MAKING MAUSOLEUMS

Covering the hills and hollows of graveyards across the Old World, mausoleums are a chilling sight. Rich families build them for their deceased lineage, only to have them corrupted by foul cults or desecrated by filthy ghouls. These terrain pieces look great when completed and easily form the centrepiece of any graveyard setting. If you search around a bit for some reference material, you'll find a bunch of variations upon the mausoleum theme. Here we will take you through the steps necessary to build two of the more common types of mausoleum. The first type involves the face of a building built into a hill, while the second example is a stand alone structure with a removable roof.

Foamboard was cut into three rectangles with small rectangular ledges on top of them. Also a triangular bit was cut out and placed on top of the centre rectangle. When cutting foamboard, it is best to use a fresh, sharp blade so as to get the best cut and avoid tearing the foamboard and getting ragged edges. A chunk of insulation foam was also roughly cut into a rectangle that'll serve as a hill. For the entrance to the tomb, a groove was cut into the foamboard suitable for a Mordheim building doorway. Nothing is glued together at this point. The empty doorway was given a door by gluing strips of balsa wood to the rear of the doorway, and a doorknob and plaque were made from plastic bits. The area where the door will rest was carefully carved out from the surface of the foamboard. Glue the door in place with some wood glue as superglue will eat the foam away!

A small roof was even tiled up using thin card. ANOTHER MAUSOLEUM This mausoleum is a bit more complicated and involved than the previous one. the grey undercoat was lightly sprayed in small bursts onto the piece. Now comes the fun part. and pencil! . hobby knife. a thorough basecoat of Chaos Black was applied. greenish brown mausoleum. If you do this right the mausoleum will pick up the grey colour in a sort of dusting fashion giving you an even coat of colour. the entire thing was sprayed Chaos Black. weathered. as it has a removable roof and several steps. Just slather it on there! You may have to repeat this a few times to get the desired result. Simple shapes work best to represent marble styling.The insulation foam was cut into the rough shape of a hill and then sanded down to a smooth round shape that forms a hill. Here is a close up of the card trimmings. To paint this mausoleum a sneaky method of using spraycans was used. and corner pieces. Detailing the plain foamboard is a bit tedious as you have to measure and cut many. Using very watereddown Green and Chestnut inks. a can of grey car undercoat (which you can easily find in any DIY store) was used to add a coat of colour. plaques. Once this had dried. Now. you will have a disgusting. You can see how it adds form and dimension to the previously flat foamboard. thoroughly wash the entire piece. Next we drybrushed the whole piece using Codex Grey and Fortress Grey to pick out the edges and raised card areas. First. many pieces of card to exact measurements. and painting could now begin. but if you think you've got what it takes. Once everything was dry. just paint any details and the earthen area behind the piece as you see fit and you are done! Or are you.. but is well worth the effort. break out your ruler. It will help to practice this technique using some old cardboard boxes before moving on to the real thing. Holding the mausoleum about 2 and a half feet away. Once it all dries.. but not in the normal method. All the pieces were then glued together and set aside to dry.

but there is no immediate need to do so. Line the walls up and using a strip of bent card.A strip of foamboard 4" wide and 18" long was cut out and segmented into 3" sections. You can glue the walls down onto it if you want. otherwise you'd have to attach each wall separately. Simply cut out a hexagon that matches your walls and cover the exposed foamboard with strips of card. In order to segment the foamboard. simply cut half way through it. Doing this now will save some heartache later. You may notice that each corner of the building is a big open hinge. it just so happens that wood dowel rods cut to the correct length fit smugly in this crevice. neatly covering the gaps! So cut one rod out for each corner and set them aside as there is no need to glue them in place right now. so make sure your measurement are correct. As the mausoleum needs a base. it is time to glue the hexagon shape together. Well. The mausoleum will be hexagonal in shape as demonstrated by the image above. which can be nightmarish! A dowel rod was cut to fit the doorway and a step was added using foamboard. glue one end of the foamboard strip to the other. See how the segmented pieces hinge upon one another on a single piece of foamboard? This is the key to the whole project. Further reinforce the walls with more strips of bent card along the inside of the mausoleum. a hexagonal slab seems to fit the bill nicely. NOT all the way through it! The door to the mausoleum was also cut out at this point. Now that we are underway. .

This circle will nicely accommodate the dome that will be attached later. In order for the roof to come off and go back into place without constantly falling off or becoming loose. We went with a simple arrangement of rectangles and plenty of open space for when we paint it later. some balsa wood sticks were glued in place. In addition to the strips around the mausoleum. with the arrow pointing towards the front door. it's all up to how complicated you want to make it.Time for the roof. it was decided that some big plaques would look nice. and thin strips of card were used to make the plaques. Use plenty of glue. . Arrange the strips of card and plastic bits in a pleasing manner. This type of simple decoration adds a ton to the simple surface of flat and boring foamboard. you don't want to put them on crooked! Glue the base to the hexagonal walls. The exposed foam of the circle was then covered with strips of thin card. but clean up any spillage to avoid a sloppy finish. A circle was traced onto foamboard using a coffee can and then oh-so carefully cut out. Affix the plaques to the sides of the mausoleum carefully. Wait for the glue to dry and think about how you want to do the stairs. After all you need to know just who is buried in the mausoleum! Some plastic shield bits. Eight strips of 4" by 1" card were cut out and glued onto the outer walls. Also an arrow was drawn to designate the facing of the roof. and add the dowel rods at this point. There are an infinite number of ways you can do this. These were specifically placed so that they would hold the roof on tightly.

Just slather it on there! You may have to repeat this a few times to get the desired result. a small clear dome was found. weathered. If you do this right the mausoleum will pick up the grey colour in a sort of dusting fashion giving you an even coat of colour. but not in the normal method. Next we drybrushed the whole piece using Codex Grey and Fortress Grey to pick out the edges and raised card areas. the grey undercoat was lightly sprayed in small bursts onto the piece. Once it all dries. you will have a disgusting. It may seem like a daunting task to paint such a large building. set up your paint area and get to work. First. Holding the mausoleum about 2 and a half feet away.We went with a simple pair of blocks that serve as stairs for the mausoleum. Let this dry before moving onto making the dome. It was simply glued on top of the roof and a pinnacle was then added using odds and ends. Now comes the fun part. Just set some time aside. Once this had dried. The mausoleum needed some sort of dome or it just wasn't going to look right. greenish brown mausoleum. thoroughly wash the entire piece. The whole structure was painted using the same method as the previous mausoleum. but it really isn't. Thin card was glued to cover any exposed foam and a simple design was cut out and placed on the first set of steps. So after a bit of looking at different salad bowls. just paint any details and you are done! . a can of grey car undercoat (which you can easily find in any DIY store) was used to add a coat of colour. It will help to practice this technique using some old cardboard boxes before moving on to the real thing. Now. just use your imagination! Here is the piece just prior to painting. Using very watered down Green and Chestnut inks. the entire thing was sprayed Chaos Black. You could place practically anything up there. plastic dishes and such.

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