CONCERT PROGRAM

January 10-11, 2014
Andrey Boreyko, conductor Adele Anthony, violin

STEPHANIE BERG Ravish and Mayhem (2012) (b. 1986)

NIELSEN Violin Concerto, op. 33 (1911) (1865-1931)

Praeludium: Largo— Allegro cavalleresco Poco adagio— Rondo: Allegretto scherzando

Adele Anthony, violin INTERMISSION

BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 7 in A major, op. 92 (1811-12) (1770-1827) Poco sostenuto; Vivace Allegretto Presto; Assai meno presto Allegro con brio

23

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Andrey Boreyko is the Stanley J. Goodman Guest Artist. Adele Anthony is the Sid and Jean Grossman Guest Artist. The concert of Friday, January 10, is underwritten in part by a generous gift from Ms. Phoebe D. Weil. The concert of Saturday, January 11, is underwritten in part by a generous gift from Mr. Stuart and Ms. Susan Keck. Pre-Concert Conversations are sponsored by Washington University Physicians. Large print program notes are available through the generosity of Delmar Gardens and are located at the Customer Service table in the foyer. These concerts are part of the Wells Fargo Advisors series.

24

FROM THE STAGE
Chris Carson, Assistant Principal Double Bass, on Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7: “If you look at Beethoven’s nine symphonies, you see that all are extremely individual, all are identifiable as separate pieces. The Seventh is known for being a dance symphony. It’s a very kinetic piece, with a lot of toe-tapping rhythm. It’s a justifiably popular symphony, but also physically taxing to play. By the last movement there is a lot of playing that just keeps on going. “A danger of the piece if finding it too easy to start the tempo. There can be a monotony to it. The challenge is finding a way to make the rhythmic repetition interesting—to create a tension you can sustain.”

SCOTT FERGUsON

Chris Carson

25

MAKING IT NEW
BY RE NÉ S P E N C E R S AL L E R

TIMELINKS
1811-12 BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 7 in A major, op. 92 Napoleon’s forces invade Russia 1911 NIELSEN Violin Concerto, op. 33 Gustav Mahler dies in Vienna 2012 STEPHANIE BERG Ravish and Mayhem President Barack Obama wins re-election

Symphony orchestras are often accused of worshipping long-dead composers while shunning the breathing ones. Yet programs that feature unfamiliar music created by unknowns seldom do well at the box office. As a species, we gravitate to the tuneful and recognizable. The structure of classical music shapes our listening experience. Conventional sonata form, for example, allows us to make certain predictions about the direction of a movement and then feel satisfied when our expectations are fulfilled, or pleasantly surprised when our expectations are subtly subverted. Form means that we aren’t simply being led around dark woods by our ears. But if concert music is to remain vital, we need to clear some space in the concert schedule for living composers and their unfamiliar, unpredictable, expectation-defying work. Tonight’s program offers three perspectives on the new: a very recent overture by a woman who is not yet 30; a 100-year-old violin concerto that tests the boundaries of neoclassicism; and one of the most popular symphonies by a composer whose works so dominate the repertory that at least one critic has proposed banning him from concert programs until we can hear him anew. STEPHANIE BERG Ravish and Mayhem CONTRAST AND UNITY Modernism is old—a century old, at least. Is it still possible to épater la bourgeoisie? On a purely pragmatic level, offending the patrons seems unwise. Few living composers are lucky enough to hear their work performed by a major orchestra. Should they alienate audiences of today in the hopes of impressing music historians of the future? Achieving relevance is a careful balancing act: challenging listeners without annoying them, acknowledging the past without slavishly repeating it, being original without being off-putting. As Stephanie Berg succinctly explains on the home page of her website,
26

“Composition, I find, is much like cooking: it’s all about proportion, balance, and the interplay of contrast and unity. But at the end of the day, no matter how complex your ideas are, how innovative your dish is, it still has to taste good.” With its wide-eyed, almost Coplandesque harmonies and hectic rhythms, Ravish and Mayhem neatly encapsulates Berg’s approach. Dramatic brass vies with whimsical woodwinds; grand gestures are interrupted by playful passages; ceremony succumbs to chaos. The sonorities are at once American and exotic. According to Berg, “I’m always a bit hesitant to cite specific regions of the world to avoid the risk of ‘stereotyping’ music, but my mind kept going to the scene of an ancient Middle Eastern street festival of sorts as I wrote it. I wouldn’t call the music ‘Arabic,’ but the melodies involve a lot of trills and flourishes, which seem to be a feature of music from that region. I think the passion and energy of the piece suggest something a little more raw than traditional Western literature. Plus there are elephants in there.” (You’ll understand what she means when you hear the finale). MISSOURI MAESTRO Originally from Kansas City, Berg holds a master’s degree in composition from the University of Missouri, where she also earned her bachelor’s degree in clarinet performance. In 2012 she was selected as a resident composer for the Mizzou International Composers Festival; an earlier version of Ravish and Mayhem was premiered that summer by the new music ensemble Alarm Will Sound. Berg lives in Columbia, Missouri, and plays clarinet with the New Music Ensemble. “I’ve only been formally composing for about four years, though I’ve dabbled in it all my life,” she notes. “I really have Jeanne Sinquefield and the Mizzou New Music Initiative to thank for turning it into a career path. After I won the Sinquefield Prize in 2009, and with some encouragement from the composition faculty, I realized that composition was something that I wanted to pursue formally. Everything that has happened since then has only reaffirmed that feeling.”

Born 1986, in Parkville, Missouri First Performance July 28, 2012, Alarm Will Sound performed the work at the Mizzou International Composers Festival in Columbia, Missouri STL Symphony Premiere This week Scoring flute piccolo 2 oboes clarinet E-flat clarinet 2 bassoons 2 horns 2 trumpets 2 trombones tuba percussion piano strings Performance Time approximately 7 minutes

27

CARL NIELSEN Violin Concerto, op. 33 A HIGHER UNITY In the summer of 1911, when Carl Nielsen began writing his Violin Concerto, he accepted an invitation from Nina Grieg, widow of Edvard, to stay in the lakeside cabin retreat where the late Norwegian composer had written much of his life’s work. The great Dane did not take the task of writing his first concerto lightly. He was himself an accomplished violinist, if no virtuoso; he played second violin in the orchestra of the Royal Theater in Copenhagen from 1889 to 1905. In a letter he wrote during the concerto’s composition, he laid out his exacting standards: “It has to be good music and yet always show regard for the development of the solo instrument, putting it in the best possible light. The piece must have substance and be popular and showy without being superficial. These contrasts can and must meet and form a higher unity.” He did not finish the piece until the middle of December, several months after he returned to Copenhagen. DAZED AND CONFUSED Although he is a national hero in Denmark, renowned for his six symphonies as well as his operas, choral works, and chamber music, Nielsen is not a fixture in the American repertory. As Alex Ross has noted, “his habit of writing furiously fast figures and then passing them from one section to another, relay style, can make even an ensemble of virtuosos sound like a mess. Audiences, for their part, often go away from Nielsen performances pleased but a little dazed, not sure what hit them.” The Violin Concerto, for all its Neoclassical trappings, is similarly weird, not to mention unusually long and difficult to play. Notes ring out shrilly; harmonies collapse into dissonances; themes collide and implode. Its beauty is severe and gleams like a glacier. CUTTING AND EASY TO GRASP The Violin Concerto comprises four movements: first slow, then quick, then slow, then quick. Unlike his work from just a few years later, it is firmly Neoclassical and strongly melodic. The opening Praeludium is tranquil and undeniably pretty
28

Born June 9, 1865, Sortelung, on the Danish island of Funen Died October 3, 1931, Copenhagen First Performance February 28, 1912, Peder Møller was soloist, with the composer conducting the Royal Danish Orchestra in Copenhagen STL Symphony Premiere January 5, 2001, Kurt Nikkanen was soloist, with Hans Vonk conducting Most Recent STL Symphony Performance October 27, 2002, Yang Liu was soloist, with Robert Spano conducting Scoring 2 flutes piccolo 2 oboes 2 clarinets 2 bassoons 4 horns 2 trumpets 3 trombones timpani strings Performance Time approximately 34 minutes

in places. But there is a sharpness beneath the sweetness, a keen Scandinavian rigor that resists the urge toward the sentimental. “My ideal is to be able to write music like a clean and sharp sword,” he wrote, “cutting and easy to grasp.” The Allegro cavalleresco that follows is an exuberant romp for full orchestra; the solo violin jousts and parries with the other instruments, culminating in a brilliant if somewhat acidulous cadenza. The dark Adagio is a meditation on mutability, as earlier themes shift and reveal themselves from different angles. With the concluding Scherzo, a lightly mocking rondo, the Concerto has shaken off any vestiges of virtuosity and, in Nielsen’s own words, “renounces everything that might dazzle or impress.” LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 7 in A major, op. 92 LOST IN THE CANON According to the most recent Orchestra Repertoire Report, which covers in exhaustive statistical detail the offerings of 137 American orchestras from 2009 to 2010, Ludwig van Beethoven was performed more often than any other composer: 457 times, to be precise. Of the top twenty most performed works, his Ninth, Seventh, and Fifth symphonies were ranked first, second, and third, respectively. The 457 scheduled performances represent a staggering 7 percent of the total works performed. (By way of contrast, just 0.7 percent were works by female composers.) Beethoven’s ubiquity not only crowds out space on the program for other worthies; it threatens to make the great man disappear, his essential strangeness obscured by the fog of the familiar. Repeated listening desensitizes us to the daring experiments that typify even his seemingly straightforward works. RESTLESS ICONOCLAST The Seventh may seem like a spontaneous expression of joy, a universally beloved celebration of love and freedom, but it is also a groundbreaking, iconoclastic work. Although audiences went wild at its premiere, in 1813, more than a year after Beethoven finished the symphony, it shocked many of his
29

Born December 16, 1770, in Bonn Died March 26, 1827, in Vienna First Performance December 8, 1813, in Vienna, under the composer’s direction STL Symphony Premiere December 3, 1908, Max Zach conducting Most Recent STL Symphony Performance January 30, 2011, Semyon Bychkov conducting Performance Time approximately 36 minutes

contemporaries. The piano seller, teacher, and critic Friedrich Wieck, who attended the rehearsals, reported that all those present believed that Beethoven must have composed it while drunk. For Carl Maria von Weber the incessant droning bass line in the first movement’s coda suggested that the composer was “ripe for the madhouse.” Even today, scholars marvel over his innovative approach to key relationships, the way the work shifts from its home key of A major to the far-flung C major and F major, rather than the expected dominant (E major). As Phillip Huscher writes, “We don’t need a course in harmony to recognize that Beethoven has taken us through the looking glass, and that everything is turned on its head.” The first movement starts slowly and majestically, a much longer introduction than was usual for Beethoven or any of his predecessors. This Poco sostenuto interlude maps out the tonal terrain, preparing us for the aforementioned shifts in key. After 61 repeated E notes, it transitions to Vivace, and its relentless driving rhythms, reminiscent of peasant dances, generate a flurry of swift dynamic changes and sudden modulations. The second movement, in A minor, is marked Allegretto, but it is slow compared with the pell-mell rush of the other movements. The most famous part of the symphony, it begins with an unsettling chord carried by the woodwinds and horns, which ushers in a solemn march led by the violas, cellos, and double basses. The third movement, which borrows a theme from an Austrian folk song, contrasts a lively scherzo with a trio section that starts off deceptively placid and gradually becomes more emphatic. The finale opens with two fortissimo chords and reestablishes the home key of A major in a frenzy of forward momentum.
Program notes © 2014 by René Spencer Saller

30

ANDREY BOREYKO
STANLEY J. GOODMAN GUEST ARTIST

Andrey Boreyko holds the position of Music Director of the Orchestre National de Belgique and the Düsseldorfer Symphoniker. With the Orchestre National de Belgique, he ended the 2012-13 season with a highly successful concert at Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw with pianist Nikolai Lugansky, and this season sees the orchestra tour Germany with pianist Boris Berezovsky, presenting a Dvořák Festival in May 2014 and completing the tour at the Concertgebouw. In North America, Boreyko is also Music Director Designate of the Naples Philharmonic (his inaugural concert was a gala with Sarah Chang in November 2013) and he additionally holds the position of Principal Guest Conductor of the Orquesta Sinfónica de Euskadi. Highlights of the 2013-14 season include performances with the New York Philharmonic, Los Angeles Philharmonic, and London Philharmonic, and with the Toronto and Houston symphony orchestras. Further ahead he will work with WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln and Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin. Boreyko’s previous positions include Chief Conductor of the Jenaer Philharmonie (where he is now Honorary Conductor) and the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, as well as the Berner Symphonieorchester, Hamburger Symphoniker, and the Poznań Philharmonic Orchestra. He was also Principal Guest Conductor of the Vancouver Symphony and Music Director of the Ural State Philharmonic Orchestra. Andrey Boreyko was born in St. Petersburg where, at the Rimsky-Korsakov Conservatory, he studied conducting and composition with Elisabeta Kudriavtseva and Alexander Dmitriev, graduating summa cum laude. While with the Jenaer Philharmonie, Boreyko received awards for the most innovative concert programming in three consecutive seasons from the German Music Critics Association.

Andrey Boreyko most recently conducted the St. Louis Symphony in November 2012.

31

ARCHIV KUNsTLER

ADELE ANTHONY
SID AND JEAN GROSSMAN GUEST ARTIST

Adele Anthony makes her St. Louis Symphony debut with these concerts.

Since her triumph at Denmark’s 1996 Carl Nielsen International Violin Competition, Adele Anthony has enjoyed an acclaimed and expanding international career. Performing as a soloist with orchestra and in recital, as well as being active in chamber music, Anthony’s career spans the continents of North America, Europe, Australia, India, and Asia. Highlights from recent seasons have included performances with the symphony orchestras of Houston, San Diego, Seattle, Buffalo, Dayton, Ft. Worth, Indianapolis, Long Beach, Milwaukee, Virginia, Wichita, and the IRIS Chamber Orchestra. Being an avid chamber music player, Anthony appears regularly at La Jolla SummerFest and Aspen Music Festival and School. Abroad, she has performed with the Budapest Philharmonic Orchestra, Denmark’s Aalborg and Aarhus Symphony Orchestras, Finland’s Kuopio Symphony Orchestra, the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Iceland Symphony Orchestra, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, NDR Orchestra Hannover, and the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France. Anthony’s wide-ranging orchestral repertoire extends from the Baroque of Bach and Vivaldi to all the classical war horses including Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, and Sibelius to contemporary composers Ross Edwards, Arvo Pärt, and Phillip Glass. Anthony studied at the Conservatory of the University of Adelaide with Beryl Kimber until 1987, and continued her studies at New York’s Juilliard School, where she worked with the eminent teachers Dorothy DeLay, Felix Galimir, and Hyo Kang. She made her Australian debut with the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra in 1983, and since then has appeared with all six symphonies of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (Sydney, Melbourne, Queensland, West Australian, Tasmanian, and Adelaide). Adele Anthony performs on an Antonio Stradivarius violin, crafted in 1728.

MaRIa CIRIELLO

32

A BRIEF EXPLANATION
You don’t need to know what “andante” means or what a glockenspiel is to enjoy a St. Louis Symphony concert, but it’s always fun to know stuff. For example, what is “Allegro cavalleresco”? Allegro cavalleresco: cavalleresco is an Italian word meaning “knightly,” “chivalrous,” or “noble,” so Carl Nielsen’s tempo for the second movement of his Violin Concerto calls for the musicians to play fast, but in a noble manner

MY INSTRUMENT:

CHRIS CARSON, ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL DOUBLE BASS
“When I was 12 I was in junior high in South Bend, Indiana. This was 1960. Back then there was so much support for the arts in the South Bend Public Schools that there were three levels of string orchestras. C orchestra was beginners. A was most advanced. “There was a girl in the A orchestra who was an accomplished violinist. I wanted to be in A where she was. I asked my friends the best way to get into the advanced orchestra. They said there was always a need for basses. Playing bass was a good path for getting from C to A orchestra. “Then she wasn’t all that into me, but I kept playing the bass.”

Chris Carson

33

DaN DREYfUs

YOU TAKE IT FROM HERE
If these concerts have inspired you to learn more, here are suggested source materials with which to continue your explorations. sjbvc7.wix.com/stephanieberg Visit the website of composer/ clarinetist Stephanie Berg mizzounewmusic.missouri.edu New music is happening at Mizzou, learn about the Mizzou New Music Initiative, supported by the Sinquefield Charitable Foundation carlnielsen.dk/pages/biography.php The Carl Nielsen Society provides lots of information and resources John Suchet, Beethoven: The Man Revealed Atlantic Monthly Press A recent bio by host of popular Classic FM radio show in the U.K.

Read the program notes online at stlsymphony.org/planyourvisit/programnotes Keep up with the backstage life of the St. Louis Symphony, as chronicled by Symphony staffer Eddie Silva, via stlsymphony.org/blog The St. Louis Symphony is on

34

DONOR SPOTLIGHT

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY MUSEUM OF ART
The Saint Louis University Museum of Art (SLUMA) enhances the cultural opportunities of a SLU education by displaying diverse works and by sponsoring educational programs related to the arts. In addition, the museum presents historical art and artifacts and exhibits work by students, faculty, staff, alumni, benefactors, and friends of the University. It has also hosted special collaborations, such as chamber concerts with the St. Louis Symphony. A new exhibition at SLUMA, No Place Like Home: American Scene Painting in the Sinquefield Collection, includes paintings, drawings, and lithographs from the private collection of Rex and Jeanne Sinquefield. The exhibit features acclaimed works by Thomas Hart Benton, Joe Jones, Grant Wood, John Rogers Cox, and other prominent artists of the American Scene Painting movement. Rex Sinquefield grew up in St. Louis and attended Saint Louis University, where he earned an undergraduate business degree. Today, he is one of the region’s most important civic leaders, serving on numerous boards including those of SLU and the St. Louis Symphony. Sinquefield met his wife, Jeanne, at the University of Chicago, where he pursued an MBA as she was completing her doctorate in demography. Today, Jeanne Sinquefield is widely noted for her long history of supporting organizations that enhance music, art, and education, especially for children. For many years, the successful couple lived in California. Their first foray into art collecting began with European post-impressionist artists. However, as the Sinquefields began to re-identify with their Midwestern roots, they began building a collection that celebrates the city of St. Louis, the state of Missouri, and the importance of the Midwest region in the national story of American art. The collection will be on display through Sunday, Feb. 2. Visit sluma.slu. edu for more information.

35

COMMUNITY & EDUCATION:

SYMPHONY IN THE CITY SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY MUSEUM OF ART

Helen Kim

Ann Fink

Nathan Schram

David Kim

JANUARY 21 7:30 p.m. Free Join Helen Kim and Ann Fink, violins, Nathan Schram, viola, and David Kim, cello, for a string quartet concert that celebrates American music against the backdrop of the current SLUMA exhibition No Place Like Home: American Scene Painting in the Sinquefield Collection.

Presented by Commerce Bank

36

AUDIENCE INFORMATION
BOX OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Saturday, 10am-6pm; Weekday and Saturday concert evenings through intermission; Sunday concert days 12:30pm through intermission.

POLICIES
You may store your personal belongings in lockers located on the Orchestra and Grand Tier Levels at a cost of 25 cents. Infrared listening headsets are available at Customer Service. Cameras and recording devices are distracting for the performers and audience members. Audio and video recording and photography are strictly prohibited during the concert. Patrons are welcome to take photos before the concert, during intermission, and after the concert. Please turn off all watch alarms, cell phones, pagers, and other electronic devices before the start of the concert. All those arriving after the start of the concert will be seated at the discretion of the House Manager. Age for admission to STL Symphony and Live at Powell Hall concerts varies, however, for most events the recommended age is five or older. All patrons, regardless of age, must have their own tickets and be seated for all concerts. All children must be seated with an adult. Admission to concerts is at the discretion of the House Manager. Outside food and drink are not permitted in Powell Hall. No food or drink is allowed inside the auditorium, except for select concerts.

TO PURCHASE TICKETS
Box Office: 314-534-1700 Toll Free: 1-800-232-1880 Online: stlsymphony.org Fax: 314-286-4111 A service charge is added to all telephone and online orders.

SEASON TICKET EXCHANGE POLICIES
If you can’t use your season tickets, simply exchange them for another Wells Fargo Advisors subscription concert up to one hour prior to your concert date. To exchange your tickets, please call the Box Office at 314-5341700 and be sure to have your tickets with you when calling.

GROUP AND DISCOUNT TICKETS
314-286-4155 or 1-800-232-1880 Any group of 20 is eligible for a discount on tickets for select Orchestral, Holiday, or Live at Powell Hall concerts. Call for pricing. Special discount ticket programs are available for students, seniors, and police and public-safety employees. Visit stlsymphony.org for more information.

Powell Hall is not responsible for the loss or theft of personal property. To inquire about lost items, call 314-286-4166. POWELL HALL RENTALS
Select elegant Powell Hall for your next special occasion. Visit stlsymphony.org/rentals for more information.
37

POWELL HALL
(TERRACE CIRCLE, GRAND CIRCLE)

BALCONY LEVEL

WHEELCHAIR LIFT
(TERRACE CIRCLE, GRAND CIRCLE)

BALCONY LEVEL

WHEELCHAIR LIFT

(DRESS CIRCLE, DRESS CIRCLE BOXES, GRAND TIER BOXES & LOGE)

GRAND TIER LEVEL

(DRESS CIRCLE, DRESS CIRCLE BOXES, GRAND TIER BOXES & LOGE)

GRAND TIER LEVEL

MET BAR

TAXI PICK UP DELMAR

MET BAR

TAXI PICK UP DELMAR

(PARQUET, ORCHESTRA RIGHT & LEFT)
BO UT IQ UE

ORCHESTRA LEVEL

(PARQUET, ORCHESTRA RIGHT & LEFT)

ORCHESTRA LEVEL

BO

UT

IQ

UE

WIGHTMAN GRAND WIGHTMAN FOYER GRAND
FOYER CUSTOMER
SERVICE
CUSTOMER SERVICE

TICKET LOBBY
TICKET LOBBY

KEY

KEY
LOCKERS

LOCKERS WOMEN’S RESTROOM

BAR SERVICES

BAR SERVICES HANDICAPPED-ACCESSIBLE

WOMEN’S RESTROOM

HANDICAPPED-ACCESSIBLE

MEN’S RESTROOM MEN’S RESTROOM ELEVATOR ELEVATOR

RESTROOM FAMILYFAMILY RESTROOM

Please make note of the EXIT signs in the auditorium. In the case of an emergency, proceed to the nearest EXIT near you.

38

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful

Master Your Semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master Your Semester with a Special Offer from Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.