OREGON OBSERVER

The
Thursday, January 16, 2014 • Vol. 129, No. 28 • Oregon, WI • ConnectOregonWI.com • $1
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unified Newspaper Group
Walking into school on her
first day at Oregon High School
several years ago, Madi Klonsin-
ski had no idea what to expect.
But by the end of the first hour,
she knew she would be a part of
a club that would change her life.
The class was “Leadership
and You,” taught by marketing
teacher John Curkovic, who is
also the school’s DECA adviser.
The group, formerly called the
Distributive Education Clubs of
America, is an international orga-
nization of marketing students.
That morning, he only brief-
ly explained what the group
was about, but Klonsinksi was
“instantly intrigued,” and in the
coming months, she began to
learn more.
Now a seni or, Kl onsi nski
has been recently selected to
be the first DECA vice-pres-
ident of event management,
Students team up to help children’s hospital
Netherwood fourth-graders raise money through craft sale
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unified Newspaper Group
Rai nbow Loom r ubber band
bracelets are very popular with ele-
mentary students this school year,
and Lori Lovell’s fourth-grade class
at Netherwood Knoll Elementary
decided to turn the students’ love
for making and wearing the brace-
lets into a service project to help
others.
Students worked together to cre-
ate a plan to purchase and make a
few hundred bracelets, then created
posters to put up around their school
and made a flyer to send home to
their third- and fourth-grade class-
mates. Students sold the bracelets
during lunch and recess, collecting
more than $300 – as well as several
dozen bracelets – to UW send to
Children’s Hospital in Madison.
Lovel l s ai s s he was “ver y
impressed and proud” her students
thought of others and their needs,
as well as the teamwork they dis-
played.
“It was exciting to watch them get
other students on board,” she said.
“The whole class worked together
and used their various abilities to
complete this project. Some jumped
into leadership roles and taught
their classmates how to make the
bracelets and others used their skills
to create flyers and posters.”
Fourth-grader Hope Flitter said
she thought the fundraiser was a
“spectacular idea” as well as a lot of
fun for the students.
“It was a really good experience
for not just me but my whole class,”
she said. “I believe that giving to
the hospital is a generous idea.
Those kids really need help.”
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Oregon School District
Year-round idea nears public stage
Netherwood Knoll group almost done researching pros, cons
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unified Newspaper Group
School all year?
The thought might seem foreign at first
– no more three months of summer vaca-
tion for students and teachers.
But taking a closer look at a year-round,
or “balanced” schedule makes good sense
to Oregon School District administrators
and staff, who are researching the idea and
will soon ask for community input on hav-
ing classes at Netherwood Knoll Elemen-
tary School every month of the year.
“Year-round” school doesn’t mean more
school days, but rather an adjustment of
schedules. In theory, the calendar could
include several breaks of three weeks or
more.
According to the National Education
Association, the most popular form of
year-round education is the “45-15 plan,”
in which students attend school for 45 days
(nine weeks) and then have 15 days (three
weeks) of vacation, not including holidays.
Calendars can also follow a “60-20” or
“90-30” schedule.
In a memo sent to the school board
last year, Netherwood Knoll staff cited
research showing that year-round school
can improve grades and lead to better
attendance, fewer disciplinary problems
Rubber band bracelets made by students at
Netherwood Knoll Elementary.
Photos submitted
Students make signs to advertise their Rainbow Loom bracelet sale. The bracelet sales raised more than $300 for the UW Children’s Hospital.
Village of Oregon
Board offers
TIF for Thysse
Businessman sought
help to expand
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
The Village Board Mon-
day aut hor i zed vi l l age
officials to offer business-
man Jason Thysse a pack-
age totaling about $92,000
in response to his compa-
ny’s request for tax-incre-
ment financing assistance.
Thysse, owner of Thysse
Pr i nt i ng i n t he Al pi ne
Business Park, asked vil-
lage officials in Novem-
ber for $150,000 in TIF
assistance to help cover
the cost of improving the
soi l and expandi ng t he
building at his property in
the park. He wants to dou-
ble the size of his office
and production plant on
West Net herwood Road
to accommodate the rapid
growth of his company.
The vi l l age i nvest ed
$265,000 in TIF in 2011
to lure Thysse to Oregon.
Now, a year-and-a-hal f
after opening the shop, the
company has about twice
as many employees.
Thys s e s ubmi t t e d a
Village of Oregon
State: Rail crossing needs gates
Overruled objection means Braun Road
entrance will cost $250,000
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
Village of Oregon offi-
cials were not successful
in their attempt to persuade
state officials to reconsider
a proposal that the village
i nst al l aut omat i c fl ash-
ing lights and gates at the
Braun Road entrance to the
Alpine Business Park.
The village contested the
proposal in a November
letter but was only able to
persuade the Office of the
Commissioner of Railroads
to delay the completion
dates for the work.
Vi l l age admi ni st rat or
Mike Gracz told the Village
Board Monday the commis-
sioner’s decision is final
and cannot be challenged.
The commi s s i oner ’ s
order includes a comple-
tion date of June 1 for the
installation of crossing and
interim warning devices
and Oct. 1 for the automatic
Managing Quite Nicely
OHS senior Klonsinski takes new state leadership post seriously
Turn to TIF/Page 2
Turn to Balanced/Page 16
Turn to Rail/Page 7
Turn to DECA/Page 5
Klonsinski
2
January 16, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
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Burst pipe closes
Walgreens for hours
SCOTT GIRARD
Unified Newspaper Group
Janis Story-DeBoer did
not expect to have a story
to tell before shopping at
Walgreens last Wednesday
afternoon.
But by the time she left,
a sprinkler head had burst
in the front entrance and
everyone was evacuated
from the store.
“I said ‘I’m going to take
some pictures because no
one will believe me,’” the
Brooklyn resident told the
Oregon Observer.
The Oregon Fire Depart-
ment was called to the scene
around 1 p.m., Oregon Fire
Capt. Tony Antoniewicz
told the Observer.
The water was contained
in the front entryway and
no damage occurred, a Wal-
greens customer service
employee told the Observ-
er.
DeBoer said she first
heard a “whoosh of water”
while in the middle of the
store, and then heard an
employee near the front
of the store say “oh my
gosh, oh my gosh” before
employees decided to evac-
uate everyone through the
back exit of the store.
“It looked like a giant
shower room,” DeBoer said
of the entryway. “There
was probably a good foot of
water. It was quite chaotic.”
The s t or e r e ope ne d
around 5 p.m., the employ-
ee said.
Ta b a t h a We t h a l o f
channel3000 first reported
the story.
Longtime Oregon insurance broker Hagstrom sells business, retires
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
Village of Oregon native
Charlie Hagstrom has retired
after 30 years in the insur-
ance business, but his former
policyholders won’t have to
travel far to visit the office
that purchased Hagstrom
Insurance.
The office of William
R. Torhorst & Associates,
located at 104 N. Main St. in
downtown Oregon, is direct-
ly across the street from 113
N. Main St., where Hagstrom
Insurance had operated since
the early 1960s.
Hagstrom joined his father
as a broker at the Hagstrom
Agency in downtown Ore-
gon in 1984. He operated the
business until Jan. 1, when
he sold it to fellow insurance
broker Bill Torhorst.
“Back in the beginning
when this (negotiations)
started, Charlie said he wants
to keep this as low-key as
possible,” Torhorst said.
“We’ve mailed out letters to
all the policyholders.
“His dad started the busi-
ness and the best part is, it’s
not leaving town,” Torhorst
added. “Local service, local
flavor, local people – that
was very important to Char-
lie and to me.”
Hagstrom said the agency
was actually started by the
late Bill Dunn, whose son
eventually ran the business
until he sold it to Hagstrom
in the early ‘60s, before
moving to New Mexico.
“It’s in the fourth gen-
eration of ownership,” Hag-
strom said of the business.
Torhorst and Hagstrom
have been longtime friends,
so Hagstrom selling to his
former business competitor
made perfect sense. He said
it was more like “a merger”
than actually selling the busi-
ness.
“Bill was the natural buy-
er,” Hagstrom said.
Torhorst has been in the
insurance business since
1978 and has operated an
office in Oregon since ’86,
he said. He has three full-
time employees.
“We understand that we
are employed and have jobs
because local people do busi-
ness with us,” he said. “We
truly appreciate that, and we
are all about customer ser-
vice.”
In retirement, Hagstrom
plans to spend more time
with his family enjoying
their cabin in northern Wis-
consin, where he is an avid
ice fisherman and outdoors-
man.
Photo by Bill Livick
Charlie Hagstrom of Hagstrom insurance has retired and sold his Main Street business after 30 years
in Oregon.
formal request Nov. 6 for
help with the estimated
$1 million-plus cost to
expand. He plans to add
12,000 square feet to the
company’ s pr oduct i on
facility and 3,000 square
feet of office space. He
also needs to increase the
parking area for employ-
ees.
Wh e n t h e Vi l l a g e
Boar d emer ged f r om
closed session Monday,
at t or ney Mat t Dr egne
said the board had autho-
rized him to prepare a TIF
agreement that includes
$67, 182 i n f i nanci al
assi st ance, al ong wi t h
waiving up to $25,000 in
building-permit fees.
Most of the TIF Thysse
is seeking would be used
t o prepare t he si t e for
bui l di ng, but he al so
needs the help because
hi s offi ce and produc-
t i on faci l i t y i s so new
that it hasn’t accumulated
enough value to use as
equity, he said.
Thysse Printing opened
in the business park in
June 2012. The company
was hoping to add about
five employees its first
year in Oregon. Instead,
i t added 17 or 18 new
workers in the first 16
months here.
“The busi ness gr ew
way faster than I antici-
pated,” Thysse said. “We
are growing and gaining
market share and adding
great new people to our
team. The downside is we
built too small a build-
ing.”
The company has 35
employees, and Thysse
wants to increase the size
of his office and produc-
tion facility to accommo-
date twice that number.
Tax Increment District
2 i ncl udes t he Al pi ne
Business Park and prop-
erties on the west side
of Market Street. It was
established in 2005 and
must be closed by 2032.
I n or der t o us e TI F,
which combines revenues
from all the taxing juris-
dictions, the village must
show that the develop-
ment would not happen
without its use, known as
the “but for” test.
Vi l l age offi ci al s di d
not return a phone call
seeking comments on the
offer before press time
Tuesday.
TIF: Request approved
Continued from page 1
Submit news stories, tips and photos online:
www.ConnectOregonWI.com
Photo by Scott Girard
Witness said “a good foot” of water collected in the entryway of Walgreen’s after a sprinker head burst at the store on Jan. 8.
January 16, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
3
Village of Oregon
Board recycles downtown Dumpster issue
New plan for
Jefferson Street
parking lot
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
It ’s become di ffi cul t
to keep straight the vari-
ous plans for using Dump-
sters in the Jefferson Street
parking lot that the Village
Board has approved and
later discarded over the past
three or four months.
The latest plan that won
the unanimous approval
of the board at Monday’s
meeting looked similar to
ones that have been consid-
ered before.
Since late last summer,
trustees have grappled with
t he quest i ons of whi ch
South Main Street busi-
ness owners coul d use
the Dumpsters, where the
Dumpsters should be locat-
ed, how many Dumpsters
should be allowed, how
they should be arranged
inside the Dumpster “cor-
ral” that the village had
built, and how the costs
of both hauling trash and
repaying the village for its
investment should be div-
vied up.
At least some of those
questions were answered
Monday.
The board took the advice
of Mason’s on Main owner
Jerry Thiel and will allow
just two Dumpsters in the
corral – one for trash and
one for recyclables.
Thiel argued that the cor-
ral is not big enough to hold
more than two Dumpsters
and still allow reasonable
access for trash haulers.
The corral presently holds
four, which is why the two
receptacles Thiel uses for
his business, Mason’s on
Main, have recently been
left outside the corral, pos-
sibly impeding the flow of
traffic in the lot.
The board also agreed on
a $520 yearly fee for use
of the Dumpsters and cor-
ral – much reduced from
the $2,800 per year fee that
was part of a plan adopted
in early December, and then
abandoned as unworkable.
Village officials initially
set the price high in hopes
of getting a five-to-seven
year payback of the vil-
lage’s $17,000 investment
i n bui l di ng a concr et e
Dumpster pad enclosed by
the corral and fencing.
The board also decided
to allow the business own-
ers to determine who would
pay Advanced Disposal’s
fee of $325 per month for
twice-weekly trash hauling,
and how much each would
pay.
A plan similar to the
one adopted Monday fell
apart in November when
DeBroux’s owner Greg
DeBroux objected to using
Advanced Disposal and
instead insisted on the trash
hauler he’s used for years –
Pellitteri – which charges
$535 per month for hauling
trash twice a week.
Once again Monday, the
board directed village attor-
ney Matt Dregne to draft
a license agreement for
business owners to sign in
order to use the Dumpsters,
which are kept on village
property. Those who don’t
sign the agreement will be
required to keep Dump-
sters on their own property,
which in hot weather create
odor and insect problems.
Dregne said before he can
write the license agreement,
he needs to know which
property owners and ten-
ants will be allowed to use
the Dumpsters.
Trustee David Donovan
agreed: “I think we should
know who’s going to use
it. Then we can amend the
agreement if somebody else
comes in.”
The board adopted vil-
lage administrator Mike
Gracz’s suggestion that
business owners must sub-
mit the list of users by noon
Friday, so that Dregne can
draft the agreement and the
board can consider final
approval at its next meeting
on Monday.
More parking
lot issues
Commercial developer
Paul Lynch, who owns
properties next to the
parking lot occupied by
RX Automotive and Rec-
reational Concepts, asked
village officials Monday
to do something about
parking and traffic pat-
terns in the lot.
He said his tenants are
often blocked from hav-
ing access to the drive-
way because of delivery
vehicles parking along-
si de ot her del i veri es
instead of staying in the
loading zone. Lynch also
said tenants of apart-
ments above South Main
Street businesses, as well
as business employees,
randomly park in places
not designated for parking
and make navigating the
lot difficult, and at times
impossible.
He sent emails to staff
and board members with
photos that illustrated the
problem.
Village officials such
as public works direc-
t or Mark Bel ow and
police chief Doug Pet-
tit explained that for
years the lot had a one-
way traffic pattern. The
lot was redesigned and
refurbished in Septem-
ber and October and now
is designed for two-way
traffic. It also has a des-
ignated loading zone in
the lane closest to the rear
entrances of businesses
on South Main Street.
Pet t i t sai d busi ness
owners “need to let deliv-
ery drivers know they
can’t block the traffic lane
– they have to stack in the
loading zone, even if they
have to walk a little.”
Village President Steve
Staton suggested the vil-
lage install no parking
signs in areas not desig-
nated for parking as a way
to alleviate congestion.
Lynch also complained
about sur f ace r unof f
that’s been gathering on
his property from the lot.
He said he’s concerned
about oil and other con-
taminants from the lot
pooling on his property
and asked to meet with
village staff to find a
way to address the matter
before it becomes a seri-
ous problem.
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Man faces two felony charges after 5th OWI
A Town of Dunn man is
facing two felony and three
misdemeanor charges fol-
lowing his fifth OWI on
Dec. 15 with his children
in the car.
Marshall Martinez, 36,
drove into a ditch on Mon-
day, Dec. 16, on Norman
Drive in the Town of Dunn
with his two children in the
car, according to the crimi-
nal complaint.
He f aces char ges of
Operating While Intoxi-
cated (fifth with passenger
less than 16 years old) and
Operating with Prohibited
Alcohol Concentration-
passenger l ess t han 16
years old, both felonies,
along with three counts of
misdemeanor bail jumping,
according to online court
records.
The final pre-trial will
take place Feb. 13, online
court records show.
According to the com-
plaint:
At around 4:20 p.m. Dec.
16, the Dane County Sher-
iff’s Office was alerted to a
reckless driver on Hwy. 51
at Hwy. B.
People advised the sher-
iff’s deputy the car was
traveling southbound in
the northbound lanes and
al most caused crashes
before the suspect’s vehi-
cle turned into the Bay
View Trailer Park, where
he picked up his 11-year-
old daughter and five-year-
old son.
The sheri ff’s deput y
found the car in the ditch,
and Martinez informed
the deputy he had slid off
of the roadway and gotten
stuck in the snow bank.
Martinez also said he
was coming from Buffalo
Wild Wings in Madison
where he was employed.
The deput y smel l ed
intoxicants as Martinez
spoke, observed bloodshot
eyes and noticed slurred
speech. Martinez told the
deputy he had consumed
two beers.
The deputy administered
field sobriety tests and
took a preliminary breath
test, which showed a .221
BAC.
– Scott Girard
File photo
The Village Board has debated plans to use Dumpsters in the Jefferson Street parking lot for the last several months, without resolution.
POLICE REPORT
Reports collected from
the log books at the Oregon
Police Department
Dec. 22
10:37 p.m. A domestic
disturbance allegedly took
place between a 37-year-
old man and a 31-year-old
woman. The man had left
the residence with two chil-
dren, 11 and 6 years old. The
woman had a cut on her right
wrist, but refused to say how
it got there. She was taken
into protective custody. The
man said the woman had
torn his shirt off and told
him to take the kids and go.
The 11-year-old said she
was afraid the woman would
harm her since the woman
was throwing objects around
the house.
Dec. 24
4:58 p.m. An officer
received an anonymous
report of a suspicious
male knocking on doors
in the Prairie Grass Road
neighborhood asking if they
were happy with their cable
company. The individual was
not located.
Dec. 27
11:37 p.m. An employ-
ee at Main Tap reported a
27-year-old man had caused
a disturbance. The employee
told the 27-year-old to leave,
which he refused to do and
punched the employee in
the face. The 27-year-old
was told he was not allowed
back at Main Tap.
Dec. 30
4:00 p.m. A 29-year-old
man reported leaving three
nail guns in the Rinpoche
Lane house he was doing
construction on that were
missing when he showed
up the next day. He said the
house was locked, but that it
could be accessed. The tools
totaled around $350.
– Scott Girard
4
January 16, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Thursday, January 16, 2014 • Vol. 129, No. 28
Unified Newspaper Group, a division of
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Potential NSA intrusion
doesn’t make a police state
I
’ve been asking myself
whether I should be con-
cerned about the National
Security Agency — specifically,
the federal agency’s apparent
ability to monitor not only the
so-called “meta-data” of our
phone calls and emails, but the
actual content of messages and
calls, as well.
Is it good that the NSA can do
this, or not? I go back and forth.
Perhaps
it’s good if
the NSA, by
using this
information,
has prevented
terrorists from
attacking our
country, or
if it has pre-
vented foreign
governments
from stealing
our secrets, which is the NSA’s
original mission. Perhaps it’s
bad if these actions represent a
fundamental shift in our under-
standing of our constitutionally
guaranteed rights to protection
from unreasonable searches and
seizures.
Another important question,
though, is whether this is a prob-
lem that I, or any other citizen,
can do anything about.
Few of us would object to any
of the traditional methods police
use to capture criminals or spies,
and keep us safe, because con-
stitutional protections and court
rulings largely spell out the lim-
its to which government can go.
But the rules have changed.
From what we read in the
press, the original assumption
of American justice — inno-
cent until proven guilty — has
changed, to one that is more
akin to the standards of the old
Soviet Union, where citizen
activities and movements were
tightly monitored and controlled
to serve the interests of the state.
But do we really live in a
police state, as some have sug-
gested? To look for an answer
to these questions, I started by
going to the official NSA web-
site.
Since it was formed in 1954,
the mission of the National
Security Agency has been “to
prevent foreign adversaries
from gaining access to sensitive
or classified security informa-
tion; and to defeat terrorists and
their organizations at home and
abroad, consistent with U.S.
laws and the protection of pri-
vacy and civil liberties.” Few
people would argue with the
importance of that mission, but
perhaps more is how the NSA
mission is carried out and how
new technological capabilities
have changed the nature of its
work.
What does seem true is that
the technical sophistication of
the NSA’s surveillance project
has allowed it to go much far-
ther than anyone ever originally
imagined.
The NSA now has an unprec-
edented potential command of
our personal information. It has
the ability to use powerful com-
puters to collect the phone num-
bers of the people we call, the
frequency of the calls we make
to specified numbers, the num-
bers they call, and the length of
such calls, all in order to analyze
patterns of calling that can lead
to the possible identification of
networks of terrorists.
It has the ability to listen to
the content of the entire nation’s
phone calls. If I were to talk to a
friend about terrorism, it is pos-
sible but unlikely that the NSA
would know it and put us tempo-
rarily under the microscope.
However, according to recent
news report, the NSA searched
“only” around 300 phone num-
bers in 2012, and only those
of “people suspected of com-
municating with foreign ter-
rorists (This Week magazine,
12/27/13).”
In December, the mass col-
lection of data by the NSA (as
revealed by Edward Snowden)
was declared unconstitutional by
Judge Richard Leon. Judge Leon
called the collection of domestic
phone information “Orwellian,”
and other commentators chimed
in.
Daniel Ellsberg, the author
of the Pentagon Papers, and
William Binney, a former NSA
official who helped create the
electronic surveillance system,
have both made the claim that
we now live in a virtual police
state — or that we are very close
to having such a state with little
effort on the part of authorities.
If we are living in a “turn-
key” police state, many of us
haven’t gotten the message.
I have asked a number of
people whether they have
become more careful about what
they say on the phone, know-
ing that it’s potentially subject
to government monitoring. No
one to whom I spoke has made
the slightest effort to change
his or her words or behaviors in
response to the NSA revelations.
I also asked people whether they
would feel uncomfortable mak-
ing political statements on the
phone, and, again, no one said
that they’d be afraid to do so.
I look out my window, and
nothing seems to have changed.
I drive around Oregon, and I see
a well-ordered, completely nor-
mal town, with citizens engaged
in completely normal activities,
unfazed by the NSA controver-
sy. Police states require fear; as
far as I can determine, we do not
currently live in a police state.
It seems to me that as long
as citizens exercise our rights
and insist that our government
respect them, there seems to
be no need for excessive con-
cern about imminent threats to
freedom from the NSA. There
are certainly other threats to
democracy, including the trend
toward corporate dominance of
campaign finance, and growing
economic inequality — but that
is another issue.
Doug Brethauer is a Village of
Oregon resident.
Brethauer
Community Voices
Guidelines for election letters
Unified Newspaper Group is
proud to offer a venue for public
debate and welcomes letters to the
editor, provided they comply with
our guidelines.
Political endorsements and oth-
er election letters must be submit-
ted about two weeks before the
relevant election.
For the upcoming spring elec-
tion, letters related to the primary
must be received by Feb. 3 and
will be printed by Feb. 6.
General election letters need
to be submitted by March 17 and
will be printed March 20.
Other special rules apply during
election season.
Letters should be no longer
than 400 words. They should
also contain contact information
– the writer’s full name, address,
and phone number – so that the
paper may confirm authorship.
Unsigned or anonymous letters
will not be printed under any cir-
cumstances.
The editorial staff of Unified
Newspaper Group reserves the
right to edit letters for length, clar-
ity and appropriateness. Letters
with libelous or obscene content
will not be printed.
Unified Newspaper Group gen-
erally only accepts letters from
writers with ties to our circulation
area.
All letters to the editor should
be of general public interest.
Letters that are strictly personal –
lost pets, for example – will not be
printed. Letters that recount per-
sonal experiences, good or bad,
with individual businesses will not
be printed unless there is an over-
whelming and compelling pub-
lic interest to do so. Letters that
urge readers to patronize specific
businesses or specific religious
faiths will not be printed, either.
“Thank-you” letters can be printed
under limited circumstances, pro-
vided they do not contain material
that should instead be placed as an
advertisement and reflect public,
rather than promotional interests.
Language, quotations, facts
and research that are contained
in a letter but come from another
source should be attributed. Pla-
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lished. Chain letters will not be
printed, nor will letters already
published in another newspaper or
magazine.
Uni f i ed Newspaper Gr oup
encourages lively public debate
on issues, but it reserves the right
to limit the number of exchanges
between individual letter writers
to ensure all writers have a chance
to have their voices heard.
This policy will be printed from
time to time in an abbreviated
form here and will be posted in its
entirety on our websites.
Corrections
See something wrong?
The Oregon Observer does not sweep errors under the rug. If you see something you know or even
think is in error, please contact editor Jim Ferolie at 845-9559 or at ungeditor@wcinet.com so we can get
it right.
Get Connected
Find updates and links right away.
Search for us on Facebook
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and then LIKE us.
January 16, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
5










Verona Area Community Theater
Presents
By Harry Segall
January 10, 11, 16, 17, 18 7:30PM
& January 12 2:00PM

Verona Area High School Performing Arts Center
For Reserved Tickets: 608-845-2383 www.vact.org

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achieving a goal she set
back in 2010 to attain a
state leadership post in
the organization. It’s a
position she started work-
ing toward in the fall of
2012, putting together a
campaign by building a
portfolio of her academic,
extracurricular and volun-
teer achievements.
After a selection com-
mi t t e e ga ve he r t he
thumbs-up during an ini-
tial screening phase, she
was then invited to Madi-
son last February for addi-
tional review, and later a
state conference, where
she was a final candidate
for a state office. After an
“agonizing and long pro-
cess,” she was selected –
an honor she said is both a
lot of work, but also a lot
of fun.
“I am responsible for
hel pi ng pl an l ocal and
state events, setting the
state officer agenda, and
making sure everything
runs smoothly,” she said.
Kl onski nski sai d t he
best part of becoming a
state officer has been the
chance to host the Cen-
tral Region Leadership
Conference in Milwau-
kee l ast mont h, whi ch
was of particular impor-
tance because it was the
first time in more than a
decade the event was held
in Wisconsin.
High praise
Ti m Fandek, educa-
tion consultant with the
Wi sconsi n Depart ment
of Public Instruction and
Wisconsin DECA char-
tered association advisor,
said Klonsinski demon-
strated “outstanding” pub-
lic speaking skills in front
of the more than 2, 200
attendees from around the
country at the conference,
and has accompl i shed
much i n her t i me wi t h
the organization, includ-
ing strategic use of social
medi a t o get feedback
from the state’s 10,000
member s on ways t o
improve upcoming events,
Because her position is
newly created, she is blaz-
ing a trail for all who fol-
low.
“ A l l o f h e r
a c h i e v e m e n t s a n d
accomplishments this year
will create a legacy for
our organization,” he said.
While DECA is known
for its business emphasis,
Klonsinski said the group
al so i ncl udes commu-
nity service, networking
and building professional
skills that can be used
far beyond the marketing
classroom.
“Being a DECA mem-
ber provides opportunities
the normal high school
student will never have,”
she sai d. “What real l y
sparked my interest was
watching the state officers
at my first district com-
petition command a room
of over two thousand with
leadership very few could
exhibit. In that moment I
knew I would eventually
be a state officer, too.”
Dur i ng t he l ast t wo
year s, Kl onsi nski has
qualified and competed
at state and international
conf er ences, t r avel i ng
across t he count ry and
meeting “thousands” of
the leaders of the next
generation, all the time
building invaluable pro-
fessional skills.
True leader
Cur kovi c s ai d he’ s
“s uper pr oud” of her
for being so active and
involved during the past
few years.
“She’s always displayed
the characteristics of a
dependable and respon-
sible young woman and
many positive attributes
of bei ng an i deal rol e
model in this school com-
muni t y and t he DECA
organi zat i on, ” he sai d.
“As a marketing student
and state officer she has
been a leadership event
organizer, and a constant
volunteer for many causes
we have had her.
“She is a model student
and that’s an understate-
ment.”
Curkovic said being a
DECA offi cer requi res
self-direction, self-moti-
vat i on and t he abi l i t y
to take on tasks without
di r ect i on f r om ot her s.
Citing her achievements
in making the OHS Hon-
or Rol l and success i n
DECA state competitions,
Curkovic said Klonsinski
has always taken pride in
her accomplishments with
a “refreshing” sense of
tenacity.
“By far what separates
Madison from others is
her genuine enthusiasm
about taking on respon-
sibilities and leadership
activities,” he said. “Mad-
ison is the kind of person
people are drawn to and
can’t help but respect. Her
ability to have such sin-
cere integrity and resolve
is inspirational. She also
has an amazi ng abi l i t y
to be a great negotiator,
dealing with difficult situ-
ations and making them
ri ght . As an observer,
Madison will successful-
ly take charge and make
those around her change
for the better as she dem-
onstrates a sincere con-
cern and caring for others.
“It’s been wonderful to
watch her grow.”
Busy schedule
These days, Klonsin-
ski is keeping busy plan-
ni ng t he St at e Car eer
Devel opment Conf er -
ence in March – design-
i ng T-shi rt s, searchi ng
for keynote speakers and
“trying to make the con-
ference the best it can be.”
She is also about to pub-
lish a Fundraising Action
Plan, which enables local
chapters to raise funds to
attend events for DECA.
At the same time, she’s
studying and working to
qualify for a third time to
the international confer-
ence held in Atlanta in
May – all this while she
waits to see where she
will attend college in the
fall.
A l ot t o do, but she
wouldn’t have it any other
way.
“DECA is about put -
ting yourself out there,
knowi ng maybe you’l l
fail, maybe you’ll embar-
rass yourself, but you’ll
most likely succeed and
at least learn something
new about yourself,” she
said. “It’s about building
those skills that you strug-
gled with before, trying
new things and finding a
passion. I have an undy-
ing love for DECA that
allows me to be involved
in things so much larger
than myself.”
DECA: OHS senior busy planning conference
Continued from page 1
Photo submitted
Punt, pass, kick winners
Knights of Columbus State Punt Pass and Kick Competition was held in Marshfield on Nov. 2. Drew
Kessenich, of Oregon, won first place in the boys age 9 competition. Pictured, from left, are Jack
Anderson (Oconomowoc) in second place, Kessenich, and Kenny Satori (Denmark) in third, along with
Timothy Guski, Knights of Columbus State Secretary.
Photo submitted
The Holy Mother of Consolation Knights of Columbus Council 13480 free-throw contest winners are,
from left: Aaron Hakes, Jane-Isabella Ciambrone, Luke Thelen, K.T. Schwass, Lauren Denu, Lizzie Prew
and Jake Mullenberg.
Free throw contest winners advance to district level
On Jan. 6, an enthusias-
tic group of girls and boys
aged 9 to 14 participated
in the annual free throw
contest sponsored by the
Holy Mother of Consola-
tion Knights of Columbus
Council 13480 at Prairie
View Elementary School.
Girls’ winners were: Jane-
Isabella Ciambrone (age 9);
K. T. Schwass (11); Lauren
Denu (12) and Lizzie Prew
(13). Boys’ winners were
Aaron Hakes (9); Luke
Thelen (11) and Jake Mul-
lenberg (13).
The wi nner s i n each
group qualify to advance
to the district level KC
Free Throw Contest at Gla-
cier Edge School in Vero-
na, along with kids from
Waunakee, Verona, Cross
Plains, Middleton and Ore-
gon. District winners can
compete in additional levels
of competition, culminating
in the state championship.
The KC council mem-
bers who prepared for and
officiated at the contest
included Mike Martin, Tom
Fisher, Jim Vogt, Dan
Krause, Marty Prew, Rich
Hackner, Mark Faber and
Dick Rydecki.
WE HAVE
MOVED!
We are excited to announce that
we have moved to our location
at 152 ALPINE PKWY.
New Patients Always Welcome
CARING DENTISTRY
FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
Mueller Dental
(608) 835-0900
www.muellerdental.com
Proudly Serving the Oregon Area for Over 16 Years!
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Your opinion is something we always want to hear.
Call 835-6677 or at connectoregonwi.com
WE’RE
ALL
EARS
Questions?
Comments?
Story Ideas?
Let us know
how we’re doing.
6
January 16, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Church Listings
BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship
COMMUNITY OF LIFE
LUTHERAN CHURCH
PO Box 233, Oregon, 53575
(608) 286-3121
office@communityoflife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship at 1111 S. Perry
Parkway, Oregon
COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Dave Pluss
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-3082
fpcoregonwi.org
Pastor Le Anne Clausen de Montes
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. Blended Worship
10:30 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11 a.m. All-ages activity

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger
Associate Pastor Twink Jan-
McMahon
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship
West Campus: Corner of Hwy. PD
and Nine Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m. Worship
(608) 271-6633
HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
8:30 am & 10:15 am Worship service
at Oregon High School PAC
Quest for grades 1-6 during 10:15
service
HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.41pi.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship
PEOPLE’S UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastor Jason Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 and 10:30 a.m. Worship
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community Worship
(9:30 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust, 105 S.
Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Bob Groth, Pastor
(608) 835-9639
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Family Worship
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, People’s United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
• 6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair
St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
• 6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
• Relationship & Divorce
Support Group. State
Bank of Cross Plains.
Every other Monday
night at 6:30 p.m.
Support groups
Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page
Coming up
Thursday, Jan. 16
• 2-4 p.m., Free e-reader and tablet classes, library,
835-3656
Saturday, Jan. 18
• 2 p.m.,Town of Oregon Caucus, 1138 Union Road
Monday, Jan. 20
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day - no schools
• 6:30-8 p.m., Dane County Christian Women’s
Connection dinner, Radisson Hotel, 517 Grand
Canyon Dr., Madison, gdburoker@charter.net
Tuesday. Jan. 21
• 6:30 p.m., Green Tuesdays and Thursdays, viewing
of “Vegucated,” Oregon Public Library
Wednesday, Jan 22
• 1 p.m., “Get the Job You Want” with Dane County
Job Center staff member Jennifer See, library
Thursday, Jan. 22
Oregon Public Library closed all day for building main-
tenance
Saturday, Jan. 25
• 7 p.m., Trivia Night in Oregon, library
Sunday, Jan. 26
• 7 a.m. to noon, pancake breakfast and bake sale,
Oregon Senior Center, 835-5801
• 5 p.m., Oregon Straw Hat Players auditions, Oregon
High School Performing Arts Center, 456 N. Perry
Pkwy., auditions@oshponline.org
Monday, Jan. 27
• 6:30 p.m., Oregon School District Board of
Education meeting, Rome Corners Intermediate
School, 1111 S. Perry Pkwy.
Tuesday. Jan. 28
• 7 p.m., Oregon Straw Hat Players auditions, Oregon
High School Performing Arts Center, 456 N. Perry
Pkwy., auditions@oshponline.org
Sunday, Feb. 2
• 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Chili dinner, Brooklyn Cub Scouts
Pack 352, Brooklyn Community Center
Community calendar
Thursday, Jan. 16
Oregon Village Board
Meeting (of Jan. 13)
Friday, Jan. 17
“Readers Theater: Chapter
9” (of Sep. ‘10)
Saturday, Jan. 18
Oregon Chamber Awards (of
Mar. ‘13)
Sunday, Jan. 19
Worship Service: St. John’s
Lutheran Church
Monday, Jan. 20
6 pm--LIVE--Oregon Village
Board Meeting
Tuesday, Jan. 21
Oregon Chamber of
Commerce Meeting (of Jan.
16)
Wednesday, Jan. 22
Movie: “Casablanca” (1943)
Thursday, Jan. 23
Oregon Village Board
Meeting (of Jan. 20)
WOW 98 & 983
Monday, Jan. 20
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:00 Rubber Stamping
9:00 Caregivers Support
12:00 Market Day Due
1:00 Get Fit
1:30 Bridge
Tuesday. Jan. 21
8:00 Strength Training
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:00 Stretch & Strengthen
10:45 Tai Chi
11:30 Silver Threads
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
1:15 & 2:15 Piano Class
Wednesday, Jan. 22
AM Foot Care
9:00 CLUB
10:45 Steven Kozar paintings
11:00 Online Games Class
1:00 Get Fit/Euchre
2:00 Knit/Crochet Group
Thursday, Jan. 23
AM Chair Massage
8:00 Strength Training
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:00 Pool Players
9:00 Stretch & Strengthen
9:30 Mindfulness Class
10:45 Gentle Yoga
12:30 Shopping at Bill’s
1:00 Cribbage
5:00 Market Day Pickup
Friday, Jan. 24
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:30 Blood Pressure
Monday, Jan. 20
Goulash Casserole, Mixed
Veg., Peach, Multi Grain
Bread, Margarine, Jell-O
VO: Soy Casserole
Tuesday, Jan. 21
Baked Chicken, Mashed
Potato/Gravy, Winter Blend,
Mandarin Oranges, W.W.
Bread
VO: Veggie Patty
Wednesday, Jan. 22
Breaded Fish on Bun With
Cheese Slice, Peas & Onions,
Banana
VO: Cheesy Sandwich
Thursday, Jan. 23
Meat Balls w/Sauce,
Spaghetti, Carrot Coins,
Pineapple, W.W. Bread
VO: Soy Beef Sauce
SO: Taco Salad
Friday, Jan. 24
Sliced Turkey Ham, Au
Gratin Potatoes, Broccoli
Flowerets, Applesauce, W.W.
Roll
VO: Au Gratin With Soy
ORE 95 & 984
Thursday, Jan. 16
Oregon School Board
Meeting (of Jan. 13)
Friday, Jan. 17
OHS Girls Varsity Basketball
vs Ft. Atkinson (of Jan. 14)
Saturday, Jan. 18
OHS Boys Varsity Hockey vs
McFarland (of Jan. 16)
Sunday, Jan. 19
OHS Boys Varsity Basketball
vs Monroe (of Jan. 16)
Monday, Jan. 20
OHS Girls Varsity Basketball
vs Portage (of Jan. 17)
Tuesday, Jan. 21
“Is He Dead?” OHS Play (of
Feb. ‘11)
Wednesday, Jan. 22
OHS Band “Thank You”
Show (of July ‘13)
Thursday, Jan. 23
RCI Band Concerts (of Jan.
21)
Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for all channels. A
new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1, 4, 7
and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.
Community cable listings Senior center
The Appendix
If you studied human anatomy twenty or thirty years ago, you
were probably taught that the appendix (or vermiform appen-
dix—the small wormlike pouch that hangs from the cecum
of the large intestine), was a useless structure, perhaps some
vestigial organ that served a purpose in our long-distant past. I
distinctly remember an argument some thirty years ago between
my father (who argued that it must have some purpose) and my
brother (who was in his first or second year of medical school,
and who argued that it had none that could be discerned). My
father’s argument was based on his belief that God would not
have created something without a purpose. He didn’t necessar-
ily know what the purpose was, but there must be one. People
do just fine without one, my brother rejoined, and he asked,
furthermore, what is the purpose of eyebrows? To keep sweat
from getting in your eyes was my father’s answer, and wouldn’t
we look pretty strange without eyebrows? Medical science now
believes that the appendix is a repository for the good bacteria
that colonize our intestines and which aid in all sorts of impor-
tant functions, from digestion to our immune system. So score
one for Dad, and the view that to everything under heaven there
is indeed a purpose. We may not always know that purpose but
should trust to Providence that there is one.
– Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
“The Lord has made everything for its purpose, even the wicked
for the day of trouble.”
Proverbs 16:4
Christian Women’s Connection
The Dane County Wisconsin After
5 Christian Women’s Connection din-
ner is set for 6:30-8 p.m., Monday,
Jan. 20, at the Radisson Hotel, 517
Grand Canyon Dr., Madison.
The theme is “Music and Move-
ment,” and how to include both in a
daily routine.
For reservations, email gdburo-
ker@charter.net or call Gloria at 219-
9865 or Joan at 233-6847.
Get ‘Vegucated’
Go to the Oregon Public Library
at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 21, for a
viewing of the film, “Vegucated,”
about three meat- and cheese-loving
New Yorkers who agree to adopt a
vegan diet for six weeks.
‘Brewing Questions’
The group meets Tuesday, Jan. 21,
and the third Tuesday of every month
in the Firefly Coffee House back
room at 8:30 a.m.
This is an open-minded discus-
sion group about faith, life and
things which matter to us. All faith
perspectives welcome for respect-
ful dialogue and making new friends.
For details, contact Le Anne at
515-1515.
Pancake breakfast and bake
sale
People are invited to the Oregon
Senior Center from 7 a.m. to noon on
Sunday, Jan. 26, for a pancake break-
fast and bake sale. Call the center at
835-5801 for more information on the
event.
Oregon Straw Hat Players
auditions
Auditions for the “@5th Annual
Putnam County Spelling Bee,” will be
held at 5 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 26, and
7 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 28, in the Per-
forming Arts Center at Oregon High
School, 456 North Perry Parkway.
Auditioners should prepare a portion
of one minute or less of a song from a
contemporary musical.
Selections from the show are wel-
come. An accompanist will be pro-
vided, and a cappella auditions are
strongly discouraged. Auditioners
may also be asked to read from the
script.
Performers age 12 and older are
welcome to audition. There are no
additional age requirements for any
role in this production.
There may be roles for ensemble
performers in addition to the named
characters in the script.
Email director Duane Draper at
auditions@oshponline.org for more
information.
Learn about depression
Winter got you down? Is it normal
sadness or something more?
Join Dr. Daniel Staddler, Family
Medicine Physician, to learn about
depression including Seasonal Affec-
tive Disorder. Learn about the signs
and symptoms of depression and what
can be done to help you feel better.
The event is 6-7:30 p.m., Wednesday,
Jan. 29, at Stoughton Hospital.
To register for this free event,
please contact Sonja at 835-2356 or
pr3@stohosp.com
AARP smart driver program
This classroom course helps older
drivers become more aware of the
changes that occur due to aging. This
program will be offered at the Oregon
Area Senior Center from 11:30 a.m.
to 4 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 30.
January 16, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
7
flashing lights and gates.
Gracz told the Village
Board in November that he
and public works director
Mark Below thought the
estimated $250,000 cost
to install gates and flash-
ing lights was unnecessary
because only two-to-three
trains per week will run on
the rail line. Instead, the
village wanted to install
crossbucks and stop signs.
The Wi s c ons i n a nd
Southern Railroad expects
to operate the trains to serve
Lycon Inc.’s new ready-
mix concrete facility in the
business park when the line
is reactivated in the spring.
The line has been closed
since around 1997. At least
initially, trains will run only
from the Alpine Business
Park to Madison to serve
Lycon.
But the railroad commis-
sioner’s office foresees a
time when the line will be
activated south of the vil-
lage and serve more users.
In denying the village’s
request, the railroad com-
missioner noted that the
crossing would have three
sets of tracks because of a
spur off the main line that
will reach into the business
park to serve Lycon’s pro-
duction facility.
Lycon is building a rail
spur off the main line so
that freight cars hauling
aggregate can reach its
plant in the business park.
“The presence of mul-
tiple tracks is one of the
key factors warranting the
installation of automatic
flashing lights with gates,”
the commissioner’s office
wrote in a letter to the vil-
lage.
In September, Gov. Scott
Walker approved a $2.29
million grant to reacti -
vate the 10-mile rail corri-
dor between McCoy Road
i n Fi t chburg and West
Netherwood Road in Ore-
gon in order to serve the
Lycon facility.
Trains running on the line
will be restricted to travel-
ing at 25 mph, and 20 mph
when reaching Braun Road
and the business park.
Given those speeds and
the number of trains that
will use the line, village
officials felt the order to
i nst al l aut omat i c fl ash-
ing lights with gates was
“overkill,” Below told the
Observer in November.
On Monday, Gracz told
t he Vi l l age Board t hat
while he didn’t agree with
or want to justify the com-
missioner’s decision, he
did feel that if the village
would ever have to install
the warning devices, now is
a good time because the vil-
lage has the funds in its TIF
2 account.
The Alpine Business Park
is in the village’s Tax Incre-
ment-Financing District 2.
The vi l l age was al so
ordered to raise the eleva-
tion of Braun Road at the
rail crossing by one foot.
When the village construct-
ed Braun Road in 2010, it
decided to build the road
with a surface elevation
“slightly more than eight
inches below the existing
top of rail.”
But Wi s c ons i n a nd
Southern Railroad wants
Braun Road to be about
four inches above the top of
the rail.
Village officials initially
objected to the change,
but Gracz told the Village
Board Monday the village
had withdrawn its objection
and that Lycon had agreed
to pay the cost of changing
the crossing elevation.
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Rail: Village opposition to rail crossing denied, could cost $250,000 to install gates
Continued from page 1
Oregon History – October
100 years ago (1913)
The Oregon School Notes
mentioned that Joe Haight
and Ernest Culb had joined
the OHS Junior class and
that Guy Smith had entered
Eighth Grade.
The OHS agri cul t ure
class announced they were
ready to test the milk of any
of the local farmers desiring
it.
It was noted that Wil-
liam McDermott had left
for Chicago on the 7th.
of October to witness the
baseball series for the city
championship between the
Cubs and the White Sox.
The court case against
Harry Waterman of Rut-
land, charged with shooting
prairie chickens, was dis-
missed due to lack of evi-
dence. The charge had been
made by Deput y Game
Warden Andrew Sampson.
Dr. E. S. Johnson, who
had been practicing medi-
cine in Dalles, Ill. , has
decided to move his prac-
tice to Oregon. He will
occupy the offices located
over the drug store formerly
occupied by Dr. Bennett.
The ownership of the
Portland Hotel passed into
the hands of John Walters
who traded it to Julius Lew-
er for the latter’s 190 acre
farm near Brooklyn. The
trade will be effective the
first of January 1914.
The automobile in which
Theodore Roosevelt stood
in when he was shot a year
ago in Milwaukee made a
stop in the village. The car,
described as “a big, roomy
cross country Rambler,”
is the property of Geo. F.
Moss, vice-president and
treasurer of the Western
States Envelope Co. Moss
and his brother-in-law, E.
J. Bearman stopped here
while on a business and
pleasure trip though the
southern and central parts
of the state. Mr. Moss’
partner had been a member
of the Roosevelt reception
committee.
50 years ago (l963)
OHS students organized
a new club, The Panther
Players, for those inter-
ested in acting and the
stage. Officers of the club
were Pat Powers, manager;
Penny Pawl i sch, di rec-
tor; Nancy Jallings, assis-
tant director and Pat Pas-
ell, prompter. The faculty
advisors were Sandra Ott
and Susan Hagestad. Their
first presentations were
two one- act plays, “Riders
to the Sea” by J. M. Synge
and “Marriage Proposal” by
Chekov.
Chuck Swibold on Union
Road Oregon advertises
that his crews can pick,
shell, haul and dry your
corn. Corn can be picked at
$5 per acre (plus gas) and
shelled at 3 cents per bush-
el. He also has a large por-
table corn dryer available.
R. L. Staley of 585 Soden
Drive, Oregon, announces
the opening of his full-ser-
vice heating company, not-
ing his 15 years of experi-
ence in the industry.
Natural gas service is
turned on in the village.
Present at the ceremonial
opening of the entrance
valve were Steve Madsen,
village president; Syl Far-
ris, superintendent of pub-
lic works; Bill Mossman,
W.P.L Manager; Bill Deck-
ert, Dane Co. operating
superintendent; and Urban
Johnson, sout hern area
mechanical superintendent.
The village board voted
to adopt a municipal gar-
bage and rubbish pickup
on a three month trial basis
with City Disposal Corp.
The Oregon School Dis-
trict cafeterias serve 680
students per day. The cost
to pupils is 30 cents a day
if on a weekly ticket or 35
cents for a single day ticket.
The OHS Future Home-
makers of America name
their new officers for the
year: Joyce Hansen, presi-
dent; Kris Kellor, vice-
president; Kay Tauchen,
secretary; Eileen Feller,
treasurer; Connie Damson,
reporter; Carmen Nielson,
degree chairperson; Annet-
ta Kopke, student council
Rep.; Bonnie Lawry, recre-
ation chairperson; Sharon
Noyce, historian; and Carol
Paulson, parliamentarian.
Oregon resident, Richard
Wechter, is honored for 25
years of service at Phillips
Petroleum Co. He is serving
as city sales manager for
Madison. Wechter has been
an active member of several
local organizations includ-
ing the Oregon Rotary Club
and the P.T.A.
Gor don Hans en and
Eldon McClure of Oregon
and Hans Sannes of Stough-
ton returned home from
a week of deer hunting in
Wyoming. They brought
back with three bucks – an
8-pointer and two 6-point-
ers.
Local residents Claude
Piggott, Rufus Thornton
and Halvor Bjornson, mem-
bers of the Dane County
Cons er vat i on League,
released 105 banded pheas-
ant roosters and 100 hens in
the local area for the open-
ing of the hunting season.
The OHS football team
wi ns t hei r homecomi ng
game over Evansville, 20-0.
In the first quarter Rich
Olson threw a pass to Gary
Anderson for a 37-yard
touchdown; then in the
third quarter Bill Outhouse
ran 10 yards for the second
touchdown. The last score
was made by Anderson
when he ran back a fumble
for a 29 yard touchdown.
Only one of their extra
points were missed. Coach
Kissling expressed his sat-
isfaction with the team’s
performance, especially the
running of Dean Cloud and
Outhouse and the line play
of Erwin Weaver and Larry
Wegger. The Homecoming
King and Queen were Rich
Olson and Mary Leslie.
25 years ago (l988)
Two Or e gon e i ght h
graders, Jo Ellen Ammato
(bass clarinet) and Matt
Cornwell (trombone) were
selected from 44 Wisconsin
school districts to perform
with the 1988 Wisconsin
Youth Honors Band during
the Wisconsin Educator’s
Convention in Madison.
OHS agricultural ed stu-
dents Eric Olstad and Bob
Behnke represented the
Wisconsin 4-H Clubs at the
National 4-H Dairy Judging
Contest held in Harrisburg,
PA.
J ay Ki r s chbaum, an
employee of WISO Indus-
tries, received his certifi-
cate of apprenticeship in the
trade of tool and die making
from the company’s vice-
president, Dennis Kjell-
strom.
Boy Scout Troop #168,
holding a Court of Honor at
St. John’s Lutheran Church,
welcomed four new scouts
to the troop: Brett Ander-
son, Richie Norton, Bruce
Pfeiffer and John Vanton.
Physicians Plus opened
their new clinic in Oregon
with a five member staff
headed by William Heifner,
M.D.
Michelle Mitchell and
her classmates at Brooklyn
Elementary School enjoyed
their contest of guessing the
weight of a huge 260-pound
pumpkin that her father had
delivered to the school.
OHS pri nci pal Henry
Appel was chosen CESA
District’s Principal of the
year. He went on to repre-
sent the CESA District at
the state level where he had
the honor be being one of
the finalists.
OHS football team pulls
off a close homecoming
victory over the DeFor-
est Norskies, 45-42; keep-
ing their playoff chances
alive. Ed Gnewuch carried
the ball 26 times for 152
yards and four touchdowns.
Homecomi ng Ki ng and
Queen were Ed Gnewuch
and Heather Northop.
Six OHS harriers earn
Badger Al l - conf er ence
Honors: Bob Richardson,
Tom Ri chardson, Dave
Williams, Lee Kleuver,
Brenda Bl omst rom and
Caryn Williams.
Jeff Virnig, a resident of
Oregon, constructed five
new Oscar Mayer Wie-
nermobiles from modified
Chevy vans at a cost of
$75,000 each. They were
constructed at his busi-
ness, J & K Manufacturing
in Madison. He was in the
village recently with one of
the vehicles.
10 years ago (2003)
Town of Oregon resi-
dents, Joan and Tammy
Grady (sisters), returned
home from Kuwait where
they were sent during Iraq
War. They both served with
the 147th. Command Avia-
tion Battalion.
Forty-eight kids, ages
8-15, participated in the
Oregon Jaycees Punt, Pass
and Kick Contest. Cooper
Smith (8-9 age group) came
away wi t h t he wi nni ng
score of 142 feet: punting
48 ft., passing 55 ft. and
kicking 39 ft. David Beers
(10-11 age group) won with
a score of 214 ft.,punting 74
ft., passing 57 ft., and kick-
ing 83 ft. Mike Valentine
(12-13 age group) won with
a score of 248; punting 81
ft., passing 72 ft. and punt-
ing 95 ft.and in the 14-15
age group Brad Shotcliff
had a winning score of 238;
punting 45 ft., passing 91
ft., and kicking 102 ft. In
the girls 10-11 age category
Shelby Wilhem won with
distances of 47, 42, and
37 feet and Kayla Crow-
ley won the girls 12-13 age
category with distances of
70,42, and 89 totaling 201
feet.
The OHS boys’ soccer
team won their own soccer
invitational, scoring victo-
ries over Wisconsin Heights
(9-0), Baraboo (3-0), and
McFarland (3-0). Those
mentioned as contribut-
ing to their success were
Derek Breidenbach, Kory
Rai sbeck, Kevn Kranz,
Ryan Parks, Ty Mavis, Erik
Hansen, and Lyle Swee-
ney. The team went on in
their regular season play to
clinch the Southern Badger
Conference Title.
OHS’ s No. 1 gol f er ,
Katie Matthews, is named
to the Badger South All-
Conference Team.
The theme chosen for the
2003 Homecoming was “A
Tropical Paradise,” Kevin
Krenz and Megan Pehler
were the King and Queen.
A ribbon cutting ceremo-
ny was held in Brooklyn
for the reopening of State
Hwy. 92. Participating were
Dean Martinson, village
president; LaVorn Dvorak,
president of the Brooklyn
Chamber of Commerce
along with state and con-
struction representatives.
Later a block party was
held on Hotel Street to cele-
brate the event. The festivi-
ties included a concert by
the Steve Miller Group.
Habi t at for Humani t y
volunteers work to organize
a build in the Oregon area.
Marcy Worzala was named
as the steering committee’s
chairperson.
The OHS Class of 2004
raises over $1, 800 with
their fund-raiser involv-
ing the sale of 520 dozen
Krispy Kreme doughnuts
and coffee from the Firefly
Coffeehouse. The Krispy
Kreme doughnuts had been
freshly baked and picked up
from a store in Milwaukee.
Tr a f f i c s i gna l s a r e
installed at the intersection
of Janesville and Wolfe
Streets.
The Oregon Youth Cen-
ter held its grand re-open-
ing at their new location,
110 North Oak Street, the
former EMS building. The
Program Director is Amy
Keppert.
Photo by Bill Livick
The rail crossing at Braun Road will need a gate and flashing lights, state officials said.
8
January 16, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Unified Newspaper Group is part of Woodward Community Media,
a division of Woodward Communications, Inc.
and an Equal Opportunity Employer.
Limo luxury
Elementary school kids earned
a ride in a black Hummer limo
after being top sellers in the
Chip Shoppe Fundraiser.
Kids who sold a minimum of 25
items earned a limo ride with
the principal.
On Dec. 13, 2013 Galant Limo
of Madison took kids on a ride
around town. The students
stopped at Pizza Pit in Oregon
and had a warm chocolate chip
cookie and milk before departing
back to school.
The Limo took three separate
trips with kids to accommodate
all 39 kids who qualified for the
ride.
The top four sellers and sibling
pass earners were: Jonathan
Fosler (PVE Kindergartner),
Emma Topp (PVE 3rd grader),
Thomas Fosler (PVE 2nd grader)
and Paige Black (PVE 1st
grader). This was a promotion
through the Chip Shoppe and
completely paid for by them.
Photos submitted
First-grader Carson Gehrke, left, and kindergartner J.J. Fosler hang out inside a black Hummer limo.
Thomas Fosler enjoys a ride inside a limo as part of a reward for a school fundraiser.
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EMERALD INVESTMENTS
MINI STORAGE
U
N
3
2
2
5
4
7
Academic achievements
Graduates
UW-Oshkosh
ElizaBeth Stetzer, BS,
Education
UW-Madison
Oregon graduates include:
Victor Steven Bittorf, MS,
Computer Sciences; Heather
Blohm, BA, Psychology; Daniel
Joseph Faust, BS, Biology,
German; Caitlin Rose Garvey,
BA, Communication Arts,
Spanish; Lydia Mary Ginther,
Master of Accountancy,
Business: Accounting;
Jill Kaitlin Halverson, BA,
Economics, Political Science;
Alexandra Kay Holznecht,
BA, Legal Studies, Spanish;
Joseph Michael Jaeckels,
BS, Engineering Mechanics;
Lauren Colleen Jernegan,
BS, Human Development and
Family Studies; Jacqueline
Joan Kursel, BS, Art;
Zachary Louis Niemeyer, BS,
Chemistry, History of Science,
Medicine and Technology;
Devan Shaye Oschmann,
BA, Sociology; Mark Alan
Scholbrock, BA, Sociology;
Travis Alan Sossaman, MS,
Materials Engineering; Melissa
A Tealey, BA, Spanish;
Michael Lawrence Tolly, BA,
Computer Sciences; Danielle
Ruth Trudell, BS, Elementary
Education; Todd James Vitale,
BBA, Business: Real Estate
and Urban Land Economics;
Stacy Lynn Weber, Master of
Physician Assistant Studies,
Physician Assistant; Mallory
Jane Williams, Doctor of
Pharmacy, Pharmacy;
Brooklyn graduates include:
Megan Rose Beers, BS,
Elementary Education; Ann
Marie Sherman Bradbury,
BS, Nursing; Aimee Ann
Dorn, MBA, Business:
General Management; Lynn
Renee Gilbertson, Doctor of
Philosophy, Communication
Sciences and Disorders; Angus
David Mcnair, BA, Journalism;
Shannon Irene Schlack, BS,
Nursing; Abbey Maureen
Wethal, BS, Life Sciences
Communication; Jennifer Lee
Lawler Yelk, MS, Counseling;
UW-Green Bay
Brooklyn graduates include:
Jennifer Malak, Bachelor’s
Degree, Nursing
UW-Milwaukee
Bradley Jens Andersen,
BSE, engineering; Alexandria
Rose Draginis, BS, educa-
tion; Andrea Nicole Gromoske,
PHD, social welfare
Academic Honors
UW-Whitewater
Brady Kinson, Summa cum
laude; Jacob Westenberger,
cum laude
UW-River Falls
Brianna Blume, Summa
Cum Laude
Upper Iowa University
Eric Disch, Cum Laude
UW-Madison
Danielle Marie Edelburg,
Eunice and Howard Ream
Memorial Foundation
Scholarship; Emily Rachel
Forster, Ferdinand Plaenert
New Freshman Excellence
Award; Diana Perdomo,
Frank Barron Morrison
Scholarship; Diana Perdomo,
Nutriad Inc. Scholarship
in Recognition of Jose Luis
Laparra; Diana Perdomo,
Walter C. and Mabel J. Topel
Animal Sciences Scholarship;
Jennifer Marie Sanford,
Wisconsin Biological Systems
Engineering Scholarship;
Melissa Ann Vandersanden,
Robert J. Spitzer Dairy Science
Scholarship;
University of Iowa
Ariel Brooke Kelzenberg,
dean’s list
Augustana College
Maureen Zach, dean’s list
UW-Superior
Lael Gombar, dean’s list
Submit graduate information and
academic honors to the
Oregon Observer:
ungcollege@wcinet.com
Photo submitted
The Brooklyn Cub Scouts Pack 352
On Friday, Nov. 8, the Brooklyn cub scouts hosted its annual lock-in as well as a space Derby.
The boys made their own space ships and raced them. They then set up tents and camped out in the
gym. Pictured above are the boys and leaders with their space ships.
Front row : Jeremy Lloyd and Dave Compton
2nd row: Kiran Mandrekar, Dayne Severson, Myles Valiska, Jacob Lorenz, Mitchell Compton, Rylan
Clark, Jonathan Hoeft, Lucas Brown
3rd Row: Quinton Doboer, Jhean- Luc Jaeschke, Brett Fink, Jacob Hoeft, Colin Sutter, Joshua Weber,
Thomas Fosler
4th Row: Seth Niday, Mitchell Mancusi, Connor Larson
Back Row: Chad Niday, Heath Valiska, Tom Lorenz, Marc Fink, Jeff Jaeschke, Rich Clark
SPORTS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, January 16, 2014
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com
The Oregon Observer
9
Girls basketball
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Sophomore guard Leah Koopman (middle), junior forward Riley Rosemeyer (left) and senior forward Katie Boehnen celebrate following a 69-64 win Thursday, Jan. 9, at
Oregon High School against Monona Grove. The win moved the Panthers into sole possession of first place in the Badger South Conference.
Panthers claw back
No. 10 Oregon erases
15-point deficit, defeats
No. 4 Monona Grove 69-64
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Time was running out on the Ore-
gon High School girls basketball team
last Thursday against Monona Grove,
and the No. 10 host Panthers needed a
spark as they trailed by 15.
That spark came off the fingertips
of senior guard Megan Brugger in the
third quarter, who nailed a 3-pointer
while being fouled. She later knocked
in the free throw and began a run
that pushed Oregon to a 69-64 win
to remain in first place in the Badger
South Conference.
“I knew we were down, and I was
really excited because I knew we
needed the points to get back into the
game,” Brugger said. “I knew that
that gave us the momentum going
forward. In my head, I knew we had
the momentum now.”
The 4-point play was just the
beginning for Oregon (9-2 overall,
5-0 Badger South). After a 20-8 run,
it was senior forward Maddy Gits and
junior forward Riley Rosemeyer who
took over. Gits, who scored 13 of her
team-leading 20 points in the fourth
quarter, drove to the basket for a score
and a foul with under three minutes to
play. Gits knocked in the free throw
to tie the game at 55.
After a Monona Grove (6-2, 2-2)
basket by senior guard Taylor Nelson,
Gits came right back with another
basket and a foul, though she missed
the free throw this time.
The Panthers got the ball back
twice and knocked in three free
throws, one by junior Rosemeyer and
two by Gits.
Rosemeyer then helped create
some separation with a basket from
a pass by Brugger and an offensive
put back to make it 64-59. Rosemeyer
scored 15 points.
The Panthers held on in the last
minute with free throws by sopho-
more guards Cassidy Nikolai and
Leah Koopman.
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Oregon senior guard Shaw Storey (right) and Stoughton freshman guard Troy Slaby
fight for a loose ball Monday in a Badger South game Monday, Jan. 13, at Oregon
High School. The Panthers were edged 31-29.
Boys basketball
Defensive struggle comes up short
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The Oregon boys basketball
team was looking for a big win
Monday, coming into a makeup
game with Stoughton as one of
the last-place teams in the Badger
South Conference.
And although neither offense put
up huge numbers, the host Panthers
had their shot after coming back
from a 13-point deficit to go up by
one with 2 minutes, 38 seconds to
play.
But the comeback was for naught
in a 31-29 loss after a 3-pointer by
Stoughton senior PJ Rosowski and
a missed basket with time running
out by Oregon senior guard Jon
Conduah.
“They turned it over a couple of
times, and we capitalized,” head
coach Jon Nedlecoff said. “That is
basketball. Hopefully once you get
over that hump, you can seal the
deal. But we didn’t seal the deal.”
It seemed like the Panthers (4-6
overall, 1-4 conference) had all
the momentum after senior guard
Shaw Storey drove into the lane for
a basket and a foul to tie the game.
Storey missed the free throw, but
Conduah later gave Oregon its first
lead since the first quarter with a
2-pointer to make it 27-25.
Stoughton senior Will Clark
(seven points) nailed a 3-pointer
to give the Vikings the lead back
at 2:58, but Oregon senior forward
Andrew McCauley made a putback
30 seconds later to make it 29-28.
After nearly two minutes of
scoreless basketball, including two
missed free throws by Stoughton
junior Nick McGlynn, Rosowski
worked to get open on the perim-
eter and drained the 3-pointer with
14.4 seconds left.
Conduah gave the Panthers a shot
to send the game into overtime by
working his way to the inside and
sending up an open shot, but the
ball hit the rim and shot to the other
side of the floor where Rosowski,
who scored nine points, secured the
rebound and was fouled.
“They hit two threes. You tip
your hat, and you move on,” Nedel-
coff said.
Defense was the main reason
why Oregon had that opportunity in
the first place, with players not only
challenging the ball handlers at the
perimeter but also by clogging the
paint and double and triple teaming
McGlynn.
Boys hockey
Oregon drops
three straight
JEREMY JONES
Sports Editor
The Oregon boys hock-
ey team that opened the
season winning eight of
11 dropped three straight
non-conference games last
week, including a 5-1 loss
Tuesday inside Madison
Ice Arena against non-con-
ference Madison West (13-
3-0).
It was a game with post-
season implications as both
teams play in the same
WIAA playoff bracket.
Seni or f or war d Al ex
Robson scored Oregon’s
lone goal in the first peri-
od.
The host Regents, how-
ever, put up a trio of goals
in the first and two more
in the second period in the
blowout.
Seni or f or war d Max
Lentz scored two goals and
recorded three assists for
Madison West.
Senior goaltender Zach
Jordan stopped 17 shots
on goals, while freshman
Henry Roskos turned away
another four.
One of the area’s top
goal i es, Madi son West
junior Henry Cutting faced
12 shots, brushing aside
11.
The Pant her s ( 8- 5-
1 overall, 3-1-0 Badger
Sout h) remai ned i n t he
conference title hunt fol-
lowing Monona Grove’s
8-0 l oss Fri day agai nst
Madison Edgewood (3-2-
0). Down two points in
Turn to Hockey/Page 8
Turn to Girls BB/Page 8
Turn to Boys BB/Page 9
Badger South
Team W-L-T
Monona Grove 4-1-0
Oregon 3-1-0
Mad. Edgewood 3-2-0
Stoughton 2-3-0
McFarland 1-3-0
Monroe 0-3-0
10
January 16, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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“We told them, ‘Don’t
let the other team dictate the
pace and be the aggressor all
the time. Go attack and make
things happen,’” head coach
Corey Sielaff said. “We
believe in our rebounding.
That is a huge strength. We
have great size, and we just
have a knack for finding the
ball. At 15, we told them we
had to claw, and we did.”
Senior guard Dani Iron-
monger, Nikolai, Koopman
and Brugger all had to help
in bigger roles than normal at
the end, as well. Senior guard
Kelsey Jahn fouled out with
5:04 left.
Jahn, who scored 11 points,
is the leading ball handler for
the Panthers and normally
takes the ball up the court and
helps set up the offense. But
with her on the bench, oth-
ers had to step up to fill that
role and handle the full-court
pressure of the Silver Eagles.
“I think by her fouling
out it kind of gave us more
momentum because we knew
we had to push even more
without one of our starters in
the game,” Brugger said.
That full-court pressure of
the Silver Eagles was similar
to the defense Oregon plays,
and it showed early as both
teams combined for 19 turn-
overs –13 by the Panthers –
in the first quarter.
Despite the double-digit
giveaways in the first quar-
ter, the Panthers only trailed
15-13 after one, but 3-point-
ers by Kelsey and Stinson
helped the Silver Eagles build
a 10-point lead in the second.
Senior guard Kelsey Jahn
hit a 3-pointer to cut into that
lead, but Nelson scored with
time running down to give
Monona Grove a 36-27 lead
at halftime.
But after Brugger’s 4-point
play, everything started to
click on offense for Oregon.
Gits, Nikolai and Jahn all
followed with baskets to cut
the deficit to eight, and Jahn
hit two free throws to cut the
Silver Eagles’ lead to 50-44
after three.
It helped that Silver Eagles
were also in foul trouble.
Seni or guar d Al exa
Kelsey, senior post Kaitlyn
Long, senior guard McKen-
zie Clary, junior wing Kelsey
Stinson, sophomore wing
Autumn Ogden and Nelson
all hit three or four fouls at
the start of the fourth quarter.
Ogden, Stinson, Clary and
Nelson all fouled out by the
end of the game.
“We got the mismatches,
and that allowed our post to
get more to the outside, and
that allowed our guards, like
me and Megan and Cassidy
and Leah, to get on the inside
and really work the paint
too,” Jahn said.
The Panthers came into the
game up a half a game and
left still in sole possession
of first place in the Badger
South. The start to this season
is the best Gits and the rest of
the seniors and juniors have
had in their Panthers’ careers.
“I think that after this win,
our team is going to go into a
lot more games knowing that
we can actually get far in the
tournament. When any team
sees that we have beaten MG,
they’ll be like, ‘Oh wow,
this team is actually going to
put up a fight,’” Gits said. “I
hope teams view us differ-
ently now that we are No. 1
in conference right now … I
just really hope to get 2014
on that basketball banner, and
we are going to do it.”
Oregon continues the sea-
son with two non-conference
games this week. First, the
Panthers host Portage at 7:30
p.m. Friday. They then trav-
el to Jefferson at 7:15 p.m.
Monday.
Oregon 30, Ft. Atkinson 19
Oregon hosted Fort Atkin-
son Tuesday and remained
unbeaten in the Badger South
Conference with a 30-19 win.
The Pant hers bui l t a
24-15 lead after three quar-
ters and were able to do
enough to stay ahead.
Senior forwards Maddy
Gi t s and Hannah Kane
each scored nine points in
the defensive struggle.
Girls hockey Boys swimming
Lack of depth
sinks Panthers
JEREMY JONES
Sports Editor
Oregon/Belleville boys
swimming moved its Bad-
ger South Conference dual
meet against rival Stoughton
from Friday up to Tuesday to
accommodate a rescheduling
of the Panthers dual at Mil-
ton to this Thursday.
In doing so, the Panthers
avoided having back-to-back
conference meets later this
week.
Despite hanging with vis-
iting Stoughton throughout
much of Tuesday’s meet,
the Panthers lack of depth
caught up to them in the
200-freestyle and 200-meter
individual medley.
Stoughton, which won
seven of 11 events, finished
1-2 in the 200 free and went
1, 3, 4 in the IM.
“Other than those two
events, we pretty much
swam with Stoughton all
night,” Oregon head coach
Scott Krueger said. “Fin-
ishing races is obviously
somet hi ng we have t o
work on.”
Freshman Jacob Larsen
and fellow underclassmen
Eli Rule, Jackson Marsden
and Josh Greene continued
to shine in the loss.
Larsen highlighted the
meet picking up individual
wins in the 100 butter-
fly (1:06.56) and 400 free
(4:44.56).
Larsen, Rule and Marsden
were joined by senior Brad
Rehrauer to take the 200
free relay in 1:50.90. Rule,
Larsen and Marsden opened
the meet with senior Sam
Phelps, taking the 200 med-
ley in 2:00.84.
Phelps was the only other
Panther individual to earn
a victory, taking the 100
breaststroke in 1:19.99.
The Panthers travel to
Milton 6 p.m. Thursday for a
conference dual rescheduled
from Jan. 7.
Lightning Invite
Larsen swam to the Pan-
thers top finish Saturday at
the Appleton North Light-
ning Invitational, taking fifth
place in the 100-yard butter-
fly in a season-best 59.42.
The Panthers top relay
finish came via the 200
free relay quartet of Rule,
Greene, Larsen and Mars-
den, which posted a 1:38.64
for sixth place.
Rule and Larsen both
finished seventh in the 100
back (1:02.01) and 500 free
(5:28.26) individually for the
Panthers.
James Lemke (200 free,
100 fly, 50 free, 100 free)
posted season-best in all
four of his swims Saturday
in Appleton, while Math-
ias Gregerson (50 free, 50
breast, 100 breast) and Sam
Phelps (50 free, 100 free,
100 breast) all posted three
best times in Appleton.
David Heim, Ben Kaep-
pler, Ryan McKirdy, Brad
Rehrauer, Jonas Temte
and Larsen each added two
season bests, while Josh
Greene, Ryan Wood and
Rule had one.
Krueger said several other
swims were just off best
times by tenths of a second.
The host Li ght ni ng
(484.5), Oshkosh West 370
and Ashwaubenon (356)
rounded out the top three
schools. Oregon finished
seventh out of 10 teams with
25 season best times.
“This was a great test for
our young team,” Krueger
said. “After missing some
practice time at the begin-
ning of the week because
of the cold and a long trip
to Appleton – the boys
responded to the challenge.”
Glover supplies Icebergs’ offense against Rock Co.
JEREMY JONES
Sports Editor
McFarland senior defense-
man Katie Glover scored a
pair of goals Tuesday as the
MSO Icebergs girls hockey
co-op skated to a 2-0 Badger
Conference win inside the
Mandt Community Center.
Stoughton forward Rachel
Dvorak and Monona Grove
defenseman Sara Wollin
assisted on both scores.
The victory improved
the Icebergs to 19-5-2 over-
all and 3-1-1 in the Badger
Conference, while the Rock
County Fury fell to 7-7-1, 1-3-
1.
“Tonight was a good per-
formance for us after having
a postponed game, a canceled
game and a canceled practice
resulting in five days off,”
Icebergs head coach Mike
Jochmann said.
Kenzie Torpy stopped 25
shots in the win.
The Icebergs travel to Viro-
qua Community Arena at 7:30
p.m. on Friday for a confer-
ence game against the Black-
hawks (0-7-0, 0-5-0) and then
to Weston at 2 p.m. Saturday
to face the second-ranked
Central Wisconsin Storm
(13-3-1).
Icebergs, Ice Bears
(canceled)
Fr i day ni ght ’ s game
between the top-ranked Bay
Area Ice Bears (12-1-0) and
10th-ranked Stoughton Ice-
bergs was canceled due to
unsafe travel conditions.
No make-up date had been
announced as the Courier
Hub went to press on Tues-
day, though Jochmann said a
make-up game doesn’t look
likely.
conference, Oregon travels to Hart-
meyer Ice Arena Tuesday, Jan. 28
for a game against the Silver Eagles
that could determine the outcome of
the Badger South.
Oregon returns to conference
action at 7 p.m. Thursday at McFar-
land (3-8-0, 1-3-0).
Mullet tournament
Senior captain Nick Strycharske
scored 11 minutes into the first peri-
od against the ninth-ranked Wauke-
sha Friday evening inside the Mullet
Ice Arena, but Oregon was unable
close out the Wings in a 2-1 loss.
Leading by a goal for nearly a
full 17 minutes, the Panthers proved
unable to get anything else past one
of the state’s top goalies in Wauke-
sha senior Jake Kupsky, who fin-
ished with 24 saves.
One of the state’s top scorers since
his freshman season, senior for-
ward Zed Dietrich took care of the
rest assisting linemate Joe Mason
on the game-tying goal before put-
ting Waukesha ahead for good eight
minutes later in the second period.
Neither team scored in the third
period as Oregon’s Jordan finished
with 28 saves.
Saturday’s game against unranked
Arrowhead provided a completely
different result as the Panthers went
down 4-1.
Sophomore Dylan Ziomek scored
Oregon’s lone goal in the second
period, but it wasn’t enough as the
Warhawks took control, lighting
the lamp three times in the decisive
period.
Jordan finished with 27 saves. No
Arrowhead stats were available as
the Observer went to press Tuesday
evening.
Oregon will make up its game
against third ranked Verona at 3:30
p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 18.
Girls BB: Gits scores 13 of 20 in the fourth to lead Oregon
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Senior forward Maddy Gits goes up for a layup in the fourth quarter Thursday against Monona
Grove. Gits scored 13 of her 20 points in the fourth quarter.
Boys hockey: Panthers look to regain winning momentum
Continued from page 7
Continued from page 7
Badger
Team W-L-T
Cap City 5-0-1
Metro Lynx 3-1-0
MSO Icebergs 2-1-1
Badger Thunder 1-3-1
Rock County Fury 1-2-1
Viroqua 0-5-0
Badger South
Team W-L
Oregon 5-0
Stoughton 3-2
Monona Grove 2-2
Madison Edgewood 2-2
Monroe 1-2
Milton 1-3
Fort Atkinson 0-3
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Senior Sam Phelps swam to victory in the 100-meter breast-
stroke Tuesday evening with a time of 1 minute, 19.99 seconds.
The host Panthers lost their Badger South Conference dual
against Stoughton 92-78, however.
January 16, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
11
January 17, 18, 19, 2014
Friday 3 pm to 8 pm
Saturday 9 am to 5 pm
Sunday 9 am to 3 pm
JANESVILLE
GUN SHOW
Janesville Fairgrounds
1301 Craig Ave, Janesville, WI
New & Used
Firearms, ammo, knives
optics & much, much more
Admission $5 ~ 14 & Under Free
For more info call 608.752.6677 or
visit www. BobAndRocco.com
Buy, Sell, or Trade
Photo submitted
Oregon Youth Wrestling continues to roll
The youth wrestling team hosted its annual tournament last Saturday at the high school. Despite the
adverse weather conditions, the event was well-attended with more than 350 wrestlers coming to
Wisconsin, Illinois and Iowa to compete.
The youth wrestlers carried last week’s momentum into the tournament and placed another nine wres-
tlers atop the podium.
Champions included Evan Fahey, Billy Outhouse, Henry Milz, David Beach, Collin Keast, Clay Haggerty,
Andrew Seitz, Abram O’Rourke (pictured above) and Seth Niday.
The team competes next on Jan. 26 in Evansville.
Wrestling
Photo by Rob Frauchiger
Senior Chad Walsh (160 pounds) dominates Fort Atkinson’s Nate Krause last Friday in a Badger
South dual against Fort Atkinson at Oregon High School. Walsh won the match by technical fall,
16-1, in 4 minutes, 29 seconds. However, Oregon lost the dual, 48-26.
Panthers drop nine of 14 against Fort Atkinson
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The Oregon High School varsity wres-
tling team looked to do better in its Bad-
ger South dual against Fort Atkinson last
Friday than in its previous dual against
Mount Horeb/Barneveld.
And the host Panthers did despite fall-
ing 48-26 to Fort Atkinson.
Oregon won five of 14 matches, which
nearly doubled its wins from the Milton
match, and four of the five wins all had
bonus points.
Seniors Jawon Turner (126 pounds),
Will Frauchiger (145) and Chad Walsh
(160) and Andrew Nyenhuis (192) all
picked up wins alongside freshman
Chris Haggerty (106).
Haggerty, Nyenhuis and Turner all
had pins, while Walsh picked up a tech-
nical fall. Frauchiger had the line deci-
sion for the Panthers.
Haggerty pinned Brendan Kind in
3 minutes, 15 seconds, while Turner
pinned Tony Smith in 3:17.
Nyenhui s got t he fal l over Bret t
Dunkleberger in 1:38.
Walsh defeated Nate Krause 16-1 in
4:29, while Frauchiger edged Mitch
Brus 2-1.
Smith and Brus were both sectional
qualifiers last season. Frauchiger and
Turner did not make sectionals last year.
Oregon continues the season at 7 p.m.
at Evansville and then travels to Lake
Geneva Badger High School for the
Badger Invitational at 10 a.m. Saturday.
The Panthers then have two more dual
meets before the Badger Conference
tournament on Feb. 8.
Oregon travels to Stoughton at 7:30
p.m. Friday, Jan. 24, and it travels to
Milton at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 31.
The conference t ournament i s at
Baraboo High School this year.
Mad City Pond Hockey
Championships
The inaugural Mad City
Pond Hockey Championships
are set for Jan. 24-26 at the
Vilas Park Lagoon. The 4-on-
4 round robin tournament
features nine divisions from
squirts to seniors open.
Registration is $280 for
adult teams (four to seven
players), $240 for youth teams
and is still open up until the
tournament.
Modeled after the pond
hockey tournament in Eagle
River, which pulls in peo-
ple from 38 different states,
the Mad City Pond Hockey
Championship will take place
the weekend between NFL
championship week and the
Super Bowl.
Unlike Eagle River, the
Mad City Pond Hockey
Championships have a youth
division.
A Winter Carnival, with
bouncy houses, small carnival
games, hockey shooting lanes
and much more entertainment
to enjoy, will be held inside
the UW Carbone Cancer
Pancreas Cancer Task Force
tent, fully enclosed with heat.
One hundred percent of the
proceeds raised from the car-
nival will be donated to the
Pancreas Cancer fund.
To make a personal or cor-
porate donation, make a check
payable to the “Pancreas Can-
cer Research Fund,” and send
it to: UW Carbone Cancer
Center, Attn: Pancreas Cancer
Research Fund, Madison, WI
53792-6164 or, make a con-
tribution online at: uwhealth.
org/pcrfund.
Sport shorts
Boys BB: Oregon falls to 1-4 in the Badger South after back-to-back losses
McGlynn, who averages 16 points a game, was
held to just eight, while the Vikings as a whole
were held to 26.8 percent shooting from the field
(12-for-42).
The only problem was that Stoughton’s
defense also limited the Panthers to tough shots.
Oregon shot 32.5 percent (13-for-40) from the
field.
“I thought they were relentless at times and
really did a nice job with how they rotated it
defensively from when the ball got swung and
when we reversed it,” Stoughton head coach
Matt Hockett said.
Another big discrepancy was the rebounds,
with Stoughton outrebounding Oregon 38-24,
including 9-3 on the offensive glass. Half
of McGlynn’s points came from offensive
rebounds. That coupled with a 4-1 advantage at
the 3-point line was enough to keep the Panthers
on the wrong side of the W-L column.
“Sometimes you can play your best game and
it doesn’t mean a ‘W’.’ Sometimes you play
a really bad game and can get the ‘W.’ That is
life,” Nedelcoff said.
Conduah led Oregon with 10 points, while
McCauley scored six.
Oregon continues the season at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday against Monroe. The Panthers then
travel to Randolph at 6 p.m. Friday before finish
the week at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Milton.
“No need to feel sorry for ourseleves,” Nedel-
coff said. “We play Monroe Thursday night, and
it won’t be any different. We just have to find a
way to get into the left side of the win column.”
Edgewood 53, Oregon 51
Oregon also lost a close game last Friday at
Madison Edgewood, falling 53-51.
The Panthers trailed by 10 at halftime but
clawed back to make it a game in the fourth quar-
ter. But once again, they couldn’t finish the deal.
Sophomore guard Alex Duff scored 16 points,
while Conduah and McCauley added nine and
eight, respectively.
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Senior forward Andrew McCauley barrels into Stoughton senior PJ Roswoski in
the fourth quarter Monday. McCauley finished with six points.
Badger South Conference
Team W L
Monona Grove 4 0
Stoughton 3 1
Madison Edgewood 3 2
Milton 1 2
Monroe 1 2
Fort Atkinson 1 3
Oregon 1 4
Continued from page 7
12
January 16, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Legals
ORDINANCE NO. 13-04
VILLAGE OF OREGON
AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL
CHAPTER 19, REPEAL AND
RECREATE CHAPTER 20,
AND REPEAL AND RECREATE
SECTIONS 17-522 AND
17-913 OF THE VILLAGE
OF OREGON CODE OF
ORDINANCES, RELATING TO
HISTORIC PRESERVATION
AND MAINTENANCE
STANDARDS IN THE
HISTORIC NEIGHBORHOOD
DESIGN OVERLAY
ZONING DISTRICT
The Village Board of the Village of
Oregon, Dane County, Wisconsin, or-
dains as follows:
1. Chapter 19 of the Village Code of
Ordinances is repealed.
2. Section 1.35 of the Village Code of
Ordinances is created as follows:
1.35. Historic Preservation Commis-
sion.
(1) The Historic Preservation Com-
mission shall consist of 7 persons com-
petent and informed in the historical, ar-
chitectural and cultural traditions of the
Village. One of the Commissioners shall
be a member of the Village Board and
shall serve during his or her term of of-
fce as a Board member. Of the remaining
6 members of the Commission, at least 3
of them shall be residents of the Village.
In addition, the Building inspector shall
be an ad hoc member of the Commission
and shall not be entitled to a vote.
(2) All members of the Commission
shall be appointed by the Village Presi-
dent subject to confrmation by the Vil-
lage Board. The frst appointments of the
6 non-Board members shall be for the
following terms: 2 for one year, 2 for two
years, and 2 for three years. Thereafter,
the terms of non-Board members shall be
3 years and until their successors are ap-
pointed and qualifed.
(3) The Village Board President shall
appoint, subject to confrmation of the
Board, for a term of 1 year an alternate
member of the Commission, in addition
to the 7 members above provided for.
The alternate shall be a resident of the
Village. The alternate shall act, with full
power, only when a member of the Com-
mission refuses or declines to vote, is
disqualifed because of interest, or when
a member is absent. Other provisions
herein appearing with regard to removal
and flling of vacancies, shall apply to
such alternate.
(4) Vacancies shall be flled for the
unexpired term as provided in Subsec-
tion (2).
(5) No compensation shall be paid
to Commission members except for ex-
penses necessary in carrying out their
duties.
(6) The Commission shall annual
select from its members a Chairperson,
Vice-Chairperson and Secretary and
shall fll vacancies in such offces.
3. Section 17-522 of the Village Code
of Ordinances is repealed and recreated
as follows:
Section 17-522 Historic Neighbor-
hood Design Overlay Zoning District.
(1) Purpose. This district is intended
to preserve and enhance the historical
qualities of the older, historically intact
portions of the Village. This district is
designed to forward both aesthetic and
historic preservation objectives of the
Village by controlling the design and ap-
pearance of sites and structures within
the district in a manner consistent with
sound land use, urban design, historic
preservation and economic revitalization
principals. The application of these stan-
dards will ensure long-term progress and
broad participation toward these princi-
pals.
(2) Boundaries: [Include description
of the District]
(3) Alterations to Structures or Sites
in the Historic Neighborhood Design
Overlay Zoning District.
(a) For purposes of this section, the
words “alter,” “altered” or “alteration”
shall mean any construction, demolition,
removal, reconstruction, replacement, or
structural or material modifcation on,
of, or to, any outdoor part of the site, or
any part of the exterior of the building or
structure.
(b) No person shall alter, or cause
to be altered, all or any part of a site or
the exterior of any building or structure
located in the Historic Neighborhood
Design Overlay Zoning District, without
frst obtaining review and approval of an
application therefore in accordance with
Section 17-913.
4. Section 17-913 of the Village Code
of Ordinances is repealed and recreated
as set forth on attached Exhibit A.
5. Chapter 20 of the Village Code of
Ordinances is repealed and recreated as
follows:
20.01 TITLE. This chapter shall be
known as the “Downtown Historic Dis-
trict Exterior Maintenance Code.”
20.02 AUTHORITY. This chapter is
adopted under the authority granted by
Wis. Stat. ñ 61.34.
20.03 PURPOSE. The purpose of this
Chapter is to promote the general welfare
and economic well-being of the Village by
establishing minimum standards for the
maintenance of outdoor areas within, and
exterior and structural components of
buildings and structures on, lands in the
Downtown Historic Preservation District.
20.04 APPLICABILITY. This Chap-
ter applies to all lands, buildings and
structures located in the Downtown His-
toric Preservation District. Nothing in this
Chapter limits the applicability of other
sections of this Code to lands, buildings
and structures in the Historic Downtown
Historic Preservation District. The bound-
aries of the downtown Historic Preserva-
tion District are as follows: [insert]
20.05 PROPERTY MAINTENANCE
REQUIREMENTS. All lands, buildings
and structures located in the Downtown
Historic Preservation District shall be
maintained in accordance with the fol-
lowing minimum standards and require-
ments:
(1) Drainage. Courts, yards and
other outdoor areas shall be graded to
divert surface water away from buildings.
Ground surface areas shall be sloped
away from buildings at a grade of at least
one-half inch per foot for a minimum of
fve feet where possible, or by alternative
means such as eaves, troughs or down-
spout extensions.
(2) Weeds. Outdoor areas shall be
kept free from noxious weeds and other-
wise maintained in accordance with sec-
tion 10.03 of this Code.
(3) Debris. Outdoor areas and adja-
cent rights of way shall be maintained in
a clean and sanitary condition, free from
debris, dust, rubbish, physical hazards,
rodent harborage and infestation, and
animal feces.
(4) Fences and Walks. Fences and
walks shall be maintained in a safe and
sanitary manner and kept in good condi-
tion, free from defects or deterioration.
(5) Exterior Surfaces. All exterior
surfaces of buildings, fences and other
structures, including but not limited to
exterior surfaces of windows and doors,
that are not inherently resistant to deteri-
oration, shall be treated with a protective
coating of paint or other suitable preser-
vative that will provide protection from
weathering and maintain an attractive ap-
pearance. Exterior surfaces treated with
paint or other preservative shall be main-
tained so as to prevent chipping, crack-
ing, or other deterioration of the exterior
surface or the surface treatment and to
present an attractive appearance.
(6) Yard Areas. Outdoor areas shall
be kept in a clean and sanitary condition,
free from any accumulation of materials
that are not used as an integral part of
the landscaping or authorized business
carried out on the property. Outdoor ar-
eas shall not be used to store appliances,
furnaces, hot water heaters, water soft-
eners, landscaping or building materials
not used within fve days, or any unsight-
ly bulk items, other than materials used
in the business carried out on the prem-
ises so long as such materials are kept in
accordance with zoning and other regu-
lations applicable to the property. All ex-
cavation and land flling operations shall
be leveled off to permit mowing of grass
and weeds. Vacant land shall be planted
with grass or otherwise landscaped in a
manner that will effectively prevent soil
erosion, and in compliance with any ap-
plicable site plan or landscaping plan to
which the land is subject by law.
(7) Structural Requirements. Every
foundation, exterior wall, roof, canopy,
overhang and chimney shall be weather
tight, watertight, rodent proof and shall
be kept in good repair, and free from
any condition that could cause struc-
tural degradation of the building. Any
sagging or bulging portion of a building
shall be repaired to a level, plumb posi-
tion. All chimneys and breaching shall be
constructed and maintained so that they
safely and properly remove the products
of combustion from the building.
(8) Windows and Doors. Windows,
doors, and basement hatchways shall
be weather tight, watertight, and rodent
proof, and kept in good repair. All door
and window hardware shall be installed
and maintained in proper working condi-
tion.
(9) Outdoor Stairs and Porches. Out-
door stairs, porches and appurtenances
thereto shall be constructed in accor-
dance with applicable building code re-
quirements, and maintained to be safe, in
good repair, and attractive.
(10) Outdoor Displays and Furniture.
Street furniture, outdoor display areas
and other temporary furnishings and
material shall be maintained in an or-
derly and attractive manner, and in con-
formance with Village approvals and all
other required permits and regulations.
(11) Waste Containers and Dump-
sters. Waste containers and dumpsters
shall be maintained in good repair and
to prevent overfow of waste. Waste con-
tainer enclosures shall be kept in good
repair.
(12) Vegetative Buffers and Other
Vegetation. Vegetative buffers shall be
maintained in such a manner as to com-
ply with any applicable screening height,
density or other requirements. Vegetative
buffers and other vegetation and shall be
trimmed, watered and cared for in such
manner as to stay in a healthy and attrac-
tive condition.
(13) Driveway, Parking and Loading
Areas. All driveway, parking, loading and
outside storage areas shall be surfaced
and maintained in accordance with any
applicable legal requirements, includ-
ing any site plan or landscaping plan to
which the land is subject. Paved surfaces
shall be kept in good repair, and shall be
repaired or replaced when any deteriora-
tion occurs to the extent that the rock or
sub-base is visible.
(14) Signage. Permitted signs shall
be maintained in good repair, and in
conformance with any applicable legal
requirements. Exterior surfaces of signs
treated with paint or other preservative
shall be maintained so as to prevent
chipping, cracking, or other deteriora-
tion of the exterior surface or the surface
treatment and to present an attractive ap-
pearance.
(15) Lighting. Lawful exterior light-
ing shall be maintained in the permitted
and constructed condition and in good
working order.
20.06. STANDARDS APPLICABLE
TO MAINTENANCE. All maintenance and
other work done on buildings and struc-
tures located in the Downtown Historic
Preservation District shall be done in
compliance with Chapter 17 of this Code,
and with the applicable standards and
best practices for the work as set forth
in 36 Code of Federal Regulations 67.7.
20.07 PERMIT REQUIREMENTS.
(1) Permit required for tuck pointing
or cleaning. Except as provided in sec-
tion 20.07(2), before proceeding with tuck
pointing or cleaning the exterior surface
of brick or masonry on a building in the
Downtown Historic Preservation District,
a permit for such work shall be obtained
from the Building Inspector. The appli-
cant shall provide a written description of
the proposed work and the means, meth-
ods and materials to be used. The Build-
ing Inspector shall issue the permit if the
application shows that the means, meth-
ods and materials proposed for the work
meet the requirements of this Chapter,
Chapter 17 of this Code, and 36 Code of
Federal Regulations 67.7. Appeals from a
denial of the application shall be made to
the Historic Preservation Commission.
(2) Exception to permit requirement.
A permit is not required for cleaning
buildings in the Downtown Historic Pres-
ervation District when washing with clear
water, scrubbing with a natural bristle
or synthetic brush (never metal) or us-
ing a garden hose or low-pressure (100
psi or below washer) and no higher than
300-400 psi. Non-ionic detergents may
be used.
20.08 RESPONSIBILITY FOR COM-
PLIANCE. Owners of lands in the Down-
town Historic Preservation District shall
be responsible for maintaining or caus-
ing maintenance of their lands in compli-
ance with this Chapter.
20.09 ENFORCEMENT AND PENAL-
TIES.
(1) Enforcement Authority. This
Chapter may be enforced by the Zoning
Administrator, Building Inspector, Village
Attorney, or other person authorized by
the Village Board.
(2) Opportunity to Correct Violations.
Before initiating legal action to recover
forfeitures or obtain injunctive or other
relief for violations of this Chapter, the
Zoning Administrator, Building Inspector,
Village Attorney, or other person autho-
rized by the Village Board, shall notify the
owner of the violation or violations, and
order the owner to correct the violation or
violations within such time as the appli-
cable Village offcial deems appropriate
under the circumstances. The applicable
Village offcial may enter an agreement
with the owner, subject to approval by
the Historic Preservation Commission,
providing for correction of the violation
or violations. An order to correct viola-
tions may be appealed to the Historic
Preservation Commission by fling a
notice of appeal with the Village Clerk
within 10 days after the order is issued.
An appeal shall stay the order. If the own-
er corrects the violation or violations in
accordance with an order or agreement
under this section, the owner shall not be
subject to forfeitures for such violation
or violations. If the owner fails to correct
the violation or violations in accordance
an order or agreement under this sec-
tion, the Village may recover forfeitures
for each day of noncompliance, begin-
ning with the frst day of noncompliance.
Notwithstanding any of the foregoing, if
the applicable Village offcial determines
that the violation or violations presents
an imminent risk of harm or damage to
any historic structure, historic site, or
the public health or safety, the applicable
Village offcial may take immediate legal
action to enforce this Chapter, and there
shall be no right to appeal such action to
the Historic Preservation Commission.
(3) Forfeitures. Violations of this
Chapter shall be subject to a forfeiture
of not less than $50.00 nor more than
$250.00, together with the costs of pros-
ecution and applicable penalty assess-
ments, fees and surcharges. Each day of
violation or noncompliance shall consti-
tute a separate offense.
(4) Injunctions. As a substitute for or
in addition to forfeiture actions, the Vil-
lage may institute a court action seeking
injunctive relief to enforce the provisions
of this chapter. It shall not be necessary
for the Village to take corrective action or
prosecute for forfeiture before seeking
injunctive relief.
(5) Corrective Action. If maintenance
or other work is done to a building or
structure in the Downtown Historic Pres-
ervation District in violation of this Chap-
ter, Chapter 17 or 36 Code of Federal
Regulations 67.7, the Historic Preserva-
tion Commission may order the owner of
the subject land to take such corrective
action as the Commission deems appro-
priate to restore the building to the condi-
tion it would have been in if the work had
been done in compliance with this Chap-
ter, Chapter 17 and 36 Code of Federal
Regulations 67.7. An order by the Com-
mission to take corrective action may
be appealed to the Village Board, within
30 days after the order is issued, for a
de novo review. On appeal, the Village
Board may order the owner of the subject
land to take such corrective action as the
Board deems appropriate to restore the
building to the condition it would have
been in if the work had been done in
compliance with this Chapter, Chapter 17
and 36 Code of Federal Regulations 67.7.
6. This ordinance shall take effect
upon passage and publication.
The foregoing ordinance was ad-
opted by the Village Board of the Village
of Oregon at a meeting held on Monday,
January 13, 2014.
APPROVED:
____________
Steven L. Staton, Village President
ATTEST:
____________
Peggy Haag, Village Clerk
Posted: January 14, 2014
Published: January 16, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
EXHIBIT A
Section 17-913: Design Overlay Zon-
ing Districts
(1) Purpose and Scope.
These districts are intended to
implement the urban design recommen-
dations of the Comprehensive Master
Plan by preserving and enhancing the
aesthetic qualities (historical and visual)
of the community, and by attaining a
consistent visually pleasing image for
various portions of the Village. As em-
phasized by said Plan, these districts are
designed to forward both aesthetic and
economic objectives of the Village by
controlling the site design and appear-
ance of development within the district in
a manner which is consistent with sound
land use, urban design, and economic
revitalization principles. The application
of these standards will ensure the long-
term progress and broad participation
toward these principles.
(2) Defnitions.
(a) cornice: The topmost projecting
portion of the entablature, or top portion
of a building. This term also refers to any
“crowning” projection of a building.
(b) header: A brick laid so that the
end only appears on the face of the wall,
as opposed to a stretcher, which is a
brick laid so that the side only appears.
(c) kickplate: A horizontal area on
the faìade of a building located between
the sidewalk/entrance pavement and the
lowest storefront windows.
(d) sign band: A horizontal area on
the faìade of a building located between
the transom and the cornice, which is
typically opaque and provides a location
for signage indicating the name of the
establishment.
(e) sill: A horizontal, lower member
or bottom of a door or window casing.
(f) transom: A horizontal bar of
stone, wood or glass across the opening
of a door or window.
(3) Procedure for Project Review and
Approval.
Proposed changes to the exterior
appearance (no structural alterations)
of properties used exclusively for resi-
dential purposes are excluded from the
provisions of this Section. All other de-
velopment applications or alterations
to sites or structures in the Downtown
Design Overlay Zoning District or the
Historic Neighborhood Design Overlay
Zoning District are subject to review and
approval under this Section. There are
three categories of Overlay Zoning Dis-
trict Review: Renovation Review, Design
Review, and Project Review.
(a) Renovation Review.
Applications which involve no
change to, but only a renovation of, the
exterior appearance of a property (such
as repainting, re-roofng, residing or re-
placing with identical colors and materi-
als approved by the Village, or a change
in the exterior appearance of a property
in (as determined by the Zoning Adminis-
trator), are subject to Renovation Review
by the Zoning Administrator.
1. Application Requirements.
All applications for Renovation Re-
view shall be made to the Zoning Admin-
istrator, and in addition, shall be accom-
panied by all of the following, in addition
to the requirements for Site Plan (per
Section 17 908):
a. A clear description of the exist-
ing appearance of the property. Clear
color photographs are recommended for
this purpose. Scaled and dimensioned
drawings of existing components such
as windows, doors, railings, fencing or
other site components, and/or detailed
building elevations which are proposed
for alteration or replacement may be re-
quired by the Zoning Administrator.
b. A clear depiction of the proposed
appearance of the property. Paint charts,
promotional brochures, and/or clear col-
or photographs of replacement architec-
tural components are recommended for
this purpose. Scaled and dimensioned
drawings of proposed components such
as windows, doors, railings, fencing or
other site components, and/or detailed
building elevations which are proposed
for renovation or replacement may be re-
quired by the Zoning Administrator.
c. A written description of the pro-
posed renovation, including a complete
listing of proposed components, materi-
als and colors.
d. Written justifcation for the pro-
posed alteration consisting of the rea-
sons why the Applicant believes the ap-
plication meets the standards in Section
17-913 (3)(a)3.
2. Renovation Review Procedure.
The application for Renovation Re-
view shall be reviewed and approved by
the Zoning Administrator, the Historic
Preservation Commission, or both, as
follows:
a. Within 20 days after the fling of
the application, the Zoning Administrator
shall determine whether the application
is complete and fulflls the requirements
of this Chapter. The Zoning Administrator
may request further information and/or
additional reports from the Applicant. If
the Zoning Administrator determines that
the application is not complete or does
not fulfll the requirements of this Chap-
ter, he shall return the application to the
Applicant. If the Zoning Administrator de-
termines that the application is complete,
he shall so notify the Applicant.
b. Within 20 days after the applicant
has been notifed that the application is
complete, the Zoning Administrator shall
review the application for compliance
with the standards set forth in Section 17
913(3)(a)(3).
c. Except as otherwise provided by
this Section, the Zoning Administrator
may approve the application as originally
proposed, may approve the application
with modifcations, or may deny the ap-
plication.
d. If the area proposed for alteration
is visible from the street grade within an
adjacent right-of-way, or where the Zon-
ing Administrator determines that the
application requires discretionary judg-
ment, the Zoning Administrator shall re-
fer the application to the Historic Preser-
vation Commission for review and action.
The Historic Preservation Commission
may approve the application as originally
proposed, may approve the application
with modifcations, or may deny the ap-
plication.
3. Standards for Approval.
The application shall not be ap-
proved unless it is determined that the
proposed alteration will not detrimentally
change, destroy, or adversely affect any
exterior feature of the site or structure. If
the application proposes an alteration to
or of part of a structure that is not histori-
cally appropriate or not in harmony with
the aesthetic character of the structure
or the District, the applicant may be re-
quired to use materials, components and
colors that are historically appropriate
and in harmony with the aesthetic char-
acter of the structure and the District.
(b) Design Review.
Applications which involve a change
only in the appearance of a property
(such as painting, roofng, siding, archi-
tectural component substitution, fencing,
paving, or signage), that will result in a
different appearance than currently pres-
ent, but not involving modifcations to
the physical confguration of a property
or structure (such as grading, the erec-
tion of a new building, the demolition
of an existing building, or the addition
to or removal of bulk from an existing
building) are subject to Design Review
by the Zoning Administrator, the Historic
Preservation Commission, and the Plan
Commission. The Zoning Administra-
tor shall serve as the liaison between
the Applicant, the Historic Preservation
Commission and the Plan Commission
in facilitating the thorough and expedient
review of an application, and shall ensure
that the technical and procedural require-
ments of the Zoning Ordinance are met.
The Historic Preservation Commission
shall serve as the recommending body
to the Plan Commission on aesthetics,
and shall focus its review on the applica-
tion’s compliance with sound aesthetic,
urban design, historic and architectural
practices per the procedures outlined
below. The Plan Commission shall serve
as the fnal discretionary review body on
aesthetics and site design, and shall fo-
cus its review on the application’s com-
pliance with sound aesthetic, land use,
site design, and economic revitalization
practices. This effort shall be guided by
the standards in this Section and, if ap-
plicable, the Village of Oregon Compre-
hensive Plan.
1. Procedure.
a. Within 20 days after the fling of
the application, the Zoning Administrator
shall determine whether the application
is complete and fulflls the requirements
of this Chapter. The Zoning Administrator
may request further information and/or
additional reports from the Applicant. If
the Zoning Administrator determines that
the application is not complete or does
not fulfll the requirements of this Chap-
ter, he shall return the application to the
Applicant. If the Zoning Administrator de-
termines that the application is complete,
he shall so notify the Applicant, and shall
forward the application to the Historic
Preservation Commission.
b. The Historic Preservation Com-
mission shall review the application, and
shall recommend to the Plan Commis-
sion that the application be approved as
originally proposed, be approved with
modifcations, or be denied.
c. The Plan Commission shall review
the application and the recommendation
of the Historic Preservation Commis-
sion, and shall approve the application
as originally proposed, approve the ap-
plication with modifcations, or deny the
application
2. Application Requirements.
Unless waived by the Historic Pres-
ervation Commission, Design Review
applications shall include everything re-
quired in an application for a Conditional
Use Permit pursuant to Section 17-905.
In addition, Design Review applications
shall include the Building Permit applica-
tion and all of the following:
a. A clear description of the exist-
ing appearance of the property. Clear
color photographs are recommended for
this purpose. Scaled and dimensioned
drawings of existing components such
as windows, doors, railings, fencing or
other site components, and/or detailed
building elevations which are proposed
for alteration or replacement may be re-
quired by the Village.
b. A clear depiction of the proposed
appearance of the property. Paint charts,
promotional brochures, and/or clear col-
or photographs of replacement architec-
tural components are recommended for
this purpose. Scaled and dimensioned
drawings of proposed components such
as windows, doors, railings, fencing or
other site components, and/or detailed
building elevations which are proposed
for renovation or replacement may be re-
quired by the Village.
c. A written description of the pro-
posed modifcation, including a complete
listing of proposed components, materi-
als and colors.
d. Written justifcation for the pro-
posed alteration consisting of the rea-
sons why the Applicant believes the ap-
plication meets the standards in Section
17 913(3)(b)3.
3. Standards for Approval.
The application shall not be ap-
proved unless it is determined that the
proposed alteration will not detrimentally
change, destroy, or adversely affect any
exterior feature of the site or structure. If
the application proposes an alteration to
or of part of a structure that is not histori-
cally appropriate or not in harmony with
the aesthetic character of the structure
or the District, the applicant may be re-
quired to use materials, components and
colors that are historically appropriate
and in harmony with the aesthetic char-
acter of the structure and the District.
(c) Project Review.
Applications which involve modif-
cation to the physical confguration of a
property (such as the erection of a new
building, the demolition of an existing
building, or the addition to or removal
of bulk from an existing building) are
subject to Project Review by the Zoning
Administrator, the Historic Preservation
Commission, and the Plan Commission.
The Zoning Administrator shall serve as
the liaison between the Applicant, the
Historic Preservation Commission and
the Plan Commission in facilitating the
thorough and expedient review of an ap-
plication, and shall ensure that the tech-
nical and procedural requirements of the
Zoning Ordinance are met. The Historic
Preservation Commission shall serve as
the recommending body to the Plan Com-
mission on aesthetics, and shall focus its
review on the application’s compliance
with sound aesthetic, urban design, his-
toric and architectural practices per the
procedures outlined below. The Plan
Commission shall serve as the fnal dis-
cretionary review body on aesthetics and
site design, and shall focus its review on
the application’s compliance with sound
LEGALS continued on page 13
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Debroux, Jones
take top honors
Oregon High School cross country
coach Doug Debroux was awarded a
plaque for 30 years of coaching at the
35th annual Wisconsin Cross Country
Coaches Association State Annual
Clinic last weekend in Brookfield.
Debroux coached both the Panthers’
boys and girls programs for 27 years
before taking over as just the girls
coach three years ago.
Senior Valerie Jones was named
Academic All-State following this sea-
son, a certificate Debroux picked up
for Jones last weekend.
January 16, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
13
aesthetic, land use, site design, and eco-
nomic revitalization practices. This effort
shall be guided by the standards in this
Section and, if applicable, the Village of
Oregon Comprehensive Plan.
1. Procedure.
a. Within 20 days after the fling of
the application, the Zoning Administrator
shall determine whether the application
is complete and fulflls the requirements
of this Chapter. The Zoning Administrator
may request further information and/or
additional reports from the Applicant. If
the Zoning Administrator determines that
the application is not complete or does
not fulfll the requirements of this Chap-
ter, he shall return the application to the
Applicant. If the Zoning Administrator de-
termines that the application is complete,
he shall so notify the Applicant, and shall
forward the application to the Historic
Preservation Commission.
b. The Historic Preservation Com-
mission shall review the application, and
shall recommend to the Plan Commis-
sion that the application be approved as
originally proposed, be approved with
modifcations, or be denied.
c. The Plan Commission shall review
the application and the recommendation
of the Historic Preservation Commis-
sion, and shall approve the application
as originally proposed, approve the ap-
plication with modifcations, or deny the
application
2. Application Requirements.
Unless waived by the Historic Pres-
ervation Commission, Project Review
applications shall include everything re-
quired in an application for a Conditional
Use Permit pursuant to Section 17-905.
In addition, Project Review applications
shall include the Building Permit applica-
tion and all of the following, unless spe-
cifcally waived in writing by the Zoning
Administrator:
a. A clear description of the exist-
ing appearance of the property. Clear
color photographs are recommended for
this purpose. Scaled and dimensioned
drawings of existing components such
as windows, doors, railings, fencing or
other site components, and/or detailed
building elevations which are proposed
for alteration or replacement may be re-
quired by the Village.
b. A clear depiction of the proposed
appearance of the property. Paint charts,
promotional brochures, and/or clear col-
or photographs of replacement architec-
tural components are recommended for
this purpose. Scaled and dimensioned
drawings of proposed components such
as windows, doors, railings, fencing or
other site components, and/or detailed
building elevations which are proposed
for alteration or replacement may be re-
quired by the Village.
c. For all projects involving a new
building, or an addition exceeding 100
square feet of gross foor area, a detailed
site plan which provides the following
information:
(1) A title block indicating name and
address of the current property owner,
developer and project consultants;
(2) The date of the original plan and
the latest date of revision to the plan.
(3) A north arrow and a graphic
scale. Said scale shall not be smaller
than one inch equals 100 feet;
(4) All property lines and existing
and proposed right-of-way lines with
bearings and dimensions clearly labeled;
(5) All existing and proposed ease-
ment lines and dimensions with a key
provided and explained on the margins
of the plan as to ownership and purpose;
(6) All existing and proposed build-
ings, structures, and paved areas, in-
cluding walks, drives, decks, patios,
fences, utility poles, drainage facilities,
and walls;
(7) All required building setback
lines;
(8) A legal description of the subject
property;
(9) The location, type and size of all
signage on the site;
(10) The location, type and orienta-
tion of all exterior lighting on the subject
property;
(11) The location of all access
points, parking and loading areas on the
subject property, including a summary of
the number of parking stalls and labels
indicating dimension of such areas;
(12) The location of all outdoor stor-
age areas;
(13) The location and type of any
permanently protected green space ar-
eas;
(14) The location of existing and pro-
posed drainage facilities;
(15) In the legend, the following data
for the subject property:
• Lot Area;
• Floor Area;
• Floor Area Ratio;
• Impervious Surface Area;
• Impervious Surface Area Ratio;
and
• Building Height.
(16) A detailed landscaping plan of
the subject property, at the same scale
as the main plan, showing the location,
species and size of all proposed plant
materials.
(17) A written description of the pro-
posed project, including a complete list-
ing of the proposed components, materi-
als and colors.
(18) Written justifcation for the pro-
posed alteration consisting of the rea-
sons why the Applicant believes the ap-
plication meets the standards in Section
17 913(3)(c)3.
3. Standards for Approval.
The application shall not be ap-
proved unless it is determined that: (1)
the proposed alteration will not detri-
mentally change, destroy, or adversely
affect any exterior feature of the site or
structure; (2) the application conforms to
the purpose and intent of Sections 17 522
and 17 913 and to the objectives and de-
sign criteria of the historic preservation
plan for the district (if any); (3) any new
improvement will not adversely affect,
and will be in harmony with, the external
appearance of other structures on the
site and in the District; (4) any demolition
will not harm the public interest; and, (5)
in the case of demolition of a deteriorated
structure, any economic hardship or dif-
fculty is not self-created or the result of
a failure to maintain the structure in good
repair.
(4) Appeals
Renovation Review decisions of the
Zoning Administrator or Historic Preser-
vation Commission may be appealed to
the Village Board. Design Review or Proj-
ect Review decisions of the Plan Com-
mission may be appealed to the Village
Board.
(5) Penalty
Penalty for violation of the provi-
sions of this ordinance shall be per the
provisions of Section 17-920.
* * *
NOTICE OF TOWN CAUCUS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the
electors of the Town of Oregon, in the
County of Dane, State of Wisconsin, that
a Town Caucus for said Town will be held
at the Town Hall, 1138 Union Road in said
Town on Saturday, January 18, 2014 at
2:00 p.m. (snow date of Saturday, Janu-
ary 25, 2014 at 2:00 p.m.) to nominate
candidates for the different Town offces
to be voted for at the Town Election to be
held on the frst Tuesday in April of this
year (April 1, 2014).
Offces to be flled with nominations
are:
Town Board Supervisor
Town Board Supervisor
2014 Tax Collection: Tax payments
can be made at the Town Hall during
normal offce hours, M-Th 8-12 & 1-4. Ad-
ditional hours are Saturday, January 25
from 8:00 a.m. – noon; Thursday, Janu-
ary 30 from 8:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. & Friday,
January 31 from 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Darryl J. Weber, Chairperson
Denise R. Arnold, Town Clerk
Posted: December 17, 2013
Published: January 9 and 16, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
TOWN OF OREGON
PLAN COMMISSION AGENDA
TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014
6:30 PM
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WI 53575
1. Call Plan Commission meeting to
order.
2. Approval of minutes from the last
meeting.
3. Public Comments.
4. Discussion and possible Action
re: TORC procedures.
5. Discussion and possible Action
re: Application for Land Use Change.
6. Update on Anderson Park.
7. Communications.
8. Adjournment.
Note: Agendas are subject to amend-
ment after publication. Check the offcial
posting locations (Town Hall, Town of
Oregon Recycling Center and Oregon
Village Hall) including the Town website
at www.town.oregon.wi.us or join the
Town’s e-mail list to receive agendas at
townoforegon@mailbag.com. It is possi-
ble that members of and possibly a quo-
rum of members of other governmental
bodies of the town may be in attendance
at any of the meetings to gather informa-
tion; however, no action will be taken by
any governmental body at said meeting
other than the governmental body spe-
cifcally referred to in the meeting notice.
Requests from persons with disabilities
who need assistance to participate in
this meeting or hearing should be made
to the Clerk’s offce at 835-3200 with 48
hours notice.
Posted: January 13, 2014
Published: January 16, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
TOWN OF OREGON
PARK COMMITTEE AGENDA
MONDAY, JANUARY 20, 2014
6:30 PM
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WISCONSIN
1. Call meeting to order.
2. Reading and approval of minutes
from the last meeting.
3. Public Comments and Appear-
ances.
4. Discussion and possible Action
re: Eagle Scout Project.
5. Discussion and possible Action
re: recommendations/decisions from the
Town Board.
6. Review of potential work projects.
7. Set next meeting date.
8. Adjournment.
Note: Agendas are subject to amend-
ment after publication. Check the offcial
posting locations (Town Hall, Town of
Oregon Recycling Center and Oregon
Village Hall) including the Town website
at www.town.oregon.wi.us or join the
Town’s e-mail list to receive agendas at
townoforegon@mailbag.com. It is possi-
ble that members of and possibly a quo-
rum of members of other governmental
bodies of the town may be in attendance
at any of the meetings to gather informa-
tion; however, no action will be taken by
any governmental body at said meeting
other than the governmental body spe-
cifcally referred to in the meeting notice.
Requests from persons with disabilities
who need assistance to participate in
this meeting or hearing should be made
to the Clerk’s offce at 835-3200 with 48
hours notice.
Steve Root, Chairperson
Posted: January 13, 2014
Published: January 16, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
ORDINANCE NO. 13-11
VILLAGE OF OREGON
AN ORDINANCE
CHANGING THE ZONING
CLASSIFICATION OF PARTS
OF LOTS 496 AND 497,
IN THE PLAT KNOWN AS
“THE BERGAMONT.”
RECITALS
A. Bergamont Holding Company,
LLC (the “Applicant”) is the owner of
Lots 496 and 497 in the Plat known as
The Bergamont (the “Property”). The
Applicant has requested that the zon-
ing classifcation of parts of Lot 496 be
changed from PB-Planned Business to
MR-8 and TR-6, and that the zoning clas-
sifcation of part of Lot 497 be changed
from PB-Planned Business to MR-8.
B. On November 7, 2013, the Village
of Oregon Planning Commission held
a public hearing regarding the applica-
tion to change the zoning classifcation
of the Property, which was preceded by
the publication of a class 2 notice under
chapter 985 of the Wisconsin Statutes.
C. On December 12, 2013, the Plan-
ning Commission recommended chang-
ing the zoning classifcation of parts of
Lots 496 and 497, subject to certain con-
ditions.
D. The Village Board determines
that, subject to certain conditions,
changing the zoning classifcation of
parts of Lots 496 and 497 is consistent
with the Village’s Comprehensive Plan,
has the potential for producing signif-
cant community benefts, promotes the
public health, safety and general welfare
of the Village, and allows appropriate use
of the Property.
ORDINANCE
The Village Board of the Village of
Oregon, Dane County, Wisconsin, or-
dains as follows:
7. The zoning classifcation of parts
of Lot 496, The Bergamont, are changed
as follows: (1) The area shown as Lot 2
on the Certifed Survey Map attached as
Exhibit A is changed from PB to MR-8;
(2) The area shown as Lot 3 on the Cer-
tifed Survey Map attached as Exhibit A
is changed from PB to TR-6. The zoning
changes set forth in this section shall
not be effective until the Certifed Survey
Maps attached as Exhibits A and B are
approved by the Village of Oregon and
recorded with the Register of Deeds for
Dane County.
8. The zoning classifcation of part
of Lot 497, The Bergamont, is changed as
follows: The area shown as Lot 2 on the
Certifed Survey Map attached as Exhibit
B is changed from PB to MR-8. The zon-
ing change set forth in this section shall
not be effective until the Certifed Survey
Maps attached as Exhibits A and B are
approved by the Village of Oregon and
recorded with the Register of Deeds for
Dane County.
9. The following restriction noted
on the plat known as The Bergamont is
hereby removed, pursuant to Wis. Stat. ñ
236.293: “There shall be no direct drive-
way access to Bergamont Drive for 450’
from the southern right of way of CTH
CC.”
10. This ordinance shall take effect
upon passage and publication.
The foregoing ordinance was ad-
opted by the Village Board of the Village
of Oregon at a meeting held on January
13, 2014.
APPROVED:
____________
Steven L. Staton, Village President
ATTEST:
____________
Peggy Haag, Village Clerk
Posted: January 14, 2014
Published: January 16, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
MINUTES OF THE REGULAR
MEETING OF THE SCHOOL
BOARD OF THE OREGON
SCHOOL DISTRICT HELD ON
DECEMBER 16, 2013
The regular meeting of the School
Board of the Oregon School District
was called to order by the President,
Ms. Courtney Odorico at 5:07 PM in the
Oregon Middle School in the Village of
Oregon, Dane County, Wisconsin. Upon
roll call, the following board members
were present: Mr. Dan Krause, Mr. Lee
Christensen, Mr. Steve Zach and Ms.
Courtney Odorico. The following board
members were absent: Mr. Jeff Ramin,
Ms. Rae Vogeler, and Mr. Wayne Mixdorf.
Administrators present: Dr. Brian Busler,
Mr. Andy Weiland, Dr. Anita Koehler, Ms.
Michelle Gard, Mrs. Candace Weidens-
ee, Mrs. Shannon Anderson, Mr. Jason
Zurawik, Dr. Leslie Bergstrom, and Ms.
Kerri Modjeski,
Proof in the form of a certifcate by
the Oregon Observer of communications
and public notice given to the public and
the Oregon Observer and a certifcate of
posting as required by Section 19.84 Wis-
consin Statutes as to the holding of this
meeting was presented by Ms. Odorico.
Mr. Zach moved and Mr. Krause
seconded the motion to proceed with
the meeting according to the agenda as
posted. Motion passed 4-0.
1. Dialogue with OMS Staff. Mrs. An-
derson and Mr. Zurawik along with staff
members, Kelly Mazeck, Special Ed, Jodi
Carlson, English, Allison Jaeger, Band,
Cassidy Heller, Math, Laura Brudos,
Spanish and Jason Symes, Social Stud-
ies, History were present with a discus-
sion with board members. Mr. Mixdorf
arrived at 6:43 p.m.
A. CONSENT CALENDAR:
Mr. Christensen moved and Mr. Zach
seconded the motion to approve the fol-
lowing items on the Consent Calendar.
1. Approve minutes of the December
9, 2013 meeting;
2. Approve payments in the amount
of $294,472.51;
3. Financial Statements ending No-
vember 30, 2013;
4. Staff Resignations/Retirements –
none;
5. Staff Assignments – none;
6. Field Trip Requests – none;
7. Acceptance of Donations - $15
from Evan and Patricia Fitzgerald family;
8. Open Enrollment Exception Appli-
cation-none;
Motion passed 5-0.
B. COMMUNICATION FROM PUB-
LIC: None.
C. ACTION ITEMS:
1. Sophomore Journalism Course
Proposal; Will be placed on January 13,
2014 Board Meeting.
D. DISCUSSION ITEMS: Student
Achievement
1. Feedback on School Goal Re-
ports;
E. DISCUSSION ITEMS: Other Top-
ics – None.
F. INFORMATION ITEMS:
1. Curriculum Update – New York
Trip: Kim White, Lori Lovell, Mary We-
ber, Stacy Sergent, Dawn Goltz, Joane
Rudolph, and Libby Chmielewski shared
with the Board their experiences at the
New York curriculum session.
2. Marketing for Prospective Stu-
dents: Discussion held. Dr. Busler will
work with administration and bring back
a proposal for the Board to review.
3. From OEA President-not present.
G. CLOSING:
1. Future Agenda was established.
2. Check Out
H. EXECUTIVE SESSION ITEMS:
1. Superintendent’s Evaluation:
Mr. Christensen moved and Mr. Mix-
dorf seconded the motion to move into
closed session on Item H.1 as provided
under Wisconsin Statutes 19.85 (1) (c).
In a roll call vote, the following members
voted yes. Mr. Christensen, Mr. Mixdorf,
Mr. Krause, Mr. Zach and Ms. Odorico.
Motion passed 5-0.
I. ADJOURNMENT:
Mr. Zach moved and Mr. Christensen
seconded the motion to adjourn the
meeting. Motion passed by unanimous
voice vote. Meeting adjourned at 8:55
p.m.
Jeff Ramin, Clerk
Oregon School District
Published: January 16, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
EXHIBIT A EXHIBIT B
From LEGALS/page 12
14
January 16, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
140 LOST & FOUND
OREGON NEAR Urban Retreat Salon
and Old Pump Station, gold chain
bracelet with key, angel wing and
dated disk. 10-29-83 engagement.
Sentimental. Reward!
Call 608-516-5177.
143 NOTICES
ROTARY INVESTS in people to generate
sustainable economic growth. For more
information: www.rotary.org This mes-
sage provided by PaperChain and your
local community paper. (wcan)
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
150 PLACES TO GO
GUN SHOW Jan 24-26. Monroe County
Fairgrounds, Tomah, WI Fri. 3-8:30pm,
Sat. 9-5pm, Sun. 9-3pm. Info 563-608-
4401 or marvkrauspromotions.net (wcan)
GUN SHOW January 18 & 19 Saturday
8-5, Sunday 8-3, 520+ tables. Adm $5.
Fond du Lac Fairgrounds www.central-
wisconsingun.org (wcan)
160 TOURS & TRAVEL
NEW YORK! Aug 1-4, 2014. Nonstop
Milwaukee! Broadway Hotel & 2 Top
Shows! 920-563-6668, rothbergertravel.
com (wcan)
163 TRAINING SCHOOLS
DENTAL ASSISTANT Be one in just 10
Saturdays! WeekendDentalAssistant.
com Fan us on Facebook! Next class
begins 3/29/2014. Call 920-730-1112
Appleton (Reg. WI EAB) (wcan)
HOME FIREARMS Training
FUN - LEARN - BE CONFIDENT
100% Safe ~ Laser Only
- Train in Your Home -
- Your Schedule -
Basic & Advanced Instruction
2 Hour Basic - $99
Each Additional Person - $50
Reservations: (608) 576-2653
Gary@FirearmFundamentals.net
Visit: www.train.
FirearmFundamentals.net
TRAINING FOR CNA
And Computer and Clerical
Early bird discount.
www.newaydirections.com or
Call Neway Directions
for class schedules
608-221-1920
340 AUTOS
DONATE YOUR Car, Truck, Boat to Heri-
tage for the Blind. Free 3-Day Vacation.
Tax Deductible. Free Towing. All paper-
work taken care of! 800-856-5491 (wcan)
YOUR GENEROUS car, truck or boat
donation allows Rawhide Ranch to help
troubled youth receive a second chance
in life. Donate to Rawhide today! 888-
653-2729 (wcan)
355 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
4 MILLION Liquidation! 200 Pontoons &
Fiberglass must go! Buy it, Trade it, Store
it for FREE! Pay later! This sale will not
last! Finance 866-955-2628. american-
marine.com (wcan)
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth
ATV's & Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo. Sport
& 4x4 Atv's @ $69/mo. American Marine &
Motorsports, Schawano =Save= 866-955-
2628 www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
360 TRAILERS
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
402 HELP WANTED, GENERAL
FLOWER WRAPPERS. Wrappers need-
ed for Valentines Jan 31-Feb 9 in
Stoughton. $8-$10 an hour. 7:30am-9pm.
Flexible hours. Call Kim 575-2327
FOUR WINDS Manor is seeking part &
full time CNA's for the PM shift at our 60
bed facility. This position would include
every other weekend and holidays with
shift differentials on PM & weekend
shifts. We offer excellent benefits with
full time hours including health, dental,
paid time off, Flex Spending Plan and
401k. If you share commitment to a
positive attitude and respect for residents
and colleagues, please consider joining
us. Applications available at www.four-
windsmaor.com or 303 S. Jefferson St.
Verona, WI 53593
LEASING AGENT: For Sundays 11-3,
every week. For high quality apartment
community on far Westside. Hourly +
rental bonus. Please submit resume to
PO Box 930427, Verona, WI 53593
NOW HIRING Full Time Positions.
Permanent Electrician, Machine Maint.
Seasonal Welders, Press Operators,
Assemblers. Avg. Compensation
w/Incentive Pay and OT Info:
jobcenterofwisconsin.com
John Deere Horicon Works (wcan)
SUPERIOR SERVICE Transportation
has an immediate opening for regional
and part-time drivers. Must have 2 years
of Class A - CDL experience with an
acceptable MVR. If you would like to run
a consistent lane and be home weekly
call 608-325-6903 or send resume to
superiorservice@tds.net.
TINA'S HOME CLEANING
Hiring personnel for residential
cleaning position. Days only. Become
a part of our growing Team!
Call 608-835-0339
tinashomecleaning@gmail.com
OTR DRIVERS NEEDED
* Above Average Pay *
* Avg 2500-3500 Miles/Wk *
* Flexible Home Time *
* 100% No touch *
* Full Benefit Pkg CDL/A *
* 12 Months Exp Preferred *
888-545-9351 Ext 13
Jackson WI
www.doublejtransport.com (wcan)
447 PROFESSIONAL
READING TUTORS Flexible hours/part
time. Stoughton, Mount Horeb, Middle-
ton. Teacher certification a must. Reading
license a plus. Successful - growing - send
resume. Arnold Reading Clinic, 8551 Gre-
enway Blvd. #210, Middleton, WI 53562
449 DRIVER, SHIPPING
& WAREHOUSING
ATTN DRIVERS: GROWING
CARRIER OFFERS STRONG
DRIVING CAREERS. JOIN US FOR
A CAREER SEMINAR. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 16 Times: 12 & 3 & 6PM
Holiday Inn Express 515 West
Verona Ave. Verona WI Directions:
From Hwy 18/151 take business Route
151 to Verona Rd. Go south on Verona
Rd to hotel.We show commitment to
our drivers by giving them what they
want! HOME WEEKENDS. Assigned
Conventional Equipment. Regional
Operating Area Competitive Pay. No
East Coast Excellent Benefits. AND
MORE. NTB-A company with heart
to serve you! Call 1-800-446-0682 or
visit www.ntbtrk.com
DRIVERS: $2000 Sign On Bonus! Class
– A 2yrs Exp. Company Drivers .38cpm
East & .34 all other. Health/Dental/401K-
Local, Regional & OTR. Owner Op's 78%
of line haul 100% FS. Plate Program, No
electronics. Tom: 800-972-0084 x0
DRIVERS: CDL-A Route Delivery. Need
Drivers for New Business in Elkhorn.
$3,000 Sign On Bonus! $58K AVG 1st yr,
$63 AVG After 2-3 day routes. Excellent
benefits. Need 1 year T/T experience
www.MBMCareers.com 877-662 0014
DRIVERS: DEDICATED. Regional &
OTR. Start up to $44/mi + Excellent Ben-
efits. 401K + Bonuses. Excellent Home-
time! CDL-A 6 mos exp. 877-704-3773
452 GENERAL
OFFICE CLEANING in Stoughton Per-
manent part time M-F. 4 hours/night. Visit
our website: www.capitalcityclean.com
Or call our office: 831-8850.
516 CLEANING SERVICES
WANT SOMEONE to clean your house?
Call DOROTHY'S SWEEP CLEAN. We
are Christian ladies that do quality work.
Dependable, insured, excellent referenc-
es. Call 608-838-0665 or 608-219-2415
524 CONTRACTORS
CONCRETE FINISHERS AND
LABORERS. Experienced w/valid DL,
CDL preferred.Competitive wage and
benefits. Contact Jeff at:
608-884-9725
548 HOME IMPROVEMENT
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your basement
needs! Waterproofing? Finishing? Struc-
tural Repairs? Humidity and Mold Control?
Free Estimates! Call 888-929-8307 (wcan)
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Winter-Rates**
30 + Years Professional
European-Craftsmanship
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
"HANDYMAN"
"Honey Do List"
No job too small
608-845-8110
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
554 LANDSCAPING, LAWN,
TREE & GARDEN WORK
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Snow Removal
608-219-1214
560 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL Does it All!
Fast and Reliable Electrical Repair
and Installations. Call ServiceLive and
get referred to a pro today:
800-757-0383 (wcan)
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! Fast and
Reliable Handyman Services. Call Ser-
viceLive and get referred to a pro today.
Call 800-604-2193 (wcan)
ONE CALL Does it All!
Fast and Reliable Plumbing Repairs
Call 800-981-0336 (wcan)
RECOVER PAINTING Currently offering
winter discounts on all painting, drywall
and carpentry. Recover urges you to join
in the fight against cancer, as a portion of
every job is donated to cancer research.
Free estimates, fully insured, over 20
years of experience. Call 608-270-0440.
572 SNOW REMOVAL
PLOWING, BLOWING, Residential and
commercial. 608-873-7038
586 TV, VCR &
ELECTRONICS REPAIR
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at $19.99/
mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to new call-
ers, so call now. 888-544-0273 (wcan)
606 ARTICLES FOR SALE
BRIDAL GOWN Sale $200-$500 OFF
of 100's of Gowns By Pronovias, Mag-
gie Sottero, Mori Lee and many more!
EDITHS, 9 Main St, Fond du Lac, www.
ediths.com (wcan)
646 FIREPLACES,
FURNACES/WOOD, FUEL
FIREWOOD SPLIT Hardwood. Stored
inside, dried 3 years. Call Randy 608-
882-6833 or
608-490-1109 Evansville.
FOR SALE Oak firewood, seasoned and
split. Delivered. 608-843-5961
648 FOOD & DRINK
SHARI'S BERRIES: ORDER mouthwa-
tering gifts! 100% satisfaction guaran-
teed. Fresh-dipped berries from $19.99
+ plus s/h. Save 20% on qualifying gifts
over $29! Call 888-479-6008 or visit
www.berries.com/happy (wcan)
WRAP UP Your Holiday Shopping with 100%
guaranteed, delivered to the door Omaha
Steaks! SAVE 67% Plus 4 free burgers -
Many Gourmet Favorites only $49.99. Order
today. 800-931-1898 Use code 49377DLB or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/gifts56 (wcan)
666 MEDICAL & HEALTH SUPPLIES
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no
activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd
waterproof alert button for free and more.
Only $29.95 per month. 877-863-6622
(WCAN)
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 888-
960-4522 for $750. off (wcan)
668 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
676 PLANTS & FLOWERS
FRUIT TREES As low as $16. Blueberry,
grape, strawberry, asparagus, evergreen
& hardwood plants. Free catalog. Wood-
stock Nursery, N1831 Hwy 95, Neills-
ville, WI 54456 Toll free 888-803-8733
wallace-woodstock.com (wcan)
PROFLOWERS ENJOY SEND FLOW-
ERS for any occasion! Take 20% off
your order over $29! Go to www.Proflow-
ers.com/ActNow or call 877-592-7090
(wcan)
688 SPORTING GOODS
& RECREATIONAL
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" NOW. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawno. 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan).
690 WANTED
DONATE YOUR CAR-
FAST FREE TOWING
24 hr. Response - TaX Deduction
United Breast Cancer FOUNDATION
Providing Free Mammograms
& Breast Cancer Info.
866-343-6603 (wcan)
We want to speak with caring, qualified leaders who
share our commitment to quality care. This position
will manage the daily operations of All Saints Assisted
Living and Memory Care on Madison’s west side.

Please send your
resume to:
ElderSpan Management, LLC
1402 Pankratz St. - Ste. 110
Madison, WI 53704.
RN PREFERRED
FACILITY ADMINISTRATOR
For information call 608.243.8800 or visit elderspan.com.
We want to speak with caring, qualified leaders who
share our commitment to quality care. This position
will manage the daily operations of All Saints Assisted
Living and Memory Care on Madison’s west side.

Please send your
resume to:
ElderSpan Management, LLC
1402 Pankratz St. - Ste. 110
Madison, WI 53704.
RN PREFERRED
FACILITY ADMINISTRATOR
For information call 608.243.8800 or visit elderspan.com.
U
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2
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4
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Now hiring part-time housekeepers and caregivers at our
beautiful senior living residence on Madison’s west side. A
variety of shifts are available, as well as shift & weekend
differentials, paid training and an array of benefits.
Resident Caregivers/CNAs
download
an application:
allsaintsneighborhood.org
608.243.8800
for more
information call:
8210 Highview Drive - Madison
Housekeepers
U
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3
0
8
0
4
Dave Johnson
(608) 835-8195
We recommend septic
pumping every two years
B & R PUMPING
SERVICE LLC
U
N
3
2
5
5
6
3
U
N
3
2
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7
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University Housing seeks individuals with culinary
expertise. Passion for food and leadership skill
required! We have a fast-paced environment, high
quality standards, and excellent customer service. We
currently have vacancies at Rheta’s Market, located in
Chadbourne Residence Hall, and Gordon Dining
& Event Center.
The positions available are limited-term employment
for approximately 6 months.
$14.726 per hour
Apply by 4:30pm, January 24, 2014 to ensure consideration
How to Apply: Complete University Housing application:
available at www.housing.wisc.edu/jobs/temp, or email
hr@housing.wisc.edu or call 608-262-2766 to obtain a
copy of application.
University Housing Human Resources
625 Babcock Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1213
Phone: 608-262-2766
Fax: 608-265-8724
hr@housing.wisc.edu
EOE/AAE
CHEF (Food Production Assistant)
Limited Term Employment (LTE)
U
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Increase Your sales opportunities…
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
AUCTION
450+ Guns at Auction Sat- Jan. 25th Prairie Du Chien,
WI. Rare Colts & Winchesters, NIB Hunting Guns/
Pistols Military Surplus & Advanced arms/ammo
(608)326-8108 www.kramersales.com (CNOW)
ENTERTAINMENT AND EVENTS
Gun Show: Dubuque County Fairgrounds 14569 Old
Highway Rd Dubuque, Iowa January 17-18-19 Fri.
Night 5-9 Sat. 9-5 Sun 9-3 Bigboreenterprises.com
(CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
HOLTGER BROS., INC. **IMMEDIATE AREA MANAGER
POSITION AVAILABLE** SW Wisconsin Take your career
further - apply now! Ideal candidate shall be organized w/
strong follow through in managing crews, assuring customer
satisfaction, & completing necessary paperwork. Min 2 years
management experience in utility industry & background
in buried/aerial cable placement required. EXCELLENT
BENEFITS PACKAGE call 920-644-6300 or send resume
to: hbicareers@holtger.com EOE by AA (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
This classifed spot for sale! Advertise your product or
recruit an applicant in over 179 Wisconsin newspapers!
Only $300/week. Call this paper or 800-227-7636 www.
cnaads.com (CNOW)
January 16, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
15
692 ELECTRONICS
DIRECTV OVER 140 channels only
$29.99 a month. Call now! Triple Sav-
ings. $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade
to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!
Start saving today. 800-320-2429 (wcan)
DISH TV RETAILER. Starting at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
800-374-3940 (WCAN)
696 WANTED TO BUY
TOP PRICES Any Scrap Metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick up
Property clean out. Honest
Fully insured. U call/We haul.
608-444-5496
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
705 RENTALS
1 BEDROOM Upper $525 w/deposit. 3
bedroom lower $700 w/deposit. 1 bed-
room upper $500 w/deposit No pets or
smokers. Evansville Area 608-882-6070
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
OREGON 1-BEDROOM Apartment.
2-Car garage. $640/month. No pets.
Jane 608-271-7071
STOUGHTON WEST St. Spacious 2
bdrm town home in nice neighborhood.
1 1/2 bath, full basement, 2 car attached
garage, large yard with fenced area
in back, includes lawn mowing except
inside fenced area, central air high effi-
ciency furnace. $1050. 1/2 month's rent
sec. dep. Call Brady 608-286-5282.
720 APARTMENTS
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
STOUGHTON 2BR $725 includes heat,
water/sewer. No dogs, 1 cat is Ok. EHO.
608-222-1981 ext 2 or 3.
750 STORAGE SPACES FOR RENT
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind
Stoughton Lumber.
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088

OREGON SELF-STORAGE
10x10 through 10x25
month to month lease
Call Karen Everson at
608-835-7031 or
Veronica Matt at 608-291-0316
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
RASCHEIN PROPERTY STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon. Call 608-206-2347
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
801 OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
STOUGHTON 209 E Main St.
Retail or Office space. 1000 sq ft.
Beautifully remodeled. $766. per month
utilities included.
608-271-0101
STOUGHTON 211 E Main St.
3400 sq. ft. Retail space plus 1800 sq.
ft. display or storage space. Beautifully
remodeled $1900/mo plus utilities.
608-271-0101
STOUGHTON 307 S Forrest
Retail or Office space. 400 sq. ft. $299/
month utilities included.
608-271-0101
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
870 RESIDENTIAL LOTS
ALPINE MEADOWS
Oregon Hwy CC.
Only 8 lots remaining!
Choose your own builder
608-215-5895

990 FARM: SERVICE
& MERCHANDISE
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete breaker,
posthole auger, landscape rake, concrete
bucket, pallet forks, trencher, rock hound,
broom, teleboom, stump grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
970 HORSES
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
975 LIVESTOCK
FOR SALE: 5 Registered bull calves
that will be year olds in May-July. All
calves are from dams classified as very
good or excellent. For more information
call Daryl Dammen at 608-465-1405
Vice President of Business Banking
Oregon Community Bank & Trust is seeking to fill a newly created position
of Vice President of Business Banking in response to our continued growth.
Oregon Community Bank & Trust is a community bank, which means we’re
proud to be part of the communities we serve.
The position is responsible for:
• Maintaining existing loan portfolio including: management of loan renewals,
updating financial documentation, strengthening relationships, and ensuring
accurate risk ratings
• Prospecting, development and management of new commercial loan and
deposit relationships
• Development of strong relationships among centers of influence
• Strategic positioning within community business organizations
Candidate preferred qualifications include: a bachelor degree in a business related
field, 5 years of commercial lending experience, sales experience with excellent
calling etiquette skills, strong business development skills demonstrated by
proven history of loan production and loan portfolio growth, ability to analyze
financial information, strong organizational skills and attention to detail, and the
ability to exercise independent judgment.
Applicants seeking a challenging, rewarding position while providing excellent
customer service should submit resumé and cover letter by e-mail to:
Mark Barberino, SVP and Chief Credit Officer
mbarberino@oregoncommunitybank.com
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Vice President / Assistant Vice President
of Treasury Management
Oregon Community Bank & Trust, a growing community bank, is seeking to
fill a newly created position of Vice President / Assistant Vice President of
Treasury Management. Oregon Community Bank & Trust is a community
bank, which means we’re proud to be part of the communities we serve.
The position is responsible for:
• The sale of treasury management / cash management products and services
to new clients and the expansion of existing customer relationships
• Performing customer/prospect analysis and develop proposed service
solutions/sales presentations
• Development of new relationships through referral and business
development efforts
• Strategic positioning within community business organizations
Candidate preferred qualifications include:
• A bachelor degree in a business related field
• 2 years of treasury management or related experience
• Experience in electronic products, including Internet Banking, Remote
Deposit and ACH
• Ability to do independent as well as joint calling of existing customers
and prospects
Applicants seeking a challenging, rewarding position while providing
excellent customer service should submit resumé and cover letter by e-mail to:
Mark Barberino, SVP and Chief Credit Officer
mbarberino@oregoncommunitybank.com
UN330799
Sienna Crest
Assisted Living
981 Park St
Oregon, WI 53575
608.835.7781
Fax: 608-835-0340
Go to www.siennacrest.com to
print an application today!
E.O.E

Now
Hiring!
Please submit your application in person, fax, mail or email to:
Attention All Caregivers
& Meal Coordinators
Sienna Crest and Sienna Meadows-Oregon, has immediate job
opportunities to join our compassionate Care Specialist Team.

Part-time NOC Care Specialist—Sienna Crest
Full-time PM Care Specialist—Sienna Meadows
Full-time AM Meal Coordinator—Sienna Crest

We offer competitive wages designed to attract & retain quality
staff. Preferred Candidate will have Assisted Living experience.
Sienna Meadows
Memory Care
989 Park St
Oregon, WI 53575
608.835.0000
Fax: 608-835-0612 U
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** DRIVERS **
FULL TIME DRIVERS NEEDED FOR REGIONAL WORK
$1,500 SIGN-ON BONUS
$750 GUARANTEE WKLY
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreens Private
Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI. Drivers make hand
deliveries to Walgreens stores within a regional area (WI,
IL, IA, MN, ND, SD). Workweek is Tues. ~ Sat. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
*Earn $21.90/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
* Full Beneft Pkg includes Life, Dental, Disability, & Health
Insurance with Prescription Card
*401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
*Paid Holidays & Vacation
*Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have a min of 18 months
T/T exp or 6 months T/T exp WITH accredited facility
school, & meet all DOT requirements.
Send resume to:
b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755
Fabricators
Maintenance Mechanics
TIG Welders
Wolf Appliance, Inc., the premier provider of quality
appliances is seeking TIG Welders, Fabricators and
Maintenance Mechanics to join our 2nd and 3rd shift
teams at our Fitchburg facility. We offer a clean,
climate controlled environment.
Wolf offers competitive compensation plus incentive
pay and shift differential. Benefts offered include:
medical, dental, and vision insurance, free life
insurance, pension, 401k, holidays, vacation and
personal days. Qualifcation testing may be required.
EOE.
Apply online at
www.subzero-wolf.com
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Customer Service Representative-
Cash Room Attendant (Teller)
Union Bank & Trust Company is seeking a part-time
Customer Service Representative for our Oregon offce.
Varied schedule with 20-24 hours per week, Monday
through Friday and rotating Saturday mornings,
8:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. Major responsibilities include
providing prompt, accurate, and courteous service as it
directly relates to daily customer account transactions.
Previous cash handling and customer service
experience is desired along with general offce
experience. Strong interpersonal, math, problem
solving, and communication skills are necessary. If
you are a team player with the desire to take an active
role in community banking then apply by going to the
following link, http://ubandt.companycareersite.com.
Affrmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer
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January 16, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
MONONA TLPPACL
®
ONE JOHN NOLEN DRIVE
MADISON, WI 53703
PHONE: 608.261.4000
TTY 711 (Local) or 800.947.3529
communityevents.mononaterrace.com
MONONA TERRACE
COMMUNITY Programs
®
Spring
2 0 1 4
January
March
April
May
February
MEDITATION AT
MONONA TERRACE
11:45am -12:30pm
Mondays through May 12
24
-
31
MEDITATION AT
MONONA TERRACE
11:45am -12:30pm
Mondays through May 12
7
-
28
MEDITATION AT
MONONA TERRACE
11:45am -12:30pm
Mondays
5
-
12
LUNCHTIME
YOGA
12 noon -12:45pm
Mondays & Thursdays through March 20 (no class February 6)
27
-
30
MONONA
TERRACE
Closed for renovation
beginning Dec. 24, 2013.
1
-
26
LUNCHTIME
YOGA
12 noon -12:45pm
Mondays & Thursdays
through March 20 (no class February 6)
3
-
27
LUNCHTIME
YOGA
12 noon -12:45pm
Mondays & Thursdays
3
-
20
TERRACE
TOWN
10am - 4pm, Exhibition Hall
1
PECHAKUCHA
NIGHT MADISON
7pm, Ballroom
“Doing What You Love x PechaKucha”
Presented by High Tech Happy Hour
13
PECHAKUCHA
NIGHT MADISON
7pm, Ballroom
“Why Madison? x PechaKucha”
Presented by Monona Terrace
17
TUNES AT
MONONA TERRACE
5:30 -7pm, Exhibition Hall
Tony Rocker & The Comeback Special
(Elvis Tribute)
5
TUNES AT
MONONA TERRACE
5:30 -7pm, Exhibition Hall
UW Jazz Orchestra
(Big Band)
2
TUNES AT
MONONA TERRACE
5:30 -7pm, Exhibition Hall
Westside Andy & Mel Ford Band
featuring Barrelhouse Chuck
(Chicago Blues)
30
TUNES AT
MONONA TERRACE
5:30 -7pm, Exhibition Hall
Leahy Luck (Irish Folk)
12
GRAND REOPENING
CELEBRATION
1 - 4pm, Sunday
Come see a newly renovated Monona Terrace.
Surprises and treats in store!
2
WRIGHT DESIGN
SERIES
7pm, Lecture Hall
“Tracing the Organic, A Thread through Goethe, Sullivan,
Wright & Alexander” Tom Kubala, AIA
4
WRIGHT DESIGN
SERIES
7pm, Lecture Hall
“Architecture that Makes Lives Better”
Lawrence Speck, FAIA
6
WRIGHT DESIGN
SERIES
7pm, Lecture Hall
TBA part of the
AIA Conference
6
WRIGHT DESIGN
SERIES
7pm, Lecture Hall
“Olgivanna Lloyd Wright: Partner to Genius;
Author, Composer and CEO” By Indira
Berndtson, The Frank Lloyd Wright Archives
20
MOON OVER
MONONA TERRACE
7:30 - 9:30pm
Rooftop Garden
(Cancelled in the case of
rain/cloud cover)
11
T’AI CHI AT
MONONA TERRACE
12 noon -12:45pm
Rooftop Garden
Tuesdays through June 24
20
-
27
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and “more positive well-
ness conditions for teach-
ers.”
Furt hermore, Net her-
wood Knoll principal Dan
Rikli said, there is a “criti-
cal mass” of Netherwood
teachers who support the
idea. Now, if district resi-
dents have a large role in
deciding whether the dis-
trict gives it the green light,
and will be asked their
opinions in the coming
months.
“Logi cal l y, i t makes
sense, but change is hard,”
he said.
Stopping the slide
School officials started
meeting in July to look into
the possibility of a “bal-
anced calendar,” though
Rikli said the group is still
in the fact-finding stage.
“We’re looking at what
does research say about
it, what are other districts
doing, what do they like,
(what’s) the impact on stu-
dent learning, the stress on
kids and staff?” he said.
Ri kl i sai d one of t he
main motivating factors in
exploring a balanced calen-
dar is eliminating the dread-
ed “summer slump,” where
students lose some of what
they’ve learned because
they’re away from classes
for nearly three months.
Last year, 40 percent of
Net her wood s t udent s ’
scores on readi ng t est s
between spring and fall. In
math, 44 percent of kids
saw their scores drop.
A second major factor is
the level of stress in schools
during the past few years,
relative to student achieve-
ment, he said.
“School i s di f f er ent
than it used to be,” Rikli
sai d “We have a l aser-
sharp focus on st udent
achievement, and we do
see stress levels of children
and staff elevating because
of that. Would a differ-
ent calendar help alleviate
that? Some research says it
does.”
To find some answers,
st af f have t al ked wi t h
school administrators in
Indiana, where the year-
round model has been com-
monplace for some time,
and are planning to travel
soon to Aurora, Colo., to
speak with school district
officials about their year-
round school calendar.
“In Wisconsin, it’s rela-
tively new, but Indiana,
Iowa, Minnesota, Colorado,
it’s not that new of a con-
cept,” Rikli said. “Some
folks in Wisconsin are start-
ing to take a look at it, as
far as its merits.”
Next steps
Rikli said the earliest
a change could be made
would be for the 2015-16
school year, providing a
year’s worth of planning if
OSD were to approve the
idea this fall. He said the
group will update the board
on its findings next month,
but just as importantly, is
planning some parent infor-
mational nights later in the
school year to invite people
to hear what’s been discov-
ered and provide feedback
that will ultimately provide
the deciding factor whether
or not to make the change.
A website is also being
developed to provide infor-
mation.
“Based on whether or not
the community as a whole
can support this … that will
determine whether we rec-
ommend it to the board,”
he sai d. “Once we get
some communication out
there, we can offer parents
a forum. We value their
input.”
Balanced: District will seek public input on proposal for Netherwood Knoll this spring
Continued from page 1
Photo by Scott Girard
If district residents approve the idea, Netherwood Knoll Elementary School could turn into a year-round school as soon as the 2015-16
school year. A school staff task force will make a recommendation to the Oregon School Board later in the school year.
E-reader help
The Oregon Public Library
hosted an e-reader help session
as part of a series of events on
helping people learn to use their
technology devices. Left, Jackie
Symdon helps Bob Wardell.
Right, Susan Kosharek takes a
look at Doug Sutter’s e-reader.
Photos by Scott Girard

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