THE COMOX VALLEY AIR FORCE MUSEUM ASSOCIATION

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

ON PROUD WINGS

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:
“NURSE VIOLET” EL PRESIDENTE DIRECTOR VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR OUTREACH COMMUNITIES IN BLOOM WEBSITE UPDATE FAREWELL FRANK VOLUNTEER WANTED! INFO SESSION QUARTER-BACK REVIEW ROSE L AND SPIT F IRE CROSSWORD THE CVAFMA NE W ME MBE RS COMING EVENTS LIBRARY FUN FARE & CROSSWORD SOLN. NOTICE 1-2 2 3 3 3-4 5 6 6 6 7-8 9-11 11 12 13 14 14 15 16 17

“Nurse Violet”
In 1995, a woman donated a Queen Alexandra Nursing Sister’s uniform, medical equipment, medals, badges, autograph book, photographs, and a 1930’s era obstetrical nursing book. The donor didn’t have much information, explaining that they were given to her family, when she was a child, by a woman guest in their Black Creek home. The uniform and artifact have been used by the family’s children as costumes. The donations are now incorporated into our WWI Nursing Sister display.
The process of updating the display with a new state of the art “personnequin” with realistic features and poseable hands, (one of 5 specialty mannequins custom-made for our museum by Doneff & Associates ), tweaked our curiosity about the items used to dress our nurse. With the help of Allison Hetman, Mel Birnie, Brian O’Cain, and Robert Lesage, we did some detective work and came up with some basic facts that raise yet more questions. Informally known as Nurse Violet, the original owner of the uniform and artifact was a woman named Jean McPherson, born in Orangeville, Ont on July 5th, 1886. Jean’s records contained no information on her parents, so it proved difficult to find any relatives. Military documents indicated that she had her medical for the Canadian Medical Service on Sept 8th, 1916, and her unit at that time was listed as the Queen Alexandra Imperial Nursing Service (QAIMS).2 She sailed from Montreal on the SS Scandinavian on the 12 Oct, 1916 but no destination was listed. Entries in her diary suggest that she was in France in 1916, possibly even at the Somme, and also at Warncliffe Hospital, in Sheffield, England in 1917. 3 A mystery arises from another record that shows her enlistment date for the Canadian Army Medical Corps as being in May of 1918, followed by a posting to Government of Canada (G.C) Hospital in Orpington, Kent. Jean’s demobilization process began in May of 1919. The records show she disembarked in New York on Sept 4th of that year, and was in Canada by Sept 13th, when she was officially struck off strength. She intended to live with a married sister in Guelph, Ont, but we lose sight of her in the public record until 1962, when a Jean (McPherson) Manhard appears on a Victoria, BC voters list. Jean McPherson Manhard died at the age of 86 on July 15, 1968.4 We have many unanswered questions about Jean’s personal history and, although we use her former possessions to tell a story, we don’t tell her story. Our display represents the contributions of
(Continued on page 2)

SPECIAL POINTS OF INTEREST:
Revealing discoveries and
research for our nursing display. WWI

Community interest in our
message and in how we present ourselves.

The latest on progress of
the Roseland restoration. coming events. Spitfire

A brief look back and Fun and games.

ON PROUD WINGS
“Nurse Violet” cont..
(Continued from page 1)

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VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

the many individuals whose history is lost to time. The display represents a point on the timeline, celebrates women's contributions in wartime, and provides insight into how the Nursing Sister’s service was the first hint of a coming shift in societal norms, a shift that changed the way women were perceived by the Canadian Forces and later by society as a whole. Because of the changes made to that display we now want to know more about what happened to Jean in the field and in the hospitals where she was stationed. We want to know why she had a Seaforth Highlander’s cap badge and why she had a France and Germany Star, a medal only awarded for operational service in France, Belgium, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, or Germany between June 6, 1944 and May 8, 1945. Did Jean serve in WWII? Was the medal hers? If it was, it would have been awarded to her when she was around 58 or 59 years old and if it wasn’t hers, to whom did it belong? What happened to Jean between 1919 and 1962? We believe these are important questions because those who serve deserve to be honored and remembered. These unanswered questions are riddles waiting to be solved and, so, the detective work continues! Corrine.
[To learn more about the history of nursing in the Canadian Forces in both WWI and WWII, Brian O’Cain suggests you check out “First In, Last Out”, by Glad Bryce , “Women Who Went to War 1938- 1946” by Eric Taylor , and “Battlefront Nurses in WWI” by Maureen Duffus , available in our library. For an idea of what the Hospital Ships and Barges were like, he suggests searching the photo archives at the Imperial War Museum site at http:/ www.iwmcollection.org.uk] 1. [Doneff and Associates at http:/www.museummannequinsanddisplays.com] 2. [Created on March 27, 1902 and patronized by Queen Alexandra, this Nursing Service was the result of the reorganization and combination of the British Army, Indian, and Colonial Nursing Services after the Boer War. To learn more about the history of the QAIMS, Robert Lesage suggests visiting the QAIMS website: http:/ www.qaranc.co.uk] 3. [Mel Birnie has researched Warncliffe and you can find personal war diaries at the Scarlet Finders website http:/www.scarletfinders.co.uk 4. [Allison has made copies of these records and created a personal file for Jean, available upon request in the Library. 5. [To find out how nurses became some of the first feminist pioneers read more of Veronica Strong-Boag’s paper “Making a Difference- The History of Canadian Nurses” available in PDF format at http://www.cbmh.ca/index.php/cbmh/article/view/231]

As we approach the end of the year it is worthwhile to reflect on some of the items your Board of Directors has done. Thanks to the generosity of the Webber PODIUM family we introduced early this year our Book of Remembrance for past members. We also created our Service Pins and it is gratifying to see how our members have continued their support to the museum over the years A water fountain was introduced and was certainly welcome, especially for our hot summers. We received approval for the Heritage Stones to be moved and the new racks to hold them should be in place for this year’s ceremony. A small committee has been formed to oversee the creation of a new website for the museum. Next year we look forward to a Comox Air Show, once again, for which we will need lots of volunteers to assist in the museum’s participation. See you there. In the meantime, on behalf of your Board I trust you and your family had a Very Merry Christmas and I wish you a Happy New Year.

EL PRESIDENTE'S

Bill

ON PROUD WINGS
DIRECTOR’S DIALOGUE

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VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

Season's Greetings! It has been an eventful first year for me and I hope to be here for many more. I certainly enjoy the myriad activities and continue to be impressed with the input and dedication of all our volunteers. I'm looking forward to the New Year and in particular can't wait to take part in the installation of the new museum panels and everything that involves. Here's hoping that 2013 is one of our best years yet. Captain Lynn

MANAGEMENT MATTERS
New Year! I know that museums "live in the past", and we occasionally dabble in today, but every once in a while we cast our eyes into the future. 2013 is imminent, so it's time to prognosticate. We all have good reasons to be excited about next year, so let's look at the 2013 "To Do" list. We anticipate a visit from Don Smith in the new year , meaning we will have the fun and challenge of designing, proofing and installing new displays. We will continue to replace the mannequin cases. An Air Show is planned for 17 August. We might be able to have the freshly repainted Black Knight T-33 Cockpit Procedures Trainer installed in our parking lot. Our big yellow CMP truck should become roadworthy. We are already getting heritage stones engraved, they will need a dedication ceremony. Decisions will be made on our Vampire. Oh yes, and we will continue to have our beautiful Museum open to the public six days a week, all year. And, we might even get a web page going! The key element in all of this is our team of volunteers; dedicated, resourceful, passionate and engaged, we could not accomplish anything without them! All that to say, there is something for everyone in the coming year: Allons'y! Jon

Community Outreach
Remembrance Day 2012 A synopsis of the delivery given in early November by Jon Ambler to:
   
Radio (CFAX), via 15 minute live interview; Grade 3, Varsity Acres Elementary School in Calgary, via Skype!; Courtenay Elementary School Remembrance Day Assembly, as guest speaker; and Campbell River High School visiting classes to learn about RCAF air power in WW2 and the Cold War.

“Students, it is my privilege to join you today as we gather, as Canadians, to remember. I have spoken to some of your assemblies before, and I always appreciate the thoughtfulness and dignity of your ceremony, well done! But, what makes us Canadians? It is not simply a matter of living in our geographic area or talking about the hockey strike, or complaining about the weather, or drinking Tim Horton’s. I believe it is our shared belief in freedom and democracy, our natural desire to do the right thing and the urge we feel to end suffering and injustice and oppression. We believe in the values of Canada, and we have a willingness to defend it. Canadians have been described as not necessarily military, but military when necessary.
(Continued on page 4)

ON PROUDWINGS
Community Outreach cont..
(Continued from page 3)

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VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

Sitting quietly here today, you are among the most fortunate people on earth. When you were born in Canada, or became Canadian by emigrating here, as I did, you really won the lottery. You live in one of the best nations on earth, with rights and freedoms and a quality of life second to none. Boys and girls alike, you have a home, you can attend good schools, walk along safe streets, have medical care when you need it, and you get to eat every day. You are someone’s’ pride and joy. You are loved. You are treasured. You are our future. We are the envy of many other nations. We share a belief in the worth of every person and that we are all entitled to dignity and the full protection of the law. We have the rule of law, based on a written constitution and a charter of rights. We commit to democratic principles of freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, the idea of a free press that can observe and criticise and be our conscience. We are free from unfair arrest and imprisonment. We freely select our government, through a secret ballot. We live free from fear and oppression based on our gender, race, colour or religion. Few on earth enjoy these freedoms. During our history Canadians have felt so strongly about those beliefs and values that they considered that giving their lives for them was an appropriate price to pay. I will say that again: Canadians feel so strongly about our beliefs and values that they consider giving their life is an appropriate price to pay. When Imperial Germany invaded neutral nations in Europe, plunging all of Europe into the First World War, from 1914 until 1918, Canada and Canadians said this is not right and must be opposed. 68,000 Canadians died to end that aggression, never forget. During the Second World War, that raged from 1939-1945, after NAZI Germany, Fascist Italy and Imperial Japan chose to act like evil bullies, to invade their neighbours, bomb their cities, enslave or exterminate the people and steal their resources, 47,000 more Canadians died to restore democracy and freedom. Similarly, when the Communists threatened freedom throughout the world and, in particular, invaded South Korea, Canadians stood up, joined with other democracies, as a member of the United Nations and, once again, said no. Over 500 Canadians died in battle and now rest there forever. More recently, we have sought to restore peace, stability, freedom and the rule of law, in the Middle East, in Africa, in Haiti, in Central America, in the Balkans, in Libya. 120 died on those operations. When terrorists attacked and murdered innocents in office buildings, such as the World Trade Center on 9/11, Canadians said we will fight back, as we did in Afghanistan, where 158 joined the fallen. We are proud to have toppled the dictator Qaddafi in Libya. Today we have gathered to talk about remembrance. The First World War ended on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. For that reason, each year at that moment, at 11 AM on November 11, we stop whatever we are doing, pause for two full minutes of silence to reflect on the heroism, mourn the sacrifice and remember the price paid for our freedom. We did this just two days ago. Freedom isn’t free. Your and my freedom was paid for by the sacrifice of those Canadians that went before, and in particular by the young men and women that gave up everything, their futures, to preserve our freedoms. When you look at the veterans on Remembrance Day you will look at old people; but, you should remember what they did as young people. The vast majority of Canadians that fought and struggled, and too often died, were young, very young and most were straight out of High School. Your responsibility is to treasure those freedoms. Your responsibility is to exercise those freedoms: be involved, care about the country, vote in every election, speak up, write letters to the editor, watch for erosion of our hard won freedoms, and take advantage of the opportunities to learn. Finally, your responsibility is to be grateful and to remember.”

ON PROUD WINGS
Communities In Bloom

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VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

“Communities in Bloom is a Canadian non-profit organization committed to fostering civic pride, environmental responsibility and beautification through community involvement and the challenge of a national program, with the focus of green spaces in community settings.”
This year, 19 Wing Comox participated in the “Communities in Bloom” challenge as part of the Canadian Forces Sustainable Communities Initiative. Participants were evaluated on the following:  Tidiness  Environmental Action  Heritage Conservation  Urban Forestry  Landscape– including floral displays  Turf and Sports Fields The Comox Air Force Museum was judged under the Heritage Conservation category and received a score of 127 out of a total possible 150 points. The judges noted that “CFB Comox is extremely strong in the Heritage Conservation criterion. Many exciting projects and programs all contribute to making CFB Comox a leader in its interest in not only preserving but in the promotion of its heritage. As Jon Ambler, Museum Curator, so aptly said, “Heritage is about people, without people there would be no heritage”. He and his legions of volunteers at the museum further Ken Oxley exemplify the accomplishments that can be achieved when people work in a goal oriented direction. The museum and the Heritage Air Park were wonderful places to visit. Congratulations on this criterion. Your facilities and presenters make CFB Comox very strong in this criterion.” Captain Lynn
“All of the Museum’s collections, be they aircraft, vehicles, artifact or pieces of art, are carefully catalogued, preserved, restored and displayed by the volunteers. All of this work is done in accordance with the highest standards of safety, both for the personnel, property and the environment. These same volunteers eagerly interact with our visitors, including many organised tours from schools, service clubs and international tourist agencies. It is important to realize that the general public does not have access to 19 Wing and, as a result, their view is restricted to what can be seen through the security fence when driving along Military Row. In summary, therefore, the Comox Air Force Museum is essentially the public face of 19 Wing and, as such, it is the Museum’s appearance and the manner of our volunteer hosts that sends the message of the Wing’s thriving and productive place, a proud element of the RCAF!” Jon

ON PROUDWINGS
M U S E U M W E B S I T E U P DAT E

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VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

An Ad-Hoc committee was formed to develop the criteria needed for the first step towards the update of the existing Museum Website. The committee, consisting of Captain Barley, Jon Ambler, Len Philips, John Low and Corrine Bainard, met at the end of November to discuss the process and to contribute ideas for improvements to the site. John Low lent his expertise and contacts to create a questionnaire that was used to clarify the priorities for the design and functionality of the website. The results were examined at the December meeting of the CVAFMA Board. The next step in the process will be to invite designers to provide their design concepts for the project based on the criteria provided by the committee. The designers will be invited to present these concepts to the Board and Captain Barley. Together they will make the final decision. Once an initial design has been agreed upon, the committee will be asking the membership for input on specific areas of interest. All members are more than welcome to submit their ideas or suggestions to the committee. Corrine

Farewell frank

1924 — 2012

With deep sadness and respect we say good bye to frank steven, a loyal friend, supporter of the museum and a past director of the association. Frank passed away in comox on December 21. Frank had an extensive flying career with the raf, rcaf, flying firemen from Victoria and as a test pilot at Grumman aviation. A number of his interesting and colourful stories have appeared in past issues of this newsletter. Always A gentleman, frank kept us informed and amused by his many accounts of aviation, including its ideals, values and idiosyncrasies. He will be missed. Happy landings, frank.

..maintain current paid print & internet advertising.
A basic knowledge of business promotion would be an asset.

..initiate new ads for seasonal events

like Nautical Days, Filberg Festival etc..
Support will be given by Director currently responsible.

Volunteer to look after advertising for the Museum
..contract with printer for production and delivery.

..updating and reprint of Museum Display Card.

..prepare annual Advertising budget for the CVAFMA Board

For more info, please contact Mike Hendren at h. 250-339-4272, c. 250-898-4192, or mghendren@gmail.com

ON PROUDWINGS
OCTOBER 2012 CAFM INFO SESSION

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VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

Outreach:

What We Did:
      It was a great summer. 54 visitors per day in August. Positive feedback in almost all comments. Donations very good too.

Boys and Girls Clubs were recently given the idea that their visits would be more than welcome. Consequently, visits from three clubs occurred in 2012. Jon visited the Cumberland Rotarians, with the same message, and visits similarly followed. The Comox Valley Probus Club is due to visit again in the near future.

 

Heritage Stone Ceremony:
Good but not perfect. The families that came much appreciated the dedication to their loved ones.

Main Gallery:
Don Smith is expected with his next new set of display upgrades at least by the end of April. The upgrades are: 1. Continuing with World War II, with intensive amount of equipment, people, artifact. 2. RCAF in WW II, emphasizing the contexts of individual squadrons within our mandate. Canadians in RAF squadrons are represented by our Brewster display. PoW displays with the Colwell Diary and data on who were where, how many and why. Exemplar aviators displays, including the Warrens, Edwards, Hammy Grey, Brewster and Ireland. Cold War section, including the 50s and Korea and the UN. Displays include the Genie missile, NORAD, UN and other smaller items.

A date error was noticed by the family of one of the dedicatees, due to faulty information having been provided. Rather than charge the full price to replace it, it was decided that only the cost price would be charged for the replacement. It was much appreciated. The proposal for a new structure to mount the stones more favourably was discussed and plans circulated. CFB Comox has expressed appreciation for the work we have done and are doing for the Stones.

3. 4.

5.

It should be noted that these upgrades done by Don will, as always, all be fully assessed and approved by us before placement, i.e. ‘ not just commissioned, purchased and plugged in. “As we all agree, I think, we’re here for the purposes of food, camaraderie, heritage and the preservation of valuable stuff. The recent Personnequins: Monday purge of the latter has resulted in: We ordered five personnequins (gender disaggregation) for our

No, your Mother doesn’t work here:

Cleanup!’ (Jon)

  

Our photo archives now having ample library space which to ‘action’ displays, which will give us surplus display cases and space to do with as we wish. They have been used, expand;  First for the Nurse Violet display, with her now holding the The back corridor and washrooms, between the library and bandage in her hand and complimented by a brand new the theatre, becoming ours to use; and display case. The need for all coffee mug users to clean them after use, for  The others have been used for displays of the ex-Snowbird the next person. Necessary equipment and materials will be Leader, Chris Bard, the SAR Tech with patient and the Argus supplied and placed in the kitchen.” engine technician.
(Continued on page 8)

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ON PROUDWINGS

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

OCTOBER 2012 CAFM INFO SESSION cont..
(Continued from page 7)

Heritage Aircraft:
CF-104: The decision has been made to refurbish it in 417 Sqn colours of silver, white and red. T-33: This cockpit procedures trainer was towed to displays for many years but had to end due to insurance coverage problems. The plan is now to park it out back in the new car park area, with steps alongside for displaying the cockpit through its canopy.

Visit to Trenton Museum:
On a visit in October, Lynn joined others to discuss museums and get a good taste for how some others are being set up. She received some excellent feedback on what is being said about our museum, plus many expressions of envy for her job! But, perhaps, it’s really the glacier and golf!?

Heritage Vehicles: Jon should be kept apprised of all and any issues we may have 1943 Radar Truck: with our currently scheduled days and whether a change is needed. The truck will most likely be ready for Collections Management Committee: the 2013 displays. In response to a question on possibly displaying this Don and Mel have lately been concentrating on uniforms to decide and other vehicles at and around the museum building itself, Jon on which are to be kept and which disposed of. Approximately 200 advised that, yes, the intention is to do more. For the time being we uniforms have been deemed OK and about four times that many are not need to decide on how to do it. needed by us and will be offered to other museums and, in the last resort, to the likes of army surplus stores. For those we keep, we look at the W5 of all uniforms and acquire 17th August 2013. all records on each. An exceptional RFC uniform c/w DFC was recently Arnold Roseland (Y2K) Spitfire Update: acquired by Mel and Don in Victoria. Terry related the activities and status of the Roseland Spitfire The Don Macklin room is now progress and some difficulties experienced with offshore contracts very well organised. Irv has made progress, currently being rectified by Vintage Wings. He also good storage available for uniforms discussed activities of VWC staff, Ken, Dean, Kaven and Henry. and medals. Question/suggestion re consider Dwayne Kerr, the VWC Airshow Manager, attended the loaning to theatre groups and others. Lots of International Council of Air Shows Convention in December and has uniforms are available through donations, but recently been setting up the Spitfire hangar for its display at the not many are usable by us. airshow.

Volunteer Schedule:

CFB Comox Air Show:

Recent Updates:
Visitors in 2012:
I have totalled the visitor numbers for 2012 as 8,316. As we have discussed, I believe we always miss a few visitors, so that count will be slightly lower than actual. Our monthly average was 693, the top month being August with 1573 and the slowest month was December with 237. I believe that our out-of-town, especially US, visitors were also reduced due to the recession. That said, we do miss the Air Cadet visits, which once helped swell our numbers and coffers. In the spring we used to get one cadet visit per week for many weeks; however, this did not occur in 2012 and is now being actively encouraged for 2013 and beyond. Jon

Shaw Cable review:
As you may have already seen on Channel 4, a Shaw Cable crew was recently in the museum to make an initial visit and interviews to air introductory information to the public on the museum. Showings of the review began on 11th January. They were very impressed with what they saw and are keen to return later for a more in -depth follow up or two. Ed.

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ON PROUD WINGS
Q U A R T E R - B A C K R E V I E W ( VISIONS
FROM THE PAST MONTHS

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

)

MUSEUM VISITORS
COMOX VALLEY ARTISTS

BOOK OF REMEMBRANCE

Ray Webber’s relatives

and ..HAIL TO SOME YOUNGER VISITORS

http://vintagewingsofcanada.blogspot.ca/2012/12/stockys-in-hall.html

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ON PROUD WINGS
QUARTER-BACK REVIEW
CONT..

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

CAFM DISPLAYS INTO THE HEALTH SERVICES CENTRE, CFB

V O L U N T E E R A P P R E C I AT I O N S E S S I O N S
POTLUCK

CHRISTMAS

- Congratulations Len Spirit of the Volunteer 2012 Award

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ON PROUD WINGS

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

QUARTER-BACK REVIEW

CONT..

ROSELAND SPITFIRE PROJECT– UPDATE
Season’s greetings from the folks at the Roseland Spitfire Project. A lot happened and a lot didn’t happen at the hangar last year, which was certainly a year of transition. We were able, finally, to stop taking two steps back for every step forward as we addressed most of the repairs and corrections required to enable this aircraft to obtain a Certificate of Airworthiness from Transport Canada. The rudder has been completely overhauled, the elevator was sent out for repair, and corrections to the fuselage and fuel bay were completed. Our ambitious schedule to achieve flying status within the next few years was dealt a severe blow by the marginal performance of the individual who was building our Wings for us in the UK. Unfortunately, he was unable to complete the project within the time & budget allocated and, as a result, the wings had to be shipped to Gatineau where a team there is correcting the errors and finishing them off. Delivery now could well need an extra year. We had staff and materials ready to begin the assembly process, i.e. mating the Wings to the airplane; but, as a result of this setback we have had to reduce the number of people presently working on the airplane. All the news, however, is not bad as our Merlin Packard engine will now be on its way here very soon and fitted to the already assembled engine cradle in the next few months. The engineers will then begin the cowlings and fairings around it. The instrument panel and cockpit assembly are nearing completion and the interior plumbing and wiring of the fuselage is very nearly complete. Thanks to 19 CEF and the Wing CE folks, the hangar has recently seen a great transition and we now have enough space to swing the aircraft, enabling work to proceed more efficiently. We also now have a fire protection system that could quench a major forest fire! As we prepare to show the airplane, during the upcoming air show in August, we will be setting up some displays to illustrate the history of this project here in the Valley and of course the Spitfire aircraft in general. If it all works as planned, Vintage Wings of Canada will also be bringing out their P51 and Stocky Edwards P40 to the airshow and we’ll be setting up a process to enable some folks to get a ride in those airplanes. More later on that...

On behalf of the engineers and volunteers at the Roseland Hangar, I wish you a Happy and Prosperous 2013. Don’t forget to come and visit us once in a while. Terry

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ON PROUD WINGS
A V IA TI O N
Across:
1. New flight plan software 5. Training school for flying, abbrv. 7. “Mr. Cessna,” Kendall _________ 10. Bombardier president, Steve ________ 11. Extensive time periods 12. Subject of the film: “The Spirit of St. Louis” 15. You and me 16. Speculate 18. Single-engined light jet program acquired by Medrar Financial in Dubai. 19. Canadian airline providing allinclusive vacation packages 21. Clear, for short 23. Colour 25. Successful air charter company from Mississauga. Air __________ 26. Reflected light 29. Weaken 31. Neodymium symbol 32. Watched 34. Brit fliers 36. Make out 39. Openings 40. Regulations for flying and navigating with instruments, abbrv. 42. Ground clouds 43. Seat belt, in a way. 44. Altitude to transition from takeoff power to climb power, abbrv. 45. Many battles. 49. Service provider for the secondbusiest air navigation system in the world. 50. Fly using wind power. 51. Kissimmee Gateway Airport code. 52. ____- air refuelling. 53. Efficiency of earnings, for short.. 54. Go through a pre-flight checklist, for example.

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

C ROSSW ORD

Crossword by Myles Mellor www.ilovecrosswords.com

Down:
1. Flight team. 2. Get enthused, with ‘up’. 3. Handheld device. 4. Code alert. 5. Fuel flow, abbrv. 6. ___ rotor. 7. Fuse. 8. Key factor in Helijet’s long -term success. 9. Maximum degree. 13. Forward portion of a plane. 14. Tilts while turning. 16. Sea danger. 17. UFO flier in movie. 18. Descend rapidly. 20. Newfoundland airport. 21. Centimetre-gram-second. 22. Bombardier’s ____ jet 85 program. 23. Helijet is the single-source helicopter provider in these islands. (2 words) 24. All nations org. 27. Altitude error, for short. 28. Navigation direction, abbrv. 30. Pilot stat, abbrv. 33. The “I” factor. 35. Big problem for pilots flying long hours. 36. “Hips don’t lie” celebrity who once passed through Gander airport. 37. President and CEO of Helijet, Danny ____. 38. Strongly endured. 41. Height established for flaps to be retracted, abbrv. 42. Kelowna, BC-based charter company that owns three Boeing 737-400 aircraft. 46. Commercial notices. 47. Increase, with ‘up’. 48. In this location. Solution on page 16.

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ON PROUDWINGS
CVAFMA Executive 2012-13
President Vice President Secretary Treasurer Bill Cuell Bob Mortimer Jean Ennis Mike Spooner Membership Bingo Coordinator Director at Large Director at Large Co-Editors Len Phillips Herb Lightfoot Mike Hendren Dave Mellin Director at Large Director at Large Observer Observer

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

Rodney Jones Terry Chester Capt. Lynn Barley Jon Ambler

Rodney Jones & Corrine Bainard

Museum Administration Information
Director Deputy Director Program Manager & Volunteer Coordinator Gift Shop Manager Captain Lynn Barley, 19 Wing Heritage Officer MWO Michael Barnucz Jon Ambler Ken Oxley

Comox Air Force Museum
19 Wing Comox, Lazo BC V0R 2K0 Phone/Fax: E-mail: Website: 250-339-8162 info@comoxairforcemuseum.ca www.comoxairforcemuseum.ca http://www.vintagewings.ca/ Tuesdays to Sundays: 10 am - 4 pm. Please call ahead to arrange tours. Enquire at Museum. May - September: 10 am - 4 pm

Roseland Spitfire Project Website: OPENING TIMES: Museum, Library and Gift Shop Spitfire Hangar Heritage Airpark

COLLABORATIVE OPPORTUNITIES
To join our Association, please leave a phone message at the Museum, or drop by and fill out an application. For only $10 annually, some of the benefits you receive include our newsletter, discounts in the gift shop, and a voice in the organization. If you are currently receiving this newsletter by mail and would like an electronic copy, please send the editor your email address. Our thanks to those of you who have contributed articles and other material for this issue. If you have been thinking of doing so, whether it be a photo, story, or anything relevant to what we do and who we are, please don’t hesitate to send it along to the contacts below:

info@comoxairforcemuseum.ca or leave a message at the Museum; The editor, at: rodney.hyde.jones@gmail.com ; or Visit www.comoxairforcemuseum.ca or drop by the museum to find out more about current activities.

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ON PROUD WINGS
A BIG WELCOME TO OUR NEW MEMBERS:

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

Dave Galant

☼ Robert Munro

Some advantages of Association membership are:

   

A voting member of the Comox Valley Air Force Museum Association (CVAFMA). Opportunity to become one of the Association Directors. Enjoyment of membership activities and social functions. Receive a discount at the Air Force Museum Gift Shop.

    

Being part of a community-focused organization. Broadening your network of contacts and making new friends. Learning first hand about Canada’s role in military aviation. An opportunity to develop new skills. Involvement in a wide range of museum activities.

Date
Feb 23

COMING EVENTS
Cumberland Heritage Fair. Theme: Home & Neighbour. CAFM display being planned.

Apr 12—26

Canadian Forces Snowbirds at Comox and Snowbirds Autograph Session in CAFM library.

Apr TBD

CVAFMA Annual General Meeting 7 PM at the Comox Air Force Museum in the theatre.

May 20

CAFM participates in Cumberland Parade with Heritage Vehicles.

Sat, May 18

Annual Garage Sale, Museum Parking Lot. (9 AM to 2 PM) (set up at 8 AM)

Jul 1

CAFM participates in Courtenay Canada Day Parade, with Heritage Vehicles, and Booth.

Aug 5 (B.C. Day)

CAFM participates in Comox Nautical Days Parade with Heritage Vehicles.

Aug 17

Comox Air Show, CFB Comox.

Page 15

ON PROUDWINGS
LIBRARY
This past year has seen many changes in the library, from a new study desk, to new archive storage system and to many new book donations. In April we enjoyed our usual number of visitors, due in part to the Snowbird arrival. One of the most anxious visitors had to be Dan Esplen from the mainland. He wrote numerous emails to the library, asking about Snowbird practice days and times, which vantage points were best, and finally where was the best B&B. We did our best to keep Dan updated with the Snowbirds itinerary, keeping in mind that said itinerary could change at a moment’s notice due to weather or other factors. The weekend came, Dan and his wife Connie arrived and took in every experience related to the Snowbirds, right down to the autograph signing at the museum. His parting gift to us was a photograph of himself, taken in front of our museum sign. From home he wrote a wonderful email of how much they had enjoyed the visit, all the great

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

volunteers, and to say he had become a member of our Association. Weeks later, we received an email from Connie to say that the worst of all things had happened. Dan had suffered a massive heart attack, from which there was no return. We were struck by the sadness of the news, remembering how much Dan was looking forward to next year’s Snowbird visit, and how quickly it can all change. Connie’s last email asked if we would be interested in Dan’s books and research material. He had collected many items to broaden his love of anything Air Force and flying, and used it to set up a website showcasing his interest. Connie is planning to keep Dan’s website going, and we wish her all the best in her efforts. As she says, aviation was Dan’s great love, and she enjoyed watching the change in him when he was talking about it. We in the library are very pleased at the idea of some of Dan’s beloved books coming to us. Dan & Connie’s URL: http://www.members.shaw.ca/cde16/index.htm Allison.

For the past few years, volunteers and staff have been reviewing dated 16 mm films, VHS and older forms of video in our collection, to preserve them on DVD for as artifact for display purposes. We have received some generous donations of cine projectors and video equipment enabling this to happen. A concurrent reason for this process was to free space taken up by bulky films and videos. About half way through this process, we now have some products of it in the library to let you know about. Beginning in this issue, we are listing these products, as below, which are reference material available for viewing in the museum’ small video theatre: mins 24 13 23 12 60 Title “Survival Pattern for Staying Alive” “Air Command Colours Presentation”. 31 July 1982. “Flying activities on HMCS Bonaventure”. 1958. “Tracker” “Flight Path – Silver Dart to today’s fast jets”. 1950s to 1990s. “Flight Path V – Silver Dart” “Air Show 1972” “SAR 1967” “Air force Day Promo” 1961 “CF-100 Retirement” Content F/O Glen Douglas forced down in the north, miles from anywhere. The film reenacts his survival Parade - Air Element of the Canadian Air Force. Sikorsky helicopter landing. Tracker launches and ‘touch and goes” Training film of land-based 880 Sqn, including maritime reconnaissance for defence, illegal fishing and poaching incident purposes. Detailed account and commentaries of the build and flying of the 50 th anniversary Dart replica production. Old footage of the Produced by Pilot Aircraft Technology History (PATH) Replica build and flights, instigated and ultimately implemented by McCaffery Incl: 104; Argus; 104 formation; C-130; Buffalo; C-130 JATO; CF-101; CF-101 aerobatic team. Incl: Albatross (touch and go, inflatable launching); Frogmen deployment; Parachute drop into trees; crashed Labrador retrieval. RCAF Golden Hawks formation, plus. North Bay 414 Sqn; 101s flying; Buffalo flying; CF-100 formation, including the Black Knight and camouflaged aircraft. Quality 1 snd, col snd, col sil, b&w snd, col snd, col fair-good. sil, b&w sil, col sil, b&w snd, col sil, col, poor.

20 4 4 1 3.5
Note:

1. snd = sound; col = colour; b&w = black and white; sil = silent. A small amount of scratching occurs in some places. 2. The DVDs are made from VHS videos or 16 mm films dated from early to late 20 th century. Movies not necessarily in present-day acceptable condition; but, have been enhanced in their conversion to improve aspects of quality.

Page 16

ON PROUD WINGS
FUN FARE

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

Spotters’ QUIZ
Fall Issue Results...
1.
2.

LIGHTER THAN AIR
Qantas Airlines: Repair Division

Never let it be said that ground crews lack a sense of humour. Here are actual maintenance complaints submitted 1. Bell XFM-1A Airacuda “Sky Tiger”. 1942. Although not firing a shot in on “Gripe Sheets” by Qantas' pilots (P) plus the solutions anger, its engineering innovations were adopted for many aircraft and recorded by maintenance engineers (E):
brought Larry Bell a resounding success to his new company. 2. Kalinin K-7, modified. The K-7 never flew well, but here appears to be a computer generated fantasy version of it merged with half of a pocket battleship! Sadly, in 1938, the K-7 designer, World War I Aviator, Konstantin Kalinin, was executed by Stalinists as an enemy of the state.
P: Left inside main tire almost needs replacement. E: Almost replaced left inside main tire. P: Test flight OK, except auto-land very rough. E: Auto-land not installed on this aircraft. P: Dead bugs on windshield. E: Live bugs on back-order. P: DME volume unbelievably high level. E: DME volume set to more believable level. P: In altitude-hold mode, autopilot gives 200 feet per minute descent. E: On extensive ground check, cannot duplicate problem . P: Evidence of leak on right main landing gear. E: Evidence removed. P: Aircraft handles funny. E: Aircraft warned to straighten up, fly right, and be serious. P: Friction locks cause throttle levers to stick. E: That's what friction locks are for. P: Noise coming from under instrument panel. Sounds like a baby hitting something with a hammer. E: Took hammer away from baby. P: Something loose in cockpit. E: Something tightened in cockpit.

Three responses were received, two of which were fully correct. The resulting tie was resolved by drawing the winner’s name from a hat: 2.

Congratulations to Robert Lesage.

Thanks to David Stinson and Geoff Plant for their entries.

This issue's quiz
A. We are looking at a person here who had an early and persuasive influence on the outcome of flying experimentations which lead humanity through the age of flight. Please identify who it is, when and what was his influence in the outcome of aviation history?

CROSSW ORD

SOLUTION

B. These are images of various portions of displays within the museum building and provided for your identification of the display item and any relevant comments you wish to make. They are particularly intended to help lift the solitudes of abandoned museum volunteers on quiet winter days.

2

3.

JL Publishing

4. 5.

1.

SPOTTER QUIZ SOLUTIONS: For a well deserved CVAFMA $10 cheque and win untold fame and fortune, please provide the correct answers by April 1st to: rodney.hyde.jones@gmail.com or phone Rodney at 250-650-0166.

Page 17

ON PROUD WINGS
GIFT SHOP
AT THE COMOX AIR FORCE MUSEUM

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 3 WINTER 2012

UNIQUE GIFT IDEAS
Something for any budget, any age. Toys, models, clothing, mugs, hats, books, clocks, decals, posters, patches, pins etc. Open Tuesday to Sunday 10 A.M. – 4 P.M. [Located outside the gate of CFB Comox at Ryan Road and Military Row]

250-339-8162

www.comoxairforcemuseum.ca

WHAT'S' NEW IN THE COMOX AIR FORCE MUSEUM GIFT SHOP - Ken Oxley
We continue to replenish popular selling items and bring in new inventory we think would interest our customers. It's a unique place to find RCAF and West Coast aviation-related gifts for yourself or someone else on your shopping list. Some of the new items include, 2012 Demo Hornet Hat @ $14.95, Lady Pilot and WASP Shopping Bags @ $5.00, a variety of new Mugs @ $10 - 12, CAF Military Police Patches @ $6, Mahogany Spitfire @ $157.50 and a Mosquito @ $155, Retired RCAF Licence Plates @ $11.95, Remove Before Flight Sweat Pants @ $14.95, Aviator Teddy Bears @ $11.95 and signed "The Desert Hawk" (Stocky's story) book @ $12.95. New merchandise is on it's way from various suppliers including Buffalo Air (Ice Pilots). Over 600 different items are in stock. A large selection of aviation pins and patches are available. They make good small gifts at @ $4 - 7. We get great feedback and suggestions from our members and volunteers, so please keep them all coming. Visitors have complimented us on our wide selection of goods and the excellent customer service.

Our goal is to enhance the Museum visitor experience.