modem V.34 Octal modem V.34 Octal modem V.34 Octal modem V.34 BRI 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 2 1 10 Mbps 1.5 Mbps 14.4 14.4 14.4 14.4 28.8 28.8 28.8 28.8 64 2 Mbps 2 Mbps 512 64 2 Mbps 2 Mbps 2 Mbps 10 Mbps 64 64 — — 57.6 57.6 57.6 57.6 115.2 115.2 115.2 115.2 — 5022-001 5022-001 5022-001 5022-001 5036–004 5036–004 5036–004 5036–004 5010-002 10 Mbps 1.5 Mbps — — 5020-003 10 Mbps 2 Mbps 2 Mbps 512 Ports 6 16 16 8 8 Sync 64 — — 64 64 Async 19.2 19.2 19.2 115.2 115.2 — — — — Model # — 5023-001 5023-001 5019-003 5019-013 Interface V.24 RJ45 V.24 RJ45 V.28 V.24 Octal DMA/PS CAM: V.24 AUI: (V.11/RS530) (V.35) (V.24) T1 CSU/DSU CAM: AUI RJ48 E1 CSU/DSU CAM: AUI RJ48 RJ11 LL/UK RJ11 PSTN/US RJ11 PSTN/UK varies by country RJ11 LL/UK RJ11 PSTN/US RJ11 PSTN/UK varies by country S0, RJ45: (V.11) (V.35) (V.24) V.24 V.11 V.24 V.35 AUI S0, RJ45 V.24 Model # — 5067-001 5067-002 5029-001 5029-011 Model # — 5005-001 5005-002 5003-004 5003-014 Notes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 6, 7 6, 7, 8 2, 4, 5, 9 2, 4, 5, 17 10, 13 5030-002 5030-003 5030-004 5050-001 5017-400 5017-500 5017-600 5012-001 10, 13, 18 CAMs CEM or CAM Set

5020-003

5020-003

5050-002

5012-002

10, 13, 18

5016-001 5016-002 5016-003 5040-xxx 5016-001 5016-002 5016-003 5040-xxx 5011-011 5011-035 5011-024 — 7710-011 7710-024 7710-035 — — —

5020-001 5020-101 5020-201 5120-xxx 5034-001 5034-101 5034-201 5037-xxx 5010-011 5010-035 5010-024 —

11 11 11 11, 12 11 11 11 11, 12 11, 13, 14

ACP 70

(Integrated) VHSL (Integrated)

4 2 2 2

57.6 — — — — — 57.6

15 15

ELX (Integrated) ISDN BRI Quad CCM

1 1 4

— — —

— 7704-001 7703-001

16 3, 15

Continues...

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

15

NOTES: 1. Supports 1 sync port at speeds up to 64 kbps plus 3 others at 19.2 kbps, or 1 at 64 kbps plus 5 at 9.6 kbps, or 1 at 64 kbps plus 5 async at 19.2 kbps. 2. Supports V.54 loopback testing. 3 V.11 or V.35 support is provided on up to 3 ports using external converter kits (models 3020-030 and 3020-050). 4. V.11 or V.35 support via external converters (models 3020-040 and 3020-060). 5. Clock speeds provided are: 1.2, 2.4, 4.8, 9.6, 19.2, 38.4, 56/57.6, 64 kbps. External clocking must be provided for all intermediate speeds. 6. The ACP 50 supports a maximum of three hex CEM/CAMs and two high speed links. 7. Supports V.54 Loop 1 testing only. 8. The V.28 CAM interface supports a V.28 electrical interface of up to 300 bps. To achieve speeds up to 1200 bps, consult your Telematics sales representative. 9. The Octal DMA II is replaced by the backward-compatible octal DMA III. Octal DMA III offers the 115.2 kbps port speed on the ACP 50/486 only in Version 2.xx or higher software. The ACP 50 supports three octal DMAs IIs with a maximum of 24 sync ports at speeds up to 64 kbps or 24 async ports at speeds up to 57.6 kbps. The ACP 50/486 with octal DMA IIIs support a maximum of 24 sync ports at 64 kbps or 24 async ports at 115.2 kbps. 10. Clock speeds provided are: 64, 128, and 256 kbps. External clocking must be provided for 384 kbps and above (no enable key required). The ACP 50 supports only one ELX or BRI module. The VHSL ports are only used for X.25 and frame relay. 11. The ACP 50 stretch chassis supports a maximum of 3 octal modem cards (24 modem ports). 12. The suffix xxx represents the three digits that specify country. Refer to the ordering section of this manual for model numbers for specific countries. 13. ACP 50 BRI supports 1 port at 2 Mbps plus 1 port at 384 kbps, or 2 ports at 512 kbps. VHSL speeds are dependent on packet size, link layer window, and flags between frames. Ports must be application-tested to achieve maximum speed without link layer retransmissions. With a single VHSL port on the ISDN BRI, the maximum speed for the ACP 50 is 2 Mbps. 14. Requires software version 2.xx or higher for V.24 operation. . 15 The ACP 70 V.series ports can be configured for either internal or external clocking, up to the maximum port speeds identified. 16. Up to four S0 ports per ACP 70; each S0 port supports 2B+D channels. Depending on BRI module locations, links 1–6 or links 1–10 must operate synchronously. 17. The octal DMA III/PS CEM and octal DMA/PS CAM support the Automatic Node Protection Switching (ANPS) feature provided by Version 4.0 software. Each CEM/CAM supports eight ports at up to 64 kbps sync and 115.2 kbps async. 18. The ELX II CEM connected to a T1 CSU/DSU CAM supports a 100 ohm, RJ48 interface. The ELX II CEM connected to an E1 CSU/DSU CAM supports a 120 ohm, RJ45 interface.

16

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Level 1 Support
Interface
The ACP 10 and ACP 70 universal ports have a V.24 interface. External V.24-to-V.11 or V.24-to-V.35 converter kits can be connected to the ACP 10 or ACP 70 to interface to V.11/V.35 devices. The ACP 50 provides a V.11, V.35, or RS530 interface, depending on the type of CAM used. The Octal DMA CAMs have a standard V.24 interface, and can use external V.11/V.35 converters. For SNA operation on the ACP 50 platforms, DMA ports configured for SDLC operation can operate in NRZ/NRZI mode. The ACP 10 supports NRZ/NRZI on all of its ports. For the ACP 50 and ACP 70, the VHSL CAM is available with a V.35, V.24, or V.11/RS530 interface. The ELX CAM provides an Ethernet AUI port in addition to the above VHSL interfaces. Table 6 summarizes the maximum number of ports possible for a specific port speed on each ACP platform. For a summary of the platforms and related port types, refer to Table 6. Table 6. Number of Ports per Speed per Platform
Feature Maximum Ports Maximum Sync Ports Max 64 kbps Sync Ports Max 384 kbps Sync Ports Max 512 kbps Sync Ports Max 2 Mbps Sync Ports Maximum Async Ports Max 19.2 kbps Async Ports Max 38.4 kbps Async Ports Max 57.6 kbps Async Ports Max 115.2 kbps Async Ports Max ISDN B Channels Max Ethernet Ports Max modem Ports Max RAM Code Storage (Banks 1 & 2) ACP 10 6 6 1 — — — 5 5 — — — — — — 256 K 512 K PROM 512 K Flash ACP 50 50 26 26 2 2 12 48 48 24 24 24 2 1 24 32 MB 1.44 MB Disk 4 MB PCMCIA ACP 70 14 14 14 2 2 — 12 12 12 12 — 8 1 — 4 MB 2 MB Flash 4 MB PCMCIA

Clocking
Each X.25 link interface can be operated using an internal or external clock. The internal clock will typically be enabled whenever the ACP is co-located with other DTEs, eliminating the need to use an external clocking device. While all ACP synchronous ports present a DTE-type physical interface, most can be configured to generate a clock signal. The ACP 10/50/70 V.11 and V.35 interfaces must be clocked by attached external devices when connecting to public network facilities. The V.11 and V.35 converters can, however, clock co-located DTE devices.

Speed
DMA-assisted ports can support X.25 or frame relay operation at a maximum rate of 64 kbps; other sync ports can be operated at speeds of 1.2 to 19.2 kbps. The ACP 50 and ACP 70 support X.25 or frame relay operation up to 2 Mbps. Table 5 on page 15 outlines the maximum supported synchronous speeds per type of port.

NOTES:
1. Requires octal DMA III and version 2.xxx and later software. 2. Dependent on packet size, link layer window, and flags between frames. Ports must be application-tested to achieve maximum speed without link layer re-transmissions.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

17

Table 7. Protocols Available with Port Types/Connectors
ACP 10 1, 2 Protocol/ Interface
SLIP, PPP 8 Async X.25 Frame Relay SNA DSP (3270 BSC) TPP IP (Ethernet) POS ISDN BRI
NOTES: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. VHSL sync-only ports: ACP 10 link 1; ACP 50 ELX and ISDN CEM/CAM ports; ACP 70 VHSL ports. Sync or async (universal) ports: ACP 10 links 2–6; ACP 50 octal DMA CEM/CAM ports; and ACP 70 links 3–6 and CCM ports. Async-only: ACP 50 hex CEM/CAM ports. The RJ11 connector appears on integrated modem modules. AUI port on the ACP 50 ELX card; embedded LAN port on ACP 70. Located on the BRI CAM. Provides one S0 interface, providing two B channels. Provides up to four S0 interfaces, providing 8 B channels. PPP is available only on the ACP 70 and on selected IP p-kits on the ACP 50.

ACP 50 1, 2 VHSL 1 (DB25) Octal (DB25)
I

ACP 70 ISDN RJ45 AUI 5 Ethernet VHSL 1 (DB25) V.24 (DDB15)
I I I I I I I I I I

2

V.24 (DDB15)

Hex 3 (RJ45)
I I

RJ11 4
I I I

ISDN RJ45

AUI 5 Ethernet

I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I

I I I I7 I

I

I

I

I I
6

I

18

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Software Architecture
ACP communication software offers ease of use and versatility: H Field-proven software—since 1985, operating code written in “C” for easy maintenance/customizing. H Software updates via diskette, flashpak, or downloaded through the network from the Network Management System. H All options are software-configurable. Dynamic user interface and routing parameters. The ACP communication software environment consists of software modules that support each of the product’s major functions: H FR (Frame Relay) H IP (Internet Protocol) including SLIP and PPP H ISDN BRI (Basic Rate Interface) H POS (Point of Sale) H Network Interface (NET) for X.25 operation H SNA (Host PAD and Terminal PAD) for SNA operation H DSP (Terminal PAD only) for BSC operation H TPP (Transparent Protocol Passthrough) H Asynchronous Interactive Terminal Interface (ITI) H Modem (MD) H System Manager (SYM) H Accounting (ACCT) H X.25 Trace (TRACE) H Network Management System (NMS) Interface to SmartView / INF / OMS H X.25 Trace (TRACE) This modular approach permits the wide variety of network connectivity available to each ACP product while maintaining common software. A single ITI module in an ACP, for example, will support as many asynchronous ports as can be installed in a given ACP platform. Similarly, multiple instances of the NET module can be activated to support X.25 operation on as many synchronous ports as required (up to the maximum that can be installed in that platform). Modular software simplifies system configuration: operational parameters are grouped by major protocol layers and functions to focus on one concept at a time, using the same commands and following the same rules. This scheme also allows you to alter configuration parameters related to one module without affecting the others. Software modules interact via a software bus (shown in Figure 3) called the network router. A software module itself, the network router is responsible for establishing connections and routing data to and from each of the other modules. H The SYM module implements the local system management functions. This module allows one to configure, monitor, control, and collect system statistics. H The TRACE module implements the system’s data analyzer function, which allows one to examine LAPB/SDLC frames, BSC blocks, X.25 packets, and SNA RUs as they exit or arrive through the synchronous ports. It also allows network operators to remotely view any port’s EIA status.

Management Modules

SYM

TRACE

NMS

ACCT

ANPS

Protocol Modules

X.25

DSP

FR

ITI

SNA

IP

TPP

POS

Media Modules

PORT

VHSL

ELX

ISDN

MODEM

CSU/ DSU

Figure 3.

ACP Software Architecture

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

19

H The NMS module implements the remote system management functions handling the ACP interface to SmartView, INF, or OMS. The SYM, TRACE, and NMS modules allow you to dynamically change the operating parameters, perform diagnostics, monitor performance, and retrieve statistics from any point on the network using a character-mode terminal or a PC equipped with SmartView, INF, or OMS. H The ACCT module implements the accounting functions for the ITI and NET modules. It produces accounting records that can be collected by SmartView Network Management System (NMS). IP accounting through a Radius server is external to the accounting module. H The Automatic Node Protection Switching (ANPS) module provides automatic backup of an entire node. This is done automatically and the network manager is informed of a failure through an SNMP trap. Async connections are accomplished by using “Y” cables. H The X.25 (NET) module implements the CCITT X.25 standard interface to handle all aspects of the packet and link level operation. Separate instances of the X.25 module are activated to support the X.25 operating mode for each synchronous port. H The DSP module, based on the BSC 3270 Display System Protocol, enables IBM 3270 devices to communicate with IBM host computers (equipped with a DSP-compliant software/hardware) through an X.25 packet switching network. Acting as a Terminal PAD (TPAD), it supports Connection Request Modes (CRM) 1 through 4. H The FR module implements a set of DTE and DCE interface functions to handle the operating environment required by both public and private frame relay networks, as well as native DTE frame relay devices such as bridges and routers. H The ITI module implements CCITT standards X.3, X.28, X.29, and X.121 to handle all aspects of asynchronous operation to and from the attached async devices. The ITI module is also responsible for voice/fax operation. H The SNA module implements a set of PU2 and PU4 functions to handle the required operating environment with both IBM PU2 devices and PU4/5 hosts. The VLU mode supports switching at the LU level while the QLLC

mode limits switching to the PU level. The QLLC mode is compatible with NPSI environments. Both NRZI and NRZ modes of operation are supported. H The IP module allows the interconnection of Ethernet TCP/IP LANs over X.25 or frame relay networks. This module supports synchronous PPP and asynchronous SLIP and PPP for connections to a LAN. Support for PAP/CHAP/Radius authentication is also available. See Order Forms for IP p-kits which support PPP with IP transporter (Version 2.xx software). H The TPP (Transparent Protocol Passthrough) module allows a transparent connection between synchronous devices through an X.25 network. TPP is used in an ACP-to-ACP configuration to transport synchronous byteand frame-oriented protocol data in the “payload” of an X.25 packet. Unlike other protocol systems, such as SNA and BSC, no “spoofing” (i.e., local handshaking) is necessary. For this reason, there is no requirement for TPAD/HPAD services. This mode of operation is proprietary, and requires that an ACP be located at transmission end points. H The ISDN BRI (Basic Rate Interface) module configures the 2B (bearer of high speed data) channels and a D (data control and signaling) channel. H The Modem (MD) module sets up the mode of operation and relevant parameters (baud rate, etc.) for each modem port integrated into the ACP. H The POS module allows the attachment of Point of Sale terminals and host computers to either private or public data networks. POS supports ISO 8583, VISAI, VISAII, APACS, SPDH, and TINET protocols. POS features include “fast connect” modems and local protocol spoofing which both help reduce overall transaction response time. H The internal T1/E1 CSU/DSU module provides direct connection to T1 or E1 services. This eliminates the need to purchase an external CSU/DSU. The CSU/DSU is a dual-port device and is fully manageable by using the ACP System Manager (SYM) software module. The interface for T1 is a 100 ohm RJ45 connector. The interface for E1 is a 120 ohm RJ45 connector. There are three LED indications per port to indicate “on line,” “yellow alarm,” and “red/blue” alarm or loss of frame.

20

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

System Management
The ACP’s resident management facility module is the System Manager module (SYM). SYM is automatically included with the ACP applications software and allows local or remote control and management of that node within a network. SYM is accessed through the ACP service port, and is displayed/used via an external terminal. An authorized user can set up a virtual call to the resident SYM module to configure the operating parameters, perform on-line diagnostics, monitor link performance, and retrieve statistics from any point in the network. All of the configuration parameters can be viewed, altered and saved on the system diskette (or in non-volatile memory in the ACP 10) without affecting the sessions in progress. Resident accounting, protocol components, and CPU/memory usage monitors cooperate to provide statistics for each node, port, user, and call. The statistics may be used to monitor the quality of service and system usage to fine-tune the operation of an ACP node. Many commands are available to help the network administrator manage the X.25, SNA, frame relay, and DSP links:
CLOSE OPEN DOWN UP STAT Do not accept new calls on that link. Cancel a close command. Clear or reset all virtual circuits on a given link; put the link in disconnect mode. Restart the link. Report the status of a link.
*10000*‘trace SmartNet:fac: p(512,512),w(5,5),d(9600,9600) com 00:31:43.8 net1.r. 3 RR r0 00:31:43.8 net1.r. 10 03 01 00:31:43.9 net1.r. 3 RR r1 00:31:43.9 net1.r. 10 03 21 00:31:44.0 net1.r. 3 CLR REQ 00:31:44.0 net1.r. 10 03 13 00 F5 00:31:44.0 net1.t. 3 CLR CNF 00:31:44.0 net1.r. 10 03 17 00:32:19.2 net1.r. 3 CAL REQ 00:32:19.2 net1.r. 10 03 0B 55 10 00 01 11 11 14 42 09 09 43 05 05

H Trace call request/accept and unnumbered packets. H Trace and display the full data packets. H Trace a specified PU or all PUs. H Trace a specified LU or all LUs. H Trace a specified CU or all CUs. H Trace a specified device or all devices. H Electronic “breakout box” for displaying the status of an ACP port EIA interface.

Extensive Diagnostic Capabilities
The diagnostic functions supported by the ACP include error messages, V.54 loopback testing, line trace, and performance monitoring. This allows the network administrator to examine transmissions from the physical layer through the packet layer quickly and easily (see the sample trace in Figure 4). The loopback testing can also be invoked remotely to troubleshoot modems, lines, or ACP ports.

The network administrator may also clear any virtual circuit on any given link. To complement the command set, the administrator may activate a very comprehensive trace facility from any point on the network. Each of the following types of trace is available on each link: H Trace all logical channels. H Trace a specific logical channel. H Trace the channel to be used for the next call. H Trace all packets.

Figure 4. A Sample Trace Figure 5 and Figure 6 illustrate external and internal modem usage with ACPs and show how the ACP’s self-generated, CCITT-defined, 511 random test pattern may be used to diagnose problems. The test pattern can be generated on three different loop tests to isolate problems quickly.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

21

Sample Network. This is a sample connection between the ACP 50 and a DTE.

ACP 50

MODEM

MODEM

DTE

(V.54 Compatible)

(V.54 Compatible)

Loopback Tests a) Loop 1. The CCITT loop 1 test is run to check for the integrity of the ACP I/O circuitry. In this example, it tests the ACP 50’s CEM. Loop 3. If loop 1 passes, the loop3 test is then run to check the path to the analog side of the local modem.

ACP 50

CPU

CEM

CAM

ACP 50

b)

CPU

CEM

CAM

MODEM

(V.54 Compatible)

c)

Loop 2. This test checks the integrity of the whole path—from the ACP port to the digital side of the remote modem.

ACP 50

MODEM

MODEM

DTE

(V.54 Compatible)

(V.54 Compatible)

Figure 5. Loopback Tests with External Modems
Sample Network. This is a sample connection between the ACP 50 and a DTE.

ACP 50

MODEM (V.54 Compatible)

DTE

Loopback Tests a) Loop 1. The CCITT loop 1 test is run to check for the integrity of the ACP I/O circuitry. In this example, it tests the ACP 50’s CEM. Loop 3. If loop 1 passes, the loop3 test is then run to check the analog side of the internal modem.

ACP 50

CPU

CEM

CAM

ACP 50

b)

CPU

CEM

CAM

c)

Loop 2. This test checks the integrity of the whole path—from the ACP port to the digital side of the remote modem.

ACP 50

MODEM

DTE

(V.54 Compatible)

Figure 6. Loopback Tests with Modems Integrated into the ACP 50

22

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Additional Network Management Options
In addition to SYM, ACPs can utilize other network management methods to control multiple ACPs within a network. These additional methods are as follows: SNMP Agent. As an interface to a local and remote management system, the ACP SNMP Agent allows you to manage, monitor, and configure the ACP from an SNMP manager at your site. Any of several SNMP managers (e.g., HP OpenView) can be used. SNMP Agent services SNMP V1 requests from the SNMP manager, and reports unsolicited traps to the SNMP manager for pre-configured ACP alarm conditions. Figure 7 shows an application using SNMP Agent for remote management.

File Transfer Protocol (FTP). The FTP software component supports the upload and download of ACP code and configuration data from a PC FTP client over an IP network (see Figure 8). ACP TELNET Server. ACP TELNET Server allows TELNET clients on a LAN to login and establish a TELNET session with the ACP System Manager (SYM). Clients can also trace components to conduct remote management and diagnostic procedures (see Figure 9 and Figure 10). Open Management System (OMS). The Open Management System (OMS) network management option is available on an HP OpenView host. This software includes an SNMP Manager which communicates with one or more SNMP Agents residing in the network.

WAN
ACP 70 Router

SNMP Manager

HP OpenView

ACP 50

Figure 7. Application Using SNMP Agent to Manage ACPs

ACP 50 FTP Server FTP Client ACP 70

IP/X.25/FR
ACP 70 FTP Server

ACP 50 FTP Server

Figure 8. Application Using FTP

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

23

ACP 70 TELNET Server

IP
ACP 70 TELNET Server

TELNET Client Router

ACP 70 TELNET Server

Figure 9. Application Using TELNET Server to Manage ACPs

ACP 70 TELNET Server

TELNET Client VT-100

IP
ACP 70 TELNET Server ACP 70 TELNET Server

ACP 70 TELNET Server

Figure 10. Application Using TELNET Client to Manage ACPs

24

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Automatic Node Protection Switching (ANPS) Support
Automatic Node Protection Switching (ANPS) is an option that can be used when the availability of the ACP is critical or when no on-site service is available. ANPS is implemented by using two ACP 50s connected in tandem (see Figure 11). The ANPS software automatically detects any failure that occurs and switches operation to the standby node. When this switch occurs, the access channels are switched between the two nodes. The network links are connected to separate and unique connection within the network, and therefore are not switched. ANPS also allows network access to the backup node or to the down system without interfering with the operation of the online node. The two nodes in an ANPS arrangement are set up to be monitored by an SNMP agent, so that a “trap” will be sent out to the Network Control Center whenever a failure or switchover occurs. This will inform the manager of the center that the status of the nodes has changed. Network Control Center to ensure that the required configurations are downloaded to the two ACP 50 nodes.

Failure Scenarios
The first or lowest-numbered channel is used by the ACP 50s to communicate a “Keep Alive” protocol. By using this protocol, each of nodes in the ANPS arrangement supervises the status of the other node. The failure scenarios that are supported by ANPS are as follows: H The online node fails. H The offline node fails. H The monitor link fails. H A manual switchover occurs. The results of each of these scenarios are described in the following paragraphs. The Online Node Fails. If a situation occurs in which the online node suffers a catastrophic failure, then the offline node detects the failure, and within seconds, activates the switching control and switches all the access ports to itself. When this occurs, the effect to the user is momentary loss of the communication session, requiring a new session to be established. The Offline Node Fails. If the offline node happens to fail, then the online node will detect a lack of activity on the monitor link and then send an SNMP trap to the Network Control Center, informing the network manager that the offline node has failed.

Connecting the Nodes
When ACPs are configured for ANPS capability, both nodes are connected to the user interface through the use of “Y” cables. These cables are specially configured to connect to two separate ACP 50s and to carry necessary switching signals from one node to the other.

Configuring the Nodes
The two ACP 50s in an ANPS arrangement must be configured identically. This enables the backup node to take over if the other system happens to fail. It is the responsibility of the

ACP 50 (A)

Independent Network Connections

V.24 IPC Connection PSTN

IPC Cable V.24 Y-Cable

ACP 50 (B)

Independent Network Connections

Figure 11. Typical Automatic Node Protection Switching (ANPS) Application

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

25

The Monitor Link Fails. An example of this scenario is if a monitor link cable becomes disconnected on ACP node (A). In this situation, the disconnected cable is detected via loss of EIA signal on the monitor link port. When this occurs, an SNMP trap is issued to the network manager, indicating that the monitor link has failed, and node (A) enters a “lnkerr” state (which is displayed in the protstat software file). If node (A) was online at the time of the disconnect, then the backup, offline node (B) will take over operation. This occurs due to the loss of “keep alive” status message from node (A). At the time of this automatic switchover, the now online node (B) sends an SNMP trap to the network manager to indicate that it is now in service.

At this point, both node (A) and node (B) are both “online.” In reality though, only node (B) is online; node (A) just thinks it is. This is an alert to the network manager that the monitor link is down. Once the monitor link is fixed, it will reconfigure node (A) to a backup position. A Manual Switchover Occurs. A manual switchover between nodes in an ANPS arrangement is accomplished either by resetting the online node or by disabling ANPS in the online system. After either of these actions, the backup node will detect that the online node is no longer active and it will switch over.

26

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

X.25 Support
Each X.25 link can be configured independently from the other links. ACPs allow the user to update most of the link parameters without resetting the unit. For example, you can activate or deactivate a link, change its speed, and modify facilities or packet level timers without affecting the operation of other links. By assigning different characteristics to the links individually, ACPs can be used to interconnect X.25 equipment and/or networks of different vintage. The following describes the characteristics of the X.25 interface as supported by the ACP NET module.

The Level 3 Packet Interface
Services
Each X.25 port can support concurrent switched and permanent virtual circuit operation.

Logical Channels
Each X.25 port can be configured to support any range of the 4096 logical channel addresses defined by the X.25 recommendation. The maximum number of logical channels that can be active concurrently on any given ACP vary by the type of platform and amount of installed memory.

The Level 2 Frame Interface
Procedures
ACP ports configured for X.25 operation support the bit-oriented, LAPB link procedures. Alternatively, the ACP can use SDLC instead of LAPB for interconnecting. (See Multipoint Support section on page 31 for further information on this subject.)

LCN Assignment
For each link, the user may specify the range and number of logical channels for PVCs or three types of logical channels (incoming, outgoing, and two-way) for SVC operation. This allows the user to fine-tune the allocation of each link’s bandwidth. For private internodal links, e.g., between ACPs, there is no need to pre-assign LCNs for PVC operation. PVCs can be routed as SVCs to provide alternate routing and contention—a feature typically available only to SVC operation. NOTE: To route an incoming call through an ACP, a pair of logical channels—one on each link—is required.

Addressing
ACP links connected to the PDN will be configured to have a logical DTE appearance. However, any link can be configured for a DCE appearance to connect directly to other X.25 equipment.

Numbering
The frame level supports both the normal (modulo 8) or the extended (modulo 128) frame sequence numbering. Modulo 128 is recommended for optimal satellite or high-speed connections, and allows the user to operate with a frame window up to 15.

Numbering
The packet level supports both the normal (modulo 8) and the extended (modulo 128) packet sequence numbering. The extended mode allows individual virtual circuits to use a window as large as the frame window supported by the underlying link.

Parameters and Timers
All the following frame level parameters are supported, and are individually soft configurable on each link: K: frame level window; 1–15. N1: maximum number of bits in a receive frame. Supports packet sizes 128, 256, 512, 1024, 2048, and 4096 (octets). T1: acknowledgement timer; 1–300 seconds. T2: Frame Acknowledgement Delay timer; 1–300 seconds. N2: retransmission counter; 0–255. T3: link watchdog timer; 0–300 seconds. ACKTHRESHOLD: a link window threshold for a link-level acknowledgement.

Packet Size
16–4096 octets. The user may configure a default (minimum) and maximum packet size. These parameters are used to bracket the values invoked by call request packets requesting flow control parameter negotiation.

Window Size
1–15. Users may configure a default (minimum) and maximum window size. These parameters are used to bracket the values invoked by call request packets requesting flow control parameter negotiation.

Throughput Class
Negotiates incoming calls to a value preconfigured by the user, and will also limit the requested value in outgoing calls to a value configured by the user.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

27

Reverse Charge
Any link can be configured for reverse charging acceptance. It can accept or reject incoming calls specifying reverse charge. Links used to interconnect X.25 DTEs can be configured to not forward calls with reverse charging to the DTE.

H Call request packet called- and calling-address fields may be modified to achieve compatibility between two interconnected destinations. H Call request packets can be validated for an authorized calling address.

Fast Select
An ACP NET module can route normal and restricted fast-select calls. Each link can also be configured to accept or reject incoming fast-select calls.

Network Support
The X.25 networking software has been certified on all major North American public data networks and has been certified for compliance with NET2 (levels 1, 2, and 3) European standards recognized by 22 European countries. ACPs are also operating successfully with X.25 equipment and software of major computer vendors that include AT&T, BULL, CDC, IBM, Honeywell, ICL, NCR, PRIME, and TANDEM. In order to accommodate the different X.121 and X.25 variations of different networks and other manufacturers’ equipment, many configurable options have been implemented in the ACP. The user may turn on or off some of these parameters as the X.25 implementation of his equipment or network evolves. Following are some of the features and capabilities that have been incorporated to facilitate the integration of ACPs into deployed networks: H Each link may be configured to insert, modify, or delete a given calling address field from outgoing call request packets. This gateway function is necessary when interconnecting an ACP-based private network to a Public Data Network. H For PDNs or equipment that do not support the 1988 CCITT recommendation, the packet level can be configured to operate per previous CCITT recommendations. H ACPs can be configured to generate diagnostic packets upon certain network errors. H ACPs can be configured to delete the flow control negotiation facility field to accommodate networks that do not support this facility. H ACPs will ignore national X.25 facilities in incoming call packets. H ACPs can be configured to accept incoming calls on LCN 0 to accommodate the French TRANSPAC network. H To accommodate different link-establishment procedures, each link may be independently configured to take the initiative or wait for the other packet mode DTE/DCE to establish the link.

D-bit
The packet level supports the delivery confirmation D-bit in incoming calls by acknowledging these packets when received at their destination.

D-bit Modification
ACPs can be configured such that packets received on a link can be considered to have their D-bit set for end-to-end acknowledgement.

Timers
Each link can be configured to support a range of packet level timers. In particular, the following timers are configurable by the user to meet the requirement of the PDN or the packet mode DTE to which it is connected: H T20, T21, T22, and T23 timers for a link with DTE appearance. H T10, T11, T12, and T13 timers for a link with DCE appearance. H ACKTIMER—A packet-acknowledgement delay timer. This timer is mandatory for satellite links and can also be used to improve the terrestrial links’ efficiency. H ACKTHRESHOLD—A packet window threshold for relaying packet level acknowledgement, used to reduce the number of acknowledgement packets.

General X.25 Features
The X.25 interface supports these additional features: H Packet splitting and reconstruction to accommodate different packet mode destinations. H Private internodal links protocol to track and clear stranded calls. Each ACP validates incoming calls to ensure that they have not been routed a second time, which would indicate a configuration error. H Private internodal links allow ACPs to establish a new path for a PVC if the primary path is unavailable.

28

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

X.25 Network Service Specifications
As a protocol, X.25 is as applicable to private networks as to public networks. Because the CCITT X.25 recommendation was specified as a subscriber-to-network interface, it was written from the DCE point of view. Accordingly, the ACP X.25 module was made to fully comply with it when operating in DTE mode. The ACP X.25 module also allows users to fully interconnect ACPs to form a private network, and to interact with other packet mode DTEs. While the ACP implements most of the networking functions—routing, alternate routing, call redirection, etc.— it does not implement Public Data Network functions, such as Closed User Groups and on-line facility registration. Table 8 outlines compliance with different facilities and options specified in 1988 for DCE and DTE modes. Table 8. 1988 Facilities/Options Compliance
Item 1 2 3 Facility/Option SVC PVC Data Transfer RNR Packet D-bit Q-bit DTE-originated Cause Codes DCE Cause Codes, 1984 Interrupts - 1984 Extensions Datagram Service Diagnostic Packet On-line Facility Registration Extended Packet Seq D-bit Modification Packet Retransmission Incoming Calls Barred Outgoing Calls Barred 1-way Log. Channel Incoming 1-way Log. Channel Outgoing Non-std Default Pkt Size - 1984 Extensions Non-std Default Window Size Default Thruput Class Assignment Flow Control Negotiation - 1984 Extensions Throughput Class Negotiation Closed User Groups - 1984 Extensions - CUG with Outgoing Access - CUG with Incoming Access - Incoming calls barred within CUG - Outgoing calls barred within CUG - CUG Selection - Bilateral CUG - Bilateral CUG w/outgoing access - Bilateral CUG Selection DTE n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n DCE n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n

Table 8. 1988 Facilities/Options Compliance (cont.)
Item 22 Facility/Option Fast Select - 1984 Extensions - Fast Select Acceptance Reverse Charging - Reverse Charging Acceptance Local Charging Prevention Network User Identification Charging Information PSS Call Statistics RPOA Selection Hunt Group PSS Multiline Call Redirection Called Line Address Modification - Call Redirection Notification Transit Delay Selection/Ind. DTE Facility Marker Calling Address Extension Called Address Extension Minimum Throughput Class End-to-end Transit Delay Max unacked frames (K) <= 7 Max unacked frames > 7 Expedited Data Negotiation LAPB LAP Frame sequence numbering (Modulo 8 & Modulo 128) SLP (single link) MLP (multi-link) Max frame size (N1) >=1080 <=2080/2088 <=8224/8232 >8224/8232 N2 retransmissions <= 10 > 10 Timers: T1: 1-15 T2: T2<T1 T3: T3>T1 T4: T4>T3 Call deflection selection and subscription TOA/NPI address subscription Abbreviated address calling DTE n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n DCE n n n n n

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n

32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

44 45

46 47 48

n

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

29

ACP Network Router
To enhance the reliability of the network, all addressing and routing decisions are distributed in the ACP node. SmartView,t the SmartNet ACP Network Management System, is not involved in call routing. Routing is based on the ACP-resident, user-configured network map and routing tables. These tables allow the network administrator to design a network topology that provides the desired level of response time, availability, and cost. The network router allows the user to specify one or more alternate routes to maintain service to users when link failures occur. An alternate route is also used when the primary route has no available logical channels or the final destination cannot be reached. When all options are exhausted and the destination is still not reachable, the ACP network will clear the call. You may also specify a call-sharing group, consisting of two or more links. The ACP will then balance the calls among all the links in the group.

Network Map
For ease of configuration and network growth, the network map concept allows the user to define the whole network in tabular form. The network map includes ACPs, other interconnected X.25 equipment, and/or public data network(s). It allows the user to associate both an X.121 address and call user data with each destination.

Routing Table
A single routing table configures an ACP node. When links are added, a few entries in that table are all that is required— there is no need to define a new routing table for each link. Once the network map is defined, the ACP uses the routing table to determine the link(s) that can be used to reach a given network destination. In addition to defining how to reach specific destinations, the routing table is used to assign priorities to the links. Hunt groups are formed by assigning the same priority to two or more links, while alternate paths are configured by assigning different priorities to links. Additional control can be configured by routing the source calling address or extended address.

Call Redirecting
Using this X.25-specified feature, ACPs can redirect calls when the attached called-DTE is busy, out of order/not obtainable, or if the call redirection feature has been set for a specified address. When configured with the appropriate reroute information, the called ACP will reroute the call to the destination address by using the best available route. If the first reroute fails to connect, the next X.121 addresses will be attempted.

X.25 Dial Out
This feature allows ACPs to automatically establish an X.25 connection to another ACP or X.25 packet mode device via the public switched telephone network (PSTN). The ACP accomplishes this by using the Hayesr/V.25bis asynchronous handshake to activate a dial-up connection, and then disconnects after a specified period of inactivity. The user specifies the handshake type and speed, timeout delay, how many times the ACP should attempt to connect to a destination, and the inactivity period that triggers automatic disconnection of the dial-up connection. This feature can be used to back up dedicated ACP X.25 links, as shown in Figure 12, or to establish a temporary “overflow” link when the number of virtual channels on the primary link exceed a predefined number. In addition, ACPs deployed at sites where traffic does not warrant a dedicated link use this feature to establish an X.25 link on demand. The first X.25 call request packet causes the ACP to establish the link; the link subsequently is brought down when no activity is detected within the preconfigured time.

Addressing
ACPs allow the routing of calls based on the content of the called address field and/or the call-user-data field. For private networks, the called address field is usually adequate. However, when interconnecting a private PDN to the public PDN, the X.121 subaddress field may not provide the necessary number of digits to uniquely identify all the private network destinations. The call-user-data field may then be used as an extension to the called address. The OSI extended address field may be used alternatively as an extension to the called address field. This allows X.25 DTEs to insert additional routing information into the facility field of the call packet.

Address Translation
ACPs can be used as a gateway between networks with different X.121 address schemes. ACPs will map either or both called and calling addresses (using addresses preconfigured by the user) to allow routing within the network.

30

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

X.25 Dial In
This feature allows ACPs with internal modems to automatically establish an X.25 connection to another ACP or X.25 packet mode device via the public switched telephone network (PSTN). With internal modems, the ACP can be configured to recognize the mode of operation, can receive a call to activate or dial up a connection, and then disconnect after a specified period of inactivity. The user specifies the handshake type and speed, timeout delay, how many times the ACP should attempt to connect to a destination, and the inactivity period that triggers automatic disconnection of the dial-up connection. This feature can be used to back up dedicated ACP X.25 links.

manner, one ACP X.25 port assumes a master role, polling all the ports of other ACPs configured for this mode of operation. The multipoint connection is totally transparent to all access protocols and routing functions supported by the ACP. The ACP modular software architecture allows the network administrator to select the link level protocol suitable for the desired physical connection. While LAPB is used for traditional point-to-point connections, SDLC is used instead as the underlying link level for multipoint operations. The X.25 packet level fully supports either link levels, providing a transparent physical environment to the terminal operator. The multipoint support allows you to economically expand your network by adding ACPs to both ends of an existing SDLC leased line, or by using current multipoint facilities to deploy a switching network. Some of the benefits are: H Reduced number of leased lines. H Use of existing multidrop lines to merge async, SNA, BSC, and X.25 traffic. H One modem per multidropped node, instead of two.

X.25 Multipoint Support
Although the X.25 LAPB specifies point-to-point, full-duplex connections, users can interconnect ACP nodes using a multidrop topology whenever it offers better cost/performance characteristics. When interconnecting ACP nodes in this

ACP 50 Link 1

PDN
Terminal A Link 2

V.25 bis- or Hayes-compatible

X.25 Host

X.25 Dial Out

PSTN

ACP 50 Link 1

PDN
Terminal A Link 2

X.25 Host

X.25 Dial In with internal modems

PSTN

Figure 12. X.25 Dial Out and Dial In — Alternate Path Applications

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

31

Figure 13a depicts a standard setup for an X.25 network carrying async traffic to a Tandem host, and a parallel SNA network supporting the SNA traffic to the IBM host.

Figure 13b depicts how these two separate networks can be merged to carry both SNA and async traffic using ACP multiprotocol capability. Figure 13c shows how ACP multipoint capability reduces the number of modems and synchronous links.

a) Traditional Multidrop Environment at a Two-Host Site
IBM Host FEP Modem Tandem Host

Site A Site A SNA Cluster Controller Site B SNA Cluster Controller Site C SNA Cluster Controller

AS Multi-drop SDLC Line

X.25

Site B

Site D

SW/AS X.25

X.25

X.25 AS

Site C

AS

b) X.25 Star Network using ACP Multiprotocol Capability
IBM Host Tandem Host

c) Multidrop Network using ACP Multiprotocol and Multipoint Capability
IBM Host Tandem Host

X.25

X.25

Site A

Site D

Site A

Site D

SDLC Links with X.25 Packet Level

SNA CC

SNA/SW/AS X.25
Site B

SNA CC

SNA/SW/AS

X.25
Site C Site B

Site C

Figure 13. The ACP Multiprotocol and Multidrop Solutions

32

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

DSP Support
Why Bisync?
User communities require their networks to comply with network conventions that are not vendor-specific, such as the X.25 interface and other protocols that fit in the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) network model. The ACP also supports a vendor-specific 3270 Bisynchronous Communication (BSC) access to allow the user to deploy hybrid networks offering the best of both worlds. Such networks combine the openness of X.25 with BSC access, providing the user with a wealth of application software and equipment available from IBM.r In August, 1981, Telenet, TransCanada Telephone, and Tymnet agreed upon a common end-to-end protocol, the 3270 Display System Protocol (DSP), that defines how BSC 3270 data is handled across an X.25 network. In 1983, an update to this standard was created, and called Display System Protocol II (DSPII). The ACP’s DSP module conforms to the mandatory requirements of the updated specification. For both 3270 point-to-point and multipoint environments, the user may use a packet switching network for data transfer instead of leased lines. This capability provides distinct advantages to the user:
I

packets into 3270 data blocks and forwards them to the host computer applications (see Figure 14).

Bisync Host

Terminals and Printers

3270 Data Blocks
Front End Processor w/ DSP Software

Control Units

FEP

Bisync Data Blocks

X.25 Packets

X.25

X.25 Packets
ACP Terminal PAD (TPAD)

Figure 14. DSP Operation in a PDN The DSP processing activity is transparent to the user, appearing as a direct connection to the host computer. In addition, all polling and related activity is handled locally and adds no additional overhead to the network: the ACP’s DSP module polls its attached control units, and no polls are passed through the network. The user may attach control units to the ACP point-to-point (one control unit per bisync port) or multidropped (two or more control units per port).

I

I

I

Simplified physical installation because the number of required leased or dial-up lines needed for each cluster controller is reduced since they can be replaced with a single access link from the ACP to the PDN. Reduced cost as PDN charges are based on use rather than connection time. Increased reliability as the ACP provides multiple, alternate routes to a host destination. Reduced cost and management overhead by combining 3270 BSC traffic with other protocols, such as X.25, SNA, and async.

Connection Methods
The DSP module allows the user to take advantage of four connection request modes (CRMs). CRM Type 1, referred to as fixed class, replaces dedicated line applications. The ACP provides the line number, CU address, and device address in the call request packet to the host DSP software. The host DSP software maps the control unit and devices to a fixed location. CRM Type 2, referred to as specific class, is similar to fixed class in that it replaces a dedicated application, but the CU address and device address in the call request packet can be mapped to a different CU and device by the host DSP software. CRM Type 3, referred to as non-specific class, is used in applications where there is a larger number of control units/devices contending for a limited number of configured control units/devices at the host. The ACP provides the CU and device

DSP within the X.25 Network
The DSP module allows up to 64 3270-type control units with attached devices to communicate in a multihost environment through an X.25 network. This mode allows devices attached to the control unit(s) to establish independent virtual circuits/ sessions to the host. In this way, devices on the same control unit can access different host computers and applications. ACPs with the DSP module allow the attachment of one or more 3270-type control units, which in turn attach display terminals and printers. Following the BSC protocol, the DSP module polls each attached control unit. A control unit transmits data to the ACP in the form of 3270 data blocks. The DSP module converts the data blocks into X.25 packets, and transmits the data through the X.25 packet switching network. At the other end, the host DSP process converts the received X.25

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

33

addresses, as well as the application ID in the call request to the host DSP software. CRM Type 4, referred to as the associated class, is used to attach printers. This is accomplished by the host DSP software returning a unique four-byte identifier that the ACP uses to connect the printer. Connection request modes 1, 2 and 3 are the most common method of attaching 3x7x controllers (e.g., 3174 and 3274) and devices such as 3178, 3179, 3180, 3191, 3275, 3276, 3277, 3278, and 3279. In addition to the four CRMs, the ACP allows the attached device to take advantage of two call methods: autocall and normal. When configured for autocall, the ACP automatically initiates calls to the host. Should the host be unreachable, the ACP will periodically retry. With the normal connection method, the user initiates the call by selecting the host application from the Application Selection menu displayed on the terminal screen. Upon selection, the user may then choose a printer from a similar menu. Calls are cleared by the user via menu selection.

Monitoring Commands
The monitoring functions of the DSP module provides a series of commands that let the user obtain status information about the ACP, control the general operation of control units and devices, and troubleshoot the system while it is operating. The user invokes monitoring commands by using the ACP’s System Manager (SYM) software module. Typical commands include the status command, down command, and up command.

Trace Functions
The DSP module’s trace function collects the 3270 data blocks being processed by the DSP module and sends them to the TRACE software module, where they are formatted for review. The Trace function monitors data blocks traveling in both directions through the network, that is, toward the host computer and toward bisync devices attached to the ACP.

34

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Frame Relay Support
The ACP 10, 50, or 70 can be equipped with a frame relay software module to provide Frame Relay Access Device (FRAD) functionality when connected to a frame relay network. Deploying ACPs as FRADs allows users to realize the benefits of frame relay services, such as cost savings and performance improvements. ACPs equipped with frame relay also provide frame relay switching: the transport of async, SNA, and X.25 data via frame relay network services. This is achieved by first encapsulating these access protocols using the LAPB X.25 protocol, which acts as a transport layer to provide SVC functionality through the frame relay network. Since frame relay networks are typically PVCs (Permanent Virtual Connections), this implementation ensures that no connectivity is lost between X.25 and frame relay networks. For example, an async device can communicate with an X.25 host, or an SNA cluster controller can communicate with QLLC hosts using a frame relay network. Figure 15 illustrates connectivity between  3270-type controllers and IBM host mainframes #1 or #2; between  asynchronous ASCII devices and asynchronous or X.25 hosts; and between  frame relay gateway devices or ELX using RFC 1490.

LMI
The FR module Local Management Interface (LMI) supports the ANSI and ITU standards (T1.617 Annex D and CCITT Q.933 Annex A)* and the “GO4” specification authored by the Group of 4. The LMI implements line monitoring and status reporting for frame relay PVCs.

DTE and DCE Interfaces
The ACP frame relay module offers both a DTE interface, to allow connection to public or private frame relay network services, and a DCE interface, to allow connection to frame relay-native devices, such as bridges and routers. By combining DCE and DTE interfaces in the same ACP, the user can concentrate several frame relay DTE devices onto one or more frame relay networks. _____________________________________ * Available in software Versions 1.10 , 2.04, and later.

Parameters and Timers
All the following frame relay link level parameters are supported, and are individually soft configurable on each link:

Host

X.25 Host IBM Main Frame #1

Async

2

2

1

QLLC
3274

SDLC
1 ACP 50

Frame Relay

Frame Relay

ACP 50

3270/ 3770 SDLC

1

Frame Relay
LAN ACP 70 ACP 50

IBM Main Frame #2

Frame Relay
3 2

Frame Relay
3

Frame Relay
Gateway

CRT LAN

Figure 15. ACP Frame Relay Support — Sample Application

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

35

GO4 nT1

ANSI T391

Description Polling Interval. Defines how often, in seconds, the ACP sends status inquiries to the network. DCE Timer 2. Defines the maximum number of seconds the DCE expects between DTE polls. DCE Timer 3. Defines the time, in seconds, for the DCE to accept nN4 polls. Full Status Request Frequency. Defines the number of status inquiry messages it will send to the network before it requests a full status message from the network. Threshold Number of Errors. Defines how many errors must occur within an nN3 window before the link enters an error state. Number of LMI Events. Defines the number of consecutive LMI events required to clear the link from an error state. Maximum Number of Polls. Defines the maximum number of polls the DCE will accept from the DTE within the nT3 window.

Inbound Congestion Control
FECN Transmission
Upon receipt of a large amount of data on a DLCI bigger than the configured receiving buffers threshold, the ACP forwards the frames with the FECN bit set to one, and sets the BECN bit to one in the frames returned to the sending device. However, it does not reduce the data output rate of the outbound DLCI. If the amount of data received overflows the receiving buffer, the ACP discards frames as follows: 1. Discards the current received frame if the DE (Discard Eligibility) bit is set to one. 2. Discards frames from the buffer with DE bit set to one. 3. Discards the last frame received with or without DE bit set one. When the ACP’s DCE interface receives data over the BC input rate, the ACP forwards the frame with the DE bit set to one.

nT2

T392

nT3

nN1

N391

nN2

N392

nN3

N393

Congestion Recovery
Congestion recovery occurs when the receiving buffer threshold is below the configured limit. The ACP will cease setting the FECN and BECN bits in the forwarded and outgoing frames. NOTE: The ACP congestion control mechanism —outbound and inbound—can be disabled via software configuration.

nN4

Outbound Congestion Control
BECN Reception
Upon reception of a frame with the BECN (Backward Explicit Congestion Notification) bit set to one, the ACP forwards the frame unchanged, throttles the output rate from Be (excess burst rate) to Bc (committed burst rate), and sets the FECN (Forward Explicit Congestion Notification) bit to one in outgoing frames on the same DLCI. If the congestion persists and the ACP receives N consecutive frames with the BECN bit set to one, the output rate is first reduced to 87.5% of Bc, then to 50% of Bc if the congestion still persists.

Frame Relay Applications
FRAD
ACP FRADs (Frame Relay Access Devices) encapsulate X.25, asynchronous, SNA, bit-oriented, and byte-oriented data in frame relay packets for fast transmission to each other over a frame relay backbone network. When equipped with ELX communication modules, ACP FRADs are also capable of routing IP LAN traffic over a frame relay WAN by using the RFC 1490 standard to encapsulate the IP datagrams. The combination of the frame relay component and the feature-rich multiprotocol PAD in the same ACP offers a unique multiprotocol FRAD Concentrator.

Congestion Recovery
Congestion recovery occurs when N/2 frames are received with the BECN bit cleared. The output rate is then raised to the next upper rate (i.e., from 50% of Bc to 87.5% of Bc to Bc then Be). The FECN bit in the outgoing frames will be cleared only when the output rate is back to Be.

Frame Relay Concentrator
This application provides the end user with the capability to concentrate multiple frame relay DTE devices, such as routers, bridges and FRADs, to one or more frame relay networks.

36

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

X.25 SVC Over Frame Relay PVC
The unique implementation of frame relay in the ACP platform allows the user to take full advantage of X.25 switching while using a frame relay PVC network. You can assign each X.25 component to either a physical port or to a frame relay DLCI. All X.25 components are interconnected through the network router (netmap/netroute), which means that you can switch data from components such as ITI, SNA, TPP, or X.25 to any other X.25 component whether it is using a physical port or an X.25 frame relay DLCI. The network router allows the user to specify one or more alternate routes to maintain service to users when frame relay link failures occur. An alternate route is also used when the primary route has no available logical channels or when the final destination cannot be reached. Figure 16 illustrates how an ACP can support access by several proprietary protocols—here asynchronous, SNA, and X.25—through the frame relay network. Multiple protocols from site D send data to the complementary sites A, B, and C which in turn can send data to site D and to each other via site D.

The user may also specify a call-sharing group, consisting of two or more frame relay links. The ACP will then balance the calls among all the links in the group. Because async and SNA protocols are transported over X.25 LCNs, both protocols use the above features to retain the extensive PAD functions (e.g., VLU and PU switching) and share the same DLCI.

Monitoring Commands
The monitoring functions of the frame relay module allow the user to obtain status information about frame relay PVCs and frame relay interfaces; to enable and disable frame relay PVCs; and to troubleshoot the network while it is operating.

Trace Functions
The trace function of the frame relay module collects data on the module’s operation. The frame relay module sends trace data to the ACP’s TRACE software module, which formats and stores the information for review.

A SITE D B C

Async ITI SNA SNA X.25 SNA

X.25 DTE X.25 DTE X.25 DTE FR DTE DLCI A DLCI B DLCI C

QLLC/ X.25

DLCI C X.25 X.25 DTE FR DTE FR DCE

FR DCE

SITE C

SNA Host

FR ACP
SNA/ SDLC DLCI B SNA X.25 DTE FR DTE FR DCE

Frame Relay Network

SITE B

SNA Host

FR ACP

FR DCE

X.29/ X.25

DLCI A X.25 X.25 DTE FR DTE

SITE A

Async Host

FR ACP

Figure 16. Multi-protocol ACP and Frame Relay Network

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

37

Asynchronous Support
The Interactive Terminal Interface (ITI) module supports connections to both asynchronous terminals and host computer asynchronous ports. All features listed here are enabled by configuring the ITI-related files in the configuration database.

Host Connectivity Features
Physical Attachment
H Dedicated. H Pulsed ring (not available on ACP 10). H Constant ring. H User-definable handshake for universal host attachment. H Sign-on. H Host port activates baud rate detection when a call is received. H Speed can be made to match the throughput class of incoming calls. H Autocall character strings can be configured. H Caller can be prompted for a class of service. H Caller can be prompted for a preferred X.3 profile. H Access Control. H Class of Service rotaries may be defined. H Multiple ACPs configurable as a single async rotary. H Ports may also be individually selected. H Closed User Group IDs may be assigned to each port. H Reverse charges may be accepted. H Flow control parameter negotiation supported.

Device Connectivity Features
Physical Attachment
H Direct attachments via EIA control or 3-wire only. H Remote attachment via leased line modems or switched line modems, external or internal.* H User-definable EIA handshaking to facilitate the attachment of terminals, PBXs, POS, etc. H Up to 100 KB of data buffer memory to optimize blockmode transmissions and high-speed async devices. H Data rates from 50 bps to 115.2 kbps.* H Autobaud/autoparity detection from 300 bps to 38.4 kbps.* H Configurable maximum permissible autobaud speed on a per-port basis. H Character code support of 5, 6, 7, 8, or 9 data bits.* H User-selectable number of stop bits (0, 1, or 2). H Configurable echo mask (sequences). H MINITEL terminal support. H Access Control. H Ports may be classified for public, group, or private access. H Class of Service password. H User name and password. H Additional security provided with an automatic callback mechanism using dial-up modems. H NUI support. H Closed User Group (CUG) support. H Access Messages. H Configurable connect banner may display node and access port identification, time and date notification, and release number of resident operating code. H Network bulletins may be displayed in Class of Service messages. H Temporary shutdown notices may be dispatched in Out of Service messages. H Broadcast messages display real time events.
* Platform dependent.

Access Messages
H Class of Service messages. H Out of Service messages.

Other Features
H Generates a Break signal or a configurable character string upon receipt of an Interrupt packet. H Call clearing uses Invitation to Clear procedures to avoid data loss.

Routing
H Supports “off-net” (local) port-to-port switching. H Incoming call routing to ports/rotaries can be set by X.121 subaddress fields, by prompting the caller, or by callĆuserĆ data or OSI extended address fields. H Incoming data may be copied to another local device or to a remote destination via the copy function. This allows the routing of reports to a shared printer and intra-network electronic mail.

38

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

X.3 Support
In addition to conforming to the mandatory 1988 CCITT X.3 recommendation, the ITI module supports both mandatory and optional X.3 values for all 22 parameters, as well as an additional set of 10 parameters to provide more flexibility. This allows most end-user installations to fully use the capabilities of packet switching without compromising the operational procedures already in place.

7. 8. 9. 10.

XOFF to device XON to PAD XOFF to PAD Forwarding on character count

X.3 Mapping
The ITI module allows the terminal operator to select an X.3 version for each call to access older generation X.25 networks and different types of X.25-based equipment. For example, a terminal operator calling a host programmed for TELENETtype support would use the X.3 TELENET version rather than the extended X.3 version. The ITI module supports some major X.3 network implementations as well as X.3 profiles of other PAD vendors to facilitate phasing in the ACP’s extended features.

X.3 (CCITT) Parameters Supported
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. PAD recall Echo Forwarding characters Idle timer Flow control device Service signals Break action Discard output CR padding Line folding Speed Flow control PAD LF insertion LF padding Edit Character delete Line delete Line display Editing signals Echo mask Parity treatment Page wait

Profile Support
H CCITT profiles 90 and 91. H 16 additional, configurable, 32-parameter profiles. H A profile can be preassigned or the terminal operator prompted for one during sign on. H Numeric or alphanumeric profile identifiers. H X.3 profile mapping; for CCITT ’76, ’80, ’84, ’88, TELENET, DATAPAC and TELEPAC networks and other equipment, such as DYNAPAC and AMDAHL. H User may review alternative profiles without affecting his own X.3 parameter settings. H Automatic storage and recall of X.3 parameter settings between sessions eliminates the need to readjust parameters following each session.

Extended X.3 Parameters
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Forwarding character 1 Forwarding character 2 Output pending timer Interval forwarding timer Horizontal TAB padding XON to device

Flow Control
H In-band flow control as defined by X.3 profile; XONXOFF characters are user defined via the extended parameters. H Out-of band flow control via user defined secondary EIA signals. Either DTR or RTS may be used. H Definable minimum and maximum buffer size and flow control threshold on a per-port basis.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

39

X.28 Support
The ITI module supports all eight X.28 commands as per the CCITT 1988 recommendation. These commands allow the user to place calls, review and alter X.3 parameters, request status of an X.25 logical connection, etc. In addition, an extended X.28 support allows the user to invoke an additional set of 19 commands. This extended support enhances the functionality of the ACP while providing the user with a friendlier interface. As in the X.3 implementation, the ITI module allows the terminal operator to select one of the preprogrammed X.28 command sets. This enables the operator to have a common command set compatible with equipment already installed and in use.
X3type X28type Invoke the X.3 emulation and mapping function. Invoke the X.28 emulation and mapping function.

X.28 Mapping
The ITI module supports an X.28 mapping function to emulate, within certain limitations, the X.28 command set of certain public data networks and other PAD implementations. Emulation for the most commonly used commands is available for CCITT ’88, TELENET, DATAPAC, TELEPAC networks, AMDAHL and DYNAPAC PAD equipment. In addition to the preprogrammed commands, the user may redefine the syntax of certain X.28 commands.

X.28 (CCITT) Commands Supported
H stat H clr H par? (parameter list) H set (parameter:value) H set? (parameter:value) H prof (identifier) H reset H int

Call Request Methods
There are four methods of requesting a connection to a destination: H Long form method. H Abbreviated (short form) method. H Direct (Autocall) method. H PVC (Permanent Virtual Circuit) method. Long Form Method. The ITI module supports the X.28 call request command, commonly referred to as the long form method, as it requires the user to specify the destination address, the facilities required for the call; e.g., reverse charging, and possibly a call-user-data-string.
Facilities supported Packet negotiation Window negotiation Throughput class Reverse charge Closed user group Fast select restricted Fast select Charging information Priority call RPOA NUI Comments Asymmetrical sizes are supported. Asymmetrical sizes are supported. Asymmetrical class is supported. May be enforced or on demand. May be enforced or on demand. Up to 124 user-specifiable bytes may be transmitted Up to 124 user-specifiable bytes may be transmitted. To request PAD billing information at end of (local) session. For the Canadian DATAPAC network. From a pre-configured list of carriers. Network User Identification

Extended X.28 Command Set
Command c <addr> call copy copyclr help iclr intd logoff npar rpar rprof rset rset? send tactt tact type Function Place a call to the specified address. Retry a previously cleared call without rekeying. Establish a secondary virtual circuit to duplicate all incoming data to a second device. Clear the copy command. Invoke a resident help function. Send an invitation to clear. Simulate a Break key; for devices without one. Hang up a modem or exit to idle state. Set parity in network bound data. Read remote PAD parameters. Select a remote X.3 profile. Set remote PAD parameters. Set and read remote PAD parameters. Send data to a remote user while in session. Invoke a resident data generator; for testing the terminal. Invoke a resident echo facility; for testing the connection. Send data to a local device.

Abbreviated Calling Method. In addition to the long form method, the ITI module supports an abbreviated method of requesting a connection, using preconfigured mnemonics. H The mnemonics can be up to 10 alphanumeric characters long.

40

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

H There are two levels of mnemonics: private mnemonics can be used only by users assigned a certain class of service, while public mnemonics can be used by any user not restricted to using abbreviated method of calling. H Should the preconfigured destinations support subaddressing or require different call-user-data content to select applications, the mnemonic addressing method allows the user to specify these fields when placing a call. This feature relieves the administrator from having to preconfigure each calling combination—an otherwise tedious and memory-inefficient exercise. H Each mnemonic can be configured to invoke a call request that includes all the fields of the long-form connect request command. H The ACP can be configured to automatically send a host logon screen upon call establishment. H The ACP can be configured with up to eight destination addresses associated with each mnemonic for automatic call forwarding. If the primary destination is unreachable, the ACP will automatically attempt to reach other addresses in the list. Examples:
Mnemonics Possible Use Inventory To call the “inventory” computer. Inventory*password Same as above, with a logon password in the call-user-data field. Gateway*12 To call port 12 at destination “gateway.”

Examples:
Possible Mnemonic Echo Echo-off Edit Bye X.28 Command Invoked Set 2:1 Set 2:0 Set 15:1 Clr

The mnemonic can be configured to represent multiple X.28 commands. In the following example, the mnemonic “mail” will set the user X.3 parameters and will cause the ACP to place a reverse charge call to a destination on the TELENET packet data network.
Mail Set1:1,2:1,3:2,22:241\R-311021300009

Help Facility
To assist users that sign on to the asynchronous ports, the ITI module offers an on-line “help” facility.
Help Functions X.3 X.28 Profiles Mnemonics RPOA Description Lists the parameters by their reference number and their function. Lists the commands and their functions. Lists the different profiles. Lists both call and command mnemonics. Lists the carrier names and codes.

Service Signals
The ITI module supports all service signals called for in CCITT ’88. The user may also, via the X.3 parameter 6 (service signals), invoke the extended mode whereby text message is printed along side the cause and diagnostic codes in reset and clear service signals. H In addition to the prescribed service signals, the network administrator can define several messages for transmission to users upon sign-on. H If necessary, the CCITT-defined X.28 command prompt (*) may be changed to any string of characters. H A broadcast message may be transmitted at any time to all ACP active users. H The ACP may be configured to transmit a local accounting service signal to the async device at the conclusion of the call. The service signal will include the user ID, destination address, time and duration of the call, number of packets, segments and characters transmitted and received, facilities negotiated, etc.

Direct Method. The third method is referred to as the direct or autocall method. Once the user is identified (if access control is configured), the ACP will automatically place a call to a predefined destination upon completion of the EIA handshake, or upon detecting data activity. PVC Method. The fourth method is using Permanent Virtual Circuits (PVCs) in a network. When configured for PVC operation, the connection will be attempted upon completion of the local EIA handshake.

User-Defined Commands
The ITI module allows the System Administrator to predefine commands that can be invoked by the user in command mode. This feature allows commonly used X.28 commands to be invoked using a mnemonic rather than the cryptic, CCITT command style. It may also be used to support a non-English language command set, and possibly to mimic other commands that the user is familiar with on other PAD equipment. A mnemonic can also be configured to represent multiple X.28 commands.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

41

X.29 Support
The ITI module’s support of X.29 allows remote host computers to read and set the ACP parameters. The ITI module also supports the reselection message defined in CCITT ’88. The supported messages are: H Set H Read H Set and read H Parameter indication H Invitation to clear H Indication of break H Error H Reselection

X.29 Reselection. This feature allows the ACP to be effectively used in X.25 networks equipped with application routers or security logon servers. In this environment, typically all asynchronous users who log on via the ACP will first be validated by the application router or logon server. Upon successful validation, the router/server would instruct the ACP to connect the user to the appropriate network destination via an X.29 reselection message. Alternative Host Selection. The ACP can be configured with alternate called addresses to be tried in sequence if the call request to the primary called address fails. The ACP can also be configured to inform the terminal operator of each failure to connect in the alternative host selection process. Asynchronous Out-dial. The ITI module’s out-dial feature can significantly reduce long distance calling costs. This feature enables users to access hosts outside the ACP-based network with a local call from the nearest ACP PAD via an async modem. The ITI module achieves this by prefacing the X.121 address of the gateway PAD with the modem initialization sequence ATDT.

Host Computer Support
X.29 Conversion. The ACP can be used by attached async devices to generate X.29 messages. For example, an async host computer may dynamically disable remote echo for certain data entry fields (e.g., a logon password). In this environment, the host can be programmed to prefix certain field prompts with a predefined command that makes the ACP generate an appropriate X.29 message to the remote ACP. In the above example, this message can cause echo to be disabled at the remote ACP for that particular field. Automatic Parameters Setting. When the ACP is used as an async host’s front end, it can be configured to download a parameter set command to ensure that the calling party’s X.3 parameters are compatible with the application being accessed on the host. Downloading of national parameters, including a national marker, is supported. Invitation to Clear. When used as a host front end, the ACP can be configured to clear a connection using the Invitation to Clear method.

X.121 Support
H The ITI module fully supports recommendation X.121 per CCITT ’88. In doing so, the ACP allows the user to call any destination accessible via one or more PDNs. All calling methods described previously allow the user to call any address up to 15 digits long. H When originating a call, the ACP can be configured to insert the port ID in the calling address field for accounting or identification purposes. H For incoming calls, the ACP can route calls to any port based on any number of sub-address digits. This allows the ACP to be compatible with networks that support a variable sub-addressing field.

42

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

SNA Support
Why Combine X.25 and SNA?
User communities require their networks to comply with network conventions that are not vendor-specific, such as the X.25 interface and other protocols that fit in the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) network model. The ACP also supports a vendor-specific SNA access to allow the user to deploy hybrid networks offering the best of both worlds. Such networks combine the openness of X.25 with SNA access, providing the user with a wealth of application software and equipment available from IBM.r Deploying an ACP-based X.25 network allows the user to realize significant cost savings. Such a network is capable of supporting multi-vendor protocols that would otherwise require separate, distinct networks. Depending on the size of the network, ACPs can provide routing, concentration, and access functions. Access to IBM mainframes, mid-range computers, and terminal controllers is carried out in either native SDLC or X.25 mode. To operate IBM equipment in X.25 mode without ACPs, the user may require costly, add-on devices or additional software—with limited functionality and incremental costs at both the host and terminal level—only to face performance issues on the processing equipment. ACPs offer an optimum solution by providing low-cost access to SDLC equipment and by assuming the processing burden of X.25 protocol enveloping, routing, and error checking without altering existing IBM equipment or software code. ACPs also relieve the IBM host of switching functions by carrying out the switching locally at the Logical Unit level, a highly desirable capability in multi-host environments. Alternatively, if public networks are not available or economical, private networks can be built using ACP units as conventional networking multiplexers. In either case, connections to the IBM system can be X.25, using X.25 adapters, or SDLC via standard IBM communication adapters. Figure 17 on page 44 illustrates connectivity between  3270-type controllers and IBM host mainframes #1 or #2;  between 5250-type controllers and IBM System 34, 36, 38 or AS/400 hosts;  between a 3777 and IBM host #1;  between ASCII devices and X.25 hosts using X.29 protocol sharing the same line facilities; and  between a 3270-type controller and IBM host mainframe #3.

ACP TPAD and HPAD Value-added Emulation
When connecting IBM equipment in their native SDLC mode, ACPs convert SNA to X.25 through an emulation technique. In this mode, PADs are required at both host and terminal ends, and are known as Host PADs (HPADs) and Terminal PADs (TPADs). All polling takes place between the ACP acting as the TPAD and the SNA cluster controller. The HPAD handles responses to host polling locally to avoid timeouts and safeguard the network bandwidth. In addition to emulating SNA session activation to establish SDLC access with the cluster controller, ACPs emulate the System Service Control Point (SSCP) functions to allow individual LUs to access multiple hosts and applications. This bypasses the complex and cumbersome cross-domain SNA session establishment that would otherwise be required at the host front end. This device segregation also allows the user to expand or reconfigure the terminal base without affecting the setup of host terminal tables. Group poll which optimizes the performance of the ACP is supported only on the H-pad.

Automatic Error Recovery
Interconnected HPAD and TPAD ACPs will recover from most errors occurring in the network. If, for example, an X.25 link fails, all SNA sessions carried over that link will be cleared, the permanent virtual circuits reset, and the calls re-established over an available alternate link and routed to the same PU/LU as before. When operating in VLU mode, the SNA module also numbers data packets sequentially to recover from loss or duplication due to problems such as a virtual circuit reset or a call clearing and reconnecting. Data is kept at the sending end until the receiving end acknowledges receiving it. If no acknowledgement is received after a certain number of polls, the call is cleared. If the reconnection fails after a number of retries, both sides of the connection will go back to the state they were in before the connection was initially placed.

PU and LU Switching
The SNA module uses QLLC protocol* to route SNA traffic from an IBM PU2 to an IBM host over an X.25 link. This

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

43

IBM Main Frame Host #1

37x5 NCP

37x5 NCP/NPSI

IBM Main Frame Host #2

IBM 3274

IBM 5294/5250

IBM 3777 

ACP 50  

SNA 3270/3770

X.25 (QLLC) X.25 


Tandem Host

ACP 50 

 

X.25

X.25

PDN

X.25
ACP 50 

IBM 3274 

5250 SNA 

X.25 (DSP)
37x5 w/DSP IBM Main Frame Host #3 

IBM 3274

Async 

IBM SYS 34/36/38 or AS/400

PC

CRT

Figure 17. ACP SNA Support—A Sample Application. mode is referred to as PU switching, as all LUs related to a PU share the same physical and logical path (i.e., one SVC) to the host. Up to 64 PUs can be supported by one ACP. The SNA module can also be configured to allow individual LUs off the same PU to establish independent sessions, a mode referred to as LU switching. Each LU essentially uses one X.25 SVC to carry its own session. To use this feature, an ACP HPAD is required at the IBM host computer to support the necessary protocol from the ACP acting as a TPAD.

3770 SNA Support
The extended feature “auto connect” provides conversion for 3770 SNA/SDLC data streams to CCITT X.25 packets for transmission across a PDN. This 3770 support can be used in addition to 5250 and 3270 SNA support.

5250/5294/5394 SNA Support
ACPs configured as TPADs convert 5250 SNA/SDLC data streams to CCITT X.25 packets for transmission across a PDN and interface to IBM System 34/36/38 and AS/400 host computers. ACPs can simultaneously support IBM 5250/5294/5394 cluster controllers. As HPADs, they can also be used as an alternative to IBM’s X.25 host adapter.

3270 SNA Support
ACPs configured as TPADs convert 3270 SNA/SDLC data streams to CCITT X.25 packets for transmission across a PDN and interface to IBM mainframes. As HPADs, they can also be used as an alternative to IBM’s Network Packet Switching Interface (NPSI).
* The ACP SNA module clears the network connection upon FRMR.

Connections to a Host
All X.25 call connection features are available to ACP with SNA capability. These features are described earlier in the ACP X.25 support section.

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ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Display Stations
Display stations can connect to a host in three different ways: via menus that contain a directory of application names or phone numbers; automatically to predefined destinations for convenience or security; or over permanent virtual circuits (PVC). A sample of the fully-configurable host selection menu is shown in Figure 18 below.

BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB

BANNER

BBBBBBBBBBBBBBB

PRINTER CONNECTION MENU A. PR555 B. Pclass4 C. 5256class D. 5256class X. QUIT PROMPT _ LU2 LU5 LU10 LU9

BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB

BANNER

BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB

<< Call Clear Message >> HOST SELECTION MENU A. HOST1 B. SYST/38 C. ABCdef S. X. Y. Z. SIGNOFF EXIT TO HOST PRINTER CONNECTION MENU PRINTER DISCONNECTION MENU

Figure 19. A Printer Connection Menu

Enhanced Security
ACPs offer various security functions to ensure that specific end users only connect to a host using pre-assigned LUs or that only predetermined hosts are available to them. This is of particular importance for host computers that allow dial-in access. In addition, selecting “SIGNOFF” from the Host Connection Menu prevents unauthorized use of the network.

PROMPT _

Figure 18. A Host Connection Menu

Printer Stations
Printer stations may be connected automatically by the host or via menus displayed at each cluster controller’s “privileged” display station. Autocall connections from the host allow an additional level of security and automatic batch printing after working hours. A sample of the fully-configurable printer connection menu is shown in Figure 19.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

45

IP Support
The IP module, in conjunction with the ELX CEM/CAM or the ACP 70 embedded AUI, allows an ACP to function as a TCP/IP router. This, combined with the other ACP-supported protocols, eliminates the need for separate networks and separate hardware. Available on the ACP 50 and ACP 70, the IP module routes IP datagrams through X.25 or frame relay networks according to the routing information contained in the IP headers of the received IP datagrams. These datagrams are split into packets or frames for transmission through the network, and reassembled at the destination ACP into the original datagram with the appropriate MAC layer and IP addressing intact. This provides a seamless interconnection of LAN users across a WAN. The IP module supports two network links up to 2Mbps, and one Ethernet 10Base5 LAN port using 802.3 or Ethernet V.2 encoding. Many large networks are now forced to support separate—and different—network infrastructures for async, SNA, SDLC, and X.25. This, combined with the increasing demand for internetworked LAN traffic, is making the work of network designers and administrators more difficult than ever before. Organizations of all sizes are integrating traffic such as async, SNA, X.25, and frame relay on a common WAN to slash costs associated with operating and maintaining separate networks. Adding IP support to the ACP leverages the available ACP protocols (SNA, DSP, POS, async, TPP, and FR) to provide an excellent multiprotocol FRAD or multiprotocol router solution.

Applications
The following is a list of a few of the most popular applications that are routed by ELX. H SNMP. (Simple Network Management Protocol.) The ACP can act as an SNMP agent system, performing network management operations requested by an SNMP manager at your site. Any of several SNMP managers (e.g., HP OpenView) can be used. SNMP Agent services SNMP V1 requests from the SNMP manager, and reports unsolicited traps to the SNMP manager for pre-configured ACP alarm conditions. Figure 7 on page 23 shows an application using SNMP Agent for remote management. H TELNET.ą(Network Terminal Protocol.) TELNET provides a means for a user to log on to a computer on another network. Both TELNET Client and TELNET Server are supported. h TELNET Client—Allows async VT-100 type terminals to login and establish a TELNET session with a TELNET host server over an IP network. (See Figure 20 and Figure 21.) TELNET Server—Allows TELNET clients on a LAN to login and establish a TELNET session with an X.25 host. (See Figure 22 and Figure 23.) TELNET Server also allows TELNET clients on a LAN to login and establish a TELNET session with the ACP System Manager (SYM), and to trace components to conduct remote management and diagnostic procedures (see Figure 9 and Figure 10 on page 24).

h

P S T N
ACP 50 TELNET Client

TELNET Server

IP
ACP 50

Async Terminals

Figure 20. Application Using Remote ACP TELNET Client Support

46

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

P S T N

TELNET Server

IP
ACP 50 Triple-X PAD ACP 50 TELNET Gateway

Async Terminals

Figure 21. Application Using Local Triple-X to ACP TELNET Gateway

TELNET Client

X.25
ACP 50 TELNET Server Host

Figure 22. Application Using Local ACP Reverse TELNET X.25 Host Server Support

TELNET Client

X.25
ACP 50 TELNET Server Host

Router

Figure 23. Application Using Remote ACP Reverse TELNET Async Host Server Support

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

47

H FTP. (File Transfer Protocol.) Allows the transfer of files from one computer on the network to other computers on the network. The FTP software component supports the upload and download of ACP code and configuration data from a PC FTP client over an IP network (see Figure 8 on page 23). H SMTP. (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol.) Allows users to send mail messages to other mail users on another network. H NFS. (Network File System.) A mechanism that allows a computer to run as a server and make some or all of its files available to remote users. Figure 24 shows additional examples of applications using ELX/IP operation.

Routing Protocols
To interoperate with other vendors’ LAN-based products, the ACP supports the Routing Information Protocol (RIP), which is the de facto standard used for sending routing information between LAN-equipped nodes in the network. This routing information is used to select the best path to the destination network. The ACP also supports the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing protocol. OSPF was developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) specifically for use in the TCP/IP environment. OSPF is classified as an Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP), meaning that it distributes routing information among the routers within an area called an Autonomous System (AS). All routers in the AS run the same routing protocol, and all maintain an identical database of routing information.

Standards
The IP software module allows ACPs to be fully interconnected over a private network, and to interact with other DTE devices supporting the same RFC (Request for Comments).
RFC # 791 792 826 951,1084 1042 Description Internet Protocol (IP) Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) Ethernet Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) BOOTP Protocol Standard for transmission of IP datagrams over IEEE 802 networks, using subnetwork access protocol (SNAP). Transmission of IP datagrams over serial lines (SLIP) Routing Information Protocol (RIP) SNMP MiB II statistics Multiprotocol Interconnect over frame relay (IP over frame relay) Link Control Protocol (LCP) Internet Protocol Control Protocol (IPCP) Multiprotocol Interconnect over X.25 packet network (IP over X.25) Open Shortest Path First (OSPF)

ELX Transceivers
Telematics offers third party transceivers to facilitate users in eliminating costly and unwieldy AUI drop cables. These transceivers provide state-of-the-art inexpensive solutions for thin coax (10Base2), unshielded twisted-pair (UTP), shielded twisted-pair (STP), and fiber optic LAN Connectivity.

Bandwidth Management
The IP module is always offered with the frame relay module. Together they provide a sophisticated bandwidth management mechanism for throttling the TCP/IP or other traffic into the frame relay network. The ACP can be configured so that each of the remote LANs are connected via a separate DLCI. Each of these DLCIs can have a different “CIR” (Committed Information Rate) so that traffic between different destination LANs and the concentration of other traffic is manageable.

1055 1058 1213 1294, 1490 1331 1332 1356 1583

Monitoring Commands
The monitoring function of the IP module allows the network administrator or user to obtain a quick status of the network with the ping command. Other commands available via the system manager (SYM) software module are status command, down command, and up command.

48

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Host

Mail Server Local Users

Async X.25
Host

3274 ACP 50 Local Users File Server Frame Relay or X.25 ACP 50 ACP 50

QLLC
Host

LAN

3270/3770
Host SLIP Modem

Multidrop

3174 3174 3174

Async

SLIP
Local Users File Server Modem

Host

Figure 24. Sample ELX/IP Applications

LAN/WAN Interface Connectivity
The following table lists the LAN/WAN interfaces and connectivity supported.
Type Supported LANs and LAN Interfaces Description Ethernet: AUI/10Base5. Also supports 10Base2, 10BaseT, STP/UTP, and fiber via external transceivers. IP TCP/IP, AS, X.25, SNA, TPP, SLIP, PPP 800 frames per second throughput. Assumes system is only routing IP traffic using RFC 1294 encapsulation. Both static and dynamic routing supported. IP over Frame Relay RFC 1294 and IP over X.25 RFC 1356. Packets per second throughput: 500 (64 Byte packets using one 256 kbps X.25 link; RFC 1356; system is only routing IP traffic).

Statistics
The IP module collects statistics on IP, routing, ICMP and Ethernet, as described in RFC 1213.

Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP)
Mobile IP users, while on the road, can connect to the ACP/ELX module via modems and access the resources on the LANs. The IP module permits a device attached to an asynchronous port of the ACP, either directly or via a modem, to use SLIP to establish a connection to the attached IP networks. The IP module conforms to the RFC-1055 for SLIP. Conforming to RFC-951 and RFC-1084, the BOOTP protocol support on the IP module facilitates a device that uses a dial-up SLIP connection to the ACP to determine its IP address.

Routed LAN Protocols Routing Concurrently Frame Relay Performance Routing Capabilities IP Encapsulation Packet Performance

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

49

Point-to-Point (PPP) Protocol
Synchronous and/or asynchronous Point-to-Point Protocol, known as PPP, provides an easy and reliable means of connecting to TCP/IP based networks (see Figure 25). PPP enables ACPs to communicate with other ACP routers or third-party routers (that comply with the same RFCs) over wide-area links. Additionally, PPP offers additional benefits over SLIP for asynchronous dial-up access to the network, such as error detection and authentication. ACP’s PPP component implements HDLC address/control field for error detection and protocol field compression, as well as TCP header compression, to reduce transmission overhead to a minimum. This improves both the throughput and interactive response on typical modem dial-up connections. In addition, the escape mechanism implementation allows control characters such as XON/XOFF to be transmitted transparently over the link. The Link Control Protocol (LCP) is used to automatically agree upon the encapsulation format options, handle varying limits on sizes of packets, determine when a link is functioning properly, detect other errors, and terminate the link. Once the LCP stage is complete, the Internet Protocol Control (IPCP) session begins. IPCP is responsible for configuring, enabling, and disabling the IP protocol modules on both ends of the point-to-point link. Synchronous PPP is capable of operating across any DTE/DCE interface (e.g., RS-232, CCITT V.35, and octal

modem). The speeds can be up to 2 Mbps when using the RS-530 and CCITT V.35 links.

IP Transporter
The IP transporter is supported in the IP module through the encapsulation of a wide range of protocols such as X.25, SNA, asynchronous, bisync, third-party bit/byte protocol, SLIP and PPP, over a TCP/IP based wide area network. The implementation of IP in ACPs (see Figure 26) now offers all the benefits of X.25 while transporting it over a TCP/IP based backbone network. ACP encapsulates a wide range of protocols in X.25 frames which in turn are encapsulated in IP datagrams for transmission over an IP network. The connection between an ACP and the backbone may be via LAN or PPP synchronous links using RS-232, RS-530, CCITT V.35, or octal modem interfaces. Speeds of the synchronous PPP links may be up to 2 Mbps.

PPP/SLIP/X.25 Gateway
The ACP PPP/SLIP/X.25 gateway provides an alternate method for accessing a remote LAN or the Internet with little or no change to the current X.25 network infrastructure. The ACP PPP/SLIP/X.25 gateway permits SLIP or PPP users to dial into their current X.25 network (PAD) and then establish a transparent virtual circuit between the PC (PPP/SLIP device) and the ACP gateway (see Figure 27).

ACP 70 PPP LAN LAN Third Party Router

ISDN

Sync PPP

PPP

Async PPP Dial–up Modem Mobile User

ACP 50 with internal dial-up modem Async PPP

PC

Figure 25. PPP Applications

50

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

FEP ACP 50

Async Host

IP

Cluster Controller

ACP 50 SNA Async

PC

Figure 26. IP Transporter

PC

. . .
PPP/SLIP

PAD

X.25

X.25

X.25 (RFC 1356)

X.25

X.25 ACP

Ethernet Frame Relay (RFC 1490)

Internet/ Intranet

X.25

PPP/SLIP/X.25 Gateway

Synchronous PPP

PC

. . .
PPP/SLIP

PAD

Figure 27. PPP/SLIP/X.25 Gateway for Internet/Intranet Access.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

51

Dynamic Allocation of IP Address
The ACP overcomes the limited number of available IP addresses by permitting the network manager to create a common pool of available IP addresses which are then shared among a large number of dial-up PPP/SLIP users. These IP addresses are then assigned dynamically to the end user during the SLIP or PPP connect time and are valid just for that session.

Figure 28 illustrates a gateway application. A PPP or SLIP user dials into the current X.25 network, and a transparent virtual circuit is established between the access point (PAD) and the ACP gateway. Optionally, the user can be directly connected to the Telematics Access Login Server before the circuit is established. (For further information on the Access Logging Server [ALS], contact your Telematics sales representative). Upon validation and approval for Internet/Intranet Access or remote LAN access, users are automatically connected to the appropriate software module on the selected ACP with PPP/SLIP/X.25 gateway using a switched virtual circuit (SVC). From then on, the SLIP or PPP data from the user’s PC is carried transparently over the X.25 network to the ACP (PPP/SLIP/X.25 gateway). This is referred to as “backhauling.” The ACP gateway strips off the X.25 and PPP/SLIP headers and forwards the IP datagrams over X.25 (RFC 1356), frame relay (RFC 1294/1490), synchronous PPP, or Ethernet links depending upon the destination.

Static IP Addresses
The ACP PPP/SLIP architecture allows network managers to assign fixed IP addresses to specific users or for specific purposes so that a given user always uses the same pre-assigned IP address.

PPP/SLIP/X.25 Gateway Application
The ACP can operate as a PPP/SLIP/X.25 gateway, connecting users to remote LANs or Internet/Intranet services. This offers an alternative means of access, and it usually requires little or no change to the existing access point(s) in the X.25 network infrastructure.

100.1.1.100
RADIUS

#1
100.1.1.101
RADIUS

#2
PAD
100.1.1.1
X.25

100.1.1.2

PPP/SLIP User LAN
X.25 Ethernet

X.25

Internet/ Intranet
ACP 50 PPP/SLIP/X.25 Gateway

X.25

PAD
Access Login Server

PPP/SLIP User

Figure 28. PPP/SLIP/Gateway Application

52

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

PAP/CHAP and RADIUS Security
The following protocols offer security for PPP users (clients) accessing the Internet: H Password Authentication Protocol (PAP), compliant with RFC1334; H Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP), compliant with RFC1334; H Remote Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS). (Authentication for SLIP is not supported.) PAP/CHAP security is a common method of verifying and validating PPP clients on servers such as the RADIUS server, which can validate thousands of users by using a centralized database. You can configure the ACP to authenticate using either CHAP (the primary, default authentication method) or PAP (the secondary method). If the ACP is configured to authenticate and the selected servers do not respond, network access is denied. Figure 29 and Figure 30 illustrate typical connections between the ACP and the RADIUS server. The RADIUS server is on the same LAN segment as the ACP. The PPP client may be on the same network or on another network.

ID/password pair repeatedly to the authenticator, until authentication is acknowledged or the connection is terminated. Passwords are sent over the network, and there is no protection from playback or repeated trial-and-error attacks. The calling PPP client controls the frequency and timing of the authentication requests. In the ACP implementation, PAP is only used if the calling PPP client does not support CHAP. The ACP implements all features of PAP in conformance with RFC 1334 and includes the following message types: H Authenticate-Request H Authenticate-ACK and NAK (ACP peer) (ACP peer)

CHAP
The Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP) uses a three-way handshake with challenge messages to verify the identity of the calling PPP client. It does this both when the link is established and periodically afterward. CHAP offers protection against playback attack by using an incrementally changing identifier and a variable challenge value. The use of repeated challenge messages limits the time of exposure to any single attack. The authenticator controls the frequency and timing of the challenge messages. This method depends on a “secret” known only to the authenticator and the calling PPP client; the secret is not sent over the link. The ACP implementation of CHAP conforms to RFC 1334 and includes the Challenge and Response, Success and Failure message types.

PAP
The Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) uses a two-way handshake to establish the identity of a calling PPP client when the link is established. The calling PPP client sends an

Router X.25/Frame Relay/Sync PPP ACP 50

Internet/ Intranet

Async PPP

PC

RADIUS Server

Figure 29. ACP and PPP Client on Same Network as RADIUS Server

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

53

ACP 50 PPP/X.25 Gateway

Router

X25 Frame Relay Sync PPP

Internet/ Intranet X.25 Dial

PPP

X.25 RADIUS Server

Figure 30. PPP Clients Remote from ACP and RADIUS Server

RADIUS
The Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) protocol is a draft RFC-based protocol. RADIUS servers are responsible for receiving user connection requests, authenticating the user, and then returning all configuration information needed for the client to deliver services to the user. The RADIUS server can act as a proxy client to other kinds of authentication servers. The ACP operates as a client of RADIUS. The ACP is responsible for passing user information to designated RADIUS servers, then acting on the response that is returned (see Figure 29 and Figure 30). The ACP generates and sends all user connection requests to the RADIUS server. Up to three server addresses may be configured. The ACP implementation of RADIUS includes a subset of messages, as defined in Internet Draft Revision 04, which are as follows: H Access-Request (ACP to RADIUS Server) H Access-Accept, Reject, and Challenge (Radius Server to ACP) The following RADIUS options are supported: H Password, IP address, subnet mask H Actual service type and protocol type H Framed user For a complete listing of RADIUS standard attributes that are supported and communicated to the ACP, see Table 9. The attribute number and related value are translated into information used by the ACP to respond to the PPP client and to the RADIUS server. NAS (Network Access Server) refers to

the ACP, which is a client of RADIUS and a server for the PPP clients. The RADIUS server offers user authentication from a central server. The RADIUS server operates on a wide range of platforms such as SunOS, Solaris, HP/UX, Alpha OSF/1, Ultrix, AIX, Linux, BSD/OS, SCO, and Unixware. (Telematics offers its own RADIUS server, called Enforcer, which operates within a Windowst or Windows NTt environment.) RADIUS Accounting Support. The ACP (NAS) operates as a client of the RADIUS accounting server. The ACP issues accounting commands to the designated RADIUS accounting server. The RADIUS server listens on UDP port 1646 for accounting requests from the ACP and returns a receive indication to the client. The RADIUS accounting server can also act as a proxy client to other kinds of accounting servers. Up to three server addresses can be configured.

Proxy ARP for IP Addressing
Proxy ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) affects IP addressing and permits the ACP to use the same subnetwork for both the ELX interface and PPP ports, without requiring either RIP or static routing. Proxy ARP automatically assigns a series of contiguous IP addresses to the ELX, SLIP, and PPP serial ports so that the ELX and PPP interfaces all belong to the same LAN segment (such as 200.1.12 in Figure 31). At the same time, this permits the flexibility to assign different subnet addresses to the ELX interface and PPP port interfaces, as needed.

54

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Table 9.

RADIUS Standard Attributes
Description Attribute # 28 29 32 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 Description

ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ
Attribute # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 User Name Idle-Timeout User Password Termination-Action NAS-Identifier Acct-Status-Type Acct-Delay-Time CHAP Password (Challenge-Response) NAS-IP-Address NAS-Port Service-Type Acct-Input-Octets Acct-Session-Id Framed-Protocol Acct-Output-Octets Acct-Authenticate Framed-IP-Address Framed-MTU State Framed-IP-Netmask Framed-Route Class 12 22 24 25 27 Acct-Session-Time Acct-Input-Packets Acct-Output-Packets Data-Filter Acct-Terminate-Cause Session-Timeout 242
Router ACP 50 IP 200.1.1.2

Internet/ Intranet
IP 200.1.1.1

PPP IP 200.1.1.3 IP 200.1.1.100 IP 200.1.1.4

RADIUS Server

IP 200.1.1.5

Figure 31. Proxy ARP Application Example

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

55

TPP Support
Why TPP?
Although the ACP family supports de facto standards, such as 3270 SNA and 3270 BSC, user communities also require their networks to transport their proprietary traffic. To this end, an ACP 10, 50, or 70 can carry Frame and Byte Oriented Protocols in X.25 packets for transport across an X.25 network. This results in network saving by reducing extra line charges.

TPP Module
The TPP software module is available on the ACP 10, ACP 70, and ACP 50 platforms. When the TPP module receives data from the FOP/BOP device, it loads it into the payload of X.25 data packets for transmission through the network. At the destination ACP, the data is then retrieved from the packets for delivery to the attached device in the native format. Figure 32 illustrates how proprietary statmux and 3780 RJE traffic can be carried through the existing X.25 network to eliminate two dedicated leased lines. The TPP processing activity is transparent to the users, appearing as a direct connection. Unlike the SNA and DSP modules, which handle the polling locally via a TPAD/HPAD functionality; the TPP module has no TPAD/HPAD functionality and requires an ACP at both ends. All polling and protocol activity is transmitted through the network. For this reason, TPP is best suited for protocols with minimal overhead, and can only be used to replace point-to-point leased lines.

FOP and BOP Protocols
The ACP TPP implementation supports two types of synchronous protocols: Byte Oriented Protocols (BOP) and Frame Oriented Protocols (FOP). All Byte Oriented Protocols are synchronized using leading sync and sync loss characters, such as ETX, EOT, and ETB (these are referred to as termination characters). All Frame Oriented Protocols are framed with a leading and trailing (7E h) flag character, and must contain a 16-bit FCS character, which is verified/ regenerated at the TPP end points.

Host Statmux

Traditional Connectivity
Statmux

Proprietary HDLC-like Protocol

3780 RJE

X.25

Frame Relay or X.25

Host

Host Statmux

ACP Solution

Statmux

3780

Frame Relay or X.25
X.25

3780 RJE

X.25

Host

Figure 32. ACP TPP Support — A Sample Solution

56

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Connection Methods
There are two methods of establishing a connection between two TPP end points: direct and PVC.

Monitoring Commands
The monitoring functions of the TPP module provides a series of commands, similar to other modules, that provides status information about the connection to the FOP/BOP device. The user invokes these monitoring commands by using the ACP’s System Manager (SYM) software module. Typical commands include the status command, down command, and up command.

Direct Method
The first method is referred to as direct or autocall. Once the EIA handshake with the DTE has completed, the ACP will automatically place a call to a predefined X.25 destination.

PVC Method
The second method is the use of a Permanent Virtual Circuit (PVC) in the X.25 network. When configured for PVC operation, the PVC will be operational upon completion of EIA handshake.

Trace Functions
The TPP module’s trace function collects the FOP/BOP frames/data blocks being processed by the TPP module and sends them to the TRACE software module, where they are formatted for review. The Trace function monitors data traveling to and from attached devices.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

57

POS Support
The POS software component is designed specifically for transaction processing applications. Typical applications include point-of-sale (POS), Electronic Benefits Transferring, ATMs, and Internet commerce. When used with ACPs, POS reduces transaction processing time in environments characterized by high volumes of low-speed, short-duration calls. Two ACP platforms support POS: message formats. The Omni terminals are synchronous or asynchronous, and can use the SDLC protocol with the ISO 8583 message format as well as the VISA, TINET, SPDH, and APACS protocols with the VISAI/VISAII message formats. The POS hosts that are supported and have been tested include, but are not limited to: ASI (Tandem), BASE24 (Tandem), CAP (IBM), and the Omnihost (VeriFone).

H ACP 50 for direct, dial, and host gateway applications. H ACP 70 for direct and host gateway applications.
The ACP 50 was the first product offering from Telematics to address the payment transaction market. SmartView is the companion network management system designed for simplifying the highly complicated tasks of network management and control. ACPs provide a cost-effective and efficient means to interconnect POS terminals and controllers with communicating host computers. Basic operating capabilities include the following:

Connection Types
Link connections between the POS terminals and controller and an ACP product may use one of four interface types:

H An ACP 50 internal modem on an octal modem CEM.
This option saves money and space by using the same set of internal modem ports for either sync or async traffic, and also eliminates the need for numerous external modems.

H An external modem attached to an ACP port. H A dedicated ACP port directly attached to the POS
terminal via RS-232 interface.

H Both synchronous and asynchronous connections. H SDLC, VISA, SPDH, APACS, and TINET terminal
communications protocols; major Wide Area Network (WAN) and Local Area Network (LAN) protocols such as X.25, frame relay, and TCP/IP based protocols.

H Gateway accessed through the X.25 network.

Programmable Message-Based Switching
ACP products support the following message formats: byte-oriented VISAI and VISAII message formats and the bit-oriented ISO 8583 message format. ACPs are programmable for routing transaction messages across the network to different hosts based on the contents of the message received, such as source terminal ID and bank ID numbers. This provides for configuration flexibility, allowing new users to be added with little or no configuration required. To illustrate message switching, refer to Figure 33 on the next page. As an example application, an authorization transaction is sent over the PSTN to the ACP 50. The transaction can be initiated from a POS terminal or via an Internet service such as travel reservations, home shopping, or home banking. The ACP 50 negotiates an analog connection and then establishes a VISA, SDLC, PPP, or SLIP connection with the calling device (see part 1 of Figure 33). The protocol to the device is terminated at the ACP 50 and only user information is sent across the X.25 or frame relay network. When the transaction reaches the gateway device (an ACP 70), the device determines what type of information has been received and then routes it accordingly. A POS transaction is routed to a merchant host for processing and authorization (see part 2a), while Internet traffic is routed to the Internet (see part 2b). If

H Programmable message-based transaction switching for
ISO 8583, VISAI, and VISAII.

H OmniNAC routing header support. H Local spoofing which allows transactions to be transported
from one protocol to any other protocol, and eliminates unnecessary overhead across the network.

Terminals and Hosts Supported
The POS terminals that have been tested and certified for operation on the ACP products are noted in the following table.
Terminals Tranz 3xx, 4xx Omni 3xx, 4xx Protocols VISA, TINET, SPDH, APACS SDLC, VISA, TINET, SPDH, APACS Message Formats VISAI, VISAII ISO 8583 VISAI, VISAII

The Tranz terminals use VISA, TINET, SPDH, and APACS protocols, are asynchronous-only, and use VISAI and VISAII

58

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Web Site

3 Internet user orders an item using a credit card transaction. The web server then sends the transaction to the merchant host for authorization.

6 Receives the transaction and then updates the customer database.

Retail POS Terminals
1

Bank Host

X.25 or Frame Relay Network

Internet

SDLC VISA SDLC

The ACP 50 negotiates an analog connection, then establishes a VISA, SDLC, PPP, or SLIP connection with the device. Next, the protocol is terminated and user information is sent across the X.25 or Frame Relay network.

4 2a Routes POS transaction to the merchant host for processing and authorization.

2b

Receives packet via TCP/IP, updates the database, and then prepares information for transmission to the bank host.

Routes Internet traffic to the Internet.

Travel Reservations PPP Home Shopping SLIP Home Banking PPP

PSTN ACP 50 Dial Concentrator

X.25 or Frame Relay Network

TCP/IP

ACP 70 Host Gateway
5 Terminates TCP/IP and then converts the transaction to Legacy X.25 for transmission to the bank host. A bank host ID number can be used to route a transaction to a specific bank host.

Merchant Host

Figure 33. Internet Commerce Application an Internet user orders an item offered over a web site, then the credit card transaction used to purchase the item is routed to the merchant host for authorization (see part 3). The merchant host receives the transaction (either from a POS device or via the Internet) over TCP/IP, updates the customer database, and then prepares information for transmission to the issuing bank of the credit card (the bank host). (See part 4.) At this point, the transmission is sent back through the ACP 70, which terminates TCP/IP and then converts the transaction to Legacy X.25 for transmission to the bank host (see part 5). Note that a bank ID number can be included in the transmitted packet to route the transaction to a specific bank host. Once the transaction reaches the bank host, the customer’s database is updated and authorization is sent back to the transaction initiator (the POS terminal or Internet user). (See part 6.) standard modem answer tone. This allows the modems to start the handshake sequence more quickly (see Figure 34). Automatic Protocol Detection. When a port uses an internal modem and its basic configuration is for automatic mode operation, the ACP 50 determines the actual connection mode (synchronous or asynchronous) and then determines the link protocol for use with SDLC or VISA. POS follows a series of steps to determine the connection mode: 1. The internal modem goes off-hook and trains with the calling modem. 2. Once the analog connection is established, the modem component waits to receive synchronous FLAG characters from the calling device to determine if it is a synchronous device. 3. If no FLAGs are received within 500 milliseconds, the call is treated as asynchronous. POS assumes SDLC protocol for synchronous connections and VISA protocol for asynchronous connections.

Other Highlights
Fast Connect. ACP 50 modems can be configured to eliminate many of the delays normally pre-programmed in standard analog modems, such as network billing delay and

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

59

1

2 Connect

3 Billing Delay

4 Answer Tone

5 Standard Modem Training

6 X.25 Call Setup

7 Host Enq

8 Data Transfer

9 POS ACK

10 X.25 PSTN Call Teardown

Normal Transaction Sequence

Ring

1

2 Fast Train Sequence

3 Local Enq

4 Data Transfer

5 POS ACK

6 PSTN Call Teardown

Fast Transaction Sequence

Ring

Seconds 0 10 20

Figure 34. Example of a Fast Connect Transaction Transaction Tracking. The ACP allows the network manager to monitor traffic by transaction, rather than by packet (which may contain information other than transaction data). The ACP tracks transactions in both directions via IN and OUT counters in the system management module. This makes it possible to monitor the performance of the system either off-line or in real time. Local Protocol Spoofing. Local protocol spoofing eliminates the handshake with the host, so only transaction data is exchanged and host overhead is reduced. When protocol spoofing occurs, the transaction starts sooner because the ENQ does not have to come from the actual host. The ACP emulates the host by polling the POS terminal with an ENQ as soon as the modem connects. With full VISA emulation, the ACP takes on the additional responsibilities of performing LRC checking, terminating and generating ACKs toward the POS terminal, and terminating the call when the transaction is complete. This further reduces X.25 network overhead and reduces total transaction time. (See Figure 35.) TPDU Support. The ACP supports TPDU addressing, making it compatible with TPDU-based transaction networks. The ACP supports TPDU in two ways:

H Switched TPDU—In this mode, the ACP passes the
received TPDU from the downlink to the uplink.

Calls Host ENQ TX Transaction ACK Host Response ACK EOT Disconnect ACP 50 Network Controller Calls Host

Merchant’s Point of Sale

TX Transaction

Host Response Host

Figure 35. Local Protocol Spoofing

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ACP Functional Description, May 1998

H Spoofed TPDU—In this mode, the ACP strips or appends
the TPDU before sending the transaction to the downstream device or host. Application Types. The ACP products process VISAII messages of application types 1 through 4, to determine the protocol (authorization or data capture) and the mode (single or multiple) of the connection to the terminal.

Figure 36 section A illustrates credit card transactions traveling from POS terminals through the telephone network (PSTN) to a ACP 50 unit, then across an X.25 or frame relay network to the merchant account host. Section B shows POS terminals that are directly attached to a controller. This arrangement is used primarily in grocery stores or shopping malls. The terminals can be connected to either a ACP 50 or ACP 70 for accessing a merchant host. Section C shows dial connections of PCs to a ACP 50 for electronic commerce applications, such as travel reservations, home shopping, and home banking. The PCs send a message to the ACP 50 via PPP, and the message is transferred over X.25 or frame relay to a web site (see section D). When receiving inputs across the access layer (sections A and B shown), the ACP acts as a single access concentrator: receiving transaction messages from multiple terminals, and then transmitting the messages across an X.25 or frame relay network. When receiving inputs from the X.25 or frame relay network layer (section E), the ACP acts as a gateway to multiple hosts: it receives a message, determines its destination host, encapsulates the message for the host protocol, and then transmits the message to the host. A message can also be transmitted directly from the X.25 or frame relay network to an X.25 host (see section F). You can manage the network through the local network manager (SYM) or remotely through the centralized network manager SmartView (section G). Protocol upgrades can be accomplished directly through the ACP software.

Example Applications
A variety of POS applications that utilize ACP systems are shown in Figure 36 on page 62. This figure is divided into seven sections (A through G), indicating the various POS applications that can be used:

H Dial concentrator applications (see section A); up to 24
internal modem connections per ACP 50.

H Direct-connect concentrator applications, using multiple
POS terminals and a 1200C or Omni 495 controller (see Section B); up to 48 async or 24 sync ports on the ACP 50.

H Dial access Internet commerce applications, including
travel reservations, home shopping, and home banking via PCs (see section C); up to 24 internal modem connections on the ACP 50.

H Connection to Internet web sites via X.25 (see section D). H Host gateway applications (section E); the ACP 70 can be
connected to a TCP/IP client/server application via Ethernet LAN. The gateway reduces the number of communication lines required at the host by providing a single point gateway access to Legacy X.25 or frame relay based host applications.

H Connection to an X.25 host (section F).

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

61

POS Terminals
Omni 330 Omni 330 Omni 390 Sync SDLC

A

D

Web Site

ACP 50 Dial Concentrator

PSTN
Tranz 330 Omni 4xx

Internet
Async/ Visa

E
ACP 50
Host Gateway

X.25 or Frame Relay Network

TCP/IP
POS Terminals

B
1200C Controller

F

TINET
Omni 495 Controller

ACP 50 Direct Connect

SDLC

X.25 Host Merchant Account Host

Home Shopping

C G
ACP 50 Dial Access Network Management System 1c 2c (SmartView)

Travel Reservations

P S T N
PPP

X.25

Home Banking

Figure 36. Sample POS Applications

62

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

ISDN BRI Support
Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) technology is the basis for high-speed, international computer-to-computer communications through a simple pair of wires or equivalent (a single, standardized physical connection for voice and data communications). ISDN offers complete digital connectivity from the subscriber’s location to and throughout the network. ISDN also offers distinct benefits, including performance advantages (higher data speeds and greater distance capabilities at lower costs); connectivity (the ability to access multiple resources from a single terminal); and faster development of new services (due to the basic transport system put in place). As a standard interface to the public network, ISDN gives customers versatility in selecting customer premises equipment for services. Furthermore, the separate signaling channel and the rich service capabilities of ISDN technology provide customers greater functionality via the public network over today’s most advanced premises systems, including local area networks (LANs) and PBXs.

ISDN Specifications
ISDN is defined in recommendations set forth by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU).
Recommendation Q.920 Describes General principles of LAPD (Link Access Procedures on the D-channel): also referred to as the Digital Subscriber Signaling System No. 1 (DSS 1) Data Link Layer. LAPD operating procedures. General principles of user-network signaling. Together, the four Q.93x protocols make up the network layer of the Digital Subscriber Signaling System No. 1 (DSS 1). User-network messages for basic call control. User-network messages for supplementary services. Signaling for frame-mode services. Procedures for full X.25 LAPB and PLP support on the B-channel, and the transport of X.25 PLP packets in LAPD frames on the D-channel.

Q.921 Q.930

Q.931 Q.932 Q.933 X.31

How ISDN Basic Rate Interface (BRI) Works
The twisted pair of copper wires from the Central Office provides the basic rate interface (BRI). The BRI is divided into three channels: two channels are labeled B and the third is labeled D. Each B channel supports a rate of 56/64 kbps. The overall BRI rate is 144 kbps. The two B channels are used for voice and data transmissions (both circuit-switched and/or packet-switched), while the single D channel is used for signaling and lower speed packet-switched data. This 2B+D configuration is available to customers over either a 2-wire (U-interface) or a 4-wire (S/T-interface), depending on the country deployed and the distance from the Central Office. The B and D channels are full-duplex bit streams which are time-division multiplexed into a common stream containing both user information and signaling/transmitting multiple signal streams over a single wire.

The implementation of ISDN BRI in ACP products adheres to the following specifications:
Level 3 Network 2 Datalink X.25 I.46X LAPB, LAPD Protocols X.25 Call Control Q.930/Q.931 LAPD Q.920/Q.921 I.440/I.441

1 Physical

I.430 (CCITT) B-Channel D-Channel

For certification details, please refer to Table 2 on page 10 or contact your Telematics representative regarding a specific country.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

63

National ISDN Variations
The CCITT recommendations released in the 1970’s allowed for broad interpretations, which have led to a mix of proprietary systems and equipment that are unable to effectively communicate with each other. As a result, several national or regional standards have evolved. The table below identifies the ISDN variations supported in ACP networking products. Euro-ISDN. In a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), 26 public network operators from 20 European countries agreed to pursue common ISDN basic (BRI) and primary (PRI) rate interfaces for a common European standard by the end of 1993. German 1TR6. Germany has been offering ISDN since 1989. As no international standard had been agreed at that time, the DBP introduced ISDN on the basis of a national standard. Now, Euro-ISDN is paving the way for efficient international communications. Euro-ISDN differs from the existing German national ISDN only in the D channel protocol used. In the case of the German national ISDN, this is the 1TR6 protocol while in the case of Euro-ISDN, it is the E-DSS1 protocol. DBP introduced the European D channel protocol in most of the ISDN exchanges in the fall of 1992. NI-1. The U.S. and Canada adopted the National ISDN (NI-1) specifications developed by Bell Communications Research Inc. (Bellcore). Prior to NI-1, AT&T and Northern Telecom had unique implementations of ISDN. The difference primarily involved ISDN voice capabilities. VN3 and Euro-Numeris. France is developing these signaling standards for its specific requirements.

Bandwidth on Demand. The ISDN option can provide additional bandwidth during peak periods. When the maximum number of virtual circuits are exceeded, additional traffic can be routed over one of the B channels. The link will subsequently be brought down when there is no additional bandwidth required. Call Backup. In Figure 37, the primary route between two nodes is a leased line. A dial-up backup link using BRI channels through the ISDN provides an alternate route whenever the primary link fails. Call Balancing. For call balancing, the ACP can be configured to direct a portion of traffic over the leased line, and other traffic through the ISDN, alternating the use of the two links call by call. Dedicated Services. The ISDN option offers dedicated connections via ISDN services (see Figure 38). In these applications, the ACP will never clear the connection, regardless the traffic load. The ACP will automatically attempt link re-initialization ISDN call failure. LAN traffic over ISDN. This functionality is available within the ACP 70 product which can support ELX and ISDN concurrently (see Figure 39). LAN-to-LAN Connection. The switched B channels provide dial-up 64 kbps links for internetworking remotely located LANs and other data equipment. A LAN-to-LAN connection allows users to access equipment attached to both LANs, including personal computers, printers, files servers, and gateways. Internetworking LANs through switched ISDN access can replace private leased lines underutilized by burst-filled LAN-to-LAN traffic, or reduce the long holding times required by slow speed modems links. For a summary of ACP-supported ISDN BRI variations and certifications , refer to Table 2 on page 10.

ACP ISDN Applications
Low Utilization Access. The BRI option can be used to establish an X.25 link on demand, utilizing one of the B channels, via ISDN services. The X.25 link will subsequently be brought down when there is no activity for a configurable period of time. This option is similar to “dial-out X.25” currently on the ACP. Leased Link Backup. In locations where ACPs are deployed, the BRI option can be used to back up dedicated ports on the VHSL or octal DMA links via ISDN. This option is similar to “dial-out X.25” currently on the ACP.

64

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

ACP 50
Leased Line

ACP 50

BRI

ISDN

BRI

Figure 37. ISDN BRI Channels used for Call-Backup or Call Balancing

ACP 50

ACP 50

ISDN

ACP

HOST PCP ACP

Figure 38. BRI Channels as the Primary Link

Ethernet LAN

Ethernet LAN

ACP 70 ISDN

ACP 70

HOST

HOST

Figure 39. LAN Traffic over ISDN (for ACP 70 only)

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

65

Internal Modem Support
Computer-to-computer data transfer that involves the use of telephone lines—either the public voice telephone system or dedicated telephone lines—requires the use of a modem. A modem is needed to translate computer data, which is in digital format, to analog format—a format that can be successfully transmitted via the telephone lines. Each computer-to-computer link involves the use of two modems, one at each computer to translate data in and out. One computer simply calls the other, the distant computer answers the call (a process referred to as handshaking), and then a communication path between the two computers is established. With the communication path intact, the modems then perform the necessary translations to import data from one computer to the other. communications and 2-wire public switched telephone network (PSTN) dial-up capabilities. CAMs can be used in combination to provide access to both leased lines and public switched telephone networks. Each octal modem CAM has a DB25 diagnostic port for data scope connection to monitor the individual modem lines, with a chassis-mounted selection dial to move between the individual modems. Three LEDs per modem line indicate transmit data (TXD), receive data (RXD), and data carrier detect (DCD) activity.

Advantages of Internal Modems
Using ACP internal modems instead of external modems presents the following advantages:

Modem Sharing
If every computer in an organization has its own dedicated modem, this can add up to a significant investment. As a result, many computer users now share modems in modem pool arrangements. While shared modems help reduce the number of modems needed, most modems are separate external devices, often taking up considerable space, and often complicated with different maintenance requirements than other network equipment. While dedicated modems reside next to their associated terminals, groups of pooled modems are often housed in large rack-mount devices and may have heavy cabling requirements.

H A large number of modem interfaces and operating speeds
are supported (see Table 10).

H Protocol upgrades can be accomplished directly through
the ACP software, thereby simplifying the upgrade procedure (see Figure 40).

H An extensive cost savings can be achieved due to: (1) the
ability to have up to 24 internal modems in a single ACP instead of 24 external modems; (2) reduced cabling; and (3) reduced rack-mount space requirements.

H ACP internal modems support the standard operating
speeds that are widely used today. The modems support both synchronous and asynchronous, full-duplex operation over 2-wire dial-up (US/UK) or leased (UK) lines.

ACP 50 Internal Modems
When an ACP system is used, shared external modems are one option that can be used. However, as an alternative to external modems, the ACP 50 can have built-in 2-wire (internal) modems, thereby eliminating the need for external modems. The ACP 50 can be equipped with up to three octal modem CEMs, each supporting up to eight high-speed, synchronous/asynchronous modems. The stretch ACP chassis can support up to three octal modem CEMs, providing the ACP with up to 24 modems. Octal modem CEMs work in conjunction with octal modem CAMs. The CAMs are available in three types: one for leased line communications (UK); one for PSTN (UK); and one for PSTN (US). These CAMs offer 2-wire leased line

H A pool of up to 24 multi-speed modem ports (see
Figure 41) can be provided in a single ACP, eliminating PSTN dedicated rotary dialing requirements. Table 10. Modem Interfaces and Operating Speeds
Interface V.32bis V.32 V.22bis V.22 V.23 V.21 V.34 Bell 212A Bell 103 Connection Rates (bps) 14400, 12000, 9600, 7200,4800 9600, 4800 2400 2400 75/1200, 1200/75 0 to 300 28000 1200 0 to 300

66

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

ISDN CRT Modem Async

X.25 X.25

PSTN
PPP ACP 50 with internal modems Frame Relay

SLIP IP PC

Figure 40. ACP Internal Modem Dial-In Applications.

X.25 Host

Modem

ACP 50 with internal modems

X.25/Frame Relay/IP
PC

SNA Cluster

Figure 41. ACP Internal Modem Leased-Line Application

H The use of one piece of equipment—the ACP 50—for
modem and other networking purposes, simplifies network management. The ACP’s Network Manager online diagnostics and EIA monitoring can be applied to modems. Some of the items that can be monitored by the ACP include Mean System Error, V.54 loops, and call failure rates.

H Translation procedures performed by ACP internal
modems are completely transparent to the end user. Users can dial out to establish outgoing calls over telephone lines as well as receive incoming calls.

H Internal modems support V.42bis data compression
standards.

H Internal ACP modems provide high-speed asynchronous
(115.2 bps) and synchronous (28.8 kbps) transmission in conjunction with V.42bis.

H Internal modems support MNP Levels 1–4, which enable
error-free data transmission, and MNP Level 5, which incorporates Levels 1–4 and compresses data by a factor of 4 to 1.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

67

Synchronous Dial-out
The end user can place an outgoing data call through the ACP to establish a dial-out connection, by using X.25 packet node devices or async devices via a PSTN line. The ACP activates the dial-up connection and, if there is no activity on the line for a specified period of time, the ACP will disconnect the call. The ACP can be customer-configured for timeout delay, the number of destination call attempts, and the inactivity period preceding automatic call disconnection. These parameters can be set to establish a means of back-up for dedicated ACP links or to establish a temporary “overflow” link when the number of virtual channels on the primary link exceeds a predefined number. Additionally, ACPs that are deployed at sites where traffic does not warrant a dedicated link, can use these parameters to establish an X.25 link on demand. The first X.25 call request packet would cause the ACP to establish the link; the link would subsequently be brought down when no activity is detected within the preconfigured time period. Because ACP internal modems are controlled by the ACP software, it is not actually required that the modem be Hayes compatible. However, for ease of use, it is possible to use the Hayes syntax when configuring dial-out numbers.

Dial-in
ACPs with internal modems can establish an X.25 connection with another ACP or a X.25 packet mode device that is placing a call via PSTN lines. The ACP internal modems can be configured to recognize the mode of operation used by the incoming call device, thereby allowing the call to be received and a connection to be established. If the incoming call line is inactive for a specified period of time, the ACP can be configured to automatically disconnect the call.

ACP Internal Modem Specifications
Details regarding ACP internal modem functionality are summarized in Tables 11 and 12. NOTE: Internal modems are not recommended for direct attachment to PBXs due to varied ringing voltages and pulses. For certification details, refer to Table 2 on page 10 or contact your Telematics representative. Table 11. Internal Modem Dial Functionality
General Automatic modem type detection 7, 8, 9, and 10-bit character lengths for async applications Auto detection/support of V.42/V.42bis Auto detection/support of MNP/MNP5 Not Currently Supported Dial-out async, half-duplex operation, FAX, caller ID, call progress tones, pulse dialing

Asynchronous Dial-out
Asynchronous dial-out capability enables the ACP 50 to both receive and place modem calls without having to preassign the calling destination. As an example, if a modem call is placed to the ACP, the ACP maintains the number of the calling modem as part of the data packet. The ACP can then automatically call back that modem. This type of arrangement is particularly useful in POS scenarios.

Synchronous Synch channels only, in originate mode Dial-out features Blind dialing * supported (UK CAM only) Asynchronous Async channels in originate or standby Dial-out features mode Dial-in features Async/sync channels, in answer mode

* Refers to dialing without waiting for call progress tones from
the PSTN or PBX such as dial tone, busy tone, etc.

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ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Table 12. General Internal Modem Specifications
Operation Modem Interfaces Error control and data compression Maximum Speed Fallback speeds Receive Signal Level Frequency Range Receive Level Adjustment Receiver Dynamic Range Receiver Baud Timing Full duplex over 2-wire dialup(US/UK) or leased line (UK) See Table 10 on page 66. V.42bis; MNP Levels 1–4 MNP Level 5 Synchronous up to 28.8 kbps; Async up to 115.2 bps 7200, 4800 bps (V.32) 1200 bps (V.22bis) Accuracy tolerance of ±1 dB 300 – 3400 Hz Automatic –9 dBm to –40 dBm (14.4k) –40 dBm to –43 dBm (12k) +/–0.01% frequency error in remote transmit timing source; for V.22bis: ± 0.03% of frequency error. ±7 Hz frequency offset Automatic gain control in all modes compensates for receive signal level fluctuations. –10 dBm ± 1 dBm – 13 dBm + 1 dB 600 ohms with return loss of ≤ 20 dB over 300 to 3400 Hz Dry line RJ11 connectors PSTN (US): FCC Part 68, DOC LL (UK), PSTN (UK): BABT Synchronous: X.25, PPP, frame relay Asynchronous: X.3, SLIP, PPP

Carrier Recovery Automatic Gain Control

PSTN Transmit Level (US) LL Transmit Level LL Line Impedance LL Line Type Cabling Requirements Approvals Protocols Currently Supported

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

69

Functional Characteristics
Personality Module
Each ACP is equipped with a personality module, a plug-in printed circuit board that houses enable key chips. The presence of certain enable keys defines the functional characteristics of that model, e.g., the protocols, features (number of LUs and devices), and memory size supported. ACP platforms are available with a variety of communication software modules to support various access and networking functions. Each function, or personality, is identified by a twoor three-letter mnemonic. Table 13 lists each personality, the related software module in the ACP operating code, and the functionality that each provides. Since ACPs are capable of supporting multiple access protocols, personalities are often combined. For example, an ACP with three functionalities—SNA PAD, X.25 switch, and async PAD—is referred to as an SNA/SW/AS ACP. Table 13. Personality Module Functionality
Personality
DSP SNA AS

Nature of Performance Data
Due to the wealth of features and configuration possibilities, the data in this document can only be estimated, for design guidelines only. Telematics recommends a detailed evaluation of any equipment prior to deployment. If exact data is required, we recommend that you conduct extensive benchmarking at your facility.

Guidelines to Data
Tables 14 through 19 on the following pages indicate the functional characteristics of each ACP, using various software combinations. Information contained in these tables is of four types:

H Numbers = data. H Asterisks (*) = indicate that the number of LCNs is
deemed too low to be practical for a port/memory configuration of this size.

ACP Software Module
DSP SNA ITI

ACP Functionality
3270 BSC TPAD SNA PAD Asynchronous PAD Supports Voice/FAX capability X.25 Switch Transparent Passthrough FRAD/ Concentrator LAN Access and Interconnection 1 ISDN Basic Rate Interface Internal Modem Point-of-sale protocol set

H Hyphens = not applicable. H TBD or blank = to be determined; data will be supplied at
a later date. It is helpful to review the following paragraphs for assumptions and guidelines concerning the tables. Connection Type. The values shown for X.25, TPP, PU–LU, CU–DEV, DLCI, and FR are the maximum allowable per ACP. Note that the LU and DEV values shown are the maximum allowable per ACP, not for each PU or CU. Logical Channels. Results listed in the Logical Channels columns were based on a configuration with the following characteristics:

SW TP FR IP BR MD POS
1

X.25 TPP Frame Relay IP BRI Modem POS

H Assumes billing is disabled, modulo 8 X.25 operation, and
default settings.

H Assumes all SNA PUs are multidropped on one sync port. H Elinks field set to equal the number of DLCIs. H No 3270 BSC CUs or devices. H Maximum number of SNA PUs and LUs. H No TPP links enabled. H Frame relay: 1 FRI, 4 DLCIs.
LCNs. Due to the wealth of features and configuration possibilities, the number of LCNs available to a given ACP can only be estimated. If it is critical to know the exact number of LCNs to be supported by an ACP in a specific environment,

Some IP personality kits include the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) and IP transporter.

Field upgrades to the functionality of the ACP 50 are achieved by plugging in additional enable keys; for the ACP 10 and 70, the protocol enable key must be upgraded to the appropriate level. This allows you to upgrade at a fraction of the cost of buying a new ACP. Refer to Tables 14 through 19, beginning on the next page, for functional characteristics and upgrade details. For additional information about software field upgrades, contact your Telematics sales representative.

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ACP Functional Description, May 1998

the ACP will provide the LCN count once it is configured and initialized. Min/Max Numbers. The Max/Min figures in the Logical Channels columns correspond to the Min/Max figures in the Ports columns. Asterisks (*) indicate that the number of LCNs is deemed too low to be practical for a port/memory configuration of this size.

In an X.25 switch, a virtual circuit requires two logical channels. SNA QLLC mode requires only one LCN per PU session; VLU mode requires one LCN per LU session. DSP requires one LCN per device session. ITI and TPP require one LCN per session. Minitel support reduces the number of logical channels by approximately 15.

Table 14. ACP 10 Functional Characteristics – Versions 10.12 and 1.xx
Ports ACP Platform Personality Kit and Model Number Min/Max Sync 2/6 2 5 1 2 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 Min/Max Async – 4 1 5 4 1 – 4 1 4 1 – 4 1 – 4 1 4 1 4 1 Max TPP – – – – – – – 3 3 3 3 – – – – – – 3 3 – – Connection Type PU–LU 3–32 3–32 3–32 – – – – – – CU– DEV – – – – – – – – – – – DLCI Switched – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 9 9 DLCI FRAD – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 9 9 Logical Channels Max/Min w/128K Mem 60/* 25 * Max/Min w/256K Mem 410/350 375 345 470 450 420 424 395 446 405 175 170 130 115 tbd tbd Enable Key Levels Protocol Key 9 14 14 1 11 11 6 11 11 Feature Key 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24

ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ Á ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ Á ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ Á ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ
SW/SNA 12x9 13x9 15x9 16x9 17x9 ACP 10 SW/AS/SNA AS w/ Type 2 software 100 90 55 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * SW/AS SW 2/6 120/60 470/420 w/Type 3 software SW/AS/TP 1Mx9 1Jx9 11x9 SW/AS/SNA/TP SW/SNA/DSP SW/AS/DSP SW/DSP 3–32 3–32 3–32 – – – 14 14 12 14 14 9 17 17 17 17 14 14 w/Type 5 software 2/6 3–32 3–32 3–32 3–32 3–32 3–32 3–32 3–32 – – 150/120 14x9 18x9 2/6 200/180 SW/AS/SNA/DSP 19x9 SW/AS/DSP/TP 3–32 3–32 – – w/Type 6 software software w/Type 7 1099 SW/AS/SNA/FR 1P99 3–32 3–32 323 293
NOTES: 1. For model numbers with x9 (such as 12x9), x=0 for EPROM memory and x=9 for Flash memory. 2. FRI = 2, for each port configuration.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

71

Table 15. ACP 50 Functional Characteristics – Version 1.13
Ports Personality Kit and Model Number Min/Max Sync 8 8 8 Min/Max Async 16/32 16/32 16/32 0/16 0/16 0/16 – – – Max TPP – – – – – – – – – Connection Type PU–LU 4–4 CU– DEV 4–4 DLCI Switched – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – DLCI FRAD – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – Logical Channels Min w/2MB Mem 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 Min w/4MB Mem 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 Enable Key Levels Protocol 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 17 17 17 9 11 Feature – 6 – 6 – 6 – 6 – 6 – 6 – 6 – – – 6 – 6 – 6 – 6 – 6 – 6 0 0 0 6 6 6

ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ Á ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ Á ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ Á ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ Á ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ Á ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ
SW/AS/SNA/DSP 5909 24–24 32–96 4–4 24–24 32–96 4–4 24–24 32–96 8–8 16–48 8–8 8–24 8–32 4–4 8–24 8–32 4–4 8–24 8–32 – – – – – – – – 14 16 16 16 24 24 24 8 8 8 14 14 SW/AS/SNA/TP 5J09 16/32 16/32 16/32 0/16 0/16 0/16 – – 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 16–192 16–48 8–8 – – – – – 14 16 16 16 24 24 8 16 24 16–192 16–48 14 SW/AS/DSP/TP 50A9 16/32 0/16 – – – 8–8 16–48 16–64 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 14 SW/TP/FR/IP 5E09 10/26 10/26 10 10 10 18 18 18 26 26 8 8 8 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – SW/AS/TP/IP 5399 SW/AS/SNA/FR/IP 5G09 16/32 16/32 16/32 0/16 0/16 0/16 – – 8–8 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 8–48 8–64 8–8 8–48 8–64 8–8 8–8 8–48 14 14 SW/AS/SNA/BR 5Ax9 16/32 16/32 16/32 0/16 0/16 0/16 – – – 16–48 8–8 16–192 16–48 8–8 14 16 16 16 24 24 24 8 8 8 16–192 16–48 8–8 8–8 8–8 14 16–192 14 SW/AS/SNA/TP/BR 5Bx9 16/32 16/32 16/32 0/16 0/16 0/16 – – 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 16 16 16 24 24 8–48 8–48 8–48 16–192 16–192 14 14
NOTE: Version 1.xx requires a minimum of 2 MB of memory.

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ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Table 15. ACP 50 Functional Characteristics – Version 1.13 (continued)
Ports Personality Kit and Model Number Min/Max Sync 8 16 24 8 8 8 Min/Max Async 16/32 16 – Max TPP 24 24 24 – – – – – – – – – Connection Type PU–LU – – – CU– DEV – – – DLCI Switched 128 128 128 – – – – – – – – – DLCI FRAD 28 28 28 – – – – – – – – – Logical Channels Min w/2MB Mem 1200 1200 1200 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 Min w/4MB Mem 1500 1500 1500 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 2400 Enable Key Levels Protocol Key 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 Feature Key – – – – 6 – 6 – 6

ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ Á ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ Á ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ Á ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ
SW/AS/TP/FR/BR 5Cx9 SW/AS/SNA/DSP/FR 5R09 16/32 16/32 16/32 0/16 0/16 0/16 – – – 4–4 4–4 24–24 32–96 4–4 24–24 32–96 4–4 24–24 32–96 8–24 8–32 4–4 8–24 8–32 4–4 8–24 8–32 14 16 16 16 24 24 24 14 14
NOTES: 1. 8M = 8 modem ports; 16M = 16 modem ports. You can have hex and octal cards included with the internal modem card, which allows a variety of async and sync port combinations. 2. For model numbers with x9 (such as 5Ax9), x=0 for ISDN NI-1 and x=1 for Euro-ISDN. 3. Version 1.xx requires a minimum of 2 MB of memory.

Table 16. ACP 50 Functional Characteristics – Version 2.xx
Ports Personality Kit and Model Number Min/Max Sync 2 8 2 8 Min/Max Async 8M/24M 8M/16M 8M/16M 8M/16M Max TPP – – – – Connection Type PU–LU – – CU– DEV – – DLCI Switched 128 128 128 128 DLCI FRAD 2 8 2 8 Logical Channels Min w/2MB Mem 1200 1200 1200 1200 Min w/4MB Mem 1500 1500 1500 1500 Enable Key Levels Protocol 11 11 Feature – –

ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ
SW/AS/FR/IP/MD 5F99 SW/AS/SNA/DSP/TP/FR/IP/ MD/POS 36–120 36–120 36–255 36–255 24 24 14 14 5P09
NOTES: 1. Version 2.xx IP includes PPP, IP Transporter, and PPP/SLIP/X.25 gateway. 2. P-kit 5P09 requires a 50/486 Type2 CPU, 8 MB of memory, and the 8 MB PCMCIA card option.

Table 17. ACP 50 Functional Characteristics – Version 4.xx

ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ Á ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ Á ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ
Personality Kit and Model Number Min/Max Sync 2 8 Min/Max Async 8M/24M 8M/16M 16/32 16/32 16/32 0/16 0/16 0/16 – – Max TPP – – – – – – – – – – – – – – PU–LU – – CU– DEV – – – – – – – – – – DLCI Switched 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 DLCI FRAD 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 Min w/8MB Mem 4000 4000 4000 4000 4000 4000 4000 4000 4000 4000 4000 4000 4000 4000 Min w/16MB Mem 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 Protocol 11 11 Feature – – – 6 – 6 – 6 SW/AS/FR/IP/MD 5F99 SW/AS/SNA/FR/IP 5G09 10 10 10 18 18 18 26 26 2 8 2 8 8–8 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 17 17 17 17 8–48 8–64 8–8 8–48 8–64 8–8 8–48 14 14 SW/AS/SNA/DSP/TP/FR/IP/ MD 16M/48M 16M/32M 16M/48M 16M/32M 36–120 36–120 – – 36–255 36–255 – – 14 14 14 14 5H09 5B99 SW/AS/TP/FR/IP
NOTES: 2. With Version 4.1 software, the SNA module of software p-kit 5H09 delivers 48 PUs with enable key 14.

Ports

Connection Type

Logical Channels

Enable Key Levels

1. Version 4.0 software includes support of PAP/CHAP/RADIUS, T1/E1 CSU/DSU hardware, dual 48VDC power supplies, and the Automatic Node Protection Switching (ANPS) feature. Version 4.0 also supports OSPF routing, TELNET, FTP, and SNMP. Version 4.0 software requires a 50/486 Type2 CPU, a minimum of 8 MB of memory, an ELX II CEM, and the 8 MB PCMCIA card option. If CSU/DSU operation is used, then a 50/486 Type2 C/D CPU is required.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

73

Table 18. ACP 70 Functional Characteristics – Version 2.xx
Ports ACP Platform Personality Kit and Model Number Min/Max Sync 6/14 6/14 6/14 6/14 Min/Max Async – – – – Max TPP 24 24 24 24 PU–LU Connection Type CU–DEV 4–32 4–32 36–255 36–255 DLCI Switched 128 128 128 128 DLCI FRAD 78 78 78 78 Logical Channels Min (1) w/8MB Mem 1200 1200 1200 1200 Min w/16MB Mem 1500 1500 1500 1500 Enable Key Levels Protocol 24 24 24 24 Feature 14 14 14 14

ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ Á ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁ
w/Type P software SW/AS/SNA/DSP/TP/FR/IP/ SW/AS/SNA/DSP/TP/FR/IP/ BR/POS 36–255 36–255 36–255 36–255 BR/POS (ISDN NI–1) 7P09 (Euro ISDN/1TR6/VN3) 7P19
NOTE: These p-kits require a 2 MB PCMCIA card for operational software storage. Telematics recommends the use of 8 MB of memory to ensure future upgradeability.

Table 19. ACP 70 Functional Characteristics – Version 4.xx
Ports ACP Platform Personality Kit and Model Number Min/Max Sync 6/14 6/14 6/14 6/14 6/14 6/14 Min/Max Async – – – – – – Max TPP – – PU–LU Connection Type CU–DEV – – DLCI Switched 128 128 128 128 128 128 DLCI FRAD 78 78 78 78 78 78 Logical Channels Min (1) w/8MB Mem 4000 4000 4000 4000 4000 4000 Min w/16MB Mem 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 Enable Key Levels Protocol 9 9 Feature – 6

ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ ÁÁÁ
w/Type R software software w/Type H SW/SNA/FR/IP 7399 36–255 36–255 36–255 36–255 36–255 36–255 SW/AS/SNA/DSP/TP/IP/FR/ BR (ISDN NI–1) SW/AS/SNA/DSP/TP/IP/FR/ BR (Euro ISDN/1TR6/VN3) 7H19 24 24 24 24 4–32 4–32 17 17 17 17 14 14 14 14 7H09 36–255 36–255
NOTE: These p-kits require a 2 MB PCMCIA card for operational software storage. Telematics recommends the use of 8 MB of memory to ensure future upgradeability.

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ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Memory, Software, and Hardware Requirements
It is important to confirm that you have the memory and hardware required for the ACP platform, protocols, and interfaces which you have purchased. Tables 20 through 22 summarize software release levels, memory requirements, and supported hardware for each personality kit. For enable keys required, see the previous section on Functional Characteristics. Versions 1.0 and 2.0 are the new software versions after the Version 10 series. The ELX, frame relay, internal modem, and ISDN interfaces require the added power now available through Versions 1.0 or 2.0 and later software . With the ACP 50 and ACP 70 only, Versions 1.0 and 2.0 provide a “protected mode” which allows the use of more than 1MB of memory with extensive applications and processes running simultaneously. Designed for future growth, a PCMCIA memory expansion slot is built into the ACP 70 motherboard as well as into the ACP 50 ELX II and ISDN CEMs to support increasing software storage requirements.

Table 20. ACP 10 Software and Memory Matrix (a Universal Network Access platform)
Model 2 Personality Kit 1 SW/SNA/DSP SW/SNA SW/AS/SNA SW/AS/DSP AS SW/AS SW SW/DSP SW/AS/SNA/DSP SW/AS/SNA/TP SW/AS/TP SW/AS/SNA/FR *
NOTES: 1. 2. 3. 4. Legend: I K = =

Software Version 10 I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 K K K K K K K K K K K K

Software Type 3

Minimum Memory in MB 4

FPK 1199 1299 1399 1499 1599 1699 1799 1899 1999 1J99 1M99 1P99

5 2 2 5 2 2 2 5 5 3 3 7*

.256 .128 .128 .256 .128 .128 .128 .256 .256 .256 .256 .256

Software modules: AS=asynchronous PAD, DSP=3270 BSC TPAD, FR=Frame Relay, SNA=SNA PAD, SW=X.25 switch, TP=Transparent Passthrough. Model numbers are used to order personality kits. For the ACP 10, the model numbers refer to the FPK flash kit model numbers; the companion EPK EPROM kit model numbers (not included here) have the same usage/requirements as the FPK. The asterisk (*) items are only available on the ACP 10 as FPK models. The minimum memory reflects the memory required by a combination of the personality kit and the hardware. Currently available. Upcoming version releases (which will replace earlier releases).

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

75

Table 21. ACP 50 Software and Hardware Matrix (a Universal Network Access platform)
Hardware Supported ACP 50 CEM/CAMs 3 Personality Kit 1 Model #2 50A9 5909 5B09 5C09 5A19 5B19 5C19 5E09 5F99 5G09 5J09 5R09 5399 5H09 5B99 5P09 Octal 5003 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Hex 5005 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ELX 5017-400/500 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I BRI 5010 Modem 5020/5034

SW/AS/DSP/TP 4 SW/AS/SNA/DSP 4 SW/AS/SNA/TP/BR 4 SW/AS/TP/FR/BR 4 SW/AS/SNA/BR 4 SW/AS/SNA/TP/BR 4 SW/AS/TP/FR/BR 4 SW/TP/IP/FR 4 SW/AS/IP/FR/MD 5 SW/AS/SNA/IP/FR 5 SW/AS/SNA/TP 4 SW/AS/SNA/DSP/FR 4 SW/AS/TP/IP 4 SW/AS/SNA/DSP/TP/FR/IP/ MD 5 SW/AS/TP/FR/IP 5 SW/AS/SNA/DSP/TP/FR/IP/ MD/POS 6
NOTES:

I

I

1. Software modules: AS=asynchronous PAD, BR=ISDN Basic Rate Interface, DSP=3270 BSC TPAD, FR=Frame Relay, IP=Ethernet LAN connections, MD=internal modem, SNA=SNA PAD, SW=X.25 switch, TP=Transparent Passthrough, POS=Point of Sale. The minimum memory required for Version 1.xx software on the ACP 50 is 2 MB; it reflects the memory required by a combination of the personality kit and the hardware. 2. Model numbers are used to order personality kits. 3. The model numbers are for CEM/CAM sets only and do not represent all the model number possibilities. 4. The current release of this software p-kit is Version 1.13. 5. Version 4.0 of this p-kit includes V.34 modem support, support of PAP/CHAP/RADIUS, T1/E1 CSU/DSU, dual 48VDC power supplies, Automatic Node Protection Switching (ANPS), OSPF, TELNET, FTP, and SNMP. Version 4.0 software requires a 50/486 Type2 CPU, a minimum of 8 MB of memory, and the 8 MB PCMCIA card option. If CSU/DSU operation is used, then a 50/486 Type2 C/D CPU is required. 6. The 5P09 p-kit is Version 2.xx software.

Legend:

I

= This personality kit uses this hardware.

Table 22. ACP 70 Software and Hardware Matrix (a Universal Network Access platform)
Hardware-Supported ACP Modules Personality Kit 1 SW/FR/IP SW/AS/SNA/DSP/TP/FR/IP/BR 4 SW/AS/SNA/DSP/TP/FR/IP/BR 4 SW/AS/SNA/FR/IP
4

Model # 2 7D09 7H09 7H19 7399 7499 7P09 7P19

Software Type R H H R E P P

Minimum Memory in MB 3 2 8 + PCMCIA 8+ PCMCIA 2 2 2 2

Quad CCM I I I I I I I

BRI Port

I I

SW/AS/SNA/IP/DSP SW/AS/SNA/DSP/TP/FR/IP/BR/ POS 5 SW/AS/SNA/DSP/TP/FR/IP/BR/ POS 5
NOTES:

I I

1. Software modules: AS=asynchronous PAD, BR=ISDN Basic Rate Interface, DSP=3270 BSC TPAD, FR=Frame Relay, IP=Ethernet LAN connections, SNA=SNA PAD, SW=X.25 switch, TP=Transparent Passthrough. The ACP 70 requires Version 2.xx or higher software. 2. Model numbers are used to order personality kits. 3. The minimum memory reflects the memory required by a combination of the personality kit and the hardware. 4. Version 4.0 of this p-kit requires a 2 MB PCMCIA card for operational software storage. Telematics recommends the use of 8 MB of memory to ensure future upgradeability. 5. These p-kits are Version 2.xx software. I = This personality kit uses this hardware.

Legend:

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ACP Functional Description, May 1998

User Responsibilities
The following information describes the responsibilities of users of ACP products. The user is responsible for:
I

Comments, Questions, Corrections
To provide the highest quality information and service possible, we welcome your comments, questions, and corrections regarding this document and any other Telematics publication. We invite you to send comments and corrections for the ACP Functional Description to: Telematics Publications Department FAX: +1 (818) 880-4726 Telematics International, Inc. Calabasas, California, USA Thank you for your responsiveness and use of our products.

I I

I

I

I

I

I

I

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Receipt of the unit at the customer’s receiving dock, unpacking, and installation of the unit. Reading the product manuals prior to operating the unit. Adequate site preparation and planning for the port configurations of the unit. Procurement of all communication cables (RS232, RS422, V.35, ...) and 220 volt power cord where applicable. Setup and configuration of the system, including the connection of cables. Setup and configuration of attached devices (modems, terminals, etc.). Identifying and supplying a suitable ASCII display terminal or Personal Computer to be used for entering configuration data. Network planning and/or host system configuration to accommodate the unit. Price quotations, installation, and cost of telephone carrier equipment and service. Determining spare equipment requirements/replacements units. Performing customer problem isolation, analysis, and resolution. Verifying that equipment operating with the unit meets customer criteria.

User Setup
The unit is designed to be set up by the customer. Physical setup instructions are provided in the Installation Manual included with each base unit shipped.

Charges, Terms, and Conditions
Contact your sales representative for pricing, availability warranty coverage, and software/hardware maintenance services.

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

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ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Index

Index
A
ACCT support, 20 ACP 10 certifications, 10 functional characteristics, 71 interfaces, 13 overview, 3 personality kits, 75 specifications, 12 ACP 50 certifications, 10 functional characteristics, 72 interfaces, 13 overview, 5 personality kits, 76 specifications, 12 ACP 70 certifications, 10 functional characteristics, 74 interfaces, 13 optional modules, 14 overview, 7 personality kits, 76 specifications, 12 ANPS support description, 25 summary, 2, 20 Architecture hardware, 9 software, 19 system features, 9 Asynchronous support description, 38 device connectivity features, 38 host connectivity features, 38 routing, 38 summary, 2 X.121 support, 42 X.28 support, 40 X.29 support, 42 X.3 support, 39 Automatic Node Protection Switching. See ANPS support

B
BRI CAM (ACP 50), 14 BRI CEM (ACP 50), 13

C
CAMs (ACP 50) definition, 13 types, 14 CCM module (ACP 70), 14 CEMs (ACP 50) definition, 13 types, 13 Certification/homologation, 10 CHAP security, 53 CSU/DSU CAM (ACP 50), 14 CSU/DSU support, 2, 20

D
DSP support connection methods, 33 description, 33 monitoring commands, 34 summary, 2, 20 trace functions, 34

E
ELX CAM (ACP 50), 14 ELX/ELX II CEM (ACP 50), 13

F
Frame Relay support applications, 36 description, 35 DTE/DCE interfaces, 35 inbound congestion control, 36 local management interface (LMI), 35 outbound congestion control, 36 summary, 2, 20 Frame relay support, applications, 35 FTP, 23, 48

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

79

H
Hardware, ACP interface converters, 14 interface hardware, 15 requirements for personality kits, 75 Hex CAM (ACP 50), 14 Hex CEM (ACP 50), 13

ISDN BRI support applications, 64 description, 63 national variations, 64 specifications, 63 summary, 20 ISDN support, summary, 2 ITI support, summary, 20

I
Interfaces, ACP, 15 Internal modem support advantages, 66 applications, 67 description, 66 dialing in, 68 dialing out, 68 interfaces, 66 modem sharing, 66 operating speeds, 66 specifications, 68 summary, 2, 20 IP support applications, 46 bandwidth management, 48 description, 46 ELX transceivers, 48 FTP, 23, 48 IP transporter, 50 LAN/WAN connections, 49 monitoring commands, 48 NFS, 48 PAP/CHAP, 53 PPP, 50 PPP/SLIP/X.25 gateway, 50 proxy ARP, 54 RADIUS, 54 routing protocols, 48 SLIP, 49 SMTP, 48 SNMP, 23, 46 standards, 48 statistics, 49 summary, 2, 20 TELNET, 23, 46 IP Transporter, 50 ISDN BRI port module (ACP 70), 14

L
Level 1 support, 17

M
Modem support. See internal modem support MTBF figures, 11

N
Network router, definition, 19 NFS, 48 NMS support, 20

O
Octal DMA CAM (ACP 50), 14 Octal DMA I/II/III CEM (ACP 50), 13 Octal modem CAM (ACP 50), 14 Octal modem CEM (ACP 50), 13 Open management system (OMS), 23 OSPF routing protocol, 48

P
PAP security, 53 Personality kits, ACP, 75 Personality module, 70 Platforms ACP 10, 3 ACP 50, 5 ACP 70, 7 Port types, 18

80

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Index

POS support applications, 61 connection types, 58 description, 58 features, 59 summary, 2, 20 terminals/hosts supported, 58 PPP protocol, 50 PPP/SLIP/X.25 gateway, 50 Protection switching. See ANPS support Proxy ARP, 54

Specifications, physical/environmental, 12 SYM description, 21 summary, 19 TELNET client access, 23 System manager interface. See SYM

T
T1/E1 CSU/DSU. See CSU/DSU TELNET, 23, 46 TPP support connection methods, 57 description, 56 FOP and BOP protocols, 56 monitoring commands, 57 summary, 2, 20 trace functions, 57 Trace support, 19

R
RADIUS security, 54 Revision history, manual, viii

S
SLIP protocol, 49 SMTP, 48 SNA support 3270 support, 44 3770 support, 44 5250/5294/5394 support, 44 combined X.25/SNA, 43 description, 43 error recovery, 43 host connections, 44 PU and LU switching, 43 security, 45 summary, 2, 20 TPAD and HPAD, 43 SNMP, 23, 46 Software, ACP overview, 19 personality kits, 75

V
V.11/V.24/V.35 interface modules (ACP 70), 14

X
X.25 support description, 27 general features, 28 level 2 frame interface, 27 level 3 packet interface, 27 multipoint support, 31 summary, 2, 20

ACP Functional Description, May 1998

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ACP Functional Description, May 1998

Telematics Corporate Offices
American/Corporate Headquarters ECI Telecom-Telematics, Inc. 1201 West Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 (954) 772-3070 (800) 883-4580 FAX (954) 351-4405 Eastern European Headquarters ECI Telecom 30 Hasivim Street Petah Tikva 49133 Israel 011-972-3-926-6555 FAX 011-972-3-926-6700 Central European Headquarters ECI Telecom GMBH Büropark Oberursel In der Au 27 61440 Oberursel, Germany 011-49-61-716-2090 FAX 011-49-61-715-4057 Western European Headquarters ECI Telecom, Ltd. Isis House Reading Road, Chineham Basingstoke, Hampshire RG24 8TW, United Kingdom 011-44-1-256-388-000 FAX 011-44-1-256-388-143 Asian Headquarters ECI Telecom (HK), Ltd. 2806 China Resources Building 26 Harbour Road Wanchai, Hong Kong 011-852-2824-4128 FAX 011-852-2802-4411

Telematics Sales and Support Offices
Spain Barajas Park San Severo 20 28042 Madrid Spain 011-34-1-329-0585 FAX 011-34-1-329-2220 France Espace Velizy “Le Nungesser” 13, Avenue Morane Saulnier 78140 VELIZY France 011-33-1-3463-0480 FAX 001-33-1-3946-2118 Netherlands HouttuinIaan 18 P.O. Box 188 3440 AD Woerden Netherlands 011-31-348-576-611 FAX 011-31-348-576-700

Singapore 150 Beach Road #15-08 Gateway West Tower Singapore, 189720 011-65-297-7335 FAX 011-65-299-2716

U.S. South 1759 N. Collins Blvd. Suite 224 Richardson, TX 75080 (214) 705-9080 (214) 437-1750

U.S. West 1534 Plaza Lane, No. 350 Burlingame, CA 94010 (650) 344-3999 FAX (650) 340-9999

U.S. East 620 Herndon Parkway Suite 120 Herndon, VA 20170 (703) 478-0560 FAX (703) 478-0143

U.S. East 90 Washington Valley Road Bedminster, NJ 07921 (908) 719-8920 FAX (908) 719-8925

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ACP Functional Description, May 1998

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