By Mike Dunn

GAYLORD – It was a low-
scoring, physically intense
battle between two of the top
Class D teams in the state. In
the end, perennial Class D
state power Mount Pleasant
Sacred Heart pulled away to
post a hard-fought 36-24
decision. The visiting Irish
led just 22-20 after three
quarters.
The St. Mary girls of coach
Dan Smith slipped to 5-1
while the Lady Irish
improved to 5-2. In the
Detroit Free Press’ first Class
D girls poll of the young sea-
son, Sacred Heart is ranked
fifth and St. Mary is ranked
ninth. Both teams advanced
to the quarterfinals last year
before losing, the Snowbirds
to Climax-Scotts and Sacred
Heart to Waterford Our Lady
of the Lake.
Coach Smith likes to see
his girls facing the stiff chal-
lenge of a team like Sacred
Heart during the regular sea-
son because he knows, win
or lose, it’s a game that makes
his girls tougher and more
playoff-ready down the
stretch.
The game also featured
two of the top Class D guards
in the state this year: Sarah
Hansen of Sacred Heart and
sweet-shooting senior Kari
Borowiak for the Snowbirds.
Sacred Heart did a better
job of imposing its style of
play on St. Mary than the
other way around and that
was a factor in the outcome.
The Snowbirds usually fly up
and down the court and put a
lot of pressure on the oppos-
ing team’s defense. Sacred
Heart was speedy enough to
get back, however, and force
St. Mary into a half-court
game.
The Irish like to slow the
game tempo down when
they have the ball and that
also kept the Snowbirds from
getting into any kind of com-
fortable offensive rhythm.
The game was close until
the final minutes of the
fourth quarter when Hansen,
who lived up to her billing as
a premier guard, began find-
ing the net at critical junc-
tures. She scored 10 of her
game-high 20 points in the
final period.
At the other end of the
floor, the Irish did an out-
standing job of keeping the
ever-dangerous Borowiak
from taking charge. Much
like the quarterfinal game
against Climax-Scotts last
March, Borowiak drew
enemy jerseys like magnets
every time she got within a
stone’s throw of the paint.
St. Mary battled back from
a 19-13 halftime deficit to
trim the lead to just two
points, 22-20, heading into
the fourth quarter but the
Irish limited the home team
to just two points over the
last eight minutes of the con-
test.
Borowiak, a scrappy battler
under any circumstance, still
finished as St. Mary’s leading
scorer with seven points and
she gathered in a team-high
eight boards. Long-armed
sophomore forward Bekah
Myler, who had her own hel-
lacious battles going on
down low against Sacred
Heart’s bruising center Averi
Gamble, finished with six
points.
It is the second year in a
row that Sacred Heart has
been able to pull away in the
fourth quarter to secure a
victory over the Snowbirds.
Last year in Mount Pleasant,
the host Irish had a big
advantage in scoring in the
final stanza en route to a 40-
34 victory.
In the last two games the
teams have played, Sacred
Heart has outscored St. Mary
31-2 in the fourth quarter.
St. Mary’s game with Ski
Valley foe Central Lake
scheduled for Monday was
postponed by the severe
cold. The Snowbirds face
another big league clash this
Friday, Jan. 10, at home
against Bellaire. Bellaire is
ranked seventh in the state in
the Free Press poll.
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THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 2014
Athlete of the Week
(989) 705-8284
www.MainStreetGaylord.com
236 West Main, Galord
Real Estate One
Gaylord
would like to
congratulate the
Athlete of the Week
FOR WEEK OF DEC. 29-JAN. 4
NOAH
MORSE
MACKINAW CITY HIGH SCHOOL
The Comets' sweet-
shooting senior
tamed the twine for
24 points with 8
steals, 7 boards and
6 assists in the tense
77-75 triple OT win
over Brimley on
Friday, Jan. 3.
S
SECTION B
CALL - (989) 732-8160 • FAX (888) 854-7441
OR EMAIL:
MIKE DUNN - MIKE@WEEKLYCHOICE.COM
ANDY SNEDDON - ANDY@WEEKLYCHOICE.COM
SPORTS
S2. M06 1$,(-0 K0( B-0-5() (11) .3**1 #-5, -,$ -% '$0 $(&'2 0$!-3,#1 (,
2'$ 2-3&' "*1' 5(2' S"0$# H$02. PHOTO BY ROB DEFORGE OF RDSPORTSPHOTO.COM
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Basketball
Snowbirds battle hard in defeat
For second year in row, St. Mary loses
close one to perennial Class D state
power Sacred Heart
Page 2-B • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice January 9, 2014
LOCAL SPORTS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
By Mike Dunn
INDIAN RIVER – The
Inland Lakes boys of coach
Joe Mahoney staged a furi-
ous fourth-quarter rally to
make things close but in the
end it was the visitors from
Rogers City holding on to
take a tense 53-50 decision
in a non-league clash played
on Friday, Jan. 3. The battling
Bulldogs (0-4) were seeking
their first win of the young
season.
Rogers City led 12-9 after
the first quarter and 24-22 at
halftime but built a nine-
point lead in the third quar-
ter, 41-32.
Todd Athey and Mike
O’Connor each turned the
twine for 14 points to pace I-
Lakes.
Coach Mahoney liked the
effort and energy he got out
of the younger players on
the squad but wants to see
his team commit fewer
turnovers and do a better job
on the free-throw line in
future games. The Bulldogs
hit on just 6-of-15 from the
charity stripe in the contest.
Alex Hincka and Chris
Lopez both scored 19 points
to pace the Hurons, who
improved to 1-3.
Inland Lakes was slated to
play host to Ski Valley rival
Bellaire on Tuesday, Jan. 3.
I-Lakes boys lose tough
one to RC
Bulldogs stage furious rally in fourth quarter to make
it close
Basketball

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PETOSKEY – Young team
still on the learning curve.
But the bumps in the road
are made an awful lot
smoother with wins acting as
shock absorbers.
The Petoskey High School
boys basketball team
returned from the Christmas
break by overcoming a slow
start then holding off Sault
Ste. Marie, 61-57, last week in
a non-conference game.
The win, Petoskey’s fourth
consecutive, upped the
Northmen to 4-1.
They were scheduled to
play host to Traverse City
West in a Big North
Conference game on
Tuesday, Jan. 7, then enter-
tain West Branch Ogemaw
Heights in another league
contest on Friday, Jan. 10.
The West game kicked off a
string of six consecutive Big
North games for the
Northmen, who entered the
week 1-0 in conference play.
They are scheduled to face
Cadillac – the only other
remaining unbeaten league
team – twice during that
stretch.
Friday’s battle with
Ogemaw Heights is a girls-
boys varsity doubleheader.
The girls game tips off at 6
p.m., followed by the boys.
Senior Joe LeBlanc scored
12 of his 19 points in the sec-
ond half to lead the
Northmen past Sault Ste.
Marie, 1-3.
LeBlanc also had 10
rebounds, while junior
Parker Monley came off the
bench to hit three 3-pointers
en route to 11 points.
Also for the Northmen,
Jason Bur added nine points
and Evan Whitmore finished
with eight points and seven
boards. Both are sopho-
mores.
Sophomore guard Jordan
Houghton scored 18 points
and made six steals to lead
the Blue Devils, while
Ray’nell Anderson added 10
points and six rebounds.
The Northmen trailed, 17-
5, in the first quarter, but by
halftime, they had seized a
27-25 advantage thanks to an
11-3 half-closing run.
Petoskey’s lead grew to 10,
54-44, midway through the
fourth quarter, but the
Northmen could never put
away the Blue Devils until the
waning moments.
Anderson scored all 10 of
his points in the final four
minutes, and Sault Ste. Marie
clawed back to within five,
57-52, with just under a
minute to play.
Whitmore scored on a
drive and LeBlanc hit two
free throws down the stretch
to ice it.
Petoskey begins six-game Big North Conference stretch
Northmen hold off Sault in return from break
By Andy Sneddon
LEWISBURG, Pa. –
Christopher Hass was well-
known as a scoring threat
during his high school days
at Pellston.
Now, he is establishing
himself in the same fashion
on the college level. And in a
most-impressive fashion.
Hass, a 6-foot-5 sopho-
more guard at Bucknell,
scored a career-high 26
points Sunday in leading the
Bison to a 68-57 Patriot
League win over Colgate.
That performance came
two nights after Hass scored
18 points in a 67-57 loss to
American. The Colgate game
marked Hass’ ninth consecu-
tive start, and he is averaging
12.6 points per game during
the stretch, a spurt that has
lifted his season average to
9.8 per game, second-best on
the team.
Fellow guard Cameron
Ayers, the son of former Ohio
State coach and current New
Orleans Pelicans assistant
Randy Ayers, is Bucknell’s top
scorer at 14.2 per game.
Hass played sparingly a
year ago as a freshman on a
Bison team that won the
Patriot League, went to the
NCAA Tournament, and fin-
ished 28-6.
As one might expect, there
was a relatively steep learn-
ing curve in going from
Pellston, where he was a
scoring machine and is third
on the state’s all-time high
school scoring list with 2,522
points, to NCAA Division I
basketball.
It has been a combination
of factors that has opened
the door for Hass, assertive-
ness and confidence topping
that list.
“Coach (Dave Paulsen) is
always telling me to stay
aggressive,” Hass said. “Me
and Cameron Ayers, we both
need to stay aggressive. The
way we play, we need to put
points on the board. Just
really attacking it and getting
to the basket more than I
have in the past.
“Before I wasn’t really sure
I could get to the basket, I
guess. I really didn’t do it
enough, but now I’m feeling
more confident.”
With those ingredients,
Hass has put his instincts as a
natural scorer on full display.
He has made 46 of his 99 field
goal attempts (46.5 percent),
including a 19-for-47 (40.4
percent) performance from
3-point land. He has also hit
16 of his 19 free throw
attempts for 84.2 percent,
second-best on the team
behind Ayers’ 85.4.
Against Colgate, Hass
made 10 of his 15 field goal
attempts overall, and was 4-
of-8 from 3-point range.
Hass got his first start just
before Thanksgiving in a 77-
64 win at Albany, a game in
which he scored six points in
16 minutes.
He followed that with a 10-
point effort against Mount St.
Mary’s, and has not scored
fewer than eight points in
any of his nine starts.
He scored a team-high 15
points on Nov. 30 in a 66-53
loss to Princeton. Four nights
later, he led the Bison with
nine rebounds in a 66-59 win
at Kent State.
There was never any ques-
tion that Hass could score,
but it’s a big step from high
school ball to college. It was
perhaps an even bigger leap
for Hass who, while continu-
ally honing his game against
the state’s best on the AAU
circuit, was going from
Northern Michigan – where
he was a huge fish in a rela-
tively small pond – to the
ocean that is Division I col-
lege ball.
“(It has) a lot to do with the
strength and the physicality,
but (also) the speed,” he said.
“You really need to learn how
to create or shot, or how to
get it off quick.”
The trick, Hass said, is
“being able to slow my mind
down, but still playing fast
physically.”
Hass’ recent success has
also raised his profile in and
around the Bucknell campus.
He’s receiving a lot more text
messages after games these
days, and post-game inter-
view requests are on the rise.
“If I go somewhere, people
are like ‘Hey Chris, good
game,’” said Hass, who
retains the innate humility
he continually displayed
even as he emerged as one of
the state’s top high school
players at Pellston. “People I
haven’t met before. Which I
think is really great.”
And while taking it up a
notch confidence-wise with
the basketball has been criti-
cal to Hass’ ascension at
Bucknell, his improved
defense is a major factor in
increased playing time.
“Chris is a really talented
offensive player,” Paulsen
told Bucknellbison.com after
the win over Colgate. “But
what I will remember is that
this is the best he had played
defensively this season.”
The Bison, who were
scheduled to play at
Lafayette on Wednesday and
are home with Holy Cross on
Saturday, are 6-7 overall, 1-1
in the Patriot League.
Among the teams that
have beaten Bucknell this
year are Stanford, St. John’s
and Princeton. The losses to
Stanford and St. John’s were
both by four points.
“We’ve had some brutal
losses -- games that we
shouldn’t have lost,” Hass
said. “I feel like they aren’t
good for our record, but at
the same, they were good for
us. We look back and go,
‘Wow, we can’t play like this
anymore.’
“It’s definitely coming
together now. Our coach is a
great coach and he’s going to
definitely get us back on
track no matter how we’re
playing. Against Colgate, we
played really well, and the
more we do that, it’s going to
become a habit.”
-- Petoskey graduate Kerby
Tamm had 16 points and six
rebounds in helping the
Central Michigan women’s
basketball team to an 84-71
Mid-American Conference
victory over Toledo.
Tamm, a junior guard,
made all four of her 3-point
attempts in the game and has
made 24 of her 54 triple tries
(44.4 percent) this season.
Tamm became just the
second player in CMU
women’s basketball history
to notch a perfect night from
behind the 3-point arc (mini-
mum four attempts), and her
16 points marked the fifth
time this season and the 10th
time in her career that she
has scored in double figures.
She also had three assists and
three steals.
Tamm scored eight points
and dished out four assists in
a 102-89 loss to Dayton last
week. CMU is 5-8 overall, 1-0
in the MAC.
The Chippewas are sched-
uled to play at Akron on
Thursday, Jan. 9, and at
Buffalo on Sunday, Jan. 12.
Both are MAC games.
-- Petoskey graduate Zak
Lewis scored a career-best 11
points and grabbed a team-
high seven rebounds in help-
ing Madonna University to a
93-83 Wolverine-Hoosier
Athletic Conference men’s
basketball victory over Siena
Heights.
Lewis, a sophomore guard,
made three of his five 3-point
attempts.
Madonna is 10-6 overall, 6-
2 league. The Crusaders were
scheduled to play Michigan-
Dearborn on Wednesday and
at Aquinas on Saturday.
— Petoskey grad Joe Keedy
had five points and nine
rebounds in helping
Swarthmore (Pa) to a 76-50
non-league men’s basketball
victory over Galludet
(Wash.).
Swarthmore is 5-6.
-- Petoskey grad Grant
Tracy had three points and
two rebounds for St.
Lawrence (N.Y.) in an 81-70
victory over State University
of New York-Canton. St.
Lawrence is 3-5.
Know a Northern Michigan
athlete playing in college? Let
us know who it is and where
he or she is playing. Contact
Andy@WeeklyChoice.com.
January 9, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 3-B
LOCAL SPORTS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Pellston grad Hass breaks out at Bucknell
Sophomore guard scores career-high 26 points
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By Doug Derrer
TRAVERSE CITY – In their
return to the ice for the New
Year, the Bay Reps hockey
team hosted Cadillac on
Friday, Jan. 3, and once
again the Reps’ lack of
offense contributed to their
3-0 loss.
Both teams were scoreless
until the Vikings scored with
4:42 and again with 2:52 left
in the opening period. After
a scoreless second period
Cadillac scored again with
2:50 left in the game to give
the Vikings the 3-0 victory.
Bay Area hosted
Grandville on Senior Day
and the Bulldogs jumped
out to a 2-0 lead after one
period. R.J. Deneweth
drilled one past the Bulldog
goalie on a power play goal
54 seconds into the second
period to make it a 2-1 game
but Grandville scored four
more goals before the period
ended to give Bulldogs a 6-1
lead.
Goals by Trevor Apsey and
Chase Joppich in the third
period sparked the Reps’
offense but Grandvillle
scored two goals also to give
the Bulldogs an 8-3 win.
The Reps have a busy
week ahead. The Reps
played at Alpena on
Wednesday, Jan. 8, and play
at Petoskey on Friday and at
Tri Valley on Saturday.
Reps fall to
Cadillac, Grandville
Reps looking for more offensive punch after
back-to-back losses to quality opponents
Hockey
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By Mike Dunn
MACKINAW CITY —
Chelsey Closs, the multi-tal-
ented sophomore star player
for the Mackinaw City girls
basketball team, is out for
the rest of the season.
Closs, who was averaging
more than 21 points and 11
rebounds per game and was
a key element in the Comets’
rocket-like 6-0 start this sea-
son under the guidance of
coach Adam Stefanski,
injured her knee while grab-
bing a rebound late in the
Comets’ hard-fought victory
over U.P. foe DeTour on Dec.
20. She suffered an anterior
cruciate ligament (ACL)
injury that requires surgery.
“It’s a major shame and
really sad for Chelsey
because she’s so dedicated
and such a team leader,”
Stefanski said. “Fortunately
she’s only a sophomore and I
know she’ll come back that
much stronger next year.
She has a great support sys-
tem with her family and
friends and she’s a tough-
minded kid. If there’s some-
one who’ll be able to come
back from this, it’s Chelsey.”
The task at hand now is
for Stefanski’s troops to
rebound from the devastat-
ing loss and look to capture
the Northern Lakes
Conference title for the third
year in a row.
“It’s a great challenge for
the girls and it’s something
that can help them all devel-
op as players in the long
run,” Stefanski said. “We’re
not lowering our expecta-
tions; we’re looking to maxi-
mize our team’s potential.
Everybody has to step up
now and the girls know that.
Before Chelsey got hurt we
were focusing as a team on
accountability and team-
work and staying positive
and being enthusiastic and
now those things take on
even greater importance.”
The Comets’ game with
Pickford that was scheduled
for Monday of this week was
postponed. The Comets
were slated to play at the
court of league foe Boyne
Falls on Wednesday, Jan. 8.
Sophomore star player injured knee late
in Dec. 20 victory over DeTour
Basketball
Mack City’s Closs
out for season!
GAYLORD — The Otsego
County Sportsplex is hosting
an open house on Thursday,
Jan. 16. There will be free
swimming in the pool from 5
to 7 p.m. and opportunities
to learn what the Sportsplex
has to offer, such as water
fitness classes, lifeguard
training, scuba training,
kayak club and the
American Red Cross learn-
to-swim program in addi-
tion to the Gaylord Gators
swim team and the Gaylord
High School swim team.
The event is open to the
public. Call Tim O’Donnell
at 731-3546 for more infor-
mation.
Open house at Sportsplex pool
January 16
Petoskey struggles to find scoring touch
in loss to non-league rival
By Andy Sneddon
SAULT STE. MARIE – A
slow start, a poor shooting
night, and a good opponent.
Add it all up, and it was a
tough night for the Petoskey
High School girls basketball
team.
Hayley Morley scored 13
points, Brenna James added
11 and Bree Swan had nine
as Sault Ste. Marie handed
the Northmen a 55-29 non-
conference loss last week.
Kati Lewis scored 12
points and Amanda Stinger
added six for the Northmen,
1-4, who made just nine of
their 43 field goal attempts
(21 percent).
Abby Blanchard had eight
rebounds to lead Petoskey,
and Katrina Daniel added
four.
The Northmen were
scheduled to play at
Traverse City West in a Big
North Conference game on
Monday, but the game was
postponed because of
weather.
They will play host to West
Branch Ogemaw Heights 6
p.m. Friday, Jan. 10, as part
of a girls-boys doublehead-
er. The boys game will follow
the girls game.
Petoskey is 1-0 in the Big
North Conference. Ogemaw
Heights entered the week 1-
4 overall, 1-3 league.
Northmen gals fall to
Sault
Basketball
MANCELONA – Originally,
the Mancelona boys basket-
ball team wasn’t to play non-
conference rival Ellsworth till
early February.
But, in order to avoid play-
ing three games in one week,
the game was rescheduled to
Friday, Jan. 3. Mancelona
made sure to take advantage
of the schedule change,
crushing Ellsworth, 59-31.
The host Ironmen were in
complete control, already
leading 16-6 at the end of the
first quarter and still holding
a 28-15 advantage at the half.
“We really came out in the
third quarter,” said
Mancelona head coach Rick
Duerksen. “We didn’t have to
press at all. We just played
some really solid defense.
And, we shot the ball really
well.”
The Ironmen dominated
after the intermission, out-
gunning Ellsworth by a 22-
to-4 margin in the third quar-
ter. The final stanza was the
only period of play in which
the visiting club outscored
Mancelona, 13-9.
Duerksen wasn’t kidding
about his team’s shooting
prowess in the win. The
Ironmen hit 26-of-47 (55 per-
cent) from the floor, as well
as going a perfect 4-for-4
from the free-throw line.
Junior Brandon Dingman
led the way for the Ironmen
with 28 points, 4 assists and 2
steals. Senior Logan Borst
also hit for double figures
with 10 points, 5 assists and 4
steals.
Other contributors for
Mancelona included: Justin
Spires with 8 points and 3
rebounds; Derek Conway
with 5 points and a team-
high 6 boards; Jacob Allen
with 4 points; and Jake
Winstead with 2 points, 4
assists, 2 rebounds and 1
steal.
Duerksen said players, like
Conway, are key to the team’s
continued success this sea-
son.
“He came off the bench to
lead us in rebounding,”
Duerksen said. “There are a
couple of guys who I have
coming off the bench and
their charged to do just that –
rebound.”
Mancelona improves to 3-
1 overall with Friday’s victory
and Duerksen said he
believes are in a good posi-
tion to make a strong run
now that the holidays are
over.
“I think so,” he said. “I’m
pleased with where we’re at.
“But, next week, we have
two games on the road at
Onaway (Jan. 14) and Forest
Area (Jan. 16). That will give
us a real good idea of how
good we really are.”
– Report by Buckland News
Service.
Mancelona dominates Ellsworth
in rescheduled hoops clash
Nice surprise
ANTRIM COUNTY –
Michigan Department of
Natural Resources conserva-
tion officers are investigating
a snowmobile-related fatality
that took place sometime in
the evening of Monday, Jan.
6, in Antrim County.
A 50 year-old man from
East Jordan was found dead
from a snowmobile accident
in a parking lot on private
property in Echo Township.
Witnesses found the man
pinned under his snowmo-
bile and covered by snow just
after 12 noon on Tuesday. His
name is being withheld at the
time of this writing until fam-
ily notifications have been
made.
It was unclear if alcohol or
drugs were a factor. An
autopsy has been ordered in
the case, and the DNR con-
tinues to investigate the inci-
dent.
Persons with information
about the incident can con-
tact Conservation Officer
Andrea Albert at the Gaylord
DNR Office at 989-732-3541,
or may call the DNR’s Report
All Poaching Line, which is a
24-hour law enforcement
dispatch system, at 800-292-
7800. Information may be left
anonymously.
Officers are seeking information about death
of 50-year-old East Jordan man in apparent
snowmobile accident on Monday evening
DNR investigates
snowmobile-related
death
GRAND LEDGE – Four
Gaylord High School
wrestlers turned in perfect
performances Saturday, lead-
ing the Blue Devils to the
championship in the Grand
Ledge Invitational at Grand
Ledge High School.
The Blue Devils finished 5-
0 in the team-format tourna-
ment, beating the host
Vikings, 40-24, in the title
match.
Gaylord, which is ranked
fifth in Division II by
Michigan Grappler, opened
the tournament with a 51-21
win over Flint Kearsley; then
downed Holland West
Ottawa, 54-15; Mason, 41-33;
and Lansing Everett, 69-1.
The Blue Devils improved
to 18-1 in duals this season.
Their lone loss came to
fourth-ranked Bay City
Western.
Gaylord’s Dominic LaJoie,
103 pounds; Seth Lashuay,
125; Tristan Gregory, 189;
Shane Foster, 215; each fin-
ished 5-0 at Grand Ledge.
LaJoie, a freshman who is
ranked fifth in his weight
class in Division II, improved
to 25-0 on the season. All of
his matches have ended in a
pin or a technical fall.
Gregory is ranked third
and Foster fourth at 189.
Gaylord junior Jeff Heinz,
140-145, picked up the 100th
victory of his career in finish-
ing 4-1 on the day. He hit the
century mark with a third-
period pin against his oppo-
nent from Everett, then won
his match against Grand
Ledge for his 101st career vic-
tory.
Gaylord’s Trent Lashuay,
112, and Tristan Lanzy, 140-
145, also finished 4-1 in the
tournament. Teammate Jon
Martin, 119, finished 3-2.
Both of Martin’s losses came
to state-ranked wrestlers.
The Blue Devils were
scheduled to partake in a Big
North Conference quad on
Wednesday, Jan. 8, at West
Branch Ogemaw Heights.
Traverse City Central and T.C.
West were also slated to par-
ticipate.
On Saturday, Jan. 11, the
Blue Devils are scheduled to
wrestle in the 20-team Bay
City Duals at Bay City
Western High School. The
field includes several ranked
teams, including the likes of
Allegan, Bay City Western,
New Lothrop and Richmond.
The five wins at Grand
Ledge gave Gaylord coach
Jerry LaJoie 506 career dual-
meet victories, a total that
ranks 13th all-time in
Michigan High School
Athletic Association history.
He notched his 500th during
a team tournament on Dec.
28 at Rogers City. The Blue
Devils went 5-0 to capture
that event.
Seth Lashuay went 5-0
with three pins at 130 to earn
the most valuable wrestler of
the tournament award.
Dominic LaJoie, Trent
Lashuay, Jacob Panosso, 140;
and Gregory also each fin-
ished 5-0, while Mike
Shyrock, 189, finished 4-1, as
did Matt Kempfer and Heinz.
Northmen second
HASTINGS – Nine
Petoskey High School
wrestlers earned medals
Saturday as the Northmen
placed second at the LH
Lamb Invitational at
Hastings High School.
Petoskey finished with 143
points, 20 ½ behind first-
place Rockford. Lake Odessa
Lakewood, 140 ½, was third,
and Hastings, 122, was fourth
in the 10-team field.
Petoskey’s Trevor
Giallombardo went 3-0 on
the day to place first 103
pounds and improve to 19-2
on the season. Giallombardo
is ranked sixth in his weight
class in Division II by
Michigan Grappler.
Giallombardo topped Cam
Malich of Ionia, 8-4, in the
title match.
Giallombardo was one of
five Northmen to reach the
championship match in his
respective weight class, but
the only Petoskey wrestler to
win.
“We could have wrestled
better, especially in the
finals,” Petoskey coach Nate
Gross said. “We went 2-2 in
third-place matches and I
thought we should have been
4-0.”
Overtaking Rockford,
which won four weight class-
es and had seven wrestlers
make it to championship
matches, would have been a
tall order, Gross said.
“Rockford is traditionally a
really strong program,” he
said. “Lakewood and
Hastings have strong teams
and we finished ahead of
both of them. We got (the
runner-up) trophy. It was a
good day.”
Placing second for the
Northmen were Scott Kibbe,
119, who finished 2-1 on the
day; Austin Linn, 135, 2-1;
Nick Strobel, 140, 2-1; and
Trevor Denoyer, 189, 1-1.
Petoskey’s Cam Plath, 152,
went 2-1 and placed third,
while Mike Kibbe, 125, and
Dakota Vieau, 171, both fin-
ished 2-2 and placed fourth.
The Northmen are sched-
uled to go to Alpena on
Wednesday, Jan. 8, for a Big
North Conference dual.
Petoskey will host a junior
varsity tournament on
Saturday, Jan. 11, at Petoskey
High School beginning at
9:30 a.m. The team will hold
a euchre fundraiser on
Saturday at the Petoskey
Snowmobile Club. Cost is
$25, payable at the door.
Food will be served at 6:30
p.m. Euchre will begin at 8
p.m.
Northmen earn nine medals, place second at Hastings
Fifth-ranked Blue Devils capture Grand Ledge
tournament
Page 4-B • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice January 9, 2014
LOCAL SPORTS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
By Mike Dunn
MACKINAW CITY — It
was a long, tough battle but
the Mackinaw City boys of
coach Austin Krieg finally
pulled it out.
The Comets played host
to perennial non-league
rival Brimley and finally pre-
vailed 77-75 in triple over-
time. The Comets improved
to 3-1 overall with the tense
victory.
Sweet-shooting senior
guard Noah Morse wasn’t on
the floor at the end of the
game after finally fouling
out in the second OT period
but he played a key role in
the Comet victory. After a
slow start, Noah had the arc
of his shot flowing like radar.
The 6-foot-1 guard tamed
the twine for a team-high 24
points and was hotter than a
jalapeno in the second half,
scoring 20 of his points.
Morse, who is averaging
nearly 26 points per game
thus far, also covered the
floor like wall-to-wall car-
peting on defense, recording
eight steals to go with seven
boards and six assists. Morse
has been big into piracy this
season, averaging a whop-
ping six steals per game. In
the victory over Pellston,
Morse recorded 12 steals,
the third highest single-
game total in state history.
Morse wasn’t alone,
though. Teammate Jonah
Robbins also showed up big
along with Matt Rivera and
Carson Hartman, who all
joined Morse in double-digit
scoring.
Jonah had a whale of a
game, stroking the nets for
21 points to help the Comet
cause. Rivera rocked the iron
for 14 points and Hartman
hit for 10.
“Our boys played well but
give a lot of credit to
Brimley,” Coach Krieg
reported. “I thought we had
them out of gas in the fourth
quarter, but they definitely
got their second wind in the
overtimes. Fortunately we
were able to make a few
plays down the stretch to
come out on top.
“We’ve worked really hard
on our execution late in
games and we’re starting to
do much better. I was very
happy with how we closed
strong to get this victory.”
Shane Beaune scored a
game-high 28 points to lead
Brimley.
Mackinaw City, which is 1-
0 in league play, was slated
to play host to Boyne Falls in
a key Northern Lakes
Conference clash on
Tuesday, Jan. 7.
Mack City boys tame
Brimley in OT
Morse and Robbins rock the iron as Comets
of coach Krieg push record to 3-1
Basketball
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Northeast Lower
Peninsula
Au Sable River: Has a good
number of steelhead. As of
this report, the ramps at Rea
and Whirlpool were usable
but those launching are
encouraged to have 4-wheel
drive and some rock salt or
gravel just in case. The river
near Oscoda is forming ice,
so floating may be limited to
the upper river below Foote
Dam.
Grand Lake: Should have
good ice but use caution.
Long Lake: Should have
good ice but use caution.
Fletchers Pond: Has fair to
good ice and providing some
good opportunities for
anglers. Those using spikes
and minnows have caught
bluegill and perch. A few
pike were taken on tip-ups.
Hubbard Lake: Takes
longer to freeze because it is
much deeper. Anglers
should wait a bit longer
before they start to venture
out.
Higgins Lake: Had some
ice out to the drop-off but
there is snow on the ice so
anglers should stay off. The
ice is not ready yet.
Houghton Lake: Ice con-
tinues to build thanks to
artic temperatures in the
region. The lake is snow cov-
ered so anglers need to use
caution and watch for pres-
sure cracks. Some are start-
ing to take ice shanties out.
Most are catching pike and a
few walleye however
bluegills should also be
available.
Upper Peninsula
Ice anglers are fishing the
inland lakes for bluegill,
crappie, perch, walleye and
pike.
Munising: The bay has ice
and some are taking their
shanties out. Anglers are
reminded to use extreme
caution.
Steelhead strong
in Au Sable River
Inland lakes are yielding bluegill,
crappie and perch for ice anglers
in northern Lower Peninsula and U.P.
DNR Fishing Report
MACKINAC COUNTY –
Graymont, Inc. has submit-
ted a proposal to the
Department of Natural
Resources to acquire more
than 10,000 acres of state-
managed forest in northern
Mackinac County near the
town of Rexton for the pur-
pose of developing a lime-
stone mine.
The DNR is currently pro-
cessing the application and
reviewing it following stan-
dard policy and procedure.
The procedure entails the
review of the proposal by
staff at multiple levels in each
of the resource-managing
divisions within the DNR
including Forest Resources,
Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks
and Recreation.
A review of the application
will also be conducted by the
DNR's Minerals
Management. As a result of
this review, staff will make a
recommendation to DNR
Director Keith Creagh, who
has the authority to make a
final decision on the propos-
al. Creagh will make his deci-
sion at a future Natural
Resources Commission
meeting.
The DNR is currently
accepting public comments
regarding the Graymont
Proposal. Input will be
accepted until the DNR
Director reaches a final deci-
sion. Provide comments to:
D N R - G r a y m o n t
ProposalComments@michi-
gan.gov
Proposal to DNR is for purchase of
state-managed forest in Mackinac County
to develop limestone mine
Feedback sought on
Graymont proposal
LANSING – Thirty-one
potential new conservation
officers will report on Jan. 12
in Lansing to attend the
Department of Natural
Resources’ (DNR) conserva-
tion officer training academy.
This is the first conservation
officer training academy
since 2007, and it will be led
by the DNR’s Law
Enforcement Division train-
ing section.
The academy is funded in
the DNR budget through a
General Fund appropriation
approved by the Legislature
and Governor Rick Snyder.
The 31 recruits will com-
plete a 22-week training
academy that includes 14
weeks of basic police training
and eight weeks of more spe-
cialized conservation officer
training. Six of the recruits
are military veterans, nine
are previous law enforce-
ment officers, and two were
conservation officers in other
states.
DNR conservation officers
serve a distinct role in
Michigan’s law enforcement
community. They are certi-
fied police officers with the
authority to enforce
Michigan’s criminal laws. As
conservation officers, they
also have unique training in a
wide variety of other areas
related to the protection of
Michigan’s citizens and natu-
ral resources.
Increased funding for
more conservation officers
was a priority for the DNR in
2014. Currently, there are
numerous areas in the state
that do not have an adequate
number of officers, said Gary
Hagler, chief of the DNR’s
Law Enforcement Division.
“Increasing the number of
conservation officers means
we can make more contact in
the field with our customers,
providing public education
opportunities and creating a
safer environment for resi-
dents and visitors enjoying
Michigan’s great outdoors,”
said Hagler. “It also means we
can provide an increased law
enforcement and protection
presence across the state,
including rural areas that
sometimes have limited law
enforcement resources.”
Recruitment for the next
class of conservation officers
is ongoing, said Lt. Creig
Grey, training supervisor for
the DNR’s Law Enforcement
Division. The DNR plans to
start the next academy in
October 2014.
“Men and women interest-
ed in a career as a conserva-
tion officer and who want to
be eligible for the next class
should get to work now tak-
ing the Michigan Civil
Service exam and completing
the online job application,”
Grey said. “To be eligible for
the next academy, candi-
dates should have their exam
and application completed
by late spring.”
Grey said two areas of the
state – the northern Lower
Peninsula and the eastern
Upper Peninsula – did not
produce many candidates for
the current recruit class, and
DNR officials would like to
see more candidates from
those regions in future acad-
emies.
For more information on
conservation officers, go to
www.michigan.gov/conser-
vationofficers.
DNR conservation officer academy starts Jan. 12 in Lansing with 31 recruits
DNR begins training new recruits
By Andy Sneddon
HOUGHTON – Craig Coxe
got right to the point with an
elementary – but effective –
explanation for his
Cheboygan High School
hockey team’s recent slide.
“To be completely honest,
we’re having a tough time
putting more pucks in the
net than keeping out of our
own,” he said. “It’s as simple
as that.”
The Chiefs’ losing streak
reached six games with 8-0
and 5-4 losses to Escanaba
and Painsdale-Jeffers,
respectively, last weekend at
the New Year’s Tournament at
Michigan Tech in Houghton.
The Chiefs entered the
week 5-9, and were to play
host to Petoskey, 0-8-3, in a
non-league game on
Wednesday. Cheboygan then
takes a 10-day break and
returns to home ice on
Saturday, Jan. 18, against Big
Rapids.
“In the game we got beat 8-
0, the shots were 19-19,”
Coxe said. “In the game that
we lost to Painsdale-Jeffers,
we outshot them 41-20 and
lost the game 5-4. It’s a prob-
lem that we’re not putting
enough pucks in and not
keeping enough out. The
team who puts more in wins
every single time.”
Escanaba scored six sec-
ond-period goals to take
command against the Chiefs,
while Jeffers overcame a 3-1
deficit to beat the Chiefs,
scoring the game-winner late
in the third period.
Michael Castagne, John
Grantner, Austin Christie and
Adam Jeanotte scored the
goals for the Chiefs. Zack
Schley, Nate Stempky,
Hunter Filice, Castagne,
Granter and Jeanotte each
had an assist.
The game with Petoskey
begins a four-game homes-
tand. The Chiefs don’t go
back on the road until Feb. 5,
when they travel to Sault Ste.
Marie.
“To be perfectly honest
with you, my kids are playing
very good hockey,” Coxe said.
“I’m not disappointed with
them one bit. A team like
Escanaba is ranked in the top
15, top 20 in the entire state
and we went two periods
with them. That shows you
right there that my kids are
playing well. Even when we
werd down 8-0, my kids were
still working really hard.
“We’ve lost six games in a
row, but to be completely
honest, four of them we
should have won.”
Northmen fall
MANISTEE – Close, oh so
close.
Manistee scored with a
minute remaining in over-
time Saturday, topping
Petoskey, 3-2, in a Northern
Michigan Hockey League
game.
The loss dropped the
Northmen to 0-8-3. They
were scheduled to play at
Cheboygan on Wednesday,
Jan. 8, and will entertain the
Bay Area Reps at Griffin
Arena 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10.
Mike Forton and Ben
Schwartzfisher scored for the
Northmen in their loss to
Manistee. Cam Wilder and
Bryndon Worden each had
an assist. Michael Whittaker
was in goal for Petoskey.
Petoskey’s game with
Cheboygan is a rematch of
the season opener. The
Chiefs won that game, 5-3, at
Griffin Arena in Petoskey.
Cheboygan, Petoskey look for a turnaround
UP trips nets two losses for Chiefs
LOCAL SPORTS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
By Andy Sneddon
CHEBOYGAN – Mother
Nature didn’t hold exclusive
rights to ice-cold over the
past week.
The Cheboygan High
School girls basketball team
took a turn at it, too.
The Chiefs briefly led
Kingsley, 12-11, in the sec-
ond quarter a week ago,
then couldn’t buy a bucket
the rest of the way, dropping
a 47-21 non-leaguer to the
Stags.
Autumn Goggin scored 24
points as Kingsley improved
to 5-2, while Cheboygan
slipped to 2-4.
The Chiefs trailed 25-15 at
halftime, and then were lim-
ited to just six points in the
second half.
Bridget Blaskowski scored
nine points to lead
Cheboygan, while Carolyn
Clark added four. Autumn
Hudak grabbed 10 rebounds
and Macey Charboneau
added five.
The Chiefs were sched-
uled to play at Pellston in a
non-league game on
Monday, Jan. 6, but the
game was postponed
because of weather.
Cheboygan’s next game is
slated for Friday, Jan. 17, at
home against St. Ignace. It is
a Straits Area Conference
game.
The Chiefs are 0-2 in the
league, while St. Ignace
entered the week 7-2 overall
and 1-0 in the league.
The Saints, who last year
won the Class D state cham-
pionship, are ranked fourth
in Class C by the Detroit Free
Press.
Kingsley tops ice-cold
Chiefs
Tough night from floor for Cheboygan gals,
who score 6 points in second half
Basketball
Thursday
January 16
Free swim from 5-6:30pm
Free Aqua Fit 6:30-7:30pm
Learn about all the Sportsplex Pool has to offer: American Red Cross Learn-to-Swim
Program. Aqua-Fit Water Fitness Classes for all ages. Kayak Klub. Flick & Float.
Scuba Training. Gaylord Gators Multi-age Swim Club. Gaylord High School Varsity
Swimming & Diving. Springboard Diving Clinics. American Red Cross Lifeguarding,
Lifeguarding Instructor and Water Safety Instructor Training. This event is open to
everyone and experts will be on hand to answer your questions.
Pool Open House Pool Open House Pool Open House Pool Open House
January 9, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 5-B
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With the early arrival of
arctic temperatures this win-
ter, ice has already formed on
many of Michigan’s inland
lakes and rivers. The
Department of Natural
Resources reminds ice fisher-
men and snowmobilers of its
mantra: No ice is safe ice.
“Just because a lake or
stream looks frozen doesn’t
mean the ice is safe,” said Lt.
Andrew Turner, marine safe-
ty and education supervisor
for the DNR Law
Enforcement Division. “By
following some guidelines on
how ice looks and feels, you
can avoid your day of ice
fishing ending in a life-
threatening incident.”
According to Turner, you
can’t always tell the strength
of ice simply by its look, its
thickness, the temperature or
whether or not it is covered
with snow. New ice, he said,
generally is much stronger
than old ice; a couple of inch-
es of new, clear ice may be
strong enough to support
you, though a foot of old, air-
bubbled ice may not.
“Clear ice that has a bluish
tint is the strongest,” Turner
said. “Ice formed by melted
and refrozen snow appears
milky, and is often very
porous and weak.”
Ice covered by snow always
should be presumed unsafe.
Snow acts like an insulating
blanket and slows the freez-
ing process. Ice under the
snow will be thinner and
weaker. A snowfall also can
warm up and melt existing
ice.
If there is slush on the ice,
stay off. Slush ice is only
about half as strong as clear
ice and indicates the ice is no
longer freezing from the bot-
tom.
Turner said anglers should
be especially cautious in
areas where air temperatures
have fluctuated. Any newly
formed ice that is created
after a cold front moves
through should be regarded
with caution. A cold snap
with very cold temperatures
quickly weakens ice and can
cause large cracks within half
a day. A warm spell may take
several days to weaken the
ice. When temperatures vary
widely, causing the ice to
thaw during the day and
refreeze at night, the result is
a weak, “spongy” or honey-
combed ice that is unsafe, he
said.
Anglers also should bear in
mind that ice weakens with
age, and late in the season,
when it turns dark and gets
honeycombed, it’s time to
quit for the season. A cold
snap sometimes halts the
deterioration, but honey-
combed ice never will
refreeze to its original
strength.
The DNR does not recom-
mend the standard “inch-
thickness” guide used by
many anglers and snowmo-
bilers to determine ice safety
because ice seldom forms at
a uniform rate.
Three or 4 inches of ice on
a shallow farm pond with no
inlets or outlets, for example,
cannot be compared to the
same amount of ice formed
over a river with strong cur-
rent, or to ice covering the
bays of the Great Lakes,
where ice cover always will
be more fragile, Turner said.
Deep inland lakes take
longer to freeze than shallow
lakes. Ice cover on lakes with
strong currents or chain-of-
lakes systems also is more
unpredictable.
“Always presume that ice is
unsafe,” Turner said. “Do not
venture out onto the ice
unless you test the thickness
and quality with a spud or
needle bar or an auger. Ice
that is 6 or 7 inches thick in
one spot can be only 2 inches
thick close by.”
On the big lakes, ice cover
in some spots may be thick
enough to safely hold a car
while other areas of ice are
little more than an inch thick.
Conditions can change with-
in just a few feet because of
currents under the ice. Be
especially careful around
pressure cracks. When the
currents are stronger, the ice
gives way to open water.
Ice near shore tends to be
much weaker because of
shifting, expansion and heat
from sunlight reflecting off
the bottom. If there’s ice on
the lake but water around the
shoreline, proceed with cau-
tion.
Avoid areas with protrud-
ing logs, brush, plants and
docks. These structures can
absorb heat from the sun,
thus weakening the sur-
rounding ice. Also avoid aer-
ation devices, such as bub-
blers used near marinas.
“I personally would never
recommend that you take a
car or truck onto the ice,”
Turner said. “But those are
personal decisions. I would
urge that anyone wear a life
jacket, wear bright colors and
take a cell phone when walk-
ing onto a frozen lake or
river. Also, bring along a set
of ice picks or ice claws,
which you can find in most
sporting goods shops.”
If you do break through,
Turner offered the following
tips:
• Try to remain calm.
• Don't remove your winter
clothing. Heavy clothes
won't drag you down, but
instead can trap air to pro-
vide warmth and flotation.
This is especially true with a
snowmobile suit.
• Turn in the water toward
the direction you came from
- that is probably the
strongest ice.
• If you have them, dig the
points of the picks into the
ice and while vigorously kick-
ing your feet, pull yourself
onto the surface by sliding
forward on the ice.
• Roll away from the area of
weak ice. Rolling on the ice
will distribute your weight to
help avoid breaking through
again.
• Get to shelter, heat, warm
dry clothing and warm, non-
alcoholic, and non-caffeinat-
ed drinks.
• Call 911 and seek medical
attention if you feel disori-
ented, have uncontrollable
shivering or have any other ill
effects that may be symp-
toms of hypothermia (the
life-threatening drop in the
body's core temperature).
To learn more about stay-
ing safe while on the water or
in the woods, visit the DNR
website www.michigan.gov/recre-
ationalsafety.
DNR reminds ice fishermen and snowmobilers that no ice is safe ice
Practice safety when going on ice
Page 6-B • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice January 9, 2014
LOCAL SPORTS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
DNR "-,1$042(-, -%%("$01 .0"2("(,& 0$1"3$ 2$"',(/3$1 -, 2'$ ("$ +)$ 130$ 2'$
0$1"3$01 0$+(, 5$** 56 %0-+ 2'$ 2'(, ("$. COURTESY OF DNR
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2'$1$, ", '$*.
1-+$-,$ 5'-
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OF DNR
GAYLORD — The annual
Greater Otsego Sports Hall of
Fame banquet will be held on
Saturday, Feb. 15, at the
Eagles Hall on Wisconsin Ave.
The Class of 2014 features
three-time state-champion
skier Anna (Estelle) Jarvis and
dominating wrestler Bob
Powell from Gaylord High
School; premier pitching star
and Detroit Tigers’ draftee
Steve Nowak and All-State
basketball and softball star
Amanda (Squires) Murray
from St. Mary; scoring
machine Jim Loshaw from
the Vanderbilt High School
basketball team; and the out-
standing Johannesburg
Central High School girls’
basketball teams which went
unbeaten from 1957 to 1960.
In addition, longtime J-L
football public address
announcer Tom Zick and
clock manager John Righi
will receive the Distinguished
Service Award.
Tickets are $35 per person
and include a prime rib din-
ner. For information or to
purchase tickets, call Tom
Johnson at 989-614-1298, Jeff
Shoff of Design One at 732-
6059, or Kim Samkowiak at
989-370-2323.
Tickets are available for the annual event
slated for Saturday, Feb. 15, at Eagles Hall
Otsego Hall of
Fame banquet
upcoming
Standings as of Dec. 19
1. The Leftovers 17-1
2. Hit Faced 15-3
3. Just Four Fun 13-5
4. DYANMIC PT 10-8
5. One Hit Wonders 9-9
6. Organized Chaos 7-11
6. OLIVER CHIROPRAC 7-11
8. J2D2 6-12
9. Quatro Stinko 3-15
9. Balls Out 3-15
OTSEGO PARKS AND REC
CO-ED VOLLEYBALL
LEAGUE
APS
Mini-Warehouse
Storage Units
are Available
NOW!
Our fenced storage area provides safe and
secure storage of your belongings.
Easy access with our in-town location.
112 E. Sixth St, PO Box 1914, Gaylord
989-732-5892
RIVERVIEW
OUTDOOR
FURNACES
(989) 344-0995
Grayling, MI
www.RiverviewOutdoorFurances.com
FINANCING
AVAILABLE!
• 100% thermostatically
controlled heat.
• There is no safer, more
efficient way to heat
with wood.
• Heat entire home,
multiple buildings,
pools, hot tubs and
domestic water.
SEE YA, SO LONG,
FAREWELL.
However you say it, it’s
goodbye to heating bills.
w w w . t a y l o r ma d e r e n o v a t i o n s . c o m
989-619-3941
Brian Taylor, Owner E-Mail: brian@taylormaderenovations. com
We can Paint Your House Before Winter-Call now to Schedule
i n t e r i o r & e x t e r i o r p a i n t i n g , r e n o v a t i o n s , c o n s t r u c t i o n
LOCAL SPORTS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
January 9, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 7-B
Roscommon, MI – Kirtland
Community College has
named Mark Vick to coach
both the men’s and women’s
basketball teams for the
remainder of the Firebirds’
2013-14 season. Vick is origi-
nally from Saint Helen,
attended Houghton Lake
High School and currently
lives in West Branch, Mich.
“I have long been interest-
ed in coaching at Kirtland,”
says Vick. “Being from the
local area, along with my
career experiences and love
for the game of basketball,
makes it a dream job. I am
truly blessed to now be a part
of the Kirtland Firebird
Program.”
Following the resignation
of former basketball coach Ty
McGregor, Kirtland Athletic
Director Don Haskin began
an immediate coaching
search and Vick accepted the
assignment on Dec. 16.
Vick’s hiring enables current
student athletes to compete
in conference season play,
which begins for Kirtland on
Jan. 4 at the McGregor
Athletic Complex (MAC) in
Mio. The Lady ‘Birds will take
the floor at 1:00 p.m. and the
men’s team competes at 3:00
p.m.
“It [was] a quick learning
curve for me to get to know
the players, for them to get to
know me, and for us to get
organized for our first game,”
said Vick about the quick
transition from interviewing
to coaching. “My biggest
hope is to provide some sta-
bility to our Student-Athletes
for the duration of the sea-
son.
“My goals are to assist our
student-athletes in achieving
their goals. It has been tough
for these young men and
women. I want them to have
a positive experience and
assist them in continuing
their basketball and educa-
tional careers after this sea-
son is completed.”
Vick brings a considerable
amount of basketball knowl-
edge to the Firebirds, includ-
ing experience at: Hale High
School/Hale, MI (Head Girls
Basketball Coach 2012-13);
Rice University/Houston, TX
(Men's Basketball, Video
Coordinator 2008-2012);
O a k l a n d
University/Rochester, MI
(Men's Basketball Video
Coordinator 2004-2008);
Smoky Mountain High
School/Sylva, NC (Boys
Basketball, Varsity Assistant,
JV Head Coach, 2003-04);
Cherokee High
School/Cherokee, NC (Boys
Basketball, Varsity Assistant,
2002-03); and Central
Michigan University/Mt.
Pleasant, MI (Student
Assistant Manager 1997-
1998).
Annually, more than 3,000
students attend a variety of
occupational, skilled trades,
two-year and transfer degree
programs at Kirtland’s loca-
tions near Roscommon,
Kirtland-Gaylord, Kirtland-
West Branch and in Tawas.
Kirtland also offers a wide
range of online courses and
degrees, all of which can be
completed from home.
For more information,
please contact Sarah
Madonna, Director of Public
Information, at 989-275-
5000, ext. 242 or
sarah.madonna@kirtland.edu.
Kirtland Hires Vick to Lead
Firebirds Basketball
4 DAY PUBLIC ESTATE SALE
"THE WALLOON LAKE ESTATE OF J.D. ANDERSON"
FOUNDER OF ANDERSON ARCHERY CORPORATION
THEENTIRE CONTENTSOFTHIS
* 12,000 SQ. FT. LODGE, GUEST HOUSE, 40FT. TOOL SHOP,
AS WELL AS ALL THE FIXTURES IN ALL BUILDINGS
WILL BE SOLD!
SALE ITEMS:
20ft Amish Oak Dining Set with 22 matching arm chairs, 1800's Scottish Grandfather Clock, Shipwreck
rudder table Queen City, Shipwreck coffee table, Shipwreck mantel piece, Regina 1901 coin operated
music box with 35 discs. #10 out of 70 of this model made, Bronze "The Packer" 1970 By John P. Klassen,
Wright Brothers Model .0026 sterling silver, Royal Doulton Vase soft paste porcelain, pre-1891, Fire engine
coffee table copper & brass, Ships wheel table 8ft dia., Ships wheel chandelier "Maasbracht" NED
OTCR001 St. Jozef Port in Netherlands 1880's, Whirleygig Pussywillow ÌÌ, Clock regulator case "Athena"
carved 1870's-1880's Waterbury Clock Co., Brumms large wall hanging 9'9" long, Stained glass window
from St. Michaels Catholic Church in Grand Ledge, MÌ., Grill and griddle restaurant style, 1945 Willys Mil-
itary Jeep, 1976 Mercedes 450 SEL 4 door sedan, Tiffany 24" hanging light fixture, Bronze "A lesson well
learned¨ 1979, Many brass ship parts, Red Crown Gasoline 42" porcelin sign, Red Crown Gasoline pump
globes, Woodard wrought iron patio furniture, Antique slot machine, Antique coin operated horse racing
machine, Royal Princess stove, Archery equipment, fishing rods, reels, tackle, bear traps, Antique phone
booth with payphone, Brass bed, Craftsman, Snap-on tools, many hand, power, and lawn tools, snow
blower, lawn mower, leaf blower and vacuum, power washer, large bellow, snow sleds, dog cage, 2 sofa
sectionals, Skis and poles, watersports, duck boat, sewing maching, antique steamer trunk, bicycles, snow-
mobile sleigh, Antique round oak dining table with ball & claw foot pedestal base, set of 14 oak dining
chairs, and much more!!!
ARTWORK-
"The Survivor" original oil by Charles Denault
"The Trophy" original oil by Bernard Thomas
Edmund Fitzgerald picture 16 of 52
VIEW PICTURES AND SALE DETAILS ONLINE AT:
WeDoEstateSaIes.org
L00AT|0N: 3ê40 Lake 0rove Pd., Petoskey, H| 49770
TEPH$ AN0 00N0|T|0N$:
Caº|, \|ºa, Vaº|erCard, C|ºcover ard Arer|car E·preºº Accep|ed. |0 ClECKS W||| oe accep|ed per requeº| ol ||e lar||].
Cue |o ||e ra|ure ol |||º ºa|e |0 ClllCRE| u|CER 18 wlll 8E All0wEC T0 E|TER A|Y 8ullCl|0 0| TlE PR0PERTY¦
|0 STR0llERS 0R 8A0S wlll 8E PERVlTTEC l|T0 SAlE. You are reºporº|o|e lor ºale rerova| ol purc|aºe o] |00|
or Surda]. wE C0 |0T V0\E 0R lElP V0\E A|Y lTEV · Y0u VuST ARRA|0E F0R Y0uR 0w| lElP. E|TER TlE
ESTATE PR0PERTY AT Y0uR 0w| RlSK · |0T RESP0|Sl8lE F0R ACClCE|TS 0R l|JuRY.
>>>>\|deo Surve|||arce or prer|ºeº
R Estate Services
"MICHIGAN'S PREMIER ESTATE SALES SERVICE"
WeDoEstateSaIes.org
THURSDAY, JANUARY 9TH 9AM4PM
FRIDAY, JANUARY 10TH 9AM4PM
SATURDAY, JANUARY 11TH 9AM4PM
SUNDAY, JANUARY 12TH 10AM2PM
3640 LAKE GROVE RD., PETOSKEY, MI 49770
Michigan Department of
Natural Resources conserva-
tion officers are seeking
information regarding an elk
poaching incident that
occurred in late December in
Montmorency County just
north of Atlanta.
A large bull elk carcass was
located near Decheau Lake
Road and Meaford Road in
Montmorency County on
Dec. 28. Parts were removed
from the animal during the
incident.
Conservation officers at
the Gaylord Operation
Center are seeking any infor-
mation that would assist with
the investigation.
"If anyone saw anything or
has any information, we'd
like to hear from them," said
Lt. Jim Gorno.
Elk poaching carries fines
of up to $2,500, restitution to
the state of up to $1,500, loss
of the firearm used in the
incident and loss of hunting
privileges for up to three
years.
Anyone with information
regarding the incident may
call the DNR Law Division at
the Gaylord Operations
Center at 989-732-3541 or the
24-hour Report All Poaching
Line at 800-292-7800.
Information may be left
anonymously, and monetary
rewards are often offered for
information that leads to the
arrest and conviction of vio-
lator(s).
DNR conservation officers seek information
about poaching incident just north of Atlanta
Elk poaching in
Montmorency County
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
$6.99 %.'C!. 13 7<998E8AG G4FGL,
;B@8@478 6;B<68F. -EL BEBF B<FGEB, "-
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?84G;8E 4A7 FB @H6; @BE8! 2BH =HFG
A887 GB 6B@8 BA <A 4A7 6;86> BHG G;<F
8KGE4 6?84A 6BAI8EG<5?8! $8,449. D4I8
$E<A: C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 ., 31
'BEG;, )8GBF>8L 231-347-2585.
2005 C;8IL &4?<5H %,. +B??<A: 546>
CE<68 4A7 ,4I8 BA G;<F BA8! ,B 6?84A!
,B ,CBEGL! CD, +84E ,CB<?8E, D88C GE847
BB7L84E G<E8F JE4CC87 BI8E 4??BLF, 32
&) 4A7 4 :E84G E<78! $5,949. D4I8
$E<A: C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 ., 31
'BEG;, )8GBF>8L, &" 231-347-2585.
AUTOMOBILES
2005 FBE7 F<I8 !HA7E87. A0D, ?84G;8E,
FHAEBB9. AF ?BJ 4F $169 4 @BAG;. DE<I8
'BJ AHGB ,4?8F, 2215 ., !<:;J4L 31
', )8GBF>8L. );BA8 231-347-3200.
JJJ.7E<I8ABJ123.6B@
2006 C;8IL !!+. ,HAEBB9, ?84G;8E,
I8EL A<68. AF ?BJ 4F $179 4 @BAG;.
DE<I8 'BJ AHGB ,4?8F, 2215 .,
!<:;J4L 31 ', )8GBF>8L. );BA8 231-
347-3200. JJJ.7E<I8ABJ123.6B@
2007 )BAG<46 6. %8FF G;4A 49> &<?8F!
0BA78E9H? 6BA7<G<BA! CD, G<?G 4A7 G8?8-
F6BC<6 FG88E<A: J;88?, 86BAB@<64? GB
7E<I8 2.4 ?<G8E, 4 6L?<A78E J<G; 4 E4G<A: B9
33 ;<:;J4L! ,4I8! $9,949. D4I8 $E<A:
C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 ., 31 'BEG;,
)8GBF>8L, &" 231-347-2585.
2008 C;8IL "@C4?4 %- 3.5%. C4E F4K
(A8 (JA8E <A B?7 &<FG &8G4??<6!
(CG<BA4? <G8@F ?<>8: F?<C 4A7 FB?7 +84E
,84GF, (A,G4E, ?B4787 J<G; A<E54:F
J;4GOF 58FG <G :8G 30 &) ;<:;J4L!
$9,949. D4I8 $E<A: C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46,
1861 ., 31 'BEG;, )8GBF>8L, &" 231-
347-2585.
2008 &8E6HEL ,45?8 )E8@<8E. ,HC8E
C?84A J<G; ;84G87 ?84G;8E, @8@BEL
F84GF, FHAEBB9, 6 7<F6 CD, CBJ8E C87-
4?F, 788C GE847 G<E8F BA I8EL 8L8 64G6;-
<A: 4??BLF. DBAOG @<FF G;<F BA8!
$11,980. D4I8 $E<A: C;8IEB?8G-
C47<??46, 1861 ., 31 'BEG;, )8GBF>8L,
231-347-2585.
2009 FBE7 F?8K ,E%. A0D, :BB7 &),
BA?L 79 $. AF ?BJ 4F $249 4 @BAG;.
DE<I8 'BJ AHGB ,4?8F, 2215 .,
!<:;J4L 31 ', )8GBF>8L. );BA8 231-
347-3200. JJJ.7E<I8ABJ123.6B@
2009 FBE7 FHF<BA ,E. ,HAEBB9, 4 6L?,
28 &). AF ?BJ 4F $199 4 @BAG;.
DE<I8 'BJ AHGB ,4?8F, 2215 .,
!<:;J4L 31 ', )8GBF>8L. );BA8 231-
347-3200. JJJ.7E<I8ABJ123.6B@
2010 C;8IL &4?<5H 1%-. C;8IEB?8G CE+-
-"F"ED! '( 0(++"E,! FH?? 946GBEL J4E-
E4AGL! E84G E<78! E84G E6BAB@L!
!4A7F 9E88 B?H8 -BBG; 9BE C;BA8, G4C-
F;<9G F;<9G 6BAGEB?, E8@BG8 FG4EG!
$14,449. D4I8 $E<A: C;8IEB?8G-
C47<??46, 1861 ., 31 'BEG;, )8GBF>8L,
&" 231-347-2585.
2010 FBE7 -4HEHF ,E%. CA+FA1 ?B64? 1
BJA8E! -BAF B9 BCG<BA4? 8DH<C@8AG ?<>8
FCBEG G;H@5 F;<9G<A: BA J;88?, 788C <A
EH558E BA 6?84A 4??BL J;88?F 4A7 @H6;
@BE8! $13,949. D4I8 $E<A: C;8IEB?8G-
C47<??46, 1861 ., 31 'BEG;, )8GBF>8L,
&" 231-347-2585.
2011 BH<6> +8:4? C1%. CA+FA1 1
BJA8E 4A7 4 E84G CE84@CH99! %8FF
G;4A 15> @<?8F! ,HAEBB9, B?H8 -BBG;,
.?GE4-,BA<6 )4E><A: AFF<FG,
"AFBG4<A@8AG E4C;<6 D<FC?4L...4A7
@H6; @BE8! $17,949. D4I8 $E<A:
C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 ., 31 'BEG;,
)8GBF>8L 231-347-2585.
2011 C;ELF?8E 200 CBAI8EG<5?8. )+"CE
D+()! %8FF G;4A 35,000 @<?8F, 9EBAG
J;88? 7E<I8 G;4G E84??L :B8F <A G;8 FABJ.
D88C GE847 G<E8F, E8@BG8 -BC BC8E4G<BA
4A7 4 :E84G 5HL! $11,949. D4I8 $E<A:
C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 ., 31 'BEG;,
)8GBF>8L, 231-347-2585.
2011 FBE7 FB6HF ,E. CA+FA1 1 BJA8E
<A ,4A:E<4 +87! ,HC8E 6?84A 6BA7<G<BA.
CD, 6EH<F8 6BAGEB?, E8@BG8, )BJ8E J<A-
7BJF, 4-J;88? AB, 5E4>8F, CHEG4<A
4<E54:F, 2 ?<G8E 4 6L?. 4A7 @BE8! $9,995.
D4I8 $E<A: C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 .,
31 'BEG;, )8GBF>8L 231-347-2585.
AUTOMOBILES
2011 FBE7 FB6HF ,E,. %84G;8E, G<AG87
J<A7BJF, FHAEBB9, ,LA6, 4 A8J G<E8F.
E84G &). AF ?BJ 4F $175 4 @BAG;.
+<I8EGBJA AHGB EBHC, -;8 B8FG 9BE
%8FF 989 /F0 +B47, C;85BL:4A, &"
231-627-6700. JJJ.+<I8EAHGB.A8G
2012 ,H54EH %8:46L 2.5 A0D. CA+FA1
1 BJA8E! A J84?G; B9 BCG<BAF 4A7 FCBEGL
?<>8 -;H@5 ,;<9G AHGB@4G<6/&4AH4? BA
0;88?, ,HAEBB9, 9B: ?<:;GF, 58FG B9 4??
22> &<?8F! 'E0 %(0 )+"CE, $18,949.
D4I8 $E<A: C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 .,
31 'BEG;, )8GBF>8L 231-347-2585.
2013 -BLBG4 CBEB??4 %E. +84? D84? BA
G;<F BA8! CA+FA1 1 BJA8E! )E<68 =HFG
?BJ8E87 4A7 FB 6?84A! ,498 4A7 FB 86B-
AB@<64? 30 &C:! B8FG B9 4?? ;4F =HFG
20,000 @<?8F. $14,950. D4I8 $E<A:
C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 ., 31 'BEG;,
)8GBF>8L 231-347-2585.
BAD C+ED"-? '( C+ED"-? %BJ J88>?L
C4L@8AGF 4I4<?45?8 4G -4<?BE87
EAG8ECE<F8F <A )8GBF>8L. C4?? 231-347-
3332 BE 1-888-774-2264. AF> 45BHG
:H4E4AG887 6E87<G 4CCEBI4?. JJJ.G4<-
?BE878AG8ECE<F8F.6B@.
CA,! F(+ CA+,. %B64? D84?8E 5HL<A:
:BB7 DH4?<GL HF87 I8;<6?8F, ,G4G8J<78
F8EI<68. 08 J<?? C<6> LBHE I8;<6?8 HC.
C4?? 9BE 4 9E88 4CCE4<F4?. 231-627-
6700.
" B.2 CA+,! 0E86>87 BE <A A887 B9
@86;4A<64? E8C4<E, 1995 4A7 HC.
4L?BE7 4E84. 989-732-9362
BUSINESS VENTURES
0A'- GB BBEEBJ $125,000 BA %4A7
CBAGE46G, 7% F86HE87 5L 6B@@8E6<4?
CEBC8EGL. 4L?BE7 4E84. 989-600-7876
CLASSIC AUTO
CA,! F(+ (%D CA+,. )?84F8 7BA'G
F8A7 GB 6EHF;8E. &<6;8?'F CB??<F<BA &
+8FGBE4G<BA 231-348-7066
F(+ ,A%E: 1940 F(+D )"C$.). 231-
348-7066
FIREWOOD & WOODSTOVE
F"+E0((D, D+2. B. &B8>8. 231-631-
9600
!84G LBHE 8AG<E8 ;B@8, J4G8E 4A7 @BE8
J<G; 4A (.-D((+ 0((D F.+'ACE
9EB@ C8AGE4? BB<?8E. DBH5?8 % -46> "A6
989-733-7651
FRESH FOOD
$6.99 0A%%E2E &EA%. &BA74L 4?? 74L
BA?L 4G B55?8EF B9 4L?BE7, 900 ,.
(GF8:B, 4L?BE7. 989-732-9005
C(D A%&('D"'E BE 6;<6>8A @4E68??4,
$10.99. -EL BEBF B<FGEB, "-75 EK<G 270,
04G8EF. 989-705-1800
GUNS
B.2"' .',, 4AL 6BA7<G<BA. CB??86GBE.
-BC 7B??4E C4<7. 231-881-2050
HEALTH
'4GHE4? +8@87<8F, 4?G8EA4G<I8 @87<-
6<A8, @87<64? @4E<=H4A4 946<?<GL. 1349
,. (GF8:B AI8., ,H<G8 1, 4L?BE7, ?B64G-
87 <A G;8 )4E>F<78 &<A< &4??, JJJ.A4G-
HE4?E8@87<8F420.6B@, 989-748-4420.
HELP WANTED
A7I8EG<F<A: ,4?8F N 4 )BF<G<BAF BC8A.
)8GBF>8L, E4L?<A:, E4FG #BE74A,
4L?BE7 N FH?? BE )4EG -<@8
,4?8FC8EFBA. 08 CH5?<F; 2 J88>?L
A8JFC4C8EF, -;8 088>?L C;B<68 4A7
G;8 C;4E?8IB<K CBHAGL '8JF. 0BE> LBHE
BJA F6;87H?8. "A78C8A78AG CBAGE46GBE.
E84G CB@@<FF<BA. -;8 58FG 64A7<74G8
J<?? 58 9E<8A7?L 4A7 8A=BL ;8?C<A: ?B64?
5HF<A8FF8F 6E84G8 CE<AG 47I8EG<F<A: GB
;8?C G;8@ E846; 6BAFH@8EF G;EBH:;-
BHG 'BEG;8EA &<6;<:4A J<G; BHE A8JF-
C4C8EF 4A7 4FFB6<4G87 CEB7H6GF. &HFG
;4I8 6B@CHG8E, "AG8EA8G 4668FF 4A7
78C8A745?8 GE4AFCBEG4G<BA. E-@4<? <A9B
GB D4I8 4G (99<68@088>?LC;B<68.6B@.
'8JF +8CBEG8E N BBLA8 C<GL N AGG8A7
4A7 E8CBEG BA ?B64? :BI8EA@8AG4? @88G-
<A:F, F6;BB? 5B4E7 4A7 ?B64? A8JF
E8CBEG<A:. EKC8E<8A687 JE<G8E 4A7 C;B-
GB:E4C;8E 4 C?HF. &HFG ;4I8 D<:<G4?
64@8E4 4A7 6B@CHG8E. E-@4<? <A9B 4A7
F4@C?8F GB D4I8 4G
(99<68@C;4E?8IB<KCBHAGL'8JF.6B@.
'8JF +8CBEG8E N BBLA8 F4??F N AGG8A7
4A7 E8CBEG BA ?B64? :BI8EA@8AG4? @88G-
<A:F, F6;BB? 5B4E7 4A7 ?B64? A8JF
E8CBEG<A:. EKC8E<8A687 JE<G8E 4A7 C;B-
GB:E4C;8E 4 C?HF. &HFG ;4I8 D<:<G4?
64@8E4 4A7 6B@CHG8E. E-@4<? <A9B 4A7
F4@C?8F GB D4I8 4G
(99<68@C;4E?8IB<KCBHAGL'8JF.6B@.
HELP WANTED
'8JF +8CBEG8E N C;4E?8IB<K N AGG8A7
4A7 E8CBEG BA ?B64? :BI8EA@8AG4? @88G-
<A:F, F6;BB? 5B4E7 4A7 ?B64? A8JF
E8CBEG<A:. EKC8E<8A687 JE<G8E 4A7 C;B-
GB:E4C;8E 4 C?HF. &HFG ;4I8 D<:<G4?
64@8E4 4A7 6B@CHG8E. E-@4<? <A9B 4A7
F4@C?8F GB D4I8 4G
(99<68@C;4E?8IB<KCBHAGL'8JF.6B@.
-;8 FEBAG )BE6; &<A<FGE<8F <F F88><A:
4CC?<64AGF <AG8E8FG87 <A F8EI<A: BA <GF
5B4E7 B9 7<E86GBEF. -;8 5B4E7 G8E@F 4E8
9BE G;E88 L84EF, 4A7 7<E86GBEF 4E8 ABG
6B@C8AF4G87. -;8 FEBAG )BE6;
&<A<FGE<8F BB4E7 @88GF G;8 G;<E7
&BA74L B9 8I8EL @BAG;. D<E86GBEF 4E8
8KC86G87 GB 4GG8A7 @BFG @88G<A:F.
C4A7<74G8F F;BH?7 58 G84@ C?4L8EF
J;B J<?? 6;4@C<BA G;8 64HF8 B9 G;8
FEBAG )BE6; &<A<FGE<8F 4A7 58 J<??<A: GB
6BAGE<5HG8 G;8<E G<@8 4A7 G4?8AGF GB
5B4E7 46G<I<G<8F, <A6?H7<A: 9HA7E4<F<A:.
ACC?<64AGF 4E8 8A6BHE4:87 GB 4CC?L 5L
?8GG8E GB BB4E7 )E8F<78AG '4A6L
F8E:HFBA, ).(. BBK 37, E??FJBEG;, &"
49729. -;8 7847?<A8 <F #4AH4EL 10,
2014. FBE @BE8 <A9BE@4G<BA, 4CC?<-
64AGF @4L 6BAG46G #4A 4G G;8 FEBAG
)BE6; &<A<FGE<8F 4G 231-588-2000.
ACC?<64AGF 4E8 8A6BHE4:87 GB 4GG8A7
G;8 #4AH4EL 20, 2014 5B4E7 @88G<A: 4G
6:30 C.@. 4G G;8 FEBAG )BE6; C498.
HOMES FOR RENT
0B?I8E<A8 4E84 GJB 587EBB@ ;B@8,
$600 @BAG;?L C?HF 78CBF<G, AB C8GF,
E898E8A68F, E847L ABJ, 231-525-8541
BE 231-420-0132.
HOMES FOR SALE
08 F8?? EA8E:L ,G4E @B7H?4E ;B@8F, ?8G
HF 5H<?7 LBHE A8J ;B@8 BE E8C?468 LBHE
9<E8 ?BFF. ,88 BHE @B78?, :<I8 HF 4 64??
9BE 4A 4CCB<AG@8AG. 'BEG;?4A7 !B@8F,
989-370-6058.
HOUSEHOLD
E+-A', D+A)E+"E,: EI8ELG;<A: <A
0<A7BJ -E84G@8AGF FE88 8FG<@4G8F
4A7 <A ;B@8 4CCB<AG@8AGF.
EFG45?<F;87 1958. C4?? 989-732-3340
BE I<F<G BHE F;BJEBB@ 4G 2281 ,BHG;
(GF8:B AI8., 4L?BE7.
MANUFACTURED HOMES
'E0 & +E)(,: DBH5?8-0<78F, 16'F,
14'F. -4>8 4ALG;<A: BA GE478. F<A4A6<A:
4I4<?45?8. A 6B@C?8G8 ?<A8 B9 C4EGF.
JJJ.@<6;<:4A84FGF<78F4?8F.A8G. 989-
966-2037
MISCELLANEOUS
$3.99 BE84>94FG; $5.99 %HA6;; $6.99
D<AA8E. !B@8@478 FC86<4?F 8I8EL 74L
BA?L 4G B55?8EF B9 4L?BE7, 900 ,.
(GF8:B, 4L?BE7. 989-732-9005
A?? -;<A:F B4F8@8AGL! B4F8@8AG
,LFG8@F "A6. C4?? HF 9BE 4?? B9 LBHE
54F8@8AG A887F! 04G8ECEBB9<A:,
F<A<F;<A:, ,GEH6GHE4? +8C4<EF, !H@<7<GL
4A7 &B?7 CBAGEB? F+EE E,-"&A-E,!
C4?? 1-888-239-6350
BA+B', !(&E&ADE DE,,E+-,. -E84G
LBHEF8?9 GB G;8 58FG 64EEBG 64>8 <A G;8
.,A 4G B55?8EF B9 4L?BE7, 900 ,.
(GF8:B, 4L?BE7. 989-732-9005
D",! -/ +8G4<?8E. ,G4EG<A: 4G
$19.99/@BAG; (9BE 12 @BF.) & !<:;
,C887 "AG8EA8G FG4EG<A: 4G
$14.95/@BAG; (J;8E8 4I4<?45?8.)
,A/E! AF> A5BHG ,A&E DA2 "AFG4??4G<BA!
CA%% 'BJ! 1-800-671-0142
%(0E,- C(,- "' &"C!"A'! C%A,,"-
F"ED AD, A+E #.,- $2 9BE 4 10-JBE7 47
<A G;8 088>?L C;B<68. -;8 4E84'F J<78FG
7<FGE<5HG<BA C4C8E 4A7 G;8 ?BJ8FG 6BFG
9BE 47I8EG<F<A:. )?468 47F BA-?<A8 4G
JJJ.088>?LC;B<68.6B@ BE 64?? 989-
732-8160. D<FGE<5HG87 J88>?L 9EB@ ,G.
":A468 GB +BF6B@@BA. 'BEG;8EA
&<6;<:4A'F 58FG 6;B<68 9BE 5HL<A: 4A7
F8??<A:.
)A' F+"ED )E+C!, 2 )"ECE %.'C!
F(+ ('%2 $7.99. -EL BEBF B<FGEB, "-75
EK<G 270, 04G8EF. 989-705-1800
)E)," N 4L?BE7 /8A7<A: 64A FHCC?L
LBHE 5HF<A8FF BE B99<68 J<G; I8A7<A:
@46;<A8F 9BE )8CF< 7E<A>F 4A7 FA46>F
9BE LBHE FG499 4A7 6HFGB@8EF. ,8EI<A:
4L?BE7, )8GBF>8L, BBLA8 C<GL,
C;4E?8IB<K, E4FG #BE74A, E4L?<A:,
%8J<FGBA, &<B 4A7 @4AL 4E84F <A
'BEG;8EA &<6;<:4A. 08 B998E 4 9H?? ?<A8
B9 CBCH?4E FA46>F 4A7 7E<A>F. %B64??L
BJA87 4A7 BC8E4G87. CBAG46G HF 4G
989-350-9238, 989-732-8160 BE 8-
@4<? HF 4G 4L?BE7/8A7<A:@@4<?.6B@.
,@4??, CE<I4G8 6B??86GBE C4L<A: 64F; 9BE
B4F854??, FBBG54?? 64E7F 589BE8 1970.
231-373-0842
,'AC$, & D+"'$, N 4L?BE7 /8A7<A:
64A FHCC?L LBHE 5HF<A8FF BE B99<68 J<G;
I8A7<A: @46;<A8F 9BE FA46>F 4A7
7E<A>F 9BE LBHE FG499 4A7 6HFGB@8EF.
,8EI<A: 4L?BE7, )8GBF>8L, BBLA8 C<GL,
C;4E?8IB<K, E4FG #BE74A, E4L?<A:,
%8J<FGBA, &<B 4A7 @4AL 4E84F <A
'BEG;8EA &<6;<:4A. 08 B998E 4 9H?? ?<A8
B9 CBCH?4E FA46>F 4A7 7E<A>F <A6?H7<A:
4 ?<A8-HC B9 ;84?G;L CEB7H6GF. %B64??L
BJA87 4A7 BC8E4G87. CBAG46G HF 4G
989-350-9238, 989-732-8160 BE 8-
@4<? HF 4G 4L?BE7/8A7<A:@@4<?.6B@.
-.E,DA2 '"!-, A?? LBH 64A 84G -HE>8L
@84?, BA?L $10. B55?8EF B9 4L?BE7,
900 ,. (GF8:B, 4L?BE7. 989-732-9005
0A'-ED #A)A'E,E &(-(+C2C%E,
$A0A,A$": 31-900, $3900, $31000,
31+, $4J4F4>< -E<C?8F, -380, ,400,
CB750, (1969-75) C4F;-)4<7,
'4G<BAJ<78 )<6>HC, 800-772-1142,
3 1 0 - 7 2 1 - 0 7 2 6 .
HF4@6?4FF<6EHAA8EF.6B@
NATIONAL CLASSIFIEDS
9 &"%%"(' C"+C.%A-"(' 46EBFF G;8
..,. 4A7 C4A474 J<G; 4 6?4FF<9<87 47 <A
BHE A4G<BA4? A8GJBE>, =HFG $695. C4??
G;8 088>?L C;B<68, 989-732-8160 BE 8-
@4<? D4I81@088>?LC;B<68.6B@
+8478E A7I<FBEL: G;8 '4G<BA4? -E478
AFFB6<4G<BA J8 58?BA: GB ;4F CHE-
6;4F87 FB@8 6?4FF<9<87F <A BHE C4C8E.
D8G8E@<A<A: G;8 I4?H8 B9 G;8<E F8EI<68
BE CEB7H6G <F 47I<F87 5L G;<F CH5?<64-
G<BA. "A BE78E GB 4IB<7 @<FHA78EFG4A7-
<A:F, FB@8 47I8EG<F8EF 7B ABG B998E
8@C?BL@8AG 5HG E4G;8E FHCC?L G;8 E847-
8EF J<G; @4AH4?F, 7<E86GBE<8F 4A7 BG;8E
@4G8E<4?F 78F<:A87 GB ;8?C G;8<E 6?<8AGF
8FG45?<F; @4<? BE78E F8??<A: 4A7 BG;8E
5HF<A8FF8F 4G ;B@8. .A78E '( 6<E6H@-
FG4A68 F;BH?7 LBH F8A7 4AL @BA8L <A
47I4A68 BE :<I8 G;8 6?<8AG LBHE 6;86>-
<A:, ?<68AF8 "D, BE 6E87<G 64E7 AH@58EF.
A?FB 58J4E8 B9 47F G;4G 6?4<@ GB :H4E-
4AG88 ?B4AF E8:4E7?8FF B9 6E87<G 4A7
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RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
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CLASSIFIEDS
Delivered to 40
Towns Each Week!
Run for
As Low
As
$
2
00
CALL: 989.732.8160 | EMAIL: classifieds@weeklychoice.com | ORDER ONLINE: www.weeklychoice.com
Page 8-B • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice January 9, 2014
1349 S. Otsego,
GayIord, MI 49735
(989) 732-2477 www.SmithReaItyGayIord.com
daIe j. smith
Associate Broker
CRS, RAM, ABR
Wendie Forman
Associate Broker GRI,
Property Manager
Heather Guss
ReaItor Associate
Mike Perdue
ReaItor Associate
HIGH TRAFFIC
LOCATION!
Lease Space Available. Close
to I-75 and downtown Gay-
lord. Over 6800 square feet of
space that has been recently
remodeled and completely
updated. Perfect for retail or
office with ample parking and a loading dock.
$189,000. MLS #286868
MAKE YOUR DREAMS COME TRUE
in this Beautiful, High Profile location on Main Street, Completely
remodeled in 2010. High Ceilings, Brick Walls, Laminate wood
flooring. Great Location between Mary's Tavern and Venus &
Blue Jeans. Currently used as an upscale Beauty Salon! Busi-
ness, Trade Fixtures, and Inventory available at additional cost.
Aprox 800 Square feet at the front of the building entirely open.
Office, Shampooing Station, Large Bath, Massage Room and Me-
chanicals in the back of building.
$135,500. MLS #288193
GAYLORD
INDUSTRIAL PARK
Modern building with 4 of-
fices and 1 reception area, 2
overhead doors and large
warehouse area includes (3)
Jib-crane posts and arms.
$195,000.
MLS #287531
SUPER VALUE
in this prime retail location
with high visibility, high
traffic and access from S.
Wisconsin and S. Illinois.
Quality building with open
floor plan and lots of win-
dows. Additional fully in-
sulated and heated 24x38
work shop. Lots of room with footprint for additional building(s) if necessary.
$275,000. MLS #286673
GREAT LOCATION
for small manufacturing or in-
dustrial business with 2250 sq
ft of office and floor space.
Overhead door and covered
main entrance, and proximity to
I-75 make this an ideal space
for commercial clients to locate.
$1,650 per month lease.
MLS #288082
THIS ONE HAS IT ALL!
Excellent Industrial space with
five (5) 18 x 18 overhead
doors, infra-red and unit
heaters. 200 Amp - boxed for
400, 3 Phase 220. 50 x 175
warehouse, 50 x 25 office with
loft. Shop has 6 x 7 handicap
restroom and 3 x 4 janitor's
closet, office has 6 x 7 handicap restroom as well. Also includes a 9 x 14 kitchen, 10 x
14 office, 16 x 34 showroom and 10 x 20 reception area.
$395,000. MLS #286396
BUY HERE
PAY HERE!!
BAD CREDIT BANKRUPTCY
REPOS OK
Largest seIection of trucks &
SUVs in Northern Michigan!
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FREE GAS!
CALL RICH! CALL RICH!
989-306-3656
1 MILE NORTH ON OLD 27
GAYLORD
989.732.5136
HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 7:30AM TO 5:30PM;
SATURDAY 8AM TO 2PM; CLOSED SUNDAY
PRO-Build
RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
.F87 2007 ,CBEGF@8A 41$ F<9G; J;88?
-BL !4H?8E. 2007 ,CBEGF@8A 41$ GBL
;4H?8E 9<9G; J;88?. -;8E8 <F 4 149G
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RESORT PROPERTY FOR RENT
,A'"BE% !A+B(.+ A'D +E,(+-, FBEG
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,4A C4E?BF B4L. 2 587EBB@F.
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E8FBEG. 989-731-2664.
SERVICES
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4A7 <A9BE@4G<BA 4G JJJ.?4EEL8AG8EG4<A-
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STORAGE
A), &<A<-04E8;BHF8 B9 4L?BE7 ;4F
5K10 HA<GF 4I4<?45?8 9BE =HFG $35 4
@BAG;. 'B ?BA: G8E@ 6BAGE46G A868F-
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0724
SUV
2004 C47<??46 ,+1 A0D. ,HC8E ?HKHEL
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?84G;8E, 788C GE847 BE<7:8FGBA8 G<E8F
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D4I8 $E<A: C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 .,
31 'BEG;, )8GBF>8L 231-347-2585.
2004 C;8IL -E4<?5?4M8E %-. %84G;8E,
40D, )<BA88E FBHA7, GBJ C>:. AF ?BJ
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5.7% !8@<, ?84G;8E, GBJ C>:, 3E7 EBJ
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F84G, 40D, GBJ C>:, ?B4787. AF ?BJ 4F
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2215 ., !<:;J4L 31 ', )8GBF>8L.
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I8ABJ123.6B@
2004 #88C %<58EGL. 40D. E84G 9BE J<A-
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DE<I8 'BJ AHGB ,4?8F, 2215 .,
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347-3200. JJJ.7E<I8ABJ123.6B@
2005 C;8IEB?8G EDH<ABK %- A0D. BE<:;G
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EBB9, 6-7<F6 CD, 788C GE847 G<E8F BA
4??BLF, EBB9 E46>, FG88E<A: J;88? 6BA-
GEB?F, +847L GB G4>8 BA J<AG8E! $7,949.
D4I8 $E<A: C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 .,
31 'BEG;, )8GBF>8L, &" 231-347-2585.
2005 C;8IL -E4<?B?4M8E %, 4K4. EKGE4
C?84A! E@8E4?7 #8J8? 8KG8E<BE, :E4L
6?BG; <AF<78, (A,G4E, 4??BLF, G<AG87 J<A-
7BJF, FHAEBB9, GBJ,6-7<F6 CD, EBB9 E46>,
G;<F <F 4 @HFG F88! $7,959. D4I8 $E<A:
C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 ., 31 'BEG;,
)8GBF>8L, &" 231-347-2585.
2005 FBE7 EF64C8. 40D, ?84G;8E, FHA-
EBB9, GBJ C>:. AF ?BJ 4F $199 4 @BAG;.
DE<I8 'BJ AHGB ,4?8F, 2215 .,
!<:;J4L 31 ', )8GBF>8L. );BA8 231-
347-3200. JJJ.7E<I8ABJ123.6B@
SUV
2005 &C EAIBL 1%. 40D, GBJ C>:,
3E7 EBJ F84G, 584HG<9H?. AF ?BJ 4F $199
4 @BAG;. DE<I8 'BJ AHGB ,4?8F, 2215
., !<:;J4L 31 ', )8GBF>8L. );BA8
2 3 1 - 3 4 7 - 3 2 0 0 .
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2005 #88C E4A7 C;8EB>88. +B6>L
&BHAG4<A 87<G<BA, 40D, ?B4787. AF ?BJ
4F $199 4 @BAG;. DE<I8 'BJ AHGB
,4?8F, 2215 ., !<:;J4L 31 ',
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2008 C47<??46 ,+1 A0D. E4G<9L<A:
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CBJ8E G4<? :4G8 4A7 @BE8! $14,949.
D4I8 $E<A: C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 .,
31 'BEG;, )8GBF>8L 231-347-2585.
2008 C;8IL -E4<?5?4M8E %-. 40D, FHA-
EBB9, GBJ C>:, ?84G;8E, ?B4787. (A?L 75
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2008 FBE7 E7:8 %<@<G87. A0D, ?84G;8E,
CBJ8E 7H4? @BBA EBB9, 4 A8J FABJ
G<E8F, A<68. AF ?BJ 4F $249 4 @BAG;.
+<I8EGBJA AHGB EBHC, -;8 B8FG 9BE
%8FF 989 /F0 +B47, C;85BL:4A, &"
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2008 &C A647<4 ,%--1. A0D, ;84G87,
?84G;8E F84GF. AF ?BJ 4F $219 4 @BAG;.
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347-3200. JJJ.7E<I8ABJ123.6B@
2008 #88C %<58EGL %<@<G87. 4K4,
?84G;8E, FHAEBB9, GBJ C>:, A<68. AF ?BJ
4F $199 4 @BAG;. DE<I8 'BJ AHGB
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2010 C;8IL EDH<ABK %--2. (A?L 41 $,
25 &), GBJ C>:. AF ?BJ 4F $219 4
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347-3200. JJJ.7E<I8ABJ123.6B@
2011 !BA74 C+-/ E1 40D. CA+FA1 1
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GEB?F 4A7 @BE8! $20,949. D4I8 $E<A:
C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 ., 31 'BEG;,
)8GBF>8L 231-347-2585.
TRUCKS
1993 FBE7 F-350 1%-. DH4??L, FHC8E
645, 7<8F8?, :E<??8 :H4E7, 4HGB@4G<6,
587?<A8E, GBJ C>:. (A?L 93 $. /8EL A<68!
,4?8 )E<68 $8,995. DE<I8 'BJ AHGB
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1999 F-250 ,HC8E DHGL, 7.3% 7<8F8?,
6E8J 645, ?BA: 5BK. $10,000. 989-786-
4595
2000 &C ,BAB@4 ,%,. EKG 645, GBJ
C>:. AF ?BJ 4F $99 4 @BAG;. DE<I8 'BJ
AHGB ,4?8F, 2215 ., !<:;J4L 31 ',
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2003 C;8IL ,<?I8E47B 3500 4K4
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6.0? /-8. $17,450. D4I8 $E<A:
C;8IEB?8G-C47<??46, 1861 ., 31 'BEG;,
)8GBF>8L 231-347-2585.
2004 &C ,<8EE4 ,%-. 3-71 B99 EB47,
4K4, 6E8J 645, F;BEG 587, GBJ C>:, 587-
?<A8E, ?84G;8E. AF ?BJ 4F $199 4 @BAG;.
DE<I8 'BJ AHGB ,4?8F, 2215 .,
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2005 FBE7 F-150 1% J/5BK. %8FF G;4A
77> &<?8F! C?84A, J<G; %88E 5H<?78E'F
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GE847 .A<EBL4? G<E8F, )8E986G 9BE G;8 7B-
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2006 C;8IL ,<?I8E47B 1500 %-3. EKG
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231-373-084
January 9, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 9-B
LOOKING FOR FOUR
GREAT SALESPEOPLE
Advert|s|ng Sa|es - 4 Pos|t|ons open.
Petoskey, Gaylord, Grayling, East Jordan
- Full or Part Time Salesperson.
We publish 2 weekly newspapers, The
Weekly Choice and the Charlevoix
County News.
Work your own schedule. lndepend-
ent Contractor. Great Commission.
The best candidate will be friendly
and enjoy helping local businesses
create print advertising to help them
reach consumers throughout Northern Michi-
gan with our newspapers and associated
products. Must have computer, lnternet ac-
cess and dependable transportation. E-mail
info to Dave at Office@WeeklyChoice.com.
CLASSIFIEDS
Delivered to 40
Towns Each Week!
Run for
As Low
As
$
2
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CALL: 989.732.8160 | EMAIL: classifieds@weeklychoice.com | ORDER ONLINE: www.weeklychoice.com
Automotive
Review
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AUTO SALES
& Petoskey RV USA
"Aobod) Sclls Ior Icss"
SCHEER
MOTORS
68A¥LIß6
Ford reigns as America's best-selling
vehicle brand in 2013 for a fourth con-
secutive year, with annual sales records
set for Ford Fiesta, Fusion and Escape,
and F-Series continuing as the country's
best-selling truck and vehicle for another
straight year. Ford Motor Company 2013
U.S. sales totaled 2,493,918 vehicles. For
December, total sales are 218,058 vehi-
cles up 2 percent – with retail up 3 per-
cent.
Ford brand U.S. retail sales are up 14
percent for the year. Overall, the Ford
brand closes out 2013 with 2,412,224
vehicles sold. Ford produced double-
digit annual retail gains across its lineup
– cars up 12, utilities up 13 percent, and
trucks are up 17 percent – with higher
average transaction prices. Retail sales
gains for the Ford brand are strongest in
the West, where sales are up 21 percent,
and the Southeast, with sales up 17 per-
cent for the year.
"December was a strong close to an
even better year for Ford Motor
Company," said John Felice, Ford vice
president, U.S. Marketing, Sales and
Service. "We saw strong growth across
the entire Ford lineup and made signifi-
cant gains in the import-dominated
coastal markets. Strong demand for our
new cars, utilities, hybrids and trucks
provided Ford with the largest share
point gain of any full-line automaker in
2013.”
Ford Fusion December performance is
up 27 percent with 24,408 sales, setting a
record for the month. Fusion sales of
295,280 vehicles in 2013 represent a 22
percent increase, setting an annual
record. Fusion continues to be a signifi-
cant driver to the company's growth in
the U.S. western and southeastern
regions, where retail sales are up 61 per-
cent and 29 percent, respectively in 2013.
Ford Fiesta sales of 71,073 vehicles for
the year mark a record, as well – and up
25 percent over 2012.
Ford Escape sales are up 22 percent for
the month, with 24,462 vehicles sold. For
the year, Escape sales of 295,993 vehicles
represent a 13 percent gain, setting an
annual record.
December sales of 74,592 Ford F-Series
vehicles extend the truck's string of sell-
ing more than 60,000 units a month to
eight. Sales of 763,402 F-Series vehicles
in 2013 represent the truck's highest level
since 2006. F-Series remains America's
best-selling truck for 37 straight years
and the country's best-selling vehicle for
32 consecutive years.
Lincoln MKZ December sales increase
73 percent, with 2,823 cars sold, provid-
ing the Lincoln brand with an overall
increase of 8 percent.
F-0# 0$(&,1 1 A+$0("'1 !$12-1$**(,& 4$'("*$ !0,# (, 2013 %-0 %-302' "-,-
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Sponsored by
Ford Motor
Company Delivers
Best Sales Year
Since 2006;
Ford Is Top Brand
with Records for
Fiesta, Fusion, Escape
IMAGE COPYRIGHT FORD MOTOR COMPANY
Classified
Ads
As Low As
$
2
00
Just log on to:
weeklychoice
.com
Or call:
989-732-8160
Page 10-B • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice January 9, 2014
By Jim Akans
It isn’t often that an opportunity comes along
to purchase a wonderful chalet style home
located in an “enchanted forest.” The week’s
feature listing is indeed a three-bedroom, two-
bath chalet and it is located in the Enchanted
Forest subdivision, which is situated just east of
Waters and Frederic.
As the residential neighborhood’s name
implies, this home on one acre has absolutely
gorgeous views, plus it is less than two blocks
from a park, beach, and deeded access to a
lake! The home has both front and back decks
for enjoying the outdoor views, an attached
one-and-a-half car garage and a detached two-
car garage. Indoors, the approximately 1,500
square foot two-level home has two fireplaces;
a wood burning insert in the family room and
an electric wood burner with remote control in
the living room. There have also been several
updates to the home in recent years.
This Enchanted Forest home is located at
11266 Whisper near Frederic and Waters and is
listed by Debbie Zelt (DebbieZelt@gmail.com)
for just $79,000. Call Debbie at Real Estate
One at (989) 705-8284 for additional informa-
tion.
weeklychoice
.com
www.NorthernRealEstate.com
Office: 989-732-1707 Toll Free: 800-828-9372
1738 S. Otsego Ave., P.O. Box 641 Gaylord, MI 49735
GREAT
PRICE
for More Than 300 Feet
of Frontage on
Outstanding Fishing
Traverse Lake. Private
Lake with No Access to
Lake Unless You Own
Property...Here's
Opportunity to Own!
$23,800.
MLS #285316
$20K PRICE DROP!
Completed Furnished, Charming
Year Long or Vacation Home in
Canada Creek. 3 Beds, 2 1/2 Baths.
Cedar Sided Inside. Low Maint
Vinyl Siding Outside.Walk Out
Basement, Gas Fireplace, Roomy
Deck,Attached 2 1/2 Car Garage
plus Additional Garage for Storage-
Toys. Newer Well-Septic System.
Enjoy All that Canada Creek has to
Offer Including 13,500 Acres for
Hunting-Fishing, 5 Lakes, 2 Blue Ribbon Trout Streams,Archery and Gun
Ranges. $149,000. MLS #276951
SQUARE 10 ACRE
PARCEL
Square 10 Acre Parcel
Filled with Maples and
Basswood. Electric, Septic
and Partially Built Cabin
on Site. Sits Off Beaten
Path but Close to
Gaylord, Petoskey, Boyne
City. Main Snow Machine
Trail 1/2 Mile Away. Great
Deer Haven too.
$36,900. MLS #288353
EXCEPTIONAL
HOME
Custom Prow Front
Ranch-Kitchen
redone in 2006-New
Cabinets- Tile ceram-
ic floors - Lighting-
All stainless steel
appliances- Natural
gas Furnace with
pellet stove for low
heating costs. - Black top Drive- Fenced in backyard - Beautifully land-
scaped with irrigation system. Many extras and a Great Location!
$179,000. MLS #286694
N
A
TU
R
A
L G
A
S &
P
E
LLE
T STO
V
E
Well Maintained
Rentals
Available
Call 732-1707
PRICE REDUCTION.
LAND CONTRACT.
JUST IN TIME FOR
HUNTING SEASON.
Versatile 10 acre parcel just
south of Mancelona.
Rolling, Mostly Wooded.
Close to Trails. Electricity
Adjacent to Property Great
for Hunting or Building that
Dream Home. Property
surveyed.
$15,500.
MLS #283494
1
0
A
C
R
E
S
Featured Home
On the Market
11266 Whisper, Frederic
Contact; Debbie Zelt, Real Estate One, Gaylord (989) 705-8284
Enchanted Forest chalet
offer gorgeous view and
lake access
Real Estate
What You Should Look
for When House
Hunting
Compliments of Ed Wohlfiel
If you’re shopping for a home and can afford to
buy one, you couldn’t be in a better position right
now. In many parts of the country, housing inven-
tory is high and both home prices and interest
rates are low and as a buyer, you can take advan-
tage of that.
With so many properties on the market, you can
probably take a more leisurely approach to house
hunting without getting into a fast-paced bidding
war. There is a caveat, however. The best homes
priced properly for the market conditions will
always be in higher demand.
As you begin your search for the right home for
you, it pays to keep in mind things you need to
check carefully so that they don’t cost you big
bucks in the long run.
Kitchen
If kitchens matter to you, you might want to be
fairly selective about them when looking for a new
home. The2009 average price for a minor kitchen
remodel for a midrange home is more than $21,000
and the cost for a major remodel is more than
$57,000 and the costs are substantially more for
higher-end homes.
Look carefully at the appliances, cabinetry, coun-
ters and floor. Those are the elements that cost
more to replace. If possible, you want newer appli-
ances to save money on repairs and energy costs;
solid-wood cabinets; and solid-surface counters,
such as granite, stainless steel, butcher block or
engineered stone. Your floor choices include wood,
cork, laminates and tile and it’s a matter of what’s
comfortable and durable for your lifestyle.
Bathrooms
Following kitchens, bathrooms are also expen-
sive rooms to remodel at a 2009 national average of
more than $16,000 because of the fixtures and
plumbing. Make sure you see no leaks or evidence
of leaks in tubs, toilets and flooring. Sharing bath-
rooms can be one of those pain points for families
so make sure you get what you need.
Roof
A roof is a big-ticket item with an average 2009
replacement cost of more than $19,000 although
adding a second layer to a roof is not nearly as
expensive as replacing the entire thing. Inside the
house, you can check the attic, ceilings and sky-
lights for signs of water damage, look for places
where the roof deck is sagging, and see if you can
detect any light coming through. If you do see light
coming through, it is likely not a problem if the
roof is made of shake shingles. Outside, inspect for
cracked, ripped, curling or missing shingles and
damaged flashing. Also look for rotting, buckling,
blistering or algae growth, which could also be
signs of trouble.
HVAC
An old heater can be hard to repair and eats up
energy at a pace faster than newer units. Furnaces
can start at about $5,000 to replace and if you buy a
combined unit with the air conditioner, add on
several thousand dollars. You may need to replace
the heat pump or air conditioner if it’s older than
10 years and a furnace or boiler if it’s more than 15
years old.
Basement
The extra room you gain may be a huge
headache if the basement floods. Look for water
marks and find out if the house has a system for
removing water.
Other areas of concern that might cost money
down the line are the driveways and sidewalks,
chimneys, insulation and windows.
If you find a house and your offer is accepted,
you’ll be dealing with a home inspector who can fill
in the gaps with a professional’s eye. The thing is, if
you really want the home, you don’t have to let
problems deter you. You are in position to negoti-
ate a price reduction with the seller or insist repairs
be made to the property before your offer is final-
ized.
If you can afford a house, you can afford the lux-
ury of taking your time to find the right one for
you.